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TV Everywhere
Television meets internet, social networks, computing & assorted devices. Hijinx ensue.
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OATC Announces "Online Multimedia Authorization Protocol"

OATC Announces "Online Multimedia Authorization Protocol" | TV Everywhere | Scoop.it

...The OMAP specification will benefit stakeholders in the online subscription content ecosystem:

-- Multimedia content publishers and distributors will reduce unauthorized access to content, share a common architecture to minimize operational overhead and cost and provide consumers with
standardized, secure access to media content over the Internet using their home and mobile devices and client software.

-- Technology vendors and third-party service providers can develop value-added services and commercial solutions to deploy across the entire subscription content ecosystem.

-- Consumers get choice, convenience and a simple and consistent experience, unlike today's proprietary solutions.

"OATC [Open Authentication Technology Committee] is creating the open standards needed to enable simple online access to subscription TV services by bridging the gaps in existing technology with practical and workable solutions," said Glenn Reitmeier, OATC president. "We are very excited to announce this preview of our first of several standards to come that will help MVPDs and programmers give their subscribers more choices than ever before." The OATC is inviting the public to download (http://www.oatc.us/Standards/Download.aspx ) the draft specification and provide comments by May 4, 2012.

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Tryphoon's comment, April 6, 2012 4:04 PM
We're co-authors!
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BSkyB's internet TV plan is brilliant, a rare example of perfect timing

BSkyB's internet TV plan is brilliant, a rare example of perfect timing | TV Everywhere | Scoop.it

On the internet, it's always better to jump before you're pushed... Equally, though, timing matters. Ten years ago I recall mobile phone companies that had just spend billions on 3G bids demonstrating to journalists how the latest handsets could stream TV direct to their mobiles. It was great, if you wanted to watch something that looked like the first moon landing viewed on a TV across a road. TV on mobiles didn't take off; music did. But now we have the bandwidth and processing power to give us video capability all over the place. And what I think is the most impressive case of jumping before being pushed in the media ecosystem recently: BSkyB's announcement that it's going to launch an internet TV service that will let you get content from it on an ad hoc basis, no matter whether you use Sky's broadband or pay for Sky in your home.  In essence, Sky is doing with its TV output what Amazon does with the Kindle: saying "we don't mind how you view our content. We just want to be the conduit so we benefit from your attention." Video-on-demand (VoD) for anyone prepared to pay, not just existing users of its pay TV service.

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Global Online TV, Video Revs Hit $22B In 2016

Global Online TV, Video Revs Hit $22B In 2016 | TV Everywhere | Scoop.it

One big mover will be so-called "Over-The-Top" (OTT) alternative TV/video providers that use the Internet to act like terrestrial cable operators and/or satellite programming services.  The report says: “The OTT television and video sector is on the brink of a huge take-off as the key players expand internationally, companies consolidat[ing] (with Hulu about to be sold to one of existing major players) and as new partnerships are announced on a daily basis.”

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Viewsonic Kills Boxee-powered TV Set

Viewsonic Kills Boxee-powered TV Set | TV Everywhere | Scoop.it

Consumer electronics developer Viewsonic has decided to pull the plug on bringing a Boxee-powered TV set to market. The company explained Smart TVs have a high cost and there is not enough consumer interest at the time. For the future, Viewsonic tells GigaOm, “Our current strategy is to stay involved with the various technology developments and consider them in the future as they become available.”  Boxee, the Brooklyn based Internet-to-TV streaming company still in partnership with Iomega and devices are expected to come to out in mid October.

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Internet audience watching online video in ever-larger numbers

Internet audience watching online video in ever-larger numbers | TV Everywhere | Scoop.it
The consumption of video online by consumers is exploding and shows no signs of letting up. Digital analytics firm comScore has released data showing that 176 million Americans — 83.3 percent of the Internet audience — watched more than 5.6 billion viewing sessions online video in May. That’s an average of 15.9 hours per viewer. The duration of the average online content video was 5.2 minutes, while the average online video ad was 0.4 minutes. Google sites had the highest number of viewing sessions with more than 2.1 billion, and highest time spent per viewer at 311 minutes, crossing the five-hour mark for the first time. The total U.S. Internet audience engaged in more than 5.6 billion viewing sessions during the course of the month, according to comScore. Google sites, driven primarily by video viewing at YouTube.com, ranked as the top online video content property with 147.2 million unique viewers, followed by VEVO with 60.4 million viewers and Yahoo sites with 55.5 million viewers. Facebook.com came in fourth with 48.2 million viewers, while Viacom Digital ranked fifth with 46.5 million viewers.
The Internet audience viewed 4.6 billion video ads in May, with Hulu generating the highest number of video ad impressions at more than 1.3 billion. Tremor Media Video Network ranked second overall (and highest among video ad networks) with 700.8 million ad views, followed by Adap.tv (642 million) and BrightRoll Video Network (565 million). Time spent watching video ads totaled more than 2.0 billion minutes during the month, with Hulu delivering the highest duration of video ads at 560 million minutes. Video ads reached 45 percent of the total U.S. population an average of 34 times during the month. Hulu also delivered the highest frequency of video ads to its viewers with an average of 48 over the course of the month.
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Online video shifts to primetime viewing

Online video shifts to primetime viewing | TV Everywhere | Scoop.it
A new study from Yahoo shows that online video viewing is increasingly happening during primetime viewing hours. Not just that, but more of that video is full-length TV and movie content.
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Is the internet going to be the death of television?

Is the internet going to be the death of television? | TV Everywhere | Scoop.it
The US pay TV market had suffered its first ever drop in subscribers. In the end the economy was roundly found to blame, with cable packages being sacrificed as families were forced to tighten their belts. But some commentators pointed to this as the inevitable result of the growth of on demand and over the top offerings available on the internet. So is technology killing what we think of as traditional television - and taking pay TV operators with it? It's a confusing picture. Nielsen, who track US television viewing habits, have reported a drop in television ownership - albeit from 98.9% to 96.7%. DVD sales are falling, while Netflix recently overtook cable operator Comcast to become the biggest subscription video service in North America. YouTube, Hulu, iPlayer, Netflix and other 'over the top' (OTT) services, not to mention illegal downloading, all offer alternatives. Apple and Google have both launched OTT services that let consumers play online content through their televisions, although Google's service is only available in the US. We're watching more video than ever before this way. But we're also watching more television. What is less clear is where the broadcast industry is ultimately headed. So what do those in the industry think lies in store?...
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YouTube Unveils Movies for Rent and Content Partnerships

YouTube Unveils Movies for Rent and Content Partnerships | TV Everywhere | Scoop.it
ouTube announced today that it is adding around 3,000 movie titles available to rent on demand for users in the United States, confirming rumors from late April that said Google's video service was looking to partner with major and independent studios to rollout premium content. YouTube is also bolstering its investment in content with its 20,000-plus partners. Through YouTube Next the platform is attempting to grow original content by bolstering YouTubeNextUp and following up on past projects like Partner Grants that helped fund content creators. YouTube is available on 350 million devices with two billion views a day. The aim for Google and YouTube is to attract users into the content honey pot of Internet video. Currently, according to YouTube, users are spending 15 minutes a day on the site yet five hours a day watching television. The goal for YouTube is to wipe away the line that is the difference between TV and online video.
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Google Will Reveal A Revamped Version Of Google TV Soon

Google Will Reveal A Revamped Version Of Google TV Soon | TV Everywhere | Scoop.it
The first version of Google TV may be a dud, but the company is working on the next version and could show it off at its I/O conference next month. An industry source says the next version of Google TV has a lot more potential than today's version for three main reasons:
-Performance. It will use a faster chip set.
-Better user experience.
-Android apps.
Google has already said it will soon be possible to run Android apps on Google TV. This source believes that Google will build a TV-specific version of the Android Market right into the Google TV interface, giving developers a lot of incentive to build apps for it.
More generally, this person thinks that Android is slated for an explosion of new video content and apps, driven in part by the new crop of Android tablets as well as the merging of Android into Google TV.
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GOAB. A TV Experience Concept

GOAB. A TV Experience Concept | TV Everywhere | Scoop.it
For a long time, watching television was a straightforward event. The couch in the living room was facing the TV and a certain number of channels played certain shows at a designated time. When someone said, “I’m going to watch TV,” it was clear what that meant.
Today, it’s not that simple. Watching TV can mean a lot of things: TV via Internet, web content via TV, video on demand, IPTV, cable, satellite, DVB-T, mobile television, etc. Let’s not forget that with broadband internet connections and the integration of Wi-Fi chips into television sets, the technical framework has changed fundamentally.
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Netflix anticipates "TV Everywhere" to be biggest competitor

"Our biggest competitor over time may be another service with a similar model to Netflix, such as Hulu Plus, or it may be free on-demand Internet video as a part of a consumer’s MVPD package, namely TV Everywhere. This free bundling of a subset of our functionality within a larger subscription service is a classic way for an incumbent to leverage its strength. While TV Everywhere is not a strong offering today, it is likely to become much better over the coming years. We’ll continue to push ahead, developing an ever-better user experience to differentiate Netflix, and exploring exclusive rights, where it makes sense, such as our “Mad Men” deal, so that we remain complementary to MVPD."
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Video - Boxee, Roku Predict Pay TV's Transformation

Video - Boxee, Roku Predict Pay TV's Transformation | TV Everywhere | Scoop.it
Internet video could transform the pay-TV industry, as cable MSOs could use the Web to market programming to subscribers outside the geographic reach of their networks, say the CEOs of Boxee and Roku Inc. We don't know which cable company will be the first to market Internet video programming to non-subscribers outside their territories, but Roku CEO Anthony Wood said it is inevitable that pay-TV providers will expand into OTT video. "Within 12 to 24 months we will see a traditional cable company go over the top,"
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Bamboom takes over-the-air TV over the top

Bamboom takes over-the-air TV over the top | TV Everywhere | Scoop.it
Bamboom Labs wants to help people cut their cable cords by putting local TV broadcasts online with all the digital trimmings -- that is, the ability to watch live or recorded shows in high definition on any device with a browser, anywhere a broadband connection is available. It's technologically ingenious, but I can't decide whether it's a service the market has been waiting for or a lawsuit waiting to happen. Or maybe it's a solution to a problem not many people are eager to solve
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Four Weird Things the Internet Is Doing to Our Understanding of Television

Four Weird Things the Internet Is Doing to Our Understanding of Television | TV Everywhere | Scoop.it

...When it comes to delivering audio-visual content to a wide audience, the Internet has lowered the barriers to entry so far that anyone with even the dinkiest camera can become a major broadcaster. The television industry may face a crisis of overhead when a large number of scrappy upstarts deliver comparable value with almost no fixed costs. Also, there are some aspects of the television business that the Internet simply does better, specifically when it comes to reaching an audience.  So there is the scent of blood in the water, and out of the resulting frenzy a few lessons have appeared. Here are four of them.  

- There doesn’t have to be a difference between a “channel” and a “show.”...
- Programming can now be delivered to your television set through a remote control...

- Marketing and distribution are often the same thing...

- Television is no longer that different from publishing...

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Barriers fall between TV, Internet

...Some entrepreneurs are toying with new models that tap into an Internet specialty - the ability to tailor choices to the individual viewer - that might give advertisers a better platform on the Internet than they have in one-size-fits-all cable TV audiences.  But true Internet TV is facing a big obstacle: It's the old-school cable and cable-like services, after all, that have got the makers of programming locked up in mega-contracts.

"There's technology, and then there's commerce," said Jim Barry of the Consumer Electronics Association. "The technology is ahead."  Commerce, meanwhile, hasn't fully figured out the best way to make a buck off Internet video...

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$500 Billion TV Market New Battlefield For Internet Companies - Forbes

$500 Billion TV Market New Battlefield For Internet Companies - Forbes | TV Everywhere | Scoop.it

The Internet is finally upending the mother of all content markets, the $500 billion TV market. Cigar-chomping East Coast incumbents like Comcast and Time Warner Cable pitted against left coast tech giants like Google, Apple and intrepid TV mogul wannabes. We’ve seen this in other content markets (see books and music). Distribution usually dies first. Borders and Tower Records died in the books and music battles. However the stakes in this battle are bigger, a lot bigger. Incumbents are better prepared, bring more to the table, and are more aggressive.  It’s unclear that if or which distributors in the TV battle will be victimized as easily. Yet clearly companies are going to die. People are going to get hurt. It’s going to be great.

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Tom George's comment, December 8, 2011 2:24 PM
Hello nice Scoop.it page I shared and just started following your topic. Are you in the TV industry?
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Google Inc. in preliminary talks to buy Hulu

Google Inc. in preliminary talks to buy Hulu | TV Everywhere | Scoop.it
Google Inc. is in preliminary talks to buy online video pioneer Hulu, people familiar with the situation said. Hulu has begun meeting with potential buyers including Google, Microsoft Corp. and Yahoo Inc... A sale would allow Hulu's media owners to make a graceful exit from a service whose success nonetheless created friction with traditional business partners. Cable and satellite distributors complained about paying for the right to carry programs that Hulu offered free online.
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Report: Internet-connected TV sales to surpass game console sales

"The market for connected devices – connected TVs, connected Blu-ray players, games consoles, media-streaming devices and hybrid set-top boxes – is continuing to grow globally as consumers seek to access services such as Netflix and iPlayer via their televisions," said Andrew Ladbrook, analyst at Informa Telecoms & Media. "In 2016, 1.8 billion in-home video devices – including tablets – will be sold, an increase of almost 800 percent from today. And by this time, 70 percent of all in-home video devices sold will be able to connect to the Internet.
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PlayLater Is Like DVR for Online Video

PlayLater Is Like DVR for Online Video | TV Everywhere | Scoop.it
PlayLater is a new service that takes the idea of a DVR and brings it to online video. With it, you can record movies or shows from nearly any website to watch later (or offline).
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Internet TV On The Rise: Roku Hits 15 Million Channel Downloads

Internet TV On The Rise: Roku Hits 15 Million Channel Downloads | TV Everywhere | Scoop.it
Internet TV platform Roku announced today that it has reached 15 million channel downloads from the more than one million people on its service. Roku's growth has been spurred by its expanding selection of entertainment channels and the company's recent move into U.S. retail stores. Roku is simple and as a platform it is cheap. There are three options available ranging from $59.99 to $99.99 and consumers pay for the subscriptions they use through it, like Netflix or Hulu Plus. Roku now has 225 entertainment channels including paid and free services for music and video. The average Roku user downloads 15 channels.
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TV Everywhere? Cable on the Net Isn't There Yet

TV Everywhere? Cable on the Net Isn't There Yet | TV Everywhere | Scoop.it
Compared to traditional cable TV, the programming on PCs and other devices is still spotty and disorganized — and the entertainment business seems to like it that way... Lots of us have moved on from the quaint era when TV watching was something you did in front of, well, a TV. Sure, we still do that some of the time. But we are spending fewer hours in front of the tube and more of them with laptops, tablets, phones, and other devices that are perfectly capable of receiving and displaying video. And we'd like our favorite shows to follow along. The TV industry is still grappling with that concept. It's partly a technical problem: you can't get a show on your iPad or Android phone unless someone's put considerable effort into delivering it there, ideally in a form that's crisp and fluid rather than blocky and unwatchable. Issues of business models, however, loom even larger. Content owners are comfy with the decades-old system of being paid by companies that distribute programming via cables in the ground or satellites in the sky — and some of them seem to find this Internet thing a little scary...
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Television Ownership Drops in U.S., Nielsen Reports

Television Ownership Drops in U.S., Nielsen Reports | TV Everywhere | Scoop.it
The Nielsen Company, which takes TV set ownership into account when it produces ratings, will tell television networks and advertisers on Tuesday that 96.7 percent of American households now own sets, down from 98.9 percent previously. There are two reasons for the decline, according to Nielsen. One is poverty: some low-income households no longer own TV sets, most likely because they cannot afford new digital sets and antennas. The other is technological wizardry: young people who have grown up with laptops in their hands instead of remote controls are opting not to buy TV sets when they graduate from college or enter the work force, at least not at first. Instead, they are subsisting on a diet of television shows and movies from the Internet. That second reason is prompting Nielsen to think about a redefinition of the term “television household” to include Internet video viewers.
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Popbox Launches Developer Platform for Internet TV

Popbox Launches Developer Platform for Internet TV | TV Everywhere | Scoop.it
... Syabas is officially launching the Popbox SDK so that developers can start building apps for the device, which is scheduled to hit the streets sometime this quarter. The SDK will enable developers to build apps that feature live or on-demand video services, plus access to social networks, music, photos and even some light games — all from the comfort of a user’s couch and HDTV.
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Telcos target OTT traffic

Leading European telecoms companies want to levy significant charges on Google and other online content providers through an overhaul of the regime governing how data travel over the Internet, reports the Financial Times.
The telcos complain that they are contending with an explosion of data on their networks, much of which comes from US sites such as Google’s YouTube video service... they favour the introduction of wholesale charges based on the volume of data traffic passing through their networks, which could result in online content providers making substantial payments to get their video material to consumers. This balance has been undermined by video traffic, much of which comes from the US as well as services such as the BBC’s iPlayer.
This idea is contentious because supporters of net neutrality – the idea that all web content should be treated equally – claim that charging content providers would create a two-tier Internet. The operators’ plans are supposed to preserve the basic, ‘best effort’ Internet, but there would also be a ‘fast lane’ under which content providers could pay to secure prioritised delivery of their material to consumers. The telcos are effectively seeking reforms to so-called ‘peering arrangements’ where historically they entered into agreements that stipulated how they would pass data traffic between each other at interconnection points.
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ESPN Seeks To Expand Distribution on New Platforms, While Being "Respectful" of Its Current Distributors

ESPN Seeks To Expand Distribution on New Platforms, While Being "Respectful" of Its Current Distributors | TV Everywhere | Scoop.it
...ESPN3 is an example of a "diginet" - a TV-like video service that isn't shown "on TV." In a world where launching a new linear cable channel is almost impossible (even Oprah had to partner with Discovery to launch OWN by repurposing Discovery Health), diginets allow major network families to expand their offerings either within their current categories or in new ones
...Diginets, from media majors and new entrant independents, are an example of how OTT platforms can drive usage and revenue models by offering something new, just as cable TV did when it first entered the market.
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