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Metaglossia: The Translation World
News about translation, interpreting, intercultural communication, terminology and lexicography - as it happens
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SATI calls for professional language practitioners' council | The New Age Online

South African Translators Institute (SATI) believes that the establishment of a professional language practitioners council would go a long way in addressing the shortage of court interpreters in the country.
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Linda Rode and Elsa Silke Among Winners of the 2012 SATI Prizes for Outstanding Translation

Linda Rode and Elsa Silke Among Winners of the 2012 SATI Prizes for Outstanding Translation
by Luso on Oct 5th, 2012
Alert! Linda Rode, Elsa Silke and the team behind the Oxford Bilingual School Dictionary: isiZulu and English have won 2012 SATI Prizes for Outstanding Translation.

The South African Translators’ Institute (SATI) has awarded Linda Rode the Outstanding Literary Translation Prize for Bitter Heuning, the translation into Afrikaans of Hermione Suttner’s unpublished English manuscript Bitter Honey. Elsa Silke won the SATI Prize for Outstanding Translation of Children’s Literature for In the Never-Ever Wood, the English translation of Linda Rode’s In die Nimmer-Immer-Bos.
The editorial team for the Oxford Bilingual School Dictionary: isiZulu and English, consisting of Gilles-Maurice de Schryver, Nomusa Sibiya, Arnett Wilkes, Megan Hall, and Fred Pheiffer received the SATI Prize for Outstanding Translation Dictionaries. No prizes were awarded in the categories for Outstanding Non-fiction Transaltion and Outstanding Service Translation.
Press release
Winners of 2012 SATI Prizes for Outstanding Translation and Dictionaries announced:
As part of its celebrations for International Translation Day on Saturday 29 September 2012, the South African Translators’ Institute awarded its 2012 Prizes for Outstanding Translation and Dictionaries, which recognise excellence in published translations and dictionaries in South Africa’s official languages.
The prizes were initiated in the year 2000 in an effort to encourage the publication of translations of original works in the indigenous languages of the country. Associated objectives are to improve the quality of such translations, to promote multilingualism and in particular the use and development of the indigenous languages, to promote cross-cultural understanding and to raise awareness of the role of translators in uniting the people of South Africa. The competition is held every three years and the winners announced around International Translation Day (30 September).
A total of 25 entries were received for this year’s competition, which is divided into five categories – literary translation (three entries), translation of non-fiction work (one entry),
translation of children’s literature (11 entries), service translation (one entry) and dictionaries (eight entries). This year prizes have been awarded in three categories, with the winners each receiving R10 000.

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