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'Canned hunting': Lions bred for petting and slaughter

'Canned hunting': Lions bred for petting and slaughter | Trophy Hunting: It's Impact on Wildlife and People | Scoop.it
In South Africa, there has been a disturbing rise in the practice of breeding lions and tigers in captivity only for trophy-hunters to shoot them dead.
Wildlife Margrit's insight:

Farmed for Profit! 

Ripped from their mothers lion cubs are put on display for photos and petting

Once too large to make money like this they're offered up for canned trophy hunting

After the hunter has gotten the prized lionhead to hang on the wall the rest of the bodyparts may well end up in the wildlife crime network for an additional profit. 

Nothing is wasted!

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Trophy Hunting: It's Impact on Wildlife and People
The Debates: Wildlife conservation vs Animal welfare - Human ego vs Wildlife management - "Right" vs "Wrong"
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Trophy hunting - Wikipedia

Trophy hunting - Wikipedia | Trophy Hunting: It's Impact on Wildlife and People | Scoop.it

Trophy hunting is the selective hunting of wild game animals...

 

Trophy hunting has firm supporters and opponents.

 

Public debate about trophy hunting often centres on the question of the morality of sport hunting and the question of the extent to which the money paid by trophy hunters benefits the population of game animals and the local economy.

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Kelly Waetzig's curator insight, June 15, 2013 8:25 PM
http://www.kwoutdoorequipment.com/hunting.html again thank you

I am a very big fan of trophy hunting and this article is very true.  I spent 20 years in the outfitting industry and know first hand what happens when things are not properly managed.  Quality can lead to quanity

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Namibia: Africa's conservation success story

Namibia: Africa's conservation success story | Trophy Hunting: It's Impact on Wildlife and People | Scoop.it
More than 40 percent of Namibia is under conservation management, and it was the first African country to incorporate environmental protection into its constitution.
Wildlife Margrit's insight:

Help me out.... although this is great news... sort of, isn't Namibia a big supporter of trophy hunting?

And I forget, WWF supports that as wildlife conservation... hmm!

>>>   Save 'em, Shoot 'em, $$$   <<<

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U.S. Bans Zimbabwe Elephant Trophies

The United States has suspended imports of sport-hunted elephant trophies from Zimbabwe citing questionable management practices and a lack of effective law enforcement.

 

The ban follows a massive ecological disaster at Hwange National Park last year which saw hundreds of elephants being killed through cyanide poisoning by poachers.

 

In a statement on its website, the US wildlife department said: "Given the current situation on the ground in both Tanzania and Zimbabwe, the Service is unable to make positive findings required under the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES) and the Endangered Species Act to allow import of elephant trophies from these countries....

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Liberals not listening about grizzly hunt

Re: “B.C. spring grizzly hunt opens,” April 2. The only appropriate word is outrage. They just don’t listen to the electorate. Once again, the B.C. Liberals have condoned the mass slaughter of . . .
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Trophy Hunting: Woman Shoots Giraffe

Trophy Hunting: Woman Shoots Giraffe | Trophy Hunting: It's Impact on Wildlife and People | Scoop.it
In this photo, a female trophy hunter sits smirking on top of the giraffe she blasted to death with a rifle as it ate from a tree.  Read More
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One global protest march for Lions, 55 cities around the world

One global protest march for Lions, 55 cities around the world | Trophy Hunting: It's Impact on Wildlife and People | Scoop.it
CITES, you are failing to protect Africa's wildlife heritage. On 15th March a Global Protest March for Lions will take place in cities around the world. ThisMEMORANDUM OF PROTEST explains why. This document will be printed out and handed over by marchers in 55 cities. 
Wildlife Margrit's insight:

Please join a March near you.

For more information please check out Chris' eNews.

 http://www.getresponse.com/archive/globalmarch/13687229.html?show_schedule=yes&u=SFas

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Prince William slammed for hunting before pleading for end to African poaching 

Prince William slammed for hunting before pleading for end to African poaching  | Trophy Hunting: It's Impact on Wildlife and People | Scoop.it
Britain's Prince William has come under fire for pleading for a stop to the illegal trade in African wildlife just hours after going hunting in Spain.
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Rhino Cry....Dave Wilcoxson ...BMI - YouTube

A Texan sings out against rhino trophy hunting. Written and performed by Dave Wilcoxson ...copyright 2014...David is a prolific songwriter and performer with his wife formed the band The Penguins...They pe...
Wildlife Margrit's insight:
Thanks for caring Dave and getting involved.
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Winner of black rhino hunting auction justifying his actions

Winner of black rhino hunting auction justifying his actions | Trophy Hunting: It's Impact on Wildlife and People | Scoop.it
Hunter Corey Knowlton: My $350,000 permit to hunt a black rhino will ultimately help save endangered species.
Wildlife Margrit's insight:
Okay, if he wants to save the rhino species why not simply donate the money? Afterall, we don't go and find a homeless candidate to "shoot" in order to give to a homeless shelter. This whole killing to save argument is irrational... hmm! Or maybe a way of justification?
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Dominique Osh's curator insight, January 17, 2:35 PM
Wildlife Margrit's insight:Okay, if he wants to save the rhino species why not simply donate the money? Afterall, we don't go and find a homeless candidate to "shoot" in order to give to a homeless shelter. This whole killing to save argument is irrational... hmm! Or maybe a way of justification?
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Black Rhino Hunt Auction Won't Help Conservation

Black Rhino Hunt Auction Won't Help Conservation | Trophy Hunting: It's Impact on Wildlife and People | Scoop.it

This weekend the Dallas Safari Club (DSC) plans to auction off the chance to kill one of the world’s last black rhinos—and shockingly, the U.S. government may be okay with it despite the species’ protection under the U.S.

 

Endangered Species Act.  According to DSC, which describes itself as both a pro-conservation and pro-hunting group, the proceeds of the January auction will go toward African conservation efforts, thereby creating a loophole that would allow the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service to grant a permit to import the dead animal as a trophy. (See “Rhino Hunt Permit Auction Sets Off Conservation Debate.”)

 

With around 1,800 black rhinos remaining in Namibia (where the hunt is slated to take place) out of a worldwide population of only 5,055, the announcement has caused more than a few double-takes. Comedian Stephen Colbert nailed it when he ripped into the obvious irony of the “kill it to save it” argument on his show The Colbert Report in October when the scheme was announced....

 

Read on http://newswatch.nationalgeographic.com/2014/01/09/black-rhino-hunt-auction-wont-help-conservation/ ;

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You don’t get a ‘trophy’ for hunting another living being with a gun

Re: “Hunter on the trail of adventure — Man has explored planet’s wildest spots in quest for big game,” Dec. 28 news story.

 

No trophy for hunting


Got a little queasy reading all about Gary Ingersoll and the House of Horrors he lives in, featuring dead animals he “bagged” from all over the globe. Until we teach animals how to shoot back, I think I’ll stay away from celebrating this “achievement.”

Paul Knopick, Denton


Animal terrorists?

I’ve heard people called “eco-terrorists” who free chimpanzees from the tortures of medical labs, who sit guard in ancient trees to prevent their destruction, who stand in front of bulldozers to stop strip coal mining and who fight to stop the wholesale slaughter of what’s left of the wildlife in the world.

 

I think that label has been wrongly placed on those people. Those who kill and maim and destroy these beautiful animals and display with unconscionable pride the trophies of their cruelty are the environmental terrorists.

 

Such hubris, such detachment from the natural world, such ignorance is regrettable.

Ed Soph, Denton

 This entry was posted in All Letters, Environment by Letters to the Editor. 
Wildlife Margrit's insight:

Strange how it all depends on your perspective... We've been lulled into complacency and allowed the hunting and gun industry to convince us that they are good guys... when in fact:

"Those who kill and maim and destroy these beautiful animals and display with unconscionable pride the trophies of their cruelty are the environmental terrorists."

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Trophy hunting nothing but an ego-stroking tragedy

Re: “Hunter on the trail of adventure — Man has explored planet’s wildest spots in quest for big game,” Saturday news story.

 

As a child and young man I hunted, shot and ate wild game. I haven’t hunted in many years, but I still shoot and own several shotguns and rifles. Game hunting is source of food, and herd thinning as a part of wildlife management is important. Trophy hunting, however, is merely a ego-stroking exercise.

 

The appropriate disposition of Gary Ingersoll’s 330 “trophies” isn’t a museum, but rather a well-publicized bonfire like those used to destroy seized ivory in African nations.

 

And how ironic that this 74-year-old great white hunter “only take[s] the grandpas.”

 

Richard Elsea, Sachse

 

This entry was posted in All Letters, Environment by Letters to the Editor.

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South Africa Tourism: A Catch 22

South Africa Tourism: A Catch 22 | Trophy Hunting: It's Impact on Wildlife and People | Scoop.it
Of the world's most popular travel destinations, South Africa ranked #21. Tourism supports 1 out of every 12 jobs in South Africa,  in total contributing 9% to the total GDP (gross domestic product...
Wildlife Margrit's insight:

Good discussion on the topic of tourism, canned hunting and poaching and its impact on wildife and the South African economy. 

Bottom line... tourists want to see lion, rhino and elephants so stop the poaching and the shooting guys!

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Former PHASA President Ronnie Rowland on PHASA Lion Policy

Rowland criticises PHASA for adopting the SA predator breeders’ stand on “hunting of captive bred lions”. He calls it shooting or executing lions contradicting the standards of Fair Chase and the traditions of hunting.
Wildlife Margrit's insight:

Divisions in the leadership and ranks of the South African hunting community... good!

 

They have this "standards of Fair Chase" policy that some think some how can apply to canned hunting... hmm! That's a stretch don't you think? Much of today's sport/trophy/canned hunting seems to be anything but a 'Fair Chase'.

 

In the US I'm heard of hunters putting up deer feeders outside their kitchen window and "popping them off" over breakfast.

 

In Africa I'm told leopard and lion are sometimes drugged and released awaiting their death from the "great white hunter" from the  USA.

 

Hmm! Then hunters like to say they are about conservation... some how it seems to me more like playing a video game to them.

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Ban will ‘open the gates to poachers’

Ban will ‘open the gates to poachers’ | Trophy Hunting: It's Impact on Wildlife and People | Scoop.it

The US conservation authorities have put a temporary ban on sport hunters taking elephant trophies back to the US.

 

The ban applies to trophies of elephants hunted in Tanzania or Zimbabwe this year.

 

Local hunting companies have slammed the move, and say if hunting outfitters have to close up shop, it will “open the gates to poachers” and take income away from poor communities.

 

The US Fish and Wildlife Service said it suspended the imports of sport-hunted elephant trophies from these countries due to “questionable management practices, a lack of effective law enforcement and weak governance” which had resulted in “uncontrolled poaching and catastrophic population declines in Tanzania”....

 

“For the US to impose a ban with absolutely zero information on the ground is absolutely ridiculous. This has been stirred up by the animal rights NGOs, who want to close down all wildlife trade from Africa. If they continue with this, it will close down elephant hunting. They will be opening up poaching in these prime reserves. The presence of professional hunters is the biggest deterrent to poaching. The local people will become impoverished. The US has got gall to feel they can dictate to Africa what they should do,” Thomson said....

Wildlife Margrit's insight:

Ron Thomson, former Hwange Game Reserve warden in Zimbabwe says, "The presence of professional hunters is the biggest deterrent to poaching"....

What? How pray tell?

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US bans imports of sport-hunted Zim elephant tusks

US bans imports of sport-hunted Zim elephant tusks | Trophy Hunting: It's Impact on Wildlife and People | Scoop.it
THE United States Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) has suspended imports of sport-hunted African elephant trophies from Zimbabwe and Tanzania
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Planned Crocodile Safari Hunting in Australia Rejected

Planned Crocodile Safari Hunting in Australia Rejected | Trophy Hunting: It's Impact on Wildlife and People | Scoop.it

Plans for crocodile safari hunting in the Northern Territory have been rejected by Federal Environment Minister Greg Hunt.

 

The Territory Government wanted to trial trophy hunting of large saltwater crocodiles.

 

The Federal Environment Department has been consulting with traditional landowners, environmental groups, industry stakeholders and animal rights groups about the proposal.

 

Today Mr Hunt said the plan would not be allowed to go ahead.

"My view is that there was a risk of cruel and inhumane treatment. That was in my view, inappropriate," Mr Hunt said....

Wildlife Margrit's insight:

Way to go Minister Greg Hunt!

He said that the planned crocodile hunts were "at risk for being cruel and inhumane".

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Cubs' First Time With Dad!

Cubs' First Time With Dad! | Trophy Hunting: It's Impact on Wildlife and People | Scoop.it
At the Oregon Zoo, an African Lion roars with excitement when he gets to meet his six month old cubs for the first time.
Wildlife Margrit's insight:
With the Global March to End Canned Lion Hunting fast approaching I think this is an appropriate upbeat video.
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Redstone Trophy Hunts denies wasting moose, caribou meat

Redstone Trophy Hunts denies wasting moose, caribou meat | Trophy Hunting: It's Impact on Wildlife and People | Scoop.it
A big game outfitter based in Alberta says his company is not guilty of wasting meat in the Northwest Territories. “We just don’t do things like that,” says David Dutchik.
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Leopards persist in mountain range despite persecution

Leopards persist in mountain range despite persecution | Trophy Hunting: It's Impact on Wildlife and People | Scoop.it
An inaccessible, rugged mountain region in northeast South Africa is home to the densest leopard population outside a state-protected area anywhere in Africa, according to a recent study. Despite this, scientists say until these findings are confirmed, calls to increase trophy hunting permits should be resisted to make sure the leopard population is viable and self-sustaining. 'Trophy hunters are currently calling for more permits to hunt leopard in this area, but luckily, the South African government doesn't have the data to allow this at the moment,' says Dr Julia Chase Grey, a research fellow at Durham University and lead author of the study, published in PLoS ONE.
Wildlife Margrit's insight:
Please, no permits to hunt these beautiful animals!
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Bob Barker spoke out regarding Dallas Safari Club rhino hunt auction

Bob Barker spoke out regarding Dallas Safari Club rhino hunt auction | Trophy Hunting: It's Impact on Wildlife and People | Scoop.it
The former host of The Price is Right penned a letter to the Dallas Safari Club released on Friday that asks the group to call off its auction of a hunting permit of an endangered black rhino in Africa.
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Dallas Club Sells Permit To Kill Endangered Rhino For $350,000

Dallas Club Sells Permit To Kill Endangered Rhino For $350,000 | Trophy Hunting: It's Impact on Wildlife and People | Scoop.it

The controversial sale draws protests and even death threats.

 

The opportunity to hunt an endangered African black rhino in Namibia went to the highest bidder over the weekend. Wealthy U.S. and foreign hunters gathered at a Dallas convention center on Saturday, or joined by phone, to participate in the Dallas Safari Club’s auctioning off of a permit to kill a black rhino, something the club has maintained was done in the name of “conservation.”

 

According to multiple sources, including CNN, the permit sold for $350,000, although the club previously stated the permit could go for as much as $1 million. The hunter who bought the permit during the closed-door event was not named and could be from anywhere in the world.

 

According to The Associated Press, dozens of protestors showed up outside the convention center on Saturday to protest what became a controversial public sale, one that even involved death threats being sent to members of the Dallas Safari Club after the club announced last year it would be auctioning off a black rhino hunting permit. Saturday’s auction marked the first time a permit of this kind was sold outside of Namibia, which grants five permits a year to hunt a black rhino as part of the African country’s culling measures....

Wildlife Margrit's insight:

Amazing what folks do to justify their actions!

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Wildlife Margrit's curator insight, January 13, 10:04 AM

Now if the auction winner is truly a conservationist he/she will not follow thru with the hunt and simply donate the $350K to save the rhino.

Nevermore Sithole's curator insight, January 14, 1:12 AM

Endangered Rhino

Sabine Anderson's curator insight, January 14, 1:54 PM

Hope this hunter will be kind and NOT go through with this but will donate the $350 000 to a worthy Rhino cause to really make a difference!

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Bear watching more profitable than bear hunting, says study

Bear watching more profitable than bear hunting, says study | Trophy Hunting: It's Impact on Wildlife and People | Scoop.it

There is more money in looking at bears than there is in shooting them - 12 times more to be exact, a new study concludes.

 

The study conducted by the Centre for Responsible Tourism, a research institute at Stanford University in Washington, D.C., and funded by the conservation organization Tides Canada, concluded that bear-related ecotourism is exponentially more profitable than trophy hunting.

 

"We found that the bear viewing is generating 12 times more in visitor spending than is bear hunting, and over 11 times more in direct revenue for the B.C. province," said lead researcher Martha Honey.

 

Ecotourism, including bear viewing, has grown rapidly over the past decade on B.C.'s Central Coast, said Honey. People from around the world come to the Great Bear Rainforest in the hopes of seeing black, grizzly and kermode bears in their natural habitat.

 

The report concluded trophy hunting, on the other hand, is on the decline, said Honey....

Wildlife Margrit's insight:

Let's make it so for all wildlife everywhere in the world shall we?

 

"We found that the bear viewing is generating 12 times more in visitor spending than is bear hunting, and over 11 times more in direct revenue for the B.C. province," said lead researcher Martha Honey.

 
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Big game hunting and the nature of the beast

Big game hunting and the nature of the beast | Trophy Hunting: It's Impact on Wildlife and People | Scoop.it

Big game hunting, in this case trophy hunting, is big business in the US, Canada, New Zealand and Africa. In South Africa it has turned into a touristic enterprise where people pay large amounts of money for a safari holiday. The vacation price includes lodging, transport and food – there being additional costs for hunting. People in there thousands flock to South Africa annually for the sport....

 

Two big game American hunters, Mindy Arthurs and Olivia Nalos Opre, have come to the defence of Buchman. ‘People think you’re just killing stuff, but if you don’t manage a herd then the whole of the herd will die’ said Mindy Arthurs. Contrary to this overused defence for the archaic pastime, hunting has little to do with conservation and especially population control.

 

Trophy hunting with free roaming animals is detrimental to conservation. Hunters want to kill the biggest and strongest animal, usually so to have the best photo, largest head to over their fireplace, and best skin to cover their floor. By killing off the strongest it goes against the natural culling process, and also weakens the gene pool. Elephant poaching is believed to have increased the number of tusk-less animals in Africa. Nature magazine reports ‘the effect on…[animals’]…genetics is probably deeper’ and more substantial than that of which we are already aware. Also, quick kills are rare, with many animals subjected to long and painful deaths when hunters severely injure and fail to kill. Hunting also causes disruption to migration and hibernation, feeding and breeding patterns, while also destroying family structures. Equally, the gun fire causes immense stress to the herd.

 

Another type of trophy hunting is called canned hunting...

http://www.nouse.co.uk/2014/01/03/big-game-hunting-and-the-nature-of-the-beast/

Wildlife Margrit's insight:

If you still thought trophy hunting was wildlife conservation:

"Trophy hunting with free roaming animals is detrimental to conservation. Hunters want to kill the biggest and strongest animal, usually so to have the best photo, largest head to over their fireplace, and best skin to cover their floor. By killing off the strongest it goes against the natural culling process, and also weakens the gene pool."

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NPR: To Save The Black Rhino, Hunting Club Bids On Killing One

NPR: To Save The Black Rhino, Hunting Club Bids On Killing One | Trophy Hunting: It's Impact on Wildlife and People | Scoop.it

The Dallas Safari Club says its controversial fundraiser is a conservation effort....

 

Fewer than 5,000 black rhinos are thought to exist in the wild, and in an effort to preserve the species, the Dallas Safari Club is offering a chance to kill one.

 

The Texas-based hunting organization is auctioning off a permit to hunt a rhinoceros in Nambia. It's a fundraiser intended to help save the larger population.

 

The idea may sound counter-intuitive, but Dallas Safari Club executive Ben Carter tells NPR's Jennifer Ludden that raising the funds to support the species is what many scientists and biologists believe is the best way to grow the population of black rhinos....

 

Listen/read the rest of the story

http://www.npr.org/2013/12/29/257881008/to-save-the-black-rhino-hunting-club-bids-on-killing-one

Wildlife Margrit's insight:
Wildlife Margrit's insight:

Upcoming January 11th auction to kill a rhino.

Read or listen to what NPR reports on this controversial issue.

 

The good ole argument that hunting is wildlife conservation... NOT!

When did you hear a hunter talk about the beauty of an animal? Its eyes, its grace, or its interaction with its young?

Hunters talk about guns, horns, antlers, size... they talk about wildife as objects, prizes, trophies... not living breathing beings.

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Wildlife Margrit's curator insight, December 30, 2013 11:17 AM

Upcoming January 11th auction to kill a rhino.

Read or listen to what NPR reports on this controversial issue.

 

The good ole argument that hunting is wildlife conservation... NOT!

When did you hear a hunter talk about the beauty of an animal? Its eyes, its grace, or its interaction with its young?

Hunters talk about guns, horns, antlers, size... they talk about wildife as objects, prizes, trophies... not living breathing beings.

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Sense of adventure comes first for hunter

Sense of adventure comes first for hunter | Trophy Hunting: It's Impact on Wildlife and People | Scoop.it
HOUSTON -- After spending the last four decades traipsing across six continents to the remotest corners of the world, Gary Ingersoll is not easily intimidated.
Wildlife Margrit's insight:

Its phrases like this: 

'Sense of adventure', 'born to hunt', 'license to kill', 'bagged a big one' etc. that so negate anything hunters say to convince us that "hunting is wildife conservation".

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R J Hayden's comment, December 29, 2013 10:24 PM
Great comment . . . I agree 100%