Trends in Sustain...
Follow
Find
8.8K views | +0 today
Trends in Sustainability
An observation of sustainable trends, thinking, solutions and opinions.
Curated by Olive Ventures
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Olive Ventures
Scoop.it!

Going the distance: driving the Tesla Model S in the real world

Going the distance: driving the Tesla Model S in the real world | Trends in Sustainability | Scoop.it

It’s difficult to get comfortable in the driver’s seat of a $100,000 car that isn’t yours.

 

The particular Model S I flew to Los Angeles to sample last week was a Signature Performance model. That means that it was one of the first 1,000 to roll off the assembly line (indicated by the “Signature” designation) and is fitted with a high-output electric inverter that can propel the car from 0 to 60 in just 4.4 seconds, a key metric that slots it in with some of the fastest production sedans in the world. It’s a stat I would come to test on numerous occasions over the following 36 hours — within the bounds of the “no street racing” clause I agreed to upon taking delivery, of course.

Olive Ventures's insight:

Good read revealing a few common gripes of EV's... and a glimpse into the future.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Olive Ventures
Scoop.it!

Marcus Fairs on how technology killed green design

Marcus Fairs on how technology killed green design | Trends in Sustainability | Scoop.it

In truth, green didn't completely die. Some aspects of it became so ubiquitous that they vanished from view. Many products today use less packaging, less embodied energy and fewer nasty chemicals than they did a decade ago. They just don't shout about it so much. Green became normal.

 

But green's message did not adapt and it ran out of steam. It fell foul of the law of diminishing returns: it's easy to make the first cut in your carbon footprint, but every subsequent one gets more difficult. And because the back-to-nature, made-do-and-mend doctrine supped from a limited gene pool of visual stimulus, it became an aesthetic trap. Once you've hewn furniture from raw timber, there's not much further you can go.

 

Technology however is intrinsically optimistic: each new development, each new device brings the promise of a new future. Each new way of arranging atoms or bits opens the door to a new solution cloaked in a new form. And since these elements are infinitely configurable, technological development is more sustainable than sustainability, since it will never run out of ideas.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Olive Ventures
Scoop.it!

Patagonia plans global campaign for responsible capitalism

Patagonia plans global campaign for responsible capitalism | Trends in Sustainability | Scoop.it

The word sustainability has been avoided altogether because Stanley says that not even the most progressive of companies has yet found a way of producing goods and services that do not ultimately cause environmental damage.

 

He illustrates the point by pointing to the item of clothing that was used in the company's "don't buy this jacket" adverts, which appeared in the United States on Black Friday, the first day of the Christmas spending frenzy.

 

While it is durable and 60% recycled, it still costs more than it sells for, given that its manufacture uses enough drinking water for 45 people, generates 20 times its weight in carbon dioxide emissions and two-thirds its weight in scrap.

 

Stanley likens consumerism to an addiction and that the first step in rehabilitation is to acknowledge there is a problem that needs addressing.

"Our head of environmental initiatives says prosperity tied to growth is the elephant in the room that nobody is really prepared to talk about," he says. "Certainly businesses would be reluctant to talk about it.

 

"So I think it's time to talk about the elephant. I have been meeting with college students as well as customers at Patagonia stores and the response to this is very strong, I think people are looking for a deeper conversation than we have been having about what business should be doing or can be doing."

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Olive Ventures
Scoop.it!

Model and interior of the Bali Green School

Model and interior of the Bali Green School | Trends in Sustainability | Scoop.it

Model and interior of the Bali Green School. Imagine learning in this place.

Olive Ventures's insight:

Been there. It is quite a sight to behold...

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Olive Ventures
Scoop.it!

The Population White Paper & Implications on the Environment

The Population White Paper & Implications on the Environment | Trends in Sustainability | Scoop.it

Join us in the upcoming talk at Green Drinks February 2013: ”The Population White Paper and Implications on the Environment”!


Date: Wednesday, 27 February 2013

Time: 6.30PM

Venue: Barber Shop by Timbre @The Arts House

 

For RSVP, drop us an email at greendrinkssingapore@gmail.com or go to our Facebook Group.

 

More Details Coming Soon. Watch this space!


In the meantime, you can read: NMP Faizah Jamal’s full speech on Population White Paper & Land Use 2030 (from an environmental perspective)

more...
Scooped by Olive Ventures
Scoop.it!

Carbon sponge could soak up coal emissions

Carbon sponge could soak up coal emissions | Trends in Sustainability | Scoop.it

In a study published Feb. 11 in Angewandte Chemie, Monash University and CSIRO scientists for the first time discovered a photosensitive metal organic framework (MOF) -- a class of materials known for their exceptional capacity to store gases. This has created a powerful and cost-effective new tool to capture and store, or potentially recycle, carbon dioxide.


By utilising sunlight to release the stored carbon, the new material overcomes the problems of expense and inefficiency associated with current, energy-intensive methods of carbon capture. Current technologies use liquid capture materials that are then heated in a prolonged process to release the carbon dioxide for storage.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Olive Ventures
Scoop.it!

Food, drink industries undermine health policy, study finds

Multinational food, drink and alcohol companies are using strategies similar to those employed by the tobacco industry to undermine public health policies, health experts said on Tuesday.

 

In an international analysis of involvement by so-called "unhealthy commodity" companies in health policy-making, researchers from Australia, Britain, Brazil and elsewhere said self-regulation was failing and it was time the industry was regulated more stringently from outside.

 

The researchers said that through the aggressive marketing of ultra-processed food and drink, multinational companies were now major drivers of the world's growing epidemic of chronic diseases such as heart disease, cancer and diabetes.

 

Writing in The Lancet medical journal, the researchers cited industry documents they said revealed how companies seek to shape health legislation and avoid regulation.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Olive Ventures
Scoop.it!

Colourful 'solar glass' means entire buildings can generate clean power

Colourful 'solar glass' means entire buildings can generate clean power | Trends in Sustainability | Scoop.it

A solar power company capable of "printing" colourful glass that can generate electricity from the sun's energy announced a £2m funding boost on Tuesday.

Oxford Photovoltaics, a spin-off from the University of Oxford, said the investment from clean-tech investors MTI Partners will help its solar glass, which can be dyed almost any colour, take a step closer to the commercial market.

 

"What we say here is rather than attach [solar] photovoltaics to the building, why not make the building the photovoltaics?" Kevin Arthur, the company's founder and CEO, told the Guardian. "If you decide to build a building out of glass, then you've already decided to pay for the glass. If you add this, you're adding a very small extra cost. [The solar cell treatment] costs no more than 10% of the cost of the facade."

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Olive Ventures
Scoop.it!

Jane Goodall on climate change: ‘We’ve just been stealing, stealing, stealing from our children, and it’s shocking’

Jane Goodall on climate change: ‘We’ve just been stealing, stealing, stealing from our children, and it’s shocking’ | Trends in Sustainability | Scoop.it

The realisation that many of the problems faced by African populations stemmed from exploitation of natural resources, first in the colonial era and then by multinational companies, led her to realise “it’s also clearly important to travel in Europe and North America, and now increasingly in Asia,” she told those gathered to listen to her at the National Museum headquarters in Nairobi.

 

She spoke of the explosion in the planet’s human population, of the ever greater need for land, food and housing, and evoked the scarcity of water as well as global warming.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Olive Ventures
Scoop.it!

Nike: The No. 1 Most Innovative Company Of 2013

Nike: The No. 1 Most Innovative Company Of 2013 | Trends in Sustainability | Scoop.it

To produce even one of these innovations in a given year is a rarity for any company, especially one with 44,000 employees. But Nike CEO Mark Parker knows he can't just rely on celebrity endorsements and the power of the swoosh when confronted by big-name competitors such as Adidas and upstarts like Jawbone and Fitbit. "One of my fears is being this big, slow, constipated, bureaucratic company that's happy with its success," he says. "Companies fall apart when their model is so successful that it stifles thinking that challenges it. It's like what the Joker said--'This town needs an enema.' When needed, you've got to apply that enema, so to speak."

 

Every CEO says this kind of thing (minus the enema part). The difference is that Parker delivers. Last year, Nike's annual revenue hit $24 billion, up 60% since he took over the reins as CEO in 2006. Profits are up 57%, and Nike's market cap has more than doubled. This story is about how he has achieved that growth, and how he has driven a commitment to the company's culture. Nike is a business with much corporate lore, that lovely, misty story of how a bunch of renegades with a waffle iron bucked the system and revolutionized an industry. But a close examination of the development of Flyknit and the FuelBand, based on interviews with top Nike executives, current and former designers, engineers, and longtime collaborators, reveals four distinct rules that guide this company, that allow it to take big risks, that push it to adapt before competitors force it to change.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Olive Ventures
Scoop.it!

Every Fast-Food Restaurant Claims Its Food Is Fresh. What Is Fresh?

Every Fast-Food Restaurant Claims Its Food Is Fresh. What Is Fresh? | Trends in Sustainability | Scoop.it

The skirmishes emphasize the extraordinary value of one abstract concept for an industry desperate to capitalize on health and sourcing trends without actually having to invest in high-quality ingredients. Fresh doesn't have to be low-calorie or even especially nutritious—a burrito with ingredients prepared on-site at Chipotle may pack three times the calories of a burger. Nor does fresh require pathologically locavorian supply-chain standards: As Arby's has revealed, a sandwich from Subway might contain cold-cuts processed, packaged, and shipped from a centralized facility in Iowa. Better yet for retailers like Taco Bell, Domino's, and Arby's, the mere implications of freshness can be sold at a premium to new customers who otherwise might have avoided those chains' wares altogether. The only unabashedly pure thing about the concept of fresh is its subjectivity.

 

"I think it's meaningless, almost, now," says Mark Crumpacker, the chief marketing officer with Chipotle. "You could claim that something very heavily processed was fresh, I guess. I don't think there are any rules around 'fresh.' You can just say it with impunity. And I think lots of people do."

 

So maybe "Is it fresh?" isn't the question we should be asking ourselves as we lose the tortilla, slice up freshness, and muddle through the trenches of fast-food trends. Instead, amid the varying strategies, we have a much more basic and far more crucial determination to make: What does fresh even mean?

Olive Ventures's insight:

eat fresh.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Olive Ventures
Scoop.it!

Warming Effect of Urban Activities Felt Widely

Warming Effect of Urban Activities Felt Widely | Trends in Sustainability | Scoop.it

You don’t have to live in a city — or even near one — for urban activities to affect your weather, according to a new study.

 

Researchers using a computer model of the atmosphere found that activities from urban areas can warm the air as far as 1,000 miles away. In some areas, that increase was as much as 1 degree Celsius (1.8 degrees Fahrenheit).

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Olive Ventures
Scoop.it!

How Waze uses crowdsourcing for better traffic data

How Waze uses crowdsourcing for better traffic data

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Olive Ventures
Scoop.it!

Erik Schlangen: A "self-healing" asphalt | Video on TED.com

Paved roads are nice to look at, but they’re easily damaged and costly to repair. Erik Schlangen demos a new type of porous asphalt made of simple materials with an astonishing feature: When cracked, it can be “healed” by induction heating.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Olive Ventures
Scoop.it!

Map of significant climate events in 2012

Map of significant climate events in 2012 | Trends in Sustainability | Scoop.it

Map of significant climate events in 2012.

 

Click to embiggen.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Olive Ventures
Scoop.it!

What Does Eco-Friendly Mean?

What Does Eco-Friendly Mean? | Trends in Sustainability | Scoop.it

Definition

Eco-friendly literally means earth-friendly or not harmful to the environment (see References 1). This term most commonly refers to products that contribute to green living or practices that help conserve resources like water and energy. Eco-friendly products also prevent contributions to air, water and land pollution. You can engage in eco-friendly habits or practices by being more conscious of how you use resources.

 

Product Qualifications

Making a truly eco-friendly product keeps both environmental and human safety in mind. At a minimum, the product is non-toxic. Other eco-friendly attributes include the use of sustainably grown or raised ingredients, produced in ways that do not deplete the ecosystem. Organic ingredients or materials are grown without toxic pesticides or herbicides. Products with "made from recycled materials" contain glass, wood, metal or plastic reclaimed from waste products and made into something new. Biodegradable products break down through natural decomposition, which is less taxing on landfills and the ecosystem as a whole. (See References 3)

 

Practice Examples

You can develop eco-friendly habits to help you use less and make the most of what you have. Turn off lights in empty rooms and use a programmable thermostat so you're only heating or cooling your home when it's occupied (see References 2). Businesses can also institute such practices, in addition to bigger initiatives, such as company-wide recycling programs to conserve natural resources and telecommuting for employees, which decreases air pollution and fuel consumption by eliminating daily travel to work.

 

Greenwashing

Companies sometimes label their products "eco-friendly" or "environmentally friendly" without them truly being so. Called "greenwashing," marketing campaigns perpetuate this practice, aimed at helping companies increase their product sales by appealing to ecologically conscious buyers. To avoid purchasing "greenwashed" products, look for products approved by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Energy Star program or an ecologically conscious consumer-advocacy group such as the Green Good Housekeeping Seal (see References 4, 5).

Olive Ventures's insight:

Head on by to www.choose.sg for some examples.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Olive Ventures
Scoop.it!

The top 10 emerging technologies for 2013

The top 10 emerging technologies for 2013 | Trends in Sustainability | Scoop.it

New challenges need new technologies to tackle them. Here, the World Economic Forum’s Global Agenda Council on Emerging Technologies identifies the top 10 most promising technology trends that can help to deliver sustainable growth in decades to come as global population and material demands on the environment continue to grow rapidly. These are technologies that the Council considers have made development breakthroughs and are nearing large-scale deployment.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Olive Ventures
Scoop.it!

Senate to be presented with US carbon tax plans

Senate to be presented with US carbon tax plans | Trends in Sustainability | Scoop.it

Less than 48 hours after President Obama began adding meat to the bones of his renewed enthusiasm to tackle the issue, a fresh proposal to establish a levy linked to greenhouse gas emissions will be unveiled.

 

Democratic Senator Barbara Boxer and Independent Bernie Sanders have arranged a press conference on Thursday to announce what they call “comprehensive legislation on climate change”.

 

“Under the legislation, a fee on carbon pollution emissions would fund historic investments in energy efficiency and sustainable energy technologies such as wind, solar, geothermal and biomass,” according to a statement on Senator Sanders’ website. “The proposal also would provide rebates to consumers to offset any efforts by oil, coal or gas companies to raise prices.”

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Olive Ventures
Scoop.it!

The fruits of frugal innovation | Green Futures Magazine

The fruits of frugal innovation | Green Futures Magazine | Trends in Sustainability | Scoop.it

India's culture of jugaad, or frugal innovation, has helped produce a wide range of sustainable breakthroughs. Are there lessons there for the rest of the world? Ian Thornton meets the innovators.

 

"What we're doing is essentially space technology at low cost", says Lakshminarayan Kannan, Founder of Vortex Engineering, laughing. "To do anything in rural India it has to be cost-effective, robust, reliable and energy-efficient", he adds. "It's like sending something to Mars. You can't send an engineer up there to fix it. The only difference is that you don't have budget constraints in space technology!"

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Olive Ventures
Scoop.it!

Are we a plague? Well, that depends…

Are we a plague? Well, that depends… | Trends in Sustainability | Scoop.it
It might not be pleasant to hear but there’s little reason to disagree with Sir David Attenborough’s pronouncement that “we are a plague on the Earth”. Of course, in terms of agreement, we need to indicate the perspective we’re defending.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Olive Ventures
Scoop.it!

This Brewery Is Powered By Beer

This Brewery Is Powered By Beer | Trends in Sustainability | Scoop.it

The Alaskan Brewing Company just upped the ante for craft breweries who pride themselves on sustainability. It will now power its Juneau facilities with a resource that’s both free and abundant if you’re a brewery: old grain. Malt and barley leftover from the brewing process will now get a second life as fuel for the brewery’s new steam boiler, making the company the world’s first "beer-powered" craft brewery.

 

“We have the unique honor of brewing craft beer in this stunning and remote place,” co-founder Geoff Larson, explains in a statement. “But in order to grow as a small business here in Alaska and continue having a positive effect on our community, we have to take special efforts to look beyond the traditional to more innovative ways of brewing. Reducing our energy use makes good business sense, and good sense for this beautiful place where we live and play.”

Olive Ventures's insight:

I'll drink to this.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Olive Ventures
Scoop.it!

Why Facebook And Twitter Are Not Most Innovative Companies

Why Facebook And Twitter Are Not Most Innovative Companies | Trends in Sustainability | Scoop.it

The simplest reason Facebook and Twitter are not on this year's Most Innovative Companies list: Neither produced innovations worth celebrating. A spot on MIC, as we call it, is not a tenured position. Every year, we assess innovation and the impact of those initiatives. In the history of our list, fewer than one-third of the companies return from one year to the next. This year, only seven are consecutive honorees, an indication of how more companies in more corners of the world are innovating to seek a competitive edge, with the stakes only getting higher.

 

Facebook and Twitter deserve special comment because they have been among the rare perennials, and their recent moves reveal two companies engaging in innovation's evil twin: short-term thinking at the expense of long-term value. Facebook's most notable product achievement in 2012 was Poke, a facsimile of Snapchat, the trendy-with-teens (and sexters) photo app. Poke stumbled almost immediately. In fact, Facebook has made a cottage industry out of chasing hot Internet services (Pinterest and Yelp included), instead of developing new ideas to delight its billion users. Similarly, Twitter's product strategy feels wholly defensive. Its most notable new feature is photo filters, a plainly unoriginal addition.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Olive Ventures
Scoop.it!

A 'Circular Economy': Why the Next Packaging Will Be Grown, Not Manufactured

A 'Circular Economy': Why the Next Packaging Will Be Grown, Not Manufactured | Trends in Sustainability | Scoop.it

Infinite economic growth is at odds with our finite planet, and this obsession with endless growth is driving us towards ecological catastrophe. I’ve just returned from the annual World Economic Forum meeting, and this reality has never been so clear to me. The forum brings together economists, but also activists, business leaders, humanitarians and technologists. 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Olive Ventures
Scoop.it!

What is the Green Gap?

What is the Green Gap? | Trends in Sustainability | Scoop.it

An infographic exploring the differences that Chinese and American citizens have towards sustainability. Information from “The Green Gap” report by Ogilvy Earth.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Olive Ventures
Scoop.it!

In Australia: Wind Power Already Cheaper Than Fossil Fuels, Solar Is Right Behind | The Energy Collective

In Australia: Wind Power Already Cheaper Than Fossil Fuels, Solar Is Right Behind | The Energy Collective | Trends in Sustainability | Scoop.it

The study shows that electricity can be supplied from a new wind farm at a cost of [$80 per megawatt hour in Australian dollars], compared to [$143 per megawatt hour] from a new coal plant or [$116 per megawatt hour] from a new baseload gas plant, including the cost of emissions under the Gillard government’s carbon pricing scheme. However even without a carbon price (the most efficient way to reduce economy-wide emissions) wind energy is 14% cheaper than new coal and 18% cheaper than new gas.…

 

Bloomberg New Energy Finance’s research on Australia shows that since 2011, the cost of wind generation has fallen by 10% and the cost of solar photovoltaics by 29%. In contrast, the cost of energy from new fossil-fuelled plants is high and rising. New coal is made expensive by high financing costs. The study surveyed Australia’s four largest banks and found that lenders are unlikely to finance new coal without a substantial risk premium due to the reputational damage of emissions-intensive investments – if they are to finance coal at all.

more...
No comment yet.