Trends in Telecom
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FCC mulls 1,400 negative comments about calls on planes

FCC mulls 1,400 negative comments about calls on planes | Trends in Telecom | Scoop.it
Now that the roar from more than 1,400 people has died down, the Federal Communications Commission can decide whether to allowing cellular service on planes. The deadline was Friday for comments, which almost
Andrew Seipp's insight:

Is anyone too surprised? I don't know if any users have had a chance to see what the roaming charges are when using a phone in a plane. If they did, I don't know how popular the service actually will be once it becomes more common.

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Net neutrality advocates 'occupy' the FCC

Net neutrality advocates 'occupy' the FCC | Trends in Telecom | Scoop.it
A small group of protestors camp out beside the FCC building and call for the agency to reregulate broadband.
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AT&T plans to bring fiber internet to an additional 100 US cities

AT&T plans to bring fiber internet to an additional 100 US cities | Trends in Telecom | Scoop.it
If the rollout is a success, AT&T would expand its fiber internet to 25 major metropolitan areas.

Via Vikram R Chari
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Vikram R Chari's curator insight, April 21, 2014 7:29 PM

Maybe, some skepticism is in order here - the proof will be in the pudding - whether the customers really get 1 Gb off the spigot. This may all be a marketing gimmick to lure more customers and/or to reduce churn. 

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Cellular industry makes concession on kill switch | NetworkWorld.com

Cellular industry makes concession on kill switch | NetworkWorld.com | Trends in Telecom | Scoop.it

Wireless carriers in the U.S., handset makers and the industry's lobbying group have made a significant concession on technology that could remotely disable stolen smartphones and tablets.

 

The companies say they will voluntarily offer software that can remotely disable and wipe phones, starting with new handsets sold in the second half of next year.

 

The mobile industry has faced mounting pressure from politicians and police to tackle an epidemic of smartphone and tablet thefts. But some critics Tuesday said the voluntary program does not go far enough.

 

"The wireless industry today has taken an incremental yet inadequate step to address the epidemic of smartphone theft," said California State Senator Mark Leno.

 

Thefts of smartphones and tablets, often at gun- or knife-point, account for more than half of all street robberies in San Francisco and a fifth of those in New York. As a result, police officials in both cities have been asking the cellular industry for over a year to install a remote kill switch on devices.

 

The kill switch, which would be triggered by the user, would lock a phone so that it can't be reused or reprogrammed. Advocates say that such a technology, if made standard on all phones, would dramatically reduce street crime.

 

The industry has so far rejected the idea, citing in part the inconvenience to consumers if a phone is accidentally disabled. But earlier this year, legislation was introduced in the U.S. Senate, the House of Representatives and California State Senate that would require the technology by law.

 

Click headline to read more--

 


Via Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Andrew Seipp's insight:

With a kill switch I would have to wonder what a customer would do if they found the phone. Having seen how common phone theft is, this would be an interesting game changer if implemented properly.

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Four is a magic number

Four is a magic number | Trends in Telecom | Scoop.it
IN AMERICA, a price war is threatened. In Europe, combatants in a bloody conflict hope for peace. Both struggles have the same cause: that the number of big...
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Andrew Seipp's curator insight, April 15, 2014 3:40 AM

Not necessarily Canadian telecom. but does show the advantages of 4 carriers and what it does to the marketplace.

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Lack of competition in wireless costs $1B

Lack of competition in wireless costs $1B | Trends in Telecom | Scoop.it
OTTAWA - Greater competition in the tightly-controlled mobile wireless market could result in savings of about $1 billion a year for consumers and the wider economy, says the Competition Bureau.The competition watchdog made the claim in a submission Thursday to…
Andrew Seipp's insight:

Ouch! Something that I am covering in my upcoming book about the telecom industry!

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The Telecom Industry Is Changing: Play or Stay Away? - Motley Fool

The Telecom Industry Is Changing: Play or Stay Away? - Motley Fool | Trends in Telecom | Scoop.it
The Telecom Industry Is Changing: Play or Stay Away?
Motley Fool
The U.S. telecom industry is dominated by two major players, Verizon (NYSE: VZ ) and AT&T (NYSE: T ) .
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Telecom company Rogers doles out nearly $40 million on its two CEOs in 2013

Telecom company Rogers doles out nearly $40 million on its two CEOs in 2013 | Trends in Telecom | Scoop.it
Guy Lawrence, who only stepped into the CEO role on Dec. 2, made a total of $12.7 million
Andrew Seipp's insight:

In case you were wondering why your Rogers bill is so high....

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