Trends in Retail Health Clinics and telemedicine
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You're The Doctor Now, And Your Office Is In Your House

You're The Doctor Now, And Your Office Is In Your House | Trends in Retail Health Clinics  and telemedicine | Scoop.it
You can now own home versions of many of the tools you used to have to schlep to a clinic to get access toand the doctor is just an Internet...

Via Xavier SEDES, Lionel Reichardt / le Pharmageek, Celine Sportisse
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Mobile Health Around the Globe: SMART Health India Uses mHealth to Fight Chronic Disease

Mobile Health Around the Globe: SMART Health India Uses mHealth to Fight Chronic Disease | Trends in Retail Health Clinics  and telemedicine | Scoop.it

“ SMART Health is a low-cost high-quality healthcare delivery system that uses smartphone-based technologies, providing the healthcare worker with personalized clinical decision support to guide the Systematic Medical Appraisal Referral and Treatment...”

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eMedToday's curator insight, October 8, 2013 10:01 PM

impressive approach to health care in developing countries

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Could The Future Of Health Care Mean No Waits In Hospitals?

Could The Future Of Health Care Mean No Waits In Hospitals? | Trends in Retail Health Clinics  and telemedicine | Scoop.it

As medical treatment is impacted by technology, consumerization, and the mobile revolution, we may see a world where your doctor already knows why you’re sick and can treat you over the phone--leaving the hospitals for the true emergencies.

 

Editor’s Note: This post is part of Co.Exist’s Futurist Forum, a series of articles by some of the world’s leading futurists about what the world will look like in the near and distant future, and how you can improve how you navigate future scenarios...


Via ET Russell, eMedToday
eMedToday's insight:

There is massive away from the hospital to the home and treatment outside the hospital like retail health clinics

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ET Russell's curator insight, August 2, 2013 3:03 AM

Dr. Nick van Terheyden, is CMIO at Nuance offers his thoughts on the hospital of the future and the top three transformations that will drive the next generation of patient-centric care.

1- Technology that works for physicians vs against them.

2. The consumerisation of health care

3. Fewer patients waiting in the hospital

 

Includes reference to sense.ly [An avatar-based telehealth platform that enables continuity of care for chronic diseases, leading to improved patient outcomes and reduced costs.]

 
eMedToday's curator insight, August 2, 2013 9:06 PM

Key point

 

Part of this movement to shift responsibility to the patient means hospitals, which have for years measured financial success based on the number of filled beds, will have to adjust to a new health care system that values empty beds and healthier patients.

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Its All Here: The Facts On Retail Health Clinics

Convenient care clinics (CCCs) are health care clinics located in retail stores, supermarkets and pharmacies that treat uncomplicated minor illnesses and provide preventative health care services. They are sometimes called "retail clinics," "retail-based clinics," "walk-in medical clinics," or "nurse-in-a-box." CCCs are usually staffed by nurse practitioners (NPs) or physician assistants (PAs). Some CCCs, however, are staffed by physicians.

Currently, there are over 1,350 CCCs located throughout the United States.[1] Most CCCs are open seven days a week – twelve hours a day during the workweek and eight hours a day on the weekend.[2] Because CCCs are such a new development, only a small percentage of Americans have received health care in a CCC setting.[3] It is estimated, however, that the number of CCCs will increase dramatically in the near future.[4]
The 2008 Survey of Health Care Consumers,[5] from the Deloitte Center for Health Solutions, finds the appetite for retail medical clinics is real, and growing, and the potential for future success substantial. The following statistics demonstrate the increase in consumer interest in retail clinics.


The survey says that these clinics are particularly popular among those who are identified as:

eMedToday's insight:

extremely good overview of the industry

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Wearable Technology And Digital Healthcare Strategies Should Shift Focus To Chronic Medical Illness

Wearable Technology And Digital Healthcare Strategies Should Shift Focus To Chronic Medical Illness | Trends in Retail Health Clinics  and telemedicine | Scoop.it

As we marvel at the gadgets that companies such as Nike, Fitbit, Jawbone and Apple have recently produced and brought to market--gadgets that can record our heart rate, calories expended, and steps taken—one can only think of how this technology could likely be used on a greater scale to help those who truly need it the most: people with chronic medical illnesses such as emphysema, diabetes, or congestive heart failure.


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Digitpedia's curator insight, December 4, 2014 11:46 AM

Very true.

David Greene's curator insight, December 5, 2014 12:33 PM

With the advent of all this wonderful technology we can't lose sight of initiating the care without assessing the patient's desire to participate...  Becoming partners in care seems to be the most effective way to help the chronically ill...

Linds's curator insight, December 30, 2014 7:25 PM

Those of us with chronic illnesses already have many medical gadgets, including portable heart rate monitors and EKGs, and simple blood pressure monitors.

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mHealth Markets Related to Telehealth Expected to Reach $1.5T by 2019

mHealth Markets Related to Telehealth Expected to Reach $1.5T by 2019 | Trends in Retail Health Clinics  and telemedicine | Scoop.it
mHealth markets related to telemedicine is currently valued at $1.4 billion and is anticipated to reach $1.5 trillion by 2019, according to new report.

Via Sam Stern
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eMedToday's curator insight, September 26, 2013 9:33 PM

Key forces driving the telehealth and mhealth convergence trend include:

Rising healthcare costs due to baby boomer population, chronic diseases, etc.More than 7 billion smart phones globally and half that many connected tablet devices all over the worldConsumer tablet computers becoming ubiquitous and inexpensiveTelemedicine is becoming a fee for services much as a cell phone.Increasing role of telemedicine and mhealth in home healthcare deliveryAvailability of home telemonitoring programs that utilize effective monitors support patient education and timely clinician intervention based on real vital signs data gathered on a daily basis.Rising EHR adoption rates due to meaningful use incentivesGovernment and local authorities recognizing the potential of telehealth technology as a tool for delivering health and social care services.
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E-health made easier – and more comfortable

E-health made easier – and more comfortable | Trends in Retail Health Clinics  and telemedicine | Scoop.it

The future of health care could be found in a tiny, paper-thin skin patch that collects vital information. The Bio-patch sensor developed by researchers at KTH Royal Institute of Technology is inexpensive, versatile and, best of all, comfortable to wear.

 

Geng Yang, a researcher at JRC iPack centre at KTH, says that the Bio-patch measures bioelectrical signals through the skin, gathering data on different parts of the body depending on where it is placed.

 

“On the chest it provides electrocardiography (ECG), on the skull it measures brainwaves (EEC), and on the forearm it can measure muscle response to stimulation from the nervous system (EMG),” he says. It also has a built-in sensor that constantly monitors body temperature.

 

With a wireless connection, the patient can analyse the readings in their smartphone, or send the data via internet to a healthcare professional for diagnosis.

 

The thinking behind Bio-patch is that health care can be moved out of the hospitals and into the home, Yang says. “Bio-patch is a step towards what is known as self-care, which is valuable especially for patients discharged after an operation, or for the elderly living unassisted,” he says.

 

Bio-patch has resulted in several publications in prestigious scientific journals and successful development of a prototype. Yang says several companies have already shown interest in the product.

  


Via nrip
eMedToday's insight:

This type of sensor can be used in small telemedicine cubicles to send vital data to a HCP

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eHWS's curator insight, July 3, 2013 8:56 AM

We started with mobile monitoring - 40 years ago!