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What do transnational education students really want? - University World News

What do transnational education students really want? - University World News | Transnational education | Scoop.it

Students involved in transnational education – learning in a different country from where the degree-awarding institution is based – are less concerned about the awarding institution’s reputation and more about a flexible learning environment and a close fit in terms of subjects available for study.

The British Council’s Education Intelligence Unit’s just-released Portrait of a Transnational Education Student, based on more than 160,000 student responses from 2007 until September 2012, found that students intending to study for a transnational education (TNE) degree valued the practicality of combining study with employment above the reputation, brand or ranking of the awarding institution.


Via Dr Vangelis Tsiligiris
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Faculty perceptions of success in cross-border university-to-university partnerships.

Faculty perceptions of success in cross-border university-to-university partnerships. | Transnational education | Scoop.it

Abstract:

In international development the strategy of cross-border university-to-university partnerships is drawing more attention. Funders such as U.S. Agency for International Development are offering large amounts of financial support for the development of university partnerships, networks, and consortiums. Despite the money that is going into university partnerships and networks, there is only limited research on whether this strategy is effective. This study was conducted at Makerere University, the oldest university in East Africa. Makerere has been engaged with international partners in scores of partnerships, making it an ideal setting to look for perspective on the process and impact of university partnerships. Interviews were conducted with 38 faculty members and content analysis tied what faculty said back to a four-stage model based on literature on partnership development. The first stage of the model focuses on initiation, particularly leadership and motivation. The second stage looks at negotiation of context, the depth of understanding that partners have of where the partnership is based, including organizational structures and the physical and cultural environment. Trust in implementation is the third stage and the final stage is how faculty members evaluate the success of partnerships at their conclusion. In addition to testing the adequacy of the model, this study sought to identify distinctions between partnerships that were internally funded and those that were externally funded. For the most part, the model proved to be a useful tool to represent the process of partnership. However, there were nuances identified, including the large degree to which faculty are motivated by individual benefits; internal challenges at the university that hinder partnership development and impact; informal faculty mentorship that happens during partnerships; and reinforcement of dependence on external funding. These findings were used to offer revisions to the original partnership development model. In this study, all the partnerships that were described were externally funded; the faculty members who were interviewed provided no examples of successful, internally funded partnerships. Implications that the university participates in only externally funded partnerships may indicate that the partnership strategy does not hold promise for future sustainability.


Via Dr Vangelis Tsiligiris
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10 Up-And-Coming Cities That Are Disrupting Education | Edudemic

10 Up-And-Coming Cities That Are Disrupting Education | Edudemic | Transnational education | Scoop.it

Nearly every nation in the world would like to bring in the best and brightest scholars to its schools (and hopefully tap into some of that genius in their economy), but not all have the resources or the facilities to do so.While the U.S. and Europe still dominate many of the lists of top universities, other nations, even some smaller ones, are working hard to provide some serious international competition, building massive education cities and cutting-edge universities that are designed to bring in students from all over the world.

While some still have a long way to go, others are proving that top-tier higher education is going to be a far more global game in the coming decades. We highlight just a few of these cities and their impressive educational offerings in this list.


Via Dr Vangelis Tsiligiris
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