TV Everywhere
Follow
Find tag "Comcast"
13.9K views | +0 today
TV Everywhere
Television meets internet, social networks, computing & assorted devices. Hijinx ensue.
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Peter Rosenberg
Scoop.it!

Comcast to Start 'Streampix' Video Service

Comcast to Start 'Streampix' Video Service | TV Everywhere | Scoop.it

Comcast said on Tuesday that it would start a new video streaming service, its latest effort to keep subscribers happy despite an onslaught of new viewing options.  Called Streampix, the service will give Comcast’s 22.3 million Xfinity cable subscribers access to 75,000 television shows and movies via cellphones, tablets and laptops.

The service is the result of a handful of licensing agreements Comcast has struck with media companies like Disney, Sony Pictures, Warner Brothers and its own NBCUniversal.  As the nation’s largest cable company, Comcast has aggressively led efforts to deliver content on multiple platforms via a subscription model. The effort, known as TVEverywhere, is aimed at keeping customers from canceling the monthly cable bill. Comcast lost 17,000 video customers in the quarter that ended Dec. 31, compared with 135,000 in the same period in 2010.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Peter Rosenberg
Scoop.it!

NBC Puts the Super Bowl on the Web Because It Thinks You’ll Watch It on TV

NBC Puts the Super Bowl on the Web Because It Thinks You’ll Watch It on TV | TV Everywhere | Scoop.it

The Super Bowl is the most valuable show on TV. Which is why NBC can charge a reported $3.5 million for a 30-second spot during the Giants-Patriots game this Sunday.  But if you watch the game on the Web, your eyeballs are worth a whole lot less. NBC, which is streaming the entire thing for the first time ever, will be lucky to get anything near a million dollars for that same ad when it runs online.  So why is Comcast’s broadcast network putting the game on the Web, period? Isn’t this the classic analog-dollars-to-digital-dimes trade that Big Media strives so hard to avoid?  Nope, says Rick Cordella, who runs digital for NBC Sports. The network assumes that nearly every eyeball — and every ad dollar — that it gets from the Web this week will be a bonus, because whoever watches online is simultaneously watching on a big TV, the way football is supposed to be watched.  This is supposed to be the classic “second screen” experience that Twitter’s Dick Costolo and so many other digital folks are excited about.  And that makes plenty of sense to me. Many TV guys have gotten plenty comfortable with the idea of streaming their most valuable live sports events online, for free. In most of those cases, the general assumption is that anyone who’s watching on the Web is someone who can’t watch the game on a TV to begin with — see the CBS/Turner Sports livestreams of the NCAA March Madness tournament.  And in NBC’s case, it is packing the Webcast full of extra camera angles and other goodies, including a feature that will let you rewatch every Super Bowl commercial once it’s aired. The assumption is that you’re holding the TV remote in one hand, and controlling your laptop with another.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Peter Rosenberg
Scoop.it!

Did the cloud just kill the set-top box?

Did the cloud just kill the set-top box? | TV Everywhere | Scoop.it
Behind Xcalibur is a cloud-based platform that moves the intelligence out of the set-top box and into the network. For consumers, the move to a cloud-based system will largely be seamless. But for Comcast, moving to the cloud means it will be able to build new features, improve the user interface and iterate on its product more quickly and easily than if was building for individual set-top boxes. “What the cloud allows you to do is to have faster innovation,” Roberts said. “Boxes have different generations, they become outdated…. That doesn’t happen in the cloud.” Not just that, but it allows Comcast to deliver TV and on-demand feeds to multiple devices with little extra work put into it. Comcast’s plan, essentially, is to make the same user interface available across multiple screens and devices within and outside of the homes. Already it has an iPad app, which lets users navigate their channel listings, on-demand video assets and Xfinity online streaming videos. And it announced a partnership with Samsung at CES to build an app for connected TVs that will be available later this year...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Peter Rosenberg
Scoop.it!

Moto, Comcast Team on In-Home TV Streamer

Moto, Comcast Team on In-Home TV Streamer | TV Everywhere | Scoop.it
The specialized streaming device, called Televation and developed in tandem with Comcast Corp. (Nasdaq: CMCSA, CMCSK)'s Innovation Labs engineers, can transcode incoming cable QAM video and ship it wirelessly using formats supported by an array of IP-connected devices, including iPads and Xoom tablets, with an eye toward Xbox 360s and Playstation 3s. Moto says the device will fit into cable's TV Everywhere strategies, at least so far as delivering TV to just about any IP-connected device that's within reach of the customer's home wireless router.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Peter Rosenberg
Scoop.it!

Comcast Taking Video Delivery Into the Cloud

Comcast Taking Video Delivery Into the Cloud | TV Everywhere | Scoop.it
Comcast could soon make its video services over IP, EVP of Strategy & Development Sam Schwartz wrote in a blog post. The Xcalibur initiative, as it's called, could revolutionize the way that Comcast customers browse, search and discover content...
...delivering its programming over IP could enable Comcast to create a better user experience for browsing and searching for content. New IP set-top boxes that Comcast is testing in Augusta, Ga. will include a universal search engine that will help users find content whether it’s on live TV, on Comcast’s video-on-demand service or recorded on their DVRs. Those set-top boxes will also have interactive apps available, including Internet applications like Facebook, Pandora and links to local traffic and weather. In other words, extending services over IP will not only open up a whole new range of connected devices that Comcast could potentially reach, but the initiative could improve the user experience of its existing electronic programming guide and navigation system.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Peter Rosenberg
Scoop.it!

IP & Convergence - Comcast Ready to Kick Apps With 'CodeBig'

Comcast Corp. (Nasdaq: CMCSA, CMCSK) is hoping to increase the value of its network by encouraging more application and software development from outsiders and finding ways to allow its video- and IP-based services to be used in a wide variety of Web-connected consumer devices. Comcast calls the initiative "CodeBig" and explained the logic behind its thinking at this week's Cable Next-Gen Video Strategies event. "Think of it as our version of Google APIs or Yahoo APIs," said Comcast Chief Software Architect Sree Kotay...
"We're not going to be the ones that decide what devices consumers [use to get content] any more than we decided what TVs people bought," Kotay says. "They're going to be on all of these platforms, and we have to get them services." Comcast is looking to separate the business logic of those services from the presentation environment, which is already comprised of a wide range of technologies...
...Kotay says that by allowing customer authentication, verification and similar business logic functions to be handled "in the cloud," the consumer experience will be more flexible and opened up to a variety of devices. For distribution of video to multiple types of screens, Comcast has been experimenting with ways to transcode video into a format that can be encrypted and packaged on the fly. That would mean Comcast would have to centralize its back-office functions, in the proverbial cloud, while letting the routers and switches take care of the distribution. "The [distribution] network we want to be as dumb as possible," Kotay says.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Peter Rosenberg
Scoop.it!

Comcast's Over-the-Top Dilemma

Comcast executives are talking about the possibility of using Internet video to sell programming to subscribers outside its cable footprint, Senior Vice President of Video Distribution Mark Hess said here Wednesday. But talking about doing something and actually doing it are two entirely different things, of course. Hess suggested there are competing forces at Comcast that could influence its decision on whether or not to go out-of-network to sell video service subscriptions in territories controlled by fellow cable MSOs such as Time Warner Cable Inc. (NYSE: TWC), Cox Communications Inc. and Charter Communications Inc.
While its programming arm, which now includes NBCUniversal LLC , could benefit from an over-the-top (OTT) play, Comcast's cable operation is focused on selling a triple play of video, high-speed data and voice to subscribers within its own franchise areas, he said. "As a content company, we think about it," Hess said. "It's something we talk about at meetings."
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Peter Rosenberg
Scoop.it!

Top Ten Ways the iPad Is Changing Cable

The iPad is helping to transform the cable industry in several ways, from how (and how fast) it deploys and develops technology, to how it works with programmers and gives consumers what they are apparently clamoring for.
The iPad is giving cable a coolness factor that it's definitely not accustomed to, but, that aside, below is our top 10 ways the Apple Inc. (Nasdaq: AAPL) gizmo is changing the face of cable.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Peter Rosenberg
Scoop.it!

HBO Go Now Playing On Samsung TVs, But Not For Comcast And TWC

HBO Go Now Playing On Samsung TVs, But Not For Comcast And TWC | TV Everywhere | Scoop.it

HBO's "TV Everywhere" service is now available on Samsung's Internet-connected HDTVs -- but customers of Comcast and Time Warner Cable can't access the feature today.  The two biggest U.S. cable operators also block access to HBO Go on Roku's Internet set-tops, while they do allow subscribers to access the service via PCs, Apple iPads and mobile phones.  Meanwhile, DirecTV is allowing customers to log in to HBO Go on Samsung TVs, but like Comcast and TWC the satellite TV company hasn't given the green light to Roku. DirecTV did not immediately provide an explanation for why the Samsung TVs are OK but the Roku boxes are not.  According to sources familiar with Comcast and Time Warner Cable's positions, HBO has not yet agreed to all of the conditions the MSOs require of their TV Everywhere partners, such as how subscriber information is handled on third-party devices and websites... 

On Time Warner Inc.'s Feb. 8 earnings call, CEO Jeff Bewkes urged the industry to make cable content available on as many devices as possible -- as quickly as possible.  "Frankly, I don't understand the reticence of distributors to authenticate on third-party sites like Roku and get HBO and TNT and all of those channels to television," Bewkes said. "As a general principle, we, as an industry, should be making viewers have availability with on-demand TV of all of their favorite networks on any platform, any device that they want to use. ... That's how you fulfill the promise of your brands and of television to viewers. And I'm hopeful that the industry will move pretty quickly past some of its -- I think their more minor concerns that they have, and they ought to speed up."

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Peter Rosenberg
Scoop.it!

Comcast Working on iPad TV Streaming Service Called AnyPlay

Comcast Working on iPad TV Streaming Service Called AnyPlay | TV Everywhere | Scoop.it

Comcast, the United States' largest cable and internet provider, is working on a television streaming solution for iPads, to compete with Cablevision and Time Warner. The streaming product was announced earlier this year, but details haven't been released until now.  The product, called AnyPlay, allows Comcast subscribers to view live television on their iPad as long as it's connected to their home network; users must have a special Motorola box which, apparently, takes the live cable stream and sends it directly to the Xfinity TV iPad app over a local wireless network. The service won't work over Wi-Fi from other locations, or via 3G.  Engadget believes the Motorola Televation cable TV-to-IPTV box is what Comcast will be using for AnyPlay.  Other solutions, like Time Warner's, stream live video over an internet connection. Comcast's AnyPlay appears to be a cable box that sends video to the iPad rather than to a television. Users can watch "most" channels included with their Xfinity TV service. Users can register up to 10 tablets, but only watch live TV on one tablet at a time.  Currently, Xfinity customers can use the Xfinity TV app to watch On Demand programming, search TV listings, and schedule DVR recordings.  There is no indication of release dates or availability, but AnyPlay will be available in limited markets at first, and spreading to all Comcast customers eventually.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Peter Rosenberg
Scoop.it!

Comcast's Roberts Pulls Out 'Xcalibur' TV, Gigabit DOCSIS, Facebook integration

Comcast's Roberts Pulls Out 'Xcalibur' TV, Gigabit DOCSIS, Facebook integration | TV Everywhere | Scoop.it
Chicago — As promised, Comcast chairman and CEO Brian Roberts provided a look at the operator's Web-connected and personalized ‘Xcalibur' TV guide -- which is still in a testing phase -- and also rolled a video showing a cable modem downloading videos at more than 1 Gigabit per second over the MSO's Chicago coaxial plant. One of the highlights of the Tru2way-based Xcalibur guide as shown by Roberts was its integration with Facebook. The feature shows "friend trends," which tracks the shows your friends have "liked"; you can then click on the show title to go right to the show. "The guide becomes what your friends tell you to watch, not what the alphabet soup tells you to watch," Roberts said. Other apps in the Xcalibur guide include weather, traffic and the Pandora music-streaming service. The guide also features a quick search function with cellphone-style predictive text entry, so you can enter "426" and it pulls up "HBO" quick search. The search goes out over the network to a database in Denver, Roberts said, the results and metadata are returned in real time...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Peter Rosenberg
Scoop.it!

Comcast Taps Facebook for Enhanced TV Experience

...The company said the new service includes "fast, intuitive search that lets users find what they want to watch in seconds from thousands of choices on TV, on demand, on their DVR or from a selection of additional content," as well as a personalized TV experience called MyTV that allows users to access all of their recordings, favorite shows, films and sports teams and recommendations in one place. Interactive traffic and weather apps and an integration with Facebook that brings social apps to the TV set are part of the mix to "let users share and discover what to watch with their friends," Comcast said. For example, users are able to "like" a show via the TV screen, which will then also appear on their Facebook wall.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Peter Rosenberg
Scoop.it!

TiVo to add Comcast video-on-demand support

TiVo to add Comcast video-on-demand support | TV Everywhere | Scoop.it
One of the major hang-ups for people switching from a cable provider's DVR to TiVo is that the retail TiVo doesn't offer the cable provider's video-on-demand (VOD) channels. So, while you can get plenty of options from TiVo's built-in video service providers--Netflix, Blockbuster, Amazon, and (soon) Hulu Plus--you can't order, say, a prize fight or even the bevy of "free" VOD options available on most cable systems, thanks to the technical restrictions of TiVo's CableCard technology. Well it looks like that sticking point may soon be unstuck as Comcast and TiVo have partnered up to offer access to cable TV, broadband content, and Comcast's Xfinity On Demand library through TiVo Premiere boxes. Here's how it works: get a TiVo Premiere at retail and Comcast will install it with its cable service at no additional charge for its customers. These customers will then have access to Comcast's Xfinity VOD content as well as their regular programming and Internet services that are available on retail TiVo Premiere units.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Peter Rosenberg
Scoop.it!

Comcast Is Making VOD More Like Live TV

Comcast Is Making VOD More Like Live TV | TV Everywhere | Scoop.it
...The problem is that VOD historically isn’t well tracked or monetized. To get the networks on board, Comcast has had to roll out new features and capabilities that take care of both of those issues. On the reporting front, Comcast is working with Nielsen to get its VOD viewership counted under the same C3 or C7 ratings that are used to track live and on-demand viewing on DVR. That provides broadcasters a “currency” through which they can sell adds against new episodes that appear on VOD shows. Comcast has also been working hard on solving the advertising problem. Until recently, VOD ads were stitched into the video file itself, which provided limited opportunity for monetization. Now Comcast has dynamic ad insertion, which enables content owners to sell new ads against the shows they’re making available through the VOD service. And it’s taking the ad game a step further by providing targeting that isn’t available for most linear broadcasting. Comcast is also allowing broadcasters to disable fast forwarding through advertisements.
The combination of unskipable ads and Nielsen reporting make VOD viewership almost like live TV — which could be a good thing for programmers. Not only could expanded VOD options increase overall viewership and introduce viewers to new shows — thereby potentially increasing linear viewership — but it could increase overall monetization.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Peter Rosenberg
Scoop.it!

Comcast Picks Microsoft To Stream 'TV Everywhere'

Comcast has officially cut over its Xfinity TV authenticated online video service to Microsoft's Internet-streaming platform, which the operator's thePlatform subsidiary has integrated into its video-management system, replacing the adaptive streaming player from Move Networks.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Peter Rosenberg
Scoop.it!

Time Warner Cable, Comcast and the End of TV as We Know It

Time Warner Cable, Comcast and the End of TV as We Know It | TV Everywhere | Scoop.it
Three recent developments that will lead to the end of the multichannel TV bundle as we know it today... Here's what I think will happen. First, packages of multi-channel services will become unbundled from the physical transport -- so for example you'll be able to buy your TV shows from Comcast and your internet service from Time Warner. But the individual TV networks will own the "Everywhere" authentication process, and begin to build a direct relationship with consumers. And once the bundles are unbundled -- and the networks have a direct line to the consumer -- the middleman (Comcast, Charter, Dish, DirecTV) will become disaggregated. And that means the end of the TV market as we know it.
more...
No comment yet.