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Online story comments affect news perception | Columbia Journalism Review

Online story comments affect news perception | Columbia Journalism Review | trend in online journalism | Scoop.it

Buttressed by editorial oversight and streamlined by redesign, online comment sections may now, more than ever, color reading of the news.

...The recipe at The Atlantic and across major online news platforms has been simple: moderate and rank posts, vet commenters, and design the forum with threading and sharing features that streamline the user experience. By tucking comment sections under the editorial tent, trashy discussion can be redeemed.

“Readers are part of the conversation, and they’re part of the content of the site,” said Bob Cohn, digital editor at The Atlantic. Sometimes, he added, “the comment thread is at least as illuminating as the underlying piece.”

Thoughtful readers deserve a decorous, accessible outlet to voice opinion, to debate, and to further report stories from their vantage point, which can even spur fresh coverage.

But readers aren’t journalists. Still, according to new research, the distinction may be blurring....


Via Jeff Domansky
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problem?!

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Jeff Domansky's curator insight, December 15, 2012 10:32 PM

Comments become news become comments...

Rescooped by Gia Kang from Giornalismo Digitale
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Online Journalism in 1981 (VIDEO) - 10,000 Words

Online Journalism in 1981 (VIDEO) - 10,000 Words | trend in online journalism | Scoop.it

Above is one of my favorite videos about online journalism — a 1981 television report from KRON-TV in the San Francisco Bay Area. It shows how, through a special service, people were able to dial into servers and download the day’s newspaper.

How long does it take to download the newspaper? Well, over 2 hours (after all, the modems shown require the user to physically place a telephone handset on top of them).

It speaks of eight newspapers who had online versions available at the time: the Columbus Dispatch, The New York Times, the Virginian-Pilot & Ledger Star, The Washington Post, the San Francisco Chronicle, the San Francisco Examiner, the Los Angeles Times and the Minneapolis Star and Tribune.

“This is an experiment,” said David Cole of the San Francisco Examiner, adding, “we’re not in it to make money.”


Via Lelio Simi
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online journalism from 1981

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The problem with online freelance journalism

The problem with online freelance journalism | trend in online journalism | Scoop.it

Reuters Blogs (blog) The problem with online freelance journalism Reuters Blogs (blog) Nate Thayer caused quite a stir in the Twittersphere this morning when he published the email correspondence between himself and Olga Khazan, an editor at the...


Via LPM Comunicação SA
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the problem

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You are a reporter: The new journalist is in the mind of the reader

You are a reporter: The new journalist is in the mind of the reader | trend in online journalism | Scoop.it
Article first published as  The Mind of the Reader Is the New Journalist  by Darin L. Hammond on Blogcritics. Traditional Journalism Before social media obliterated traditional journalism, we would...

Via Darin L. Hammond, Sergey Ruseev, M. Edward (Ed) Borasky, Ji-eun Cha
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Content, context and code: verifying information online | Online Journalism Blog

Content, context and code: verifying information online | Online Journalism Blog | trend in online journalism | Scoop.it

When the telephone first entered the newsroom journalists were sceptical. “How can we be sure that the person at the other end is who they say they are?” The question seems odd now, because we have become so used to phone technology that we barely think of it as technology at all – and there are a range of techniques we use, almost unconsciously, to verify what the person on the other end of the phone is saying, from their tone of voice, to the number they are ringing from, and the information they are providing.

Dealing with online sources is no different. How do you know the source is telling the truth? You’re a journalist, for god’s sake: it’s your job to find out.


Via Lelio Simi
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the way to verify the info

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Moving away from ‘the story’: 5 roles of an online investigations team | Online Journalism Blog

Moving away from ‘the story’: 5 roles of an online investigations team | Online Journalism Blog | trend in online journalism | Scoop.it
In almost a decade of teaching online journalism I repeatedly come up against the same two problems: people who are so wedded to the idea of the...

Via M. Edward (Ed) Borasky
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solution ; to make clear information

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How to: verify content from social media | Online Journalism Features | Journalism.co.uk

How to: verify content from social media | Online Journalism Features | Journalism.co.uk | trend in online journalism | Scoop.it
Digital journalism experts advise on monitoring and verifying content, and handling corrections (RT @paulbradshaw: How to: verify content from #socialmedia | Online Journalism Features http://t.co/BFVGZAwj via @twttimes...)...

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one of the solutions

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