Tsotsi: South Africa
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Apartheid in South Africa Laws, History: Documentary Film - Raw Footage (1957)

Apartheid (lit. "aparthood") (pronounced [uh-pahrt-heyt, [uh-pahr-hahyt]) is an Afrikaans word for a system of racial segregation enforced through legislatio...
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Apartheid.

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In 1948, the National Party passed the Apartheid, which means "total separateness." The Apartheid lasted from 1948 to the early 1990's. The government put laws into place to impose the apartheid. One example is The Population Registration Act of 1950 required all of the citizens to register with the government as either white, indian, colored or bantu. The blacks were each assigned a homeland based on what language they spoke, while the whites spoke many languages but did not have to split into smaller divisions because they were considered the major majority in South Africa. In 1948, the National party passed a law that outlawed interracial marriages throughout South Africa. The purpose of the apartheid was to guarantee political privilege English speaking minority. In 1911, the mine and works act secured the best jobs for the whites and in doing so, limited the blacks to hard, manual laboring jobs. 

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Boipatong massacre - 17 June 1992 | South African History Online

Boipatong massacre - 17 June 1992 | South African History Online | Tsotsi: South Africa | Scoop.it
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On June 17, 1992, the Joe Slovo informal settlement in Boipatong was attacked by a group of 300 armed men from Kwa Hostel in near by Sebokeng Township. The armed men were affiliated with the Inkatha Freedom Party. Observers suspected that the attack was aimed at undermining the delicate process of negotiations between the National Party and the African National Congress. The Boipatong Massacre is one of the bloodiest and brutal moments of popular violence. Ramaphosa accused the police to be involved because they believed that they still wanted South Africa to be segregated and separate from the blacks. This shows the violence that took place in South Africa during the 1940's and the 1990's and it also showed that some government officials would do anything to to make South Africa a segregated area once again.

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A Human Being Died That Night

A Human Being Died That Night | Tsotsi: South Africa | Scoop.it
A Human Being Died That Night recounts an extraordinary dialogue. Pumla Gobodo-Madikizela, a psychologist who grew up in a black South Af...
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I would recomend this book for several reasons. One reason is that the main character of the book is a psychologist who grew up in a black South African township. Another reason is because she recalls her interviews with Eugene de Kock, the commanding officer of state-sanctioned death squads under apartheid.

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Apartheid's gone, but poverty remains; South Africa

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During the book Tsotsi, the African Americans in South Africa had to endure many things. One of the major issues facing African Americans during the 1940's and around the 1990's, was poverty. Tsotsi lived in a ram shacked house while just being a teenager because his mother taken from him. While the whites were thriving in South Africa, the blacks were resorting to crime so they could get money and survive. The houses Sophiatown in the book Tsotsi ether have broken windows with nothing stopping the cold coming through the window and could not afford to fix there houses let a lone have a stable job and support them selves. While many of the Whites were able to work and have a steady income in South Africa, The Blacks were forced to find money and food by them selves, whether it was from stealing, or murdering others to get it.

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The New York Times Upfront | The news magazine for high school

The New York Times Upfront | The news magazine for high school | Tsotsi: South Africa | Scoop.it
1991: The End of Apartheid
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 In a Black ghetto near Johannesburg, South Africa on the day of June 16 1976, Antoinette Sithole and thousands of other people had no idea that
they would change history. The government had ordered schools to teach all major courses in Afrikaans , and not in English, the Dutch-based tongue of the white rulers who oppressed their native lives. After months of not being able to understand the Afrikaner language, Ten's of thousands of
students protested. An hour into the protest, the police opened fire on an unarmed crowd killing at least 23 citizens. After the shooting, South Africa erupted in rioting, and that later became known as the "Soweto uprising" claiming nearly 600 lives. Secret police spied on black activists. Arrest's, Beatings and even murder of dissidents were the standard fare. One year after the events in Soweto South Africa, Steven Biko, the leader of the South African Students Organization, were beaten to death by government agents. In 1962, Nelson Mandela the leader of the military wing of the leading anti-apartheid group the African National Congress was arrested and given a life sentence. After that rioting took place in the streets and the foundation of the Apartheid began to crack.  
     

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Tsotsi

Tsotsi | Tsotsi: South Africa | Scoop.it
Tsotsi is a real find, by one of the most affecting and moving writers of our time (Financial Times)-- and the novel is now being reiss...
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The word Tsotsi means thug or gang banger. in the book you learn about a group of four criminals in the post Arpartheid Sophiatown. Tsotsi does not know his own name and does not answer to anyboby. Tsosti does not feel guilt when he kills his victim. But after a job on a friday night, Boston, who is feeling guilty about the murder, pushes Tsotsi to far about asking him personal questions, that eventually leads Boston brutally beaten. That shows in the book that he does not like people asking to much personal information because Tsotsi himself does not know. After attacking Boston, Tsotsi goes out for a walk late at night and sees a party going on. While he was standing there, a women with a baby came running up to him and he tackled her. He then noticed that she had a box with her. once the women left, Tsotsi looked and saw a baby inside. Tsotsi and the rest of the group decide to go into the city, which they call Terminal place. This is where Tsotsi meets Morris Tshabalala, a man who had lost both of his legs by a post falling on him. While stalking Morris, Tsotsi sees the desperation in his body, then the relief of getting away from his pursuer. After letting Morris live, instead of killing him for his money. Tsotsi changes his ways after recalling a traumatic memory of his mother being ripped from her bed by a police officer, then waited for his father to come home but when he never did return to Tsotsi, that is when he goes on his own and starts his gang. After that, Tsotsi leaves his gang, sees Die Aap as a person rather then a tool, he then tries to reconcile with Boston after almost kicking him to death. At the end Tsotsi goes by his real name, David Madondo. David then gave his life to save the baby and then was crushed by a falling wall, while finally redeeming himself in the process.

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