TV Everywhere
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TV Everywhere
Television meets internet, social networks, computing & assorted devices. Hijinx ensue.
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What's Going to Kill the TV Business?

What's Going to Kill the TV Business? | TV Everywhere | Scoop.it

...What's going to kill the TV business, or at least challenge it, isn't Apple designing the perfect remote or Microsoft designing a superior guide. It's two things.

First is the rising cost of entertainment, which is happening right now. The sitcoms and great dramas you love cost more to produce every year because they're labor intensive. Sports rights are seeing even worse inflation. ESPN recently signed a deal with the NFL to pay 73% more each year for Monday Night Football. So Comcast and its ilk are stuck between rising programming costs and flat-lining middle class wages. That's a problem, and eventually something has to give. But in the short term, providers can merge and channels can be cut and costs can be saved. Expensive shows and sports rights shouldn't destroy the TV business on their own.

Combined with a second trend -- the accelerating exodus of attention away from television -- the TV business might really be in trouble. But this second trend is still more of a projection than a reality. One hundred million households still pay for a bundle of networks. That number isn't really going down. With the pace of household formation tripling in the last year, it could even go up. The number of cord-cutters -- households that have replaced the bundle with over-the-Internet video like Netflix -- is in the low single-digit millions. TV-providers have even found a hedge against cord cutting. They've become Internet-providers and expanded overseas to make up the revenue they're not making here. Cord-cutting is a marginal trend that could sneakily turn mainstream, creating an innovator's dilemma for TV and cable. But not yet.

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Pay-TV industry not united on TV Everywhere

Pay-TV industry not united on TV Everywhere | TV Everywhere | Scoop.it

...differing approaches illustrate a divide in the media industry over how best to put content on the Web while also keeping customers hooked to their TVs.  In 2009, cable giant Comcast Corp.and Time Warner — parent of TNT, TBS, HBO and other popular channels — unveiled TV Everywhere, an initiative that was to be a blueprint for the pay-TV industry to develop a platform to let subscribers watch content on their computers, phones or tablets. The proposition was simple enough: Take all that is good about television — lots of channels at the click of a button — and transfer it online.  The hope was that by offering subscribers more content online, people would be less likely to cut the cord to their cable or satellite TV service in favor of so-called over the top services such as Netflix, Hulu and Roku. TV Everywhere was also meant to discourage programmers from giving away their shows for free online.  But in the three years since it was conceived, TV Everywhere has struggled to gain traction.  "It's simply a mess," BTIG media analyst Rich Greenfield said. "A complete and utter failure."  Andy Heller, vice chairman and TV Everywhere point person for Time Warner's Turner Broadcasting, believes "the real stumbling block has been deals." Some programmers and distributors, Heller said, are using TV Everywhere contract talks as an excuse to try to "change terms and conditions" of other contracts.  Another problem is that neither the programmers nor the pay-TV providers can decide who should be the gatekeeper for content online. Some consumers have to register at multiple networks to watch content, while others can do one-stop shopping through their distributor.  "We're trying to figure out, can you have a single access point?" said Mike Hopkins, president of distribution for Fox Networks. "It's technically complicated but not impossible."

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A Virtual MSO Shall Rise, Boxee CEO Says

The United States's first virtual MSO will materialize later this year, giving broadband devices a new way to deliver on-demand and live subscription TV services directly to consumers, predicts Boxee CEO Avner Ronen.  The prediction came up during a discussion with Light Reading Cable about a week after Boxee started shipping a component that feeds over-the-air digital TV broadcasts to the Boxee Box. (See Boxee Tees Up Live TV Cord-Cutting Tool .)  But Boxee has no interest in becoming a virtual MSO itself. That's an expensive proposition that reportedly scared off even the deep-pocketed Microsoft Corp. (Nasdaq: MSFT), which opted instead for pay-TV partnerships that send content to the Xbox 360. (See Microsoft Puts Pay-TV Plan on Pause and Comcast, Verizon Connect With the Xbox 360.)  "We don't have an appetite to become a virtual MSO in the sense of us going out and licensing those channels and providing ... guarantees and so on," Ronen says. "We'd much rather [have] somebody like Comcast Corp. (Nasdaq: CMCSA, CMCSK) or DirecTV Group Inc. (NYSE: DTV) or Netflix Inc. (Nasdaq: NFLX) or Amazon.com Inc. (Nasdaq: AMZN) do those deals and for us to support those over-the-top offerings on our platform like we do today for traditional over-the-top."  Still, Ronen thinks there's a good chance that someone, perhaps an incumbent pay-TV player, will try the virtual MSO model this year.

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$500 Billion TV Market New Battlefield For Internet Companies - Forbes

$500 Billion TV Market New Battlefield For Internet Companies - Forbes | TV Everywhere | Scoop.it

The Internet is finally upending the mother of all content markets, the $500 billion TV market. Cigar-chomping East Coast incumbents like Comcast and Time Warner Cable pitted against left coast tech giants like Google, Apple and intrepid TV mogul wannabes. We’ve seen this in other content markets (see books and music). Distribution usually dies first. Borders and Tower Records died in the books and music battles. However the stakes in this battle are bigger, a lot bigger. Incumbents are better prepared, bring more to the table, and are more aggressive.  It’s unclear that if or which distributors in the TV battle will be victimized as easily. Yet clearly companies are going to die. People are going to get hurt. It’s going to be great.

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Tom George's comment, December 8, 2011 5:24 PM
Hello nice Scoop.it page I shared and just started following your topic. Are you in the TV industry?
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Netflix anticipates "TV Everywhere" to be biggest competitor

"Our biggest competitor over time may be another service with a similar model to Netflix, such as Hulu Plus, or it may be free on-demand Internet video as a part of a consumer’s MVPD package, namely TV Everywhere. This free bundling of a subset of our functionality within a larger subscription service is a classic way for an incumbent to leverage its strength. While TV Everywhere is not a strong offering today, it is likely to become much better over the coming years. We’ll continue to push ahead, developing an ever-better user experience to differentiate Netflix, and exploring exclusive rights, where it makes sense, such as our “Mad Men” deal, so that we remain complementary to MVPD."
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London 2012 — NBC Signup Needed to Stream Olympics

London 2012 — NBC Signup Needed to Stream Olympics | TV Everywhere | Scoop.it

This edition of the Summer Games promises to be different from past Olympics, and it might be a real boon for viewers. Every stream from every sport from London will be live. There will be no dilly-dallying as there was two years ago at the Vancouver Winter Games when NBC streamed only hockey and curling live on its site. But as usual, the opening and closing ceremonies will be tape-delayed until prime time. In all, there will be 3,500 hours of live streaming video. Few will watch them all (is it possible, I wonder?), but they will be there. Still, whatever you watch, at whatever time, you will want to be able to dip into it without encountering any access problems. “Sure, we have fears that people who are asked to take an action, to click for access, are going to be deterred,” said Gary Zenkel, the president of NBC Olympics. “We learned two years ago that the consumer needs more education.” He said customers have, over that time, learned to verify their accounts for other content.

“A portion of the population is getting comfortable,” he added.

Verification (or authorization) should be easy and quick. It looks simple in the short demonstration video starring Carson Daly that NBC has sent to cable, satellite and telephone company providers: Go to nbcolympics.com /LiveExtra. From a drop-down menu, choose the cable, satellite or telephone company you have an account with. The next step depends on where you subscribe (and if you’re on a digital tier that includes MSNBC and CNBC, which is nearly everyone’s). Generally, you will have to enter the user name and password that corresponds to your account to verify your computer, mobile device or tablet. If all works well, you will never have to verify again. But Comcast and Cablevision have developed ways to speed the process. When Comcast Xfinity and Cablevision Optimum broadband customers identify themselves on the NBC Olympic site from their home computers, their accounts will be recognized and automatically verified without the entering of user names and passwords. “We wanted to create a frictionless environment and remove obstacles to let them get to the Olympic content,” said Amalia O’Sullivan, Cablevision’s vice president for broadband product operations. “We know that for a very condensed period time, and for a broad base of customers, there would be great interest in this product.”...

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BSkyB's internet TV plan is brilliant, a rare example of perfect timing

BSkyB's internet TV plan is brilliant, a rare example of perfect timing | TV Everywhere | Scoop.it

On the internet, it's always better to jump before you're pushed... Equally, though, timing matters. Ten years ago I recall mobile phone companies that had just spend billions on 3G bids demonstrating to journalists how the latest handsets could stream TV direct to their mobiles. It was great, if you wanted to watch something that looked like the first moon landing viewed on a TV across a road. TV on mobiles didn't take off; music did. But now we have the bandwidth and processing power to give us video capability all over the place. And what I think is the most impressive case of jumping before being pushed in the media ecosystem recently: BSkyB's announcement that it's going to launch an internet TV service that will let you get content from it on an ad hoc basis, no matter whether you use Sky's broadband or pay for Sky in your home.  In essence, Sky is doing with its TV output what Amazon does with the Kindle: saying "we don't mind how you view our content. We just want to be the conduit so we benefit from your attention." Video-on-demand (VoD) for anyone prepared to pay, not just existing users of its pay TV service.

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Cable Co-Op Boots Up TV Everywhere Project

The National Cable Television Cooperative Inc. (NCTC) , Light Reading Cable has learned, has launched a plan to create a centralized authentication platform for multi-screen services like HBO Go or those planned around the the 2012 Summer Olympics in London.  An authentication system, in this sense, would ensure that customers that try to log into an MSO's TV Everywhere offering via a PC or an iPad are indeed cable TV subscribers and are authorized to view the particular piece of content they have requested.  Several large and mid-sized MSOs have created their own authentication systems for TV Everywhere or are working in tandem with a company like Synacor Inc. to build content portals and develop TV Everywhere interfaces with individual programmers. But that still leaves hundreds of cable operators out there that don't have the resources to build their own system or are not quite big enough to make it worthwhile for one vendor to take them on individually.  The NCTC hopes its aggregated approach will create economies of scale for its MSO members and for TV Everywhere vendors. Instead of forcing hundreds of individual operators to make requests to launch HBO Go, for example, there's an opportunity for the NCTC "to create a bridge, or a common platform" to authenticate their customers for HBO content to be delivered to PCs, tablets and other IP-connected devices, says NCTC VP of Technology Alan Tschirner.

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Netflix: It’s not about the cord

Netflix: It’s not about the cord | TV Everywhere | Scoop.it
Over-The-Top Video Netflix is often credited (or blamed, depending on your perspective) for inspiring cable cord-cutting by cable and satellite subscribers... With nearly 23 million users in the U.S., Netflix has nearly as many subscribers as Comcast, the nation’s No. 1 cable MSO. By the end of 2011, it is likely to have more total subscribers than HBO, currently the largest subscription video service. More to the point, with its embedded app available on more than 300 different SKUs of connected devices, Netflix’s potential reach already extends to far-more devices than that of any MVPD in the U.S., and it has the luxury of growing internationally — adding to its scale — while U.S. MSOs largely do not. Right now, Netflix’s service — on-demand, a la carte — is highly personalized, whereas MVPD service — fixed tiers, bundled programming packages — is fairly standardized. As sufficient scale, however, even personalized content services will begin to have an aggregate impact that rivals that of pre-bundled, standardized services. [Netflix] is just hoping to get there before anyone really notices.
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