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Japan quake could cost $309 billion - Mar. 23, 2011

Japan quake could cost $309 billion - Mar. 23, 2011 | Tsunamis | Scoop.it
Japan's devastating earthquake and tsunami could cost up to $309 billion, making it the most costly disaster in the country since the end of World War II, the Japanese government said Wednesday.

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Shawn Coville's curator insight, December 3, 2013 11:12 PM

The article by Annalyn Censky talks of the devastation caused by the tsunami that hit Japan in 2011. It discusses the monetary loss associated with this storm and also discusses the death toll experienced. I want to use this to compare and contrast with the death toll and monetary loss seen for the 2004 tsunami.

 

Censky, Annalyn. “Japan quake could cost $309 billion.” CNN. Time Warner Corporation. 23 March, 2011. Web. 2 Nov. 2013.

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Floating nuclear plants could prove tsunami-proof | GizMag.com

Floating nuclear plants could prove tsunami-proof | GizMag.com | Tsunamis | Scoop.it

The most frightening part of a tsunami hitting a nuclear power plant is what comes after – radioactive leaks that contaminate the water around the plant are exceedingly difficult to contain. The clean up of the radioactive water around the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant in Japan, which was struck by a tsunami in 2011, is expected to take decades. MIT researchers have come up with an alternative; they propose building floating nuclear plants, far enough offshore to simply ride out a tsunami and emerge unscathed.

 

The new design proposed by Jacopo Buongiorno, Associate Professor of Nuclear Science and Engineering at MIT and his colleagues, calls for constructing sturdy floating platforms, similar to the ones that support offshore oil and gas rigs. Light-weight nuclear reactors could be built on top of these platforms in shipyards, and then towed to appropriate locations offshore. Mooring the platform to the seafloor, would, they say, ensure that the nuclear power plant remains unaffected by a tsunami's waves. A power transmission line could connect the plant to the electrical grid.

 

"Tsunamis and earthquakes are no longer a source of risk for the nuclear plant," explains Buongiorno. "Essentially the ocean shields the seismic waves and the tsunami waves in relatively deep water, say 100 meters (300 ft) deep, are not big, so they don't pose a hazard for the plant."

 

It also becomes easy to avoid the biggest issue that leads to radioactive contamination in a damaged nuclear plant, the overheating of the reactor cores that lead to a meltdown, something that would be impossible in the ocean, according to the team.

 

Click headline to read more and watch video clip--

 


Via Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
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Subsea World News - Japan: Researchers Sample Pacific for Signs of Fukushima

Subsea World News - Japan: Researchers Sample Pacific for Signs of Fukushima | Tsunamis | Scoop.it
An international research team is reporting the results of a research cruise they organized to study the amount, spread, and impacts of radiation released into the ocean from the tsunami-crippled reactors in Fukushima, Japan. The group of 17 researchers and technicians from eight institutions spent 15 days at sea in June 2011 studying ocean currents, and sampling water and marine organisms up to the edge of the exclusion zone around the reactors.

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Scrutiny of Tohoku reconstruction funds needed | The Japan Times Online

Scrutiny of Tohoku reconstruction funds needed | The Japan Times Online | Tsunamis | Scoop.it
Last December there was a mild eruption of indignation when it was reported that some of the money earmarked for reconstruction of areas affected by the earthquake and tsunami of March 2011 would go to protect research whaling from interventionists...

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3D tsunami simulator enables highly precise tsunami forecasting

3D tsunami simulator enables highly precise tsunami forecasting | Tsunamis | Scoop.it
Fujitsu Limited today announced that, based on its joint research with Tohoku University that began in 2012, the two have developed a 3D tsunami simulator that can replicate in fine detail the surge of water in urban areas as well as river surges caused by a tsunami. The joint research succeeded in ...

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Tsunami 8,200 years ago wiped out tribes on ‘Britain’s Atlantis’

Tsunami 8,200 years ago wiped out tribes on ‘Britain’s Atlantis’ | Tsunamis | Scoop.it
Research has modelled in detail a historic and deadly tsunami. The most accurate computer models suggest it devastated landmasses.

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NOAA Tsunami Website

NOAA Tsunami Website | Tsunamis | Scoop.it
Comprehensive NOAA Tsunami website -
NOAA's role in research, monitoring, preparedness and warnings

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Research reveals causes of Fukushima tsunami - Voxy

Research reveals causes of Fukushima tsunami - Voxy | Tsunamis | Scoop.it
Research reveals causes of Fukushima tsunami Voxy Research from the University of Otago along with a team of international scientists, has shown for the first time that fine sediment clay within the Japan Trench plate boundary megathrust fault, was...

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What is a tsunami?

What is a tsunami? | Tsunamis | Scoop.it
Tsunamis are giant waves caused by earthquakes or volcanic eruptions under the sea. They speed along as fast as jet planes. As they near land, these waves rear up to great heights and can drown whole islands. Historically tsunamis have been referred to as tidal waves, but that name is discouraged by oceanographers because tides have little effect on tsunamis.

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Meghan Doran's curator insight, March 31, 2014 7:28 PM

This incredibly helpful website contains lots of basic information about tsunamis. 

 

"What is a tsunami?." What is a tsunami?. N.p., n.d. Web. 21 Mar. 2014. <http://oceanservice.noaa.gov/facts/tsunami.html

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Has debris from 2011 Japan earthquake reached Midway Atoll ...

Has debris from 2011 Japan earthquake reached Midway Atoll ... | Tsunamis | Scoop.it
Projections suggest submerged debris from 2011 Tohoku earthquake and tsunami in Japan should have reached Midway Atoll, at northwestern end of Hawaiian archipelago. ...

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Japan taps into our oyster talent - NEWS.com.au

Japan taps into our oyster talent - NEWS.com.au | Tsunamis | Scoop.it
Japan taps into our oyster talent
NEWS.com.au
JAPAN'S tsunami-devastated oyster industry is tapping into Tasmanian expertise to help it recover from the 2011 natural disaster.
Zin's insight:

Australia's engagement with Asia: Japan

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Scientists explain scale of Japanese tsunami - Research - University of Cambridge

Scientists explain scale of Japanese tsunami - Research - University of Cambridge | Tsunamis | Scoop.it

Tsunamis are caused by earthquakes under the seabed. Some tsunamis – including the disaster that hit Japan last year – are unexpectedly large. Cambridge scientists suggest that their severity is caused by a release of gravitational energy as well as elastic energy.


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Holly Davis's curator insight, March 24, 2014 4:49 PM

I will be able to get some information about tsunamis from this article as well as some information about the tsunami that occurred in Japan. I plan on focusing on the Japanese tsunami because everyone is most likely going to remember it because it only happened 3 years ago, and is still being talked about today. 

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visualizing.org

visualizing.org | Tsunamis | Scoop.it

This visualization, just released from the NOAA Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory, shows the estimated size of the tsunami — the approximate wave heights that researchers anticipated seeing as the tidal wave traveled across the Pacific basin Friday morning. The largest wave heights, shaded in black, were expected near the earthquake epicenter, just off the coast of Japan. If their models were correct, the wave would decrease in height as it traveled across the deep Pacific, but would also grow taller as it neared coastal areas. According to NOAA, "in general, as the energy of the wave decreases with distance, the near shore heights will also decrease (e.g., coastal Hawaii will not expect heights of that encountered in coastal Japan). A second image provided by NOAA illustrates the depth of the Pacific Ocean floor. Comparing the two, you can see how low wave height tends to correlate with deeper areas of the ocean. An animated view can be seen here.


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WORLDWIDE: Fisheries Another Victim of Japan Tsunami

WORLDWIDE: Fisheries Another Victim of Japan Tsunami | Tsunamis | Scoop.it

The devastating earthquake that ravaged Japan in 2011 may have also wreaked havoc on vital fisheries, researchers say.

 

The magnitude 9.0 Tohoku-Oki temblor in 2011 was the most powerful earthquake to hit Japan in recorded history, and set off a tsunami that lay waste to the country's northeastern coast, claiming the lives of nearly 19,000 people.

 

Past studies have analyzed the effects of tsunamis on marine ecosystems, for example investigating the effects the 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami had on coral reefs, seagrass beds and mangrove forests. A recent study also showed how the tsunami affected the seafloor by leaving behind huge, underwater dunes.

 

However, until now, scientists had not looked into the effects of a major tsunami on fisheries, one of Japan's most important industries.

 

Since 2008, researchers had regularly surveyed fishery resources at the port of Tomarihama, the coastal area closest to the epicenter of the quake. To see what effects the tsunami had, scientists took a fisherman's boat to analyze this site via scuba diving three months after the catastrophe. Trees and structures up to 50 feet (15 meters) high on the area's coast were almost entirely destroyed by the disaster, suggesting the tsunami reached at least that height there.

 

"More than 90 percent of the boats around the survey point were swept away or destroyed by the tsunami, so it was difficult to rent a boat after the disaster," said researcher Hideki Takami, a marine biologist at the Tohoku National Fisheries Research Institute in Japan.

 

The scientists focused their survey on two types of marine life, abalone (Haliotis discus hannai) and sea urchin (Strongylocentrotus nudus). Both are valuable fisheries resources in Japan, and since they are common and abundant grazers there, both may exert strong influences on the marine ecosystems where they live.

 

The researchers found that levels of adult abalone dropped by more than half after the tsunami. In addition, "juvenile abalone and sea urchins largely decreased, to 14 and 5 percent of the densities just before the disaster, respectively," Takami told OurAmazingPlanet.

 

Underwater visibility at the site was much lower than it was before the earthquake due to sediment in the ocean, even three months after the tsunami. The researchers suggest the great turbulence the tsunami caused washed away many of the animals in the ecosystem.

 

The researchers do note these findings are based on surveys conducted at just one site, "so the overall picture of effects of the earthquake and tsunami event on rocky shore ecosystems remains largely unknown," Takami said. Still, given the drop in juvenile abalone levels, "since the age at first capture of abalone is at four to five years old, "the future commercial catch may considerably decrease for at least four to five years after the event," he said.

 

Future research should continuously monitor the ocean ecosystems "to avoid collapse of these ecologically and economically important resources," Takami said.

 

Takami and his colleagues Nam-il Won and Tomohiko Kawamura will detail their findings in a future issue of the journal Fisheries Oceanography.

 

- 7 Craziest Ways Japan's Earthquake Affected Earth: http://www.ouramazingplanet.com/2572-craziest-japan-earthquake-effects.html

 

- Waves of Destruction: History's Biggest Tsunamis: http://www.livescience.com/19618-history-biggest-tsunamis.html

 

- 7 Ways the Earth Changes in the Blink of an Eye: http://www.ouramazingplanet.com/239-seven-ways-the-earth-changes-in-the-blink-of-an-eye-100809html.html

 

Copyright 2013 OurAmazingPlanet, a TechMediaNetwork company. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

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'Double tsunami' doubled Japan destruction

'Double tsunami' doubled Japan destruction | Tsunamis | Scoop.it
Researchers have discovered that the destructive tsunami generated by the March 2011 Tōhoku-Oki earthquake was a long-hypothesized "merging tsunami" that doubled in intensity over rugged ocean ridges, amplifying its destructive power before reaching shore.

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Unstable sea slab near Barrier Reef could cause monster tsunami in north Queensland

Unstable sea slab near Barrier Reef could cause monster tsunami in north Queensland | Tsunamis | Scoop.it
December 21, 2012 – AUSTRALIA – An enormous slab of sea floor is in the early stages of collapse off north Queensland, and could generate a tsunami when it finally breaks off, researchers warn.

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NASA Finds Japan Tsunami Waves Merged, Doubling Power - NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory

NASA Finds Japan Tsunami Waves Merged, Doubling Power - NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory | Tsunamis | Scoop.it
NASA and university researchers have discovered the tsunami generated by the magnitude 9.0 quake off northeastern Japan in March 2011 was a long-hypothesized 'merging tsunami'...

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Tsunami forecasting: The next wave

Tsunami forecasting: The next wave | Tsunamis | Scoop.it

A simulation of the 2011 Tohoku tsunami used data from buoys and sea-floor sensors (triangles) to estimate wave heights. Deeper colours indicate higher waves.
NOAA CENTER FOR TSUNAMI RESEARCH


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Tsunami Warning Systems: Lessons from Japan

Tsunami Warning Systems: Lessons from Japan | Tsunamis | Scoop.it
Japan is one of the most well-prepared countries in the world to deal with the threat of a tsunami.
Warning systems are in place, and concrete sea walls wrap around much of the coastline. Bu...

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Meghan Doran's curator insight, February 18, 2014 3:03 PM

This article is about how even if a country is prepared for a tsunami, they can still be surprised by the magnitude of the damage that can occur. The article also talks about some of the problems Japan had and how to fix them as well as how to to better prepare other areas.

 

Saengpassa, Chularat, and Pongphon Sarnsamak. Thailand's tsunami warning system finally ready, after 8 years . The Jakarta Post , 25 Dec. 2012. Web. 18 Feb. 2014. <http://www.voanews.com/content/tsunami-warning-systems-lessons-from-japan-118017249/167190.html>.

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Tsunami Facts, Tsunami Information, Tsunami Videos, Tsunami Photos - National Geographic

Tsunami Facts, Tsunami Information, Tsunami Videos, Tsunami Photos - National Geographic | Tsunamis | Scoop.it
Get Tsunami facts, photos, wallpapers, news and safety tips at National Geographic.

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Meghan Doran's curator insight, March 31, 2014 7:43 PM

More great info about how tsunamis occur and how large and fast they are. 

 

"Tsunamis." National Geographic. N.p., n.d. Web. 28 Mar. 2014. <http://environment.nationalgeographic.com/environment/natural-disasters/tsunami-profile/>.

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Nano Patents and Innovations: Satellite Images of Effects of Earthquake on Japan From NASA

Nano Patents and Innovations: Satellite Images of Effects of Earthquake on Japan From NASA | Tsunamis | Scoop.it
Satellite Images of Effects of Earthquake on Japan From NASA http://t.co/QRyux2r3 via @zite NASAの映像にもハッキリ記録されている。...

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