Turkey: Towards E...
Follow
Find
30 views | +0 today
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Zeynep Akarsu from Life on Earth
Scoop.it!

Beware: Peppers, Pears and Grapes From Turkey Are Most Toxic Produce In Europe, Study Finds

Beware: Peppers, Pears and Grapes From Turkey Are Most Toxic Produce In Europe, Study Finds | Turkey: Towards European Union | Scoop.it
Of 76 different fruits and vegetables recently evaluated, Turkish peppers contained the most excessive and dangerous amounts of pesticide chemicals, according to Food Without Pesticides, a new 26-page guide to European food released this week by Greenpeace Germany.

 

The rotten facts

 

Turkish peppers topped the list of “most contaminated” produce in the guide, with an average of 24 chemical substances found in the specimens analyzed. In second place, with an average of 10 chemical substances, were Turkish pears. Nine chemical substances were found in Turkish pears, on average, putting them at third place.

 

Eleven different Turkish crops were rated, using 582 samples. The guide used a green/yellow/red light system to show its ratings, with a red light meaning that more than one-third of the samples had dangerous levels of chemicals in them.

 

Of all 23 major fruit-and-vegetable-exporting countries that were evaluated in the report, Turkey had the highest number of crops in the “red light” category. The study was conducted using fruit taken from retail and wholesale stores in Europe in 2009 and 2010, but it is unlikely that pesticide use has declined significantly in Turkey since then.

Pregnant women, sick people, and children are especially advised to avoid food in the “red light” category, according to Greenpeace.

Via Yvonne Overton
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Zeynep Akarsu from Solar Turkey
Scoop.it!

"Turkey- the European country with the most renewable energy potential- must establish a world-leading manufacturing base"

"Turkey- the European country with the most renewable energy potential- must establish a world-leading manufacturing base" | Turkey: Towards European Union | Scoop.it

The Turkish government’s goals for 2023, the centenary of the Republic, include several in the energy sector. With huge dependence on Russian gas and questions about the outlook for diversification (whether Azeri or Iranian gas would be more reliable is a question), the AK Government must exploit the country’s renewable energy resources, which are actually much greater than the 2023 targets, more than double.

 

Meeting those targets alone would shave up to 1 per cent of GDP off the current account balance, not to mention the stable capital flows that could finance it. Because Turkey’s structural energy problem is so large and so widely understood, strategic and institutional investors would embrace a more open and fast-paced approach to investment in it.

 

Turkey has the second biggest onshore wind and solar potential in Europe, and third biggest geothermal potential, but development has been slow. Despite several wind power licensing rounds in the past decade, the last in 2007, with a potential for close to 10GW of installed capacity, only 1.8GW have been installed so far. Indeed, the 10GW 2014 interim target for wind power in the energy ministry’s 2009 strategic plan is far out of reach.

 

There are a number of issues to consider. As mentioned by the Global Wind Energy Council, Turkey’s main obstacles for development are its complex and bureaucratic administrative procedures. But there are other issues as well.

 

Turkey’s industrial organisation is dominated by local oligarchic structures, where foreign strategic involvement is limited. The renewables sector is no different. Most licenses have ended up in the hands of non-strategic investors – many are a portfolio item for diversified holding companies or in the hands of smaller local concerns, without the expertise to develop sites or present bankable business plans, who are reluctant to collaborate with strategic partners. Licenses were sought as a “trade,” as if they were a security that could be flipped for a profit, before any thought of building a wind farm. The most basic of financial and technical analysis has not been undertaken on a large number of such licenses. A more aggressive approach by the government to facilitate a secondary market that allows the transfer of such licenses to committed renewable firms would be fruitful.

 

Plese follow the link in the title for the full article


Via Alejandro Pinero
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Zeynep Akarsu from Solar Turkey
Scoop.it!

Solar Power Must Be Used in Turkey

Solar Power Must Be Used in Turkey | Turkey: Towards European Union | Scoop.it

General Manager of Turkey’s IBC SOLAR Turkey, Hayri Bali, said buildings that will install photovoltaic systems would be burdened with electricity bills. Bali, whose company operates Turkey’s first official solar energy plant in Konya, said that those who want to reduce energy costs should head towards solar energy.

 

“Turkey receives a great deal of sun and its flawless radiance makes it an attractive investment” he said. The country’s total annual duration of sunshine is 2,640 hours, at 7.2 hours per day. This is a potential of 80 billion kWh per year. “We need to use this power” Bali says.


Via Alejandro Pinero
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Zeynep Akarsu from World Geothermal Markets
Scoop.it!

Geothermal industry discuss European policy, East Africa, Turkey, Hungary and more at GeoPower Europe Congress

Geothermal industry discuss European policy, East Africa, Turkey, Hungary and more at GeoPower Europe Congress | Turkey: Towards European Union | Scoop.it

Weakening government support for renewable energy, geothermal in particular (compared with wind or solar) could be holding...


Via GPC Jo
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Zeynep Akarsu from Solar Turkey
Scoop.it!

'Opportunities to increase share of renewables is in the hands of Turkey'

'Opportunities to increase share of renewables is in the hands of Turkey' | Turkey: Towards European Union | Scoop.it

Turkey's economy has performed in a rapid growth in recent years. Covering the years 2002-2011, published by TurkStat the annual average growth for the last decade considerable income in 2009 - 4.9% of Turkey's economy in spite of negative growth luk every year seems to have grown by about 5%. In parallel with the current rapid economic growth in Turkey's energy needs are increasing rapidly at the same rate.


Via Alejandro Pinero
more...
No comment yet.