Metaglossia: The Translation World
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Metaglossia: The Translation World
News about translation, interpreting, intercultural communication, terminology and lexicography - as it happens
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With nine written versions and two alphabets, Inuit language finally getting much needed makeover

In the Inuit regions of Labrador, the word “son” is written as “Innik.” Cross the border into Arctic Quebec and the word becomes “Irniq.” Skip across Hudson Strait onto Baffin Island, and the word is now a series of syllabic symbols that—to non-Inuit—might look like a triangle, a whistle and several elevated squiggles.

It’s all the same Inuktitut word. But in the linguistic maze of the Canadian Arctic, the roughly 40,000 speakers of the Inuit language use no fewer than nine different writing systems and two alphabets.

“Linguists have told us Inuktitut is one of the hardest languages to learn as a second language,” said James Eetoolook, vice-president of Nunavut Tunngavik, the corporation governing the Nunavut Land Claims Agreement.

And it’s why — after decades of planning — Canada’s Inuit are now hammering out a plan to unite the entire Arctic under a single Roman-lettered language.

“There’s been talk of this for years; it’s not new,” said Jeela Palluq-Cloutier, the Inuit-language coordinator for ITK, the organization representing all Canada’s Inuit.

But it’s only recently that ITK has formed Autausiq Inuktut Titirausiq, a task force of eight representatives — two from each of Canada’s four Inuit regions — to figure out a common standard to be understood from Inuvik to Labrador.

Just last month, the task force made news in the Arctic by recommending the system abandon Inuit syllabics and stick strictly to Roman orthography.

“With language erosion, we have to figure out a better way for young people to read and write in our language,” said Jeannie Arreak-Kullualik, one of two Nunavut representatives on the task force.

Like many Canadian Aboriginal groups, the Inuit had no written language before the arrival of European missionaries. But the size and inaccessibility of Inuit territory meant different churches made contact with different regions at different times.

In the 1700s, Moravian missionaries taught the Labrador Inuit a written language based on the Roman alphabet. On Baffin Island a few decades later, Anglicans were teaching a symbol-based system known as Inuktitut syllabics.

By the time aircraft, snowmobiles and radio communication hit the Arctic, Canada’s Inuit suddenly realized they couldn’t read each other’s Bibles.

Most Southern Canadians are familiar with syllabics, the iconic symbol-based language used on stop signs and public buildings in Iqaluit.

But that version of written Inuktitut is only used in Nunavut and Northern Quebec. Even then, usage varies wildly.

Elders use old syllabics, while most of Nunavut uses an updated system developed in the 1970s. Speakers of the Natsilingmiut dialect, who live near the last known whereabouts of the Franklin Expedition, employ four more characters used by nobody else.

“So, the syllabic writing system is all over the place,” said Eetoolook.

Inuit leaders have been discussing a unified script since the 1970. But as might be expected with an effort to revamp a written language across 160,000 kilometres of Arctic, the idea has been controversial.

At times, Inuit elders even saw the proposal as sacrilege. Since certain Inuit Bibles were originally penned in syllabics, translating them into Roman orthography was seen as disrupting the word of God.

Even now, “the move to completely switch over to Roman orthography was not taken lightly by Inuit in the eastern Arctic as they have a deep attachment to it,” said Eetoolook.

“Many associate syllabics with their Inuit identity.”

But what’s changed Inuit minds this time around is education. The wide variance of written Inuktitut — and the difficulty of learning syllabics — has resulted in young Inuit abandoning the tongue for English.

In 2009, linguist Aurélie Hot surveyed syllabic literacy across parts of Nunavut, and found only teachers and translators were using it daily.

“There seem to be a vicious circle that keeps the status of Inuktitut at the level of a symbolic language,” said Hot in a 2010 interview with the Iqaluit-based Nunatsiaq News.

For fear of offending any particular region or speaker, Inuit leaders are urging a very careful approach to designing the unified language. As Arreak-Kullualik said, it will be carefully designed not to disrupt regional pronunciations “it will be like saying ‘potato’ in one region and ‘po-tah-to’ in another.”

And even then, once the language is complete, the plan is only to place it into the school system.

The really tricky work — swapping out syllabics traffic signs and translating government documents into the new script — will have to wait until a future when the unified language generation has come of age.

“We could see, ten to fifteen years down the road, that it’s a possibility that syllabics will be phased out,” said Palluq-Cloutier.

The language might stay in the education system, she noted, but in history class.

National Post

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New reforms threaten future of Japanese language study in England | The Japan Times

New reforms threaten future of Japanese language study in England
BY WILLIAM HOLLINGWORTH
KYODO
SEP 25, 2015
ARTICLE HISTORY
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LONDON – Teachers in England are concerned the study of Japanese in their country could be severely undermined in light of plans to scrap one of the most important exams in the subject.

From 2017, education firm Pearson is planning to scrap A and A-S levels in Japanese, due to new requirements that the exam be redeveloped, although discussions are still ongoing with the Department for Education to find a way to save the qualification.

Over 3,500 people have signed a petition calling for the exam to be retained, arguing that removing the only qualification in Japanese for 16- to 18-year-olds is likely to reduce the incentive for younger students to take up the language in the first place.

“I’m devastated. This is a genuinely retrograde step,” said Andrew Hunt, head of languages at Whitgift School, Croydon.

Referring to the General Certificate of Secondary Education (GCSE) exams normally sat by those aged 15 and 16, he said, “It will probably have an impact on our GCSE Japanese take-up in the medium term, and in the long term the lack of progression may put off pupils from choosing to start learning the language at all, which would be very sad.

“Currently a large number of our pupils benefit from the opportunity to gain fluency in Japanese and also take part in a cultural exchange with our partner school in Saitama Prefecture.”

In 2014, there were 260 candidates for the A-level, which attracts native Japanese speakers who want to validate their proficiency according to English standards.

A-level Japanese is almost exclusively studied in England, although occasionally a few students in Wales will also sit the exam. Scotland has no similar qualifications in Japanese.

For the A-S level, which is effectively half of an A-level and is taken in the first year of the two-year A-level course, there were 291 candidates last year, while around 1,100 students take GCSE Japanese each year in Britain.

“Each year, I have students who would like to carry on Japanese at university level and, for them, the A-level is very important,” said Sachiko Yamaguchi, who teaches at Aquinas College, Sheffield.

The current Japanese A-level is considered to be traditional and demanding. It comprises reading comprehension, translation and essay writing. However, the exam does not test either speaking or listening skills.

Regulators want to standardize all language A-levels and bring them into line with the French and German exams, which have equal components of speaking, listening, reading and writing.

Exam providers like Pearson have decided to scrap A-levels in several languages less popular among students because they feel they and the schools do not have the resources to redevelop the exams along the lines required by regulators.

Insisting on tests for speaking and listening will inevitably require more classroom preparation, resources and manpower, they claim.

Redeveloped exams could also put off native speakers of minority languages from taking the A-level, as many of them prefer to attend informal Saturday schools rather than formal lessons, they say.

As a result, a total of 13 lesser-taught language A-levels — including Polish, Turkish and Arabic — are being ditched, leaving only six: French, German, Spanish, Italian, Chinese and Russian.

“It’s shocking,” Hunt said. “England is going to lose two-thirds of its language A-levels. We are getting mixed messages from, on the one hand, the Foreign and Commonwealth Office, which says we need more speakers of minority languages, and then these decisions by the privatized exam boards. The government should be subsidizing the exams.”

Hunt said he would welcome a redeveloped Japanese A-level but argues the existing exam already “stretches” students and is “academically rigorous.”

A Pearson spokesman said, “We are continuing to talk to Ofqual (The Office of Qualifications and Examinations Regulation) and the Department for Education about the available options for securing the future of our A-level qualifications in Japanese from September 2017.

“We believe that all parties should work together in the interests of those learners who want to secure these important qualifications,” the spokesman said.
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Sorenson Communications Announces Dayton Video Relay Service Interpreting Center | FinancialContent Business Page

Sorenson Communications Announces Dayton Video Relay Service Interpreting Center
Interpreting Centers Support Increased Communication Access for People Who Are Deaf and Use American Sign Language

SALT LAKE CITY, UT -- (Marketwired) -- 09/24/15 -- Today, Sorenson Communications®, the leading provider of Video Relay Service (VRS) for people who are deaf and use sign language to communicate, announced the opening of a new Sorenson Video Relay Service® (SVRS®) interpreting center in Dayton, Ohio. The new center will operate in conjunction with the 100-plus other Sorenson VRS interpreting centers in major cities throughout the U.S.

"Sorenson is committed to empowering the Deaf community to communicate in real time, in our native language -- American Sign Language (ASL)," notes Ron Burdett, Sorenson vice president of community relations. "Opening the Dayton SVRS interpreting center, which provides access to professional SVRS interpreters, is another way Sorenson shows its commitment to the Deaf community."



SVRS, a service paid for by the U.S. government's Telecommunications Relay Service (TRS) fund, empowers deaf people who use ASL to conduct video relay calls with hearing people, 24/7, through a qualified ASL interpreter. Calls are placed using a videophone, a high-speed internet connection and a standard TV. Calls may also be placed through a mobile device, such as a smartphone with a front-facing camera or a computer. When a deaf caller places a VRS call to a hearing person, an ASL interpreter appears on the screen. The deaf caller signs to the interpreter, who is fluent in ASL and spoken English. The interpreter then speaks the message to the hearing recipient. The hearing caller responds and the interpreter signs the message back to the deaf person, thus "relaying" the conversation between them.

SVRS closely simulates a conversation between two hearing people, something the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) calls "functional equivalency." Title IV of the ADA mandates access to functionally-equivalent communications for deaf people.

"Sorenson Communications is dedicated to providing the best-possible SVRS experience for deaf and hearing callers," notes Chris Wakeland, vice president of interpreting for Sorenson. "That means the new Dayton center and each Sorenson VRS interpreting center in the U.S. is staffed with the highest-quality interpreters -- professionals who are dedicated to providing excellent interpreting for every call."

About Sorenson Communications
Sorenson Communications® (www.sorenson.com) is a provider of industry-leading communications products and services for the deaf. The company's offerings include Sorenson Video Relay Service® (SVRS®), the highest-quality video interpreting service; the Sorenson ntouch® VP videophone, designed especially for use by deaf individuals; ntouch® PC, software that connects users to SVRS by using a PC and webcam; ntouch® for Mac®, software that connects users to SVRS by using an Apple® computer; ntouch® Tablet, which turns the Apple iPad® with a front-facing camera into a larger-screen mobile VP; and ntouch® Mobile, an application empowering SVRS communication via mobile devices.

Disclaimer
If you choose Sorenson as your default provider, you can port your existing 10-digit number to Sorenson from another provider or Sorenson can provide you with one for the geographic area where you live or work. If you later change your default provider, you can port your number to that provider. When selecting Sorenson, you must provide to Sorenson the physical address (i.e., the Registered Location) from which you are placing the call, so that Sorenson can properly route any 911 calls you may make. If you move or change your location, you must notify Sorenson immediately. You can update your Registered Location from your Sorenson videophone by calling 800-659-4810 or by visiting www.svrs.com/moving. Sorenson will confirm receipt of your Registered Location information. Emergency calls made via internet-based TRS may not function the same as traditional E911 service. For example, you may not be able to dial 911 if there is an internet-service failure or if you lose electrical power, and your 911 call may not be routed correctly if you have not updated your Registered Location. For more information on the process of obtaining 10-digit numbers and the limitations and risks associated with using Sorenson's VRS to place a 911 call, please visit Sorenson's website: www.sorenson.com/disclaimer. For information on toll-free numbering, please visit www.svrs.com/tollfree.
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Pope Francis' interpreter becomes unlikely star during historic papal visit

NEW YORK — If you haven’t noticed by now, Pope Francis has a rather large entourage traveling with him here in the United States.

We’re talking about an estimated 100 people, all accompanying him to make his voyage as smooth as possible.

His papal posse included one man who hasn’t left the pontiff’s side — his official interpreter Monsignor Mark Miles.

Ever since the pope’s arrival on Wednesday, online chatter has focused on his so-called “wingman,” who appears in every single photo op with his Holiness.

So who is he?

Monsignor Miles is a native of the British territory of Gibraltar and speaks both English and Spanish. He’s been the man who Pope Francis has leaned heavily on to effectively spread his message.

The pope, who was born in Argentina and is fluent in both Spanish and Italian, has yet to master the English language.

It was during a recent trip to the Philippines where he summoned Monsignor Miles to be his voice for the people.

Soon after the first few appearances, the 48-year-old Monsignor became a star in the with the Filipino press.

Some fans launched Facebook fan pages and others created elaborate Instagram collages which pointed out his apparent “cutest dimple ever.”

With the Pope expected to deliver a number of addresses in the next few days — with only four in English — we’ll be seeing a lot more of Monsignor Miles.
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Scholars debate role of French language - Life & Style - VietNam News

HA NOI (VNS) — Local scholars gathered yesterday to discuss the role of French literature in Viet Nam's culture and history during a roundtable discussion co-organised by the French Institute and Nha Nam Publishing House.

The participants discussed their reverence for the language, as well as their concerns that younger generations are only interested in learning English.

Le Hong Sam, a veteran translator of French literature, recalled when Vietnamese primarily studied French literature during wartime. The curriculum was filled with French novels and poems, while students spent only one or two hours per week reading Vietnamese prose.

"It wasn't an exaggeration to say Vietnamese literature was a foreign subject at that time," Sam said. "However, rather than a compulsion, my friends and I exposed French literature with admiration and profound comprehension. We ended up loving French culture even though some of us had never been to France."

Sam referred to prominent poet Xuan Dieu as an example of a scholar who was heavily influenced by French literary works.

"We all feel like our heads were filled with the beauty of French culture and literature," she said.

Literary critic Pham Xuan Nguyen, who also attended the discussion, reminisced about the habit of placing books underneath furniture to prevent it from moving during transit.

"Furniture could be thrown away after some time, but I kept those books - mainly French ones – on my bookshelf until now," he said.

French literature has existed ­– and continues to develop – in Viet Nam for more than a century, and "it is undeniable that it gradually plays an organic role in Vietnamese literature", according to Sam.

Professor Dang Anh Dao, the daughter of leading intellectual Professor Dang Thai Mai, agreed that Vietnamese translations were heavily influenced by French literary works.

"Literary translation is to compare, relate to the origin and find the similarities among different countries' literature," she said.

According to Dr. Pham Xuan Thach, French literature gave him "a new world and a new mindset", even though French works were exposed to his generation through translations rather than the original literature.

"I still remember how Le Petit Prince (The Little Prince) and Terre des hommes (Wind, Sand and Stars) by Antoine de Saint-Exupery struck me as if there was another world out there," he said. "They brought me a sense of diversity in our life. I feel grateful to French literature."

Dao said she is concerned about the popularity of English at present.

"The youth now are more interested in English translation than ever," she said. "Lots of Vietnamese poetry books that had been translated into French were only used as ... a gift within the local translation community."

Nguyen shared similar sentiments.

"It makes sense that young students have decided to focus on English due to globalisation," he said. "But I'm now wondering which is better: the former generation that had no choice but to study French literature, or the modern generation that is free to choose any language, rendering their minds like a ‘hotpot'," he said.

Sam, however, said the youth tend to view language learning differently.

"They (the new generation) don't necessarily learn the foreign language to be able to grasp the meaning of literary works," she said. "People don't need to learn Russian language to understand the novels of Leo Tolstoy, Fyodor Dostoyevsky or Vladimir Nabokov."

Thach said that even though the cultural world he was born into and adored no longer exists, "We have to accept the present".

"However much I love French literature, I cannot deny the fact that my kid is living with a different culture," he said. "He still prefers reading Doraemon (a Japanese comic book)."

Sam added, "The diversity itself is the only factor that helps us understand our character." — VNS
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Mario Vargas Llosa condemns 'small-mindedness' of 'imposing' regional language over Spanish

NOBEL Prize winning novelist Mario Vargas Llosa has slammed what he considers to be Catalunya's restrictions on speaking Spanish at the expense of the regional tongue, catalán.
The Peruvian former presidential candidate (pictured left), well-known for his liberalism and social conscience, made the controversial speech at Salamanca University when he was awarded an honorary degree.
Although his claims that authorities in Catalunya are 'trying to prevent' the use of Spanish have been refuted hotly by residents of the region, fluency in catalán is necessary for getting a job in the public sector and is the main teaching language in its schools.
Former education minister José Ignacio Wert passed a law which forced the government to fund schooling in Spanish at a private academy where parents wished their children to be taught in the national tongue but could not find a State school which did so, and a small number of parents have taken the regional government to court when their kids were refused an education in Spanish.
“There has been a policy in Catalunya which went against a reality that cannot be extinguished – the use of Spanish as a deep-rooted language,” Vargas Llosa stated.
Referring obliquely to all regions in Spain with a co-official language where any of their local or higher authorities imposed this above the national tongue, the author said this approach was 'small-minded, peevish, parochial and backward'.
“It will never prosper,” he stressed.
“Catalunya has the enormous luck and the great cultural wealth of being a bilingual region.
“The Spanish and catalán languages are not enemies; they complement each other perfectly in an age where both globalisation and community spirit are paramount.”
Vargas Llosa, 79, has hit the headlines in Spain more than ever just lately, having spent a great deal more time in the country due to his new relationship with Philippine model and socialite Isabel Preysler (pictured right).
The mother of singer Enrique Iglesias – through her seven-year marriage to crooner Julio in the 1970s – held the title of Marquise Consort of Griñón in the 1980s through her second husband, and has been a widow since her third spouse Miguel Boyer, former treasury minister for Spain, passed away last year.
This week, the 64-year-old it-girl and the novelist behind modern classics such as The feast of the goat, The way to Paradise and The bad girl appeared for the first time in Spain as an official couple in public at Madrid's Theatre Royal in the presence of King Felipe VI and Queen Letizia.
The Monarchs were due to open the new season's programme of shows at the theatre, and the author had been invited as a guest.
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Over 8 in 10 primary EU school pupils studied foreign language in 2013: Eurostat - Xinhua | English.news.cn

BRUSSELS, Sept. 24 (Xinhua) -- In 2013, around 17.7 million primary school pupils in the European Union (EU), or 81.7 percent of all the pupils at this level, were studying at least one foreign language, Eurostat, the statistical office of the EU, said Thursday.

Currently, there are 24 official languages recognized within the EU. In addition, there are regional languages, minority languages, and languages spoken by migrant populations. It should also be noted that several EU member states have more than one official language, added Eurostat.

The dominance of English is confirmed at the lower secondary level (pupils aged around 11-15 depending on the national educational system), with 17.1 million pupils in the EU learning English as a foreign language in 2013.

French came second, followed by German, Spanish, Russian and Italian.

In particular, Russian, the most popular non-EU language at lower secondary level in the EU that is most commonly studied in the Baltic member states, including Lithuania, Estonia, Latvia, as well as in Slovakia and Bulgaria.

All or nearly all pupils at primary level in 2013 attended foreign language classes in Cyprus, Luxembourg, Malta, Austria, Croatia, Italy, Spain, as well as in France and Poland.

Moreover, in some member states, young pupils were studying two or more foreign languages, particularly in Luxembourg, followed at a distance by Estonia and Greece.
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OpenWorks, Company of Angels Stage English-Language Debut of AND NOW: THE WORLD!, Beginning Tonight

OpenWorks Theatre and Company of Angels in association with Derby Theatre present AND NOW: THE WORLD! The English language premiere of the award-winning German play that questions the effects of the internet on our behaviour is written by Sibylle Berg and directed by Abigail Graham, with dramaturge Clare Brennan. The national tour runs today 25th September to 12th November. Press night is slated for the Derby Theatre on Friday 2nd October, 8pm. London press night is Wednesday 28th October, 8pm at the Hackney Showroom.

Winner of the Theater Heute's German Play of the Year Award, this solo performance asks what it means to be a young woman in a digital world. AND NOW: THE WORLD! uncovers the harsh anonymity of a life lived online; are human relationships sacrificed in return for a digital existence? Award-winning playwright Sybille Berg, nominated for the most prestigious award for German speaking playwrights, the Mulheim Dramatists' Award as well as winner of the 2008 Wolfgang-Koeppen-Literaturpreis, dissects a human response to an online world of possibilities.

Award winning dramaturge and playwright Clara Brennan and OpenWorks Artistic Director have worked together to bring And Now: The World! to UK audiences. Brennan garnered critical acclaim, including winning a Fringe First, for Spine (2014) as well as being awarded the Channel 4 Screenwriting Prize in 2013. As a playwright, her work has been performed at the Soho Theatre, Southwark Playhouse, York Theatre Royal, The Duke's Theatre, the Arcola Theatre and the Traverse Theatre.

OpenWorks' Artistic Director, Abigail Graham said, "I'm thrilled that we are bringing this amazing award-winning German text to the UK. It's an important, thought-provoking play that tackles the most urgent issues of our times - digital culture, activism, feminism, human relationships. Sybille Berg is one of the best playwrights I have come across and I can't wait to share her work with British audiences."

Abigail Graham has directed numerous productions ranging from DEBRIS (2014) for which she was nominated for Best Director for the Off West End Awards, the critically acclaimed Molly Sweeney (2013) and The Censor (2012) for which she was shortlisted for the JMK Young Director Award.

OpenWorks are dedicated to creating theatre for new audiences, they achieve this by integrating paid traineeships, for young people who do not traditionally access the arts, into the rehearsal process - the trainees then act as ambassadors for the work amongst their peers. Building on their company philosophy that 'excellent art should be available to everyone', OpenWorks make rebellious, honest and humane theatre which develops alongside their outreach and audience development work. OpenWorks believe that by involving a wider range of people, theatre can prove to be a better reflection of society.

Outreach activities play an integral role in OpenWorks' philosophy. And Now: The World! will include pre-show workshops on internet consumption and feminism. In addition, OpenWorks are running a scheme of traineeships in London and Derby, providing ten young people from diverse backgrounds with paid work experience opportunities.

Company of Angels fosters and produces challenging theatre, bringing plays, artists and ideas from Europe, the company tour ground-breaking plays to young adults nationally and internationally. Through a range of research projects and development schemes, Company of Angels nurture the next generation of artists, exploring and documenting news and ideas to directly engage young people. And Now: The World! is part of the company's programme of supporting emerging companies. Previous projects include Questions and Dancers (2015) and Helver's Night (2014).

For more, follow on Twitter @OpenWorksTweets, @anglescompany, #ANTW, or visit openworkstheatre.co.uk or go to companyofangels.co.uk.

IF YOU GO:

24 - 25 Sept Platform Arts Hub, Islington (Previews)

Hornsey Road Baths, 2 Tiltman Place, off Hornsey Road, London, N7 7EE

7.30pm | £3-£5
http://www.platformislington.org.uk | 020 7527 8802

2 Oct Derby Theatre

15 Theatre Walk, Derby, DE1 2NF

8pm | £10 - £7
https://www.derbytheatre.co.uk/ | 01332 59 3939

15 - 17 Oct Moor Theatre Delicatessen

The Moor, Sheffield, South Yorkshire, S1 4PF

8pm | £5-£7
http://theatredelicatessen.co.uk/ | 07908 764480

19 - 22 Oct Emporium Theatre, Brighton

88 London Road, Brighton, BN1 4JF

7.30pm | £10-£12
http://emporiumbrighton.com/

23 - 24 Oct The Edge Theatre & Arts Centre, Manchester

Manchester Road, Chorlton, Manchester, M21 9JG

7.30 | £10-£12
http://www.edgetheatre.co.uk/ | 0161 282 9776

27 - 31 Oct Hackney Showroom, London

Hackney Downs Studios, Amhurst Terrace, London, E8 2BT

8pm | £12
http://www.hackneyshowroom.com/| 0203 095 9747

2 - 4 Nov Tobacco Factory Theatre, Bristol

Tobacco Factory, Raleigh Rd, Bristol, BS3 1TF

Times and prices TBC
http://www.tobaccofactory.com/ | 0117 902 0344

12 Nov Arts Centre Washington, Sunderland

Biddick Lane, Washington, Tyne and Wear, NE38 8AB

7.30pm | £6

http://www.artscentrewashington.co.uk/ | 0191 219 3455
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Communication Officer- Chinese Language

Background

The International Centre for Integrated Mountain Development (ICIMOD) is a regional intergovernmental learning and knowledge sharing centre serving the eight regional member countries of the Hindu Kush Himalayan (HKH) region – Afghanistan, Bangladesh, Bhutan, China, India, Myanmar, Nepal, and Pakistan. Our aim is to influence policy and practices to meet environmental and livelihood challenges emerging in the HKH region. To do this we bring together researchers, practitioners, and policy makers from the region and around the globe to generate and share knowledge, support evidence-based decision making, and encourage regional collaboration. ICIMOD delivers impact through its six Regional Programmes of Adaptation to Change, Transboundary Landscapes, River Basins, Cryosphere and Atmosphere, Mountain Environment Regional Information System, and Himalayan University Consortium (emerging). These regional programmes are supported by the four Thematic Areas of Livelihoods, Ecosystem Services, Water and Air, and Geospatial Solutions and underpinned by Knowledge Management and Communication. ICIMOD seeks to reduce poverty and vulnerability and improve the lives and livelihoods of mountain women and men, now and for the future.

The Chinese Communications Officer will work with communication and outreach across ICIMOD’s programmes with Chinese activities.

Key tasks and responsibility

Assist ICIMOD with all Chinese communication efforts, including the adaptation of style or format to ensure that messages achieve maximum impact;

Spearhead scoping missions on communication practices in China to recommend the best communication modes to achieve impact for ICIMOD;

Work with the KMC team and the China focal point at ICIMOD to generate news, blogs, and feature materials for publication in key specialist and general-interest media, science platforms, and networks in China;

Solicit/contribute news and events specific to ICIMOD from Chinese partner institutions for the website and Chinese social media;
Work closely with Human Resources Development to organize Chinese interaction and language session(s) at ICIMOD;
Lead the translation work and summary of key Chinese literature into English and vice versa;
Lead KMC-related events organized in China in close collaboration with other partners;
Work closely with the KMC team in developing an information page on ICIMOD’s website in Chinese;
Work closely with KMC Focal Points and programme staff to identify opportunities to create and support the development of engaging Chinese content aligned with the objectives of ICIMOD and its initiatives;
Research and harvest reliable and relevant resources – information, data, and knowledge from open-access repositories in China;
Ensure quality assurance of annotated bibliography work commissioned by different Initiatives and their availability through HIMALDOC;
Help strengthen the media database at ICIMOD and news dissemination with a particular emphasis on Chinese media agencies;
Interact with and work in close relationship with CN-ICIMOD and liaise with other Chinese partners both in China and at ICIMOD.
Minimum Requirements

Native Chinese Speaker
Graduate degree in Journalism, Information Management/Science, Development Communication, Knowledge Management, or related field with extensive experience in information, behavioral, and/or communication sciences
A minimum of two years of experience in related field, as well as experience with a recognized national or international organization.
Skills and Competencies

Communication skills: Good written and oral English communication skills; ability to interact with a wide variety of people and maintain friendly, professional manner.
Innovation: Ability to easily adapt to changing technologies and constantly explore and learn new technologies, techniques, and protocols.
Social/team competency: Ability to work smoothly and effectively with others in the team to establish constructive ideas or solutions that meet organizational objectives; comfortable in multicultural settings.
Impact and results orientation: Proactive approach for smooth organization of internal processes; work independently with strong sense of initiative, discipline, and self-motivation.
Duration:2 years, of which the first six months will be under probation.With Duty Station in Kathmandu

Remuneration:Monthly salary will be based on qualification and experience, according to ICIMOD rules and regulations.

Gender and Equity Policy

Qualified and eligible women candidates and those from disadvantaged backgrounds are highly encouraged to apply. ICIMOD implements a gender equity policy and is supportive of working women. It operates a day-care centre and is committed to the integration of gender issues at organizational and programmatic levels.

HOW TO APPLY:
Method of application

Applicants are requested to apply online before 15 October 2015through ICIMOD's online application system.

Only shortlisted candidates will be notified.
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Investorideas.com - Yappn (OCTQB: YPPN) Powers Largest Social Media Network for German Football - Fanorakel.com Global Language Expansion

Yappn (OCTQB: YPPN) Powers Largest Social Media Network for German Football - Fanorakel.com Global Language Expansion
 

New York, New York - September 24, 2015 (Newsfile Corp.) (Investorideas.com newswire) Yappn Corp. (OCTQB: YPPN) ("Yappn" or "Company") a leader in real-time language technology and translation services, is pleased to announce that Fanorakel AG ("Fanorakel"), Germany's largest social media network for German Football, has expanded its mobile and online experience in English (fanorakel.com/en), as its first expansion language, in conjunction with the release of its iOS and Android English apps supported by Yappn's technology. Fanorakel is also available as a premium app on the LG TV Smart Hub and will also look to expand its language presence with second screen global content. The parties have initially agreed to a revenue share program as Fanorakel broadens commercialization and will then look to expand their relationship as announced on December 8, 2014.

Fanorakel continues to expand its real-time services globally as the popularity of German professional Football grows and the parties will also increase Fanorakel's global social engagement through Yappn's multilingual engagement tools and Yappn's agency agreement with HootSuite to reach global fans, in their native languages, through various social media outlets around the world.

As announced in 2013, The Deutsche Fußball League and 21st Century Fox have a global media rights deal beginning in the 2015 — 2016 season that will make the German league available to Football fans throughout North America, South America, Europe and Asia.

The deal includes over 80 countries including the United States, Canada, Brazil, China, Indonesia and Japan and includes all 306 Bundesliga matches, DFL Supercup, and Bundesliga Relegation Playoffs. According to Sporteology.com, association football, commonly known as football or soccer, is the world's most popular sport, with 3.5 billion fans all around the world and played by 250 million players in over 200 countries.

Franz Dillitzer, CEO of Fanorakel said: "Our site is designed to have real-time interaction with our fan base that expresses their opinions about specific sport related topics. Our reservation in translation services from German in the past was losing the contextual relevance of the sports terminology. Yappn has given us the ability to create our customized lexicon while translating it in real-time, giving our fans a respectful and true experience in English, without losing the true meaning of our messaging."

Since first announcing the relationship, Fanorakel has been focused on the testing and integration of its English platform while upgrading its technology platform to manage multiple languages with Yappn. To better allow Fanorakel to focus its resources on growth of its offering to a worldwide audience, the parties have initially agreed to work together on building a larger audience and a revenue share program. The parties are also working on a definitive agreement to expand the scope of their relationship to include a potential Joint Venture relationship as originally announced. The scope of the Agreement would be to expand offerings across both the global Football / Soccer market and other leading professional sports opportunities through both Fanorakel and Fan Oracle.

"Fanorakel has built an impressive Social Media presence with 4 million followers in different social media platforms, all in a single language, German. Yappn is looking forward to supporting their goal to globalize their offerings as German Professional Football is available in over 80 countries starting this season and create new and engaging activities for fall around the world, through Yappn's commercial, revenue driven platform.", stated David Lucatch, Founder and CEO of Yappn.

About Fanorakel

Fanorakel creates unique social content, interactive user platforms and applications that create engagement for fans prior, during and post matches, across the entire Football Fan experience over mobile, web and Smart TV applications. Fans have the choice to participate in the conversation by predicting the outcome of a match and collecting points to win one-of-a-kind prizes or to use it on its betting platform. Fanorakel's platform allows to seamless integrate into partners websites, giving them the ability to offer tickets, coupons and sports betting services for registered users. Currently, Fanorakel generates revenues from subscribers, advertisers and sponsors, from buyers of content and licensing its technical infrastructure to third parties.

About Yappn

Yappn is a real-time multilingual company that amplifies brand and social messaging, expands online commerce and provides customer support by globalizing these experiences with its proprietary approach to language. Through its real-time multilingual amplification platform, Yappn eliminates the language barrier, allowing the free flow of communications in 67 languages.

Yappn focuses on delivering global reach and efficiencies without the need of human intervention, making the language experience immediate through all phases of Ecommerce, online events and content programming.

Yappn Corp. is publicly traded in the U.S. on the OTCQB — symbol "YPPN"

To learn more about Why Language Matters to a growing global economy, visit our blog at www.whylanguagematters.com.

For more information, please visit http://www.yappn.com or contact:

David Lucatch, Founder and CEO
info@yappn.com

or

Jeanny So, VP, Corporate Communications
jeanny@yappn.com
T: 1.800.395.9943 FREE x 228

Forward Looking Information

Legal Notice and Safe Harbor Statement

This press release contains "forward-looking statements" within the meaning of Section 21E of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934. All statements, other than statements of historical fact, and those preceded by or that include the words "believes," "expects," "given," "targets," "intends," "anticipates," "plans," "projects," "forecasts" or similar expressions, are "forward-looking statements." Although Yappn Corp.'s management believes that such forward-looking statements are reasonable; it cannot guarantee that such expectations are, or will be, correct. These forward-looking statements involve a number of risks and uncertainties, which could cause the Company's future results to differ materially from those anticipated. Additional information regarding the factors that may cause actual results to differ materially from these forward-looking statements is available in the Company's filings with the SEC including the Current Reports on Form 8-K and each subsequently filed Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q and Annual Report on Form 10-K. The Company assumes no obligation to update any of the information contained or referenced in this press release.
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8 Reasons Why the Tokyo Olympics Will Be the Most Futuristic We've Ever Seen

In 1964, the last time Tokyo hosted the Summer Olympics, the nation revealed one of the biggest mic drops in transportation history: the debut of the shinkansen, the world-famous bullet train that became a Japanese icon. The first high-speed train in the world, it spurred similar technology to spread to Europe and other East Asian nations, paving the way for current maglev trains and, arguably, the Hyperloop.

Nations often introduce revolutionary new technology to the world at the Olympic Games. And the 2020 Tokyo Olympics will be incredible.

Tokyo is one of the most futuristic, complex, and sophisticated cities on Earth. It has the busiest train station in the world (Shinjuku station sees 3.64 million people pass through per day). It has the second most Fortune 500 companies in the world, the tallest tower in the world, and the busiest urban transport system in the world.

Emerging tech in Japan is going to change how we experience the Olympics in 2020, and could even change world.



Tokyo, the world’s largest metropolis. Image: Wikicommons

1. A Village of Robots

Japan is one of the most automated nations on Earth. The major robotics industries in the US, China, Korea, Germany, France, and other countries work with—and compete with—the robot builders in Japan. So naturally, we’ll see an army of robots swarming Japan during the event. Enough to populate a small village, which is exactly what the Olympics committee wants to do.

Last week, Asahi Shimbun reported that a government committee is launching a program to install robots around the city, in “an initiative toward a ‘universal future society’ where robots and information technologies that assist humans regardless of age, nationality or disabilities are commonplace.”

This “robot village” will be in Tokyo’s Odaiba neighborhood, which will also be home to the athletes’ Olympic Village. (It’s already home to a 60-foot Gundam statue.) But they will be far from the only robots in the capital for the Games. Here’s the idea: Many of the 920,000 foreigners expected to populate Tokyo per day during the Olympics can call for nearby robots to help with language translation, directions, or beckon for transportation—transportation that itself could be robotic, self-driving cars. From area hotels to shops to Tokyo’s Haneda International Airport, helpful, personal, polite robots will coexist along the millions of humans to carry their luggage, check them into their lodging, or drive them to sightsee at Tokyo Skytree.



The famous 60-foot tall Gundam statue in Tokyo’s Odaiba district, seen here in 2009. Odaiba will serve as location for the Olympic Village in 2020, which the government hopes to populate with helpful robots. Credit: AP

2. Instant Language Translation

The English skill level in Japan, compared to other advanced nations, is low. And while the number of foreigners learning to speak Japanese has skyrocketed in the last decade, there’re still significant language and cultural barriers that tourists run into. That’s why Japan is rolling out cutting-edge instant translation technology for 2020.

The country’s government-bankrolled National Institute of Information and Communications Technology offers VoiceTra, a real-time translation app that accommodates 27 languages for text translation, including Urdu and Bhutan’s Dzongkha. Voice translation is a bit harder; the agency says the app understands 90% of spoken content. It covers English, Japanese, Korean, and Chinese so far and is expected to accommodate over 10 languages by 2020. The software will be available on computers and phones and at tourist-dense spots like landmarks and shopping centers and for safety, hospitals.

Meanwhile in the private sector, Panasonic is making a palm-sized gadget worn around the neck that’ll translate Japanese into 10 languages for the thousands of visitors set to descend on the metropolis. The electronics giant also plans to provide visitors with a smartphone app that scans Japanese signs and translates them on the spot. These are services that could be useful in countries across the globe.



Small, handheld devices from companies like Panasonic will translate phrases to Japanese on the spot for foreign visitors in 2020. Image: itmedianews/YouTube

3. Self-Driving Taxis

We’ve previously reported on the Robot Taxi plans from DeNA, the Japanese gaming giant that’s planning to get driverless taxis on Tokyo’s roads by the 2020 Olympic Games. That’s a significant achievement when some of the biggest names in tech—Google, Apple, Uber —plus car manufacturers like BMW, Toyota, and Mercedes are all scrambling to be the first to get fully functioning autonomous vehicles on the road.

But Tokyo is the biggest, densest city on planet Earth: 13 million humans, 4,600 people per square mile. Plus during the Olympics, it’s estimated a whopping 920,000 foreigners will roam the megalopolis on any given day. If Japan gets driverless taxis on Tokyo streets in time for the Olympics, it’s going to be an insane test run.


In August, Japanese companies DeNA and ZMP unveiled the new iteration of their self-driving Robot Taxis, seen here. It’ll hopefully be in service by the Olympics. Credit: Robot Taxi

4. TV Broadcasts in Glorious 8K

Japanese state television broadcaster NHK plans to air the Olympic Games in tantalizingly detailed 8K high definition. Just like the color TV boom of the 1960s, Japanese companies are hoping to make the new, ultra-vivid image quality the de facto viewing on screens in Japan and beyond.

The made-in-Japan resolution, Japan Times reports, offers next-generation screen resolution: 7,680 by 4,320 pixels, or 16 times as many pixels as current HD. NHK has been at the definitive global forefront of 8K development, having started researching it way back in 1995. If anyone is bringing 8K to the world, it’s Japan, and it’ll be going gangbusters at the Olympics.

Next month, Japanese electronics company Sharp will start selling 8K TVs—at $125,000 a pop. Clearly, those 85-inch 8K displays aren’t meant for average consumers—for now. By 2020, NHK wants those TVs in consumer homes. Maybe demand will go up once viewers get HD viewing of their favorite sports: like baseball, surfing, or wushu, all contenders for new sports to be added to the Olympics schedule in 2020.



8K TV being demonstrated in Tokyo. Credit: Japan Times YouTube channel

5. Algae As a Fuel Source

We’ve written before about the benefits of using algae as a fuel source for jets and buses, and how Japan in particular is eyeing it as an attractive energy alternate for the nuclear-nervous Fukushima region. And big global names like Boeing backing the plans, which can lead to greater commercialization worldwide.

Algae has remarkable potential as an alternative energy source. It sucks in carbon dioxide and converts it into energy. It’s preferable to other green energies that are grown on land, like oil made from corn, because it can produce 60 times more oil per acre and is relatively easy to grow. What’s more, if you stick algae plants next to carbon-spewing coal plants, the algae can actually decrease the emissions level in the vicinity, all while cranking out useable power. The problem is that Algae’s super expensive—making a liter of the stuff costs about $2.50, and that cost needs to be closer to 80 cents to be a viable alternative.

But Boeing wants to help Japan fly Olympic tourists to the island nation on jets fueled by algae. As part of a consortium of over 40 organizations, including the University of Tokyo, the Japanese government, Japan Airlines, and All Nippon Airways, Boeing aims to offer algae flights on these major Japanese airlines for the millions of tourists expected to visit Japan in 2020. Which is good, since algae can cut carbon dioxide emissions by up to 70 percent, compared to petroleum fuels.

If Boeing and the others can prove that algae can be cost efficient, effective, and useful on a scale as large as the Olympics, we could start seeing a lot more international flights running on green.



Japan Airlines is working with Boeing, the University of Tokyo, and others to provide algae-fueled flights in time for the Tokyo Olympics. Credit: Shutterstock

6. Hydrogen-Powered Buses and Buildings

Speaking of power, Japan is rolling out another alternate energy that could be a global game-changer. It’s the most abundant element in the universe: hydrogen.

According to the Wall Street Journal, the Tokyo government plans to spend 40 billion yen ($330 million) in the next five years to improve hydrogen energy use leading up to the Olympics, making Japan a “Hydrogen Society.” When hydrogen gas mixes with oxygen in a fuel cell, it’s able to produce exhaust-free energy, just like water can.

The plan is to make the entire Olympic Village hydrogen-powered, complete with at least 100 fuel cell-powered buses, press lounges, and athlete dorms. The government also wants 6,000 of cell-powered cars in the road, AutoBlog reports, with 100,000 on streets by 2025. There’s even going to be a giant pipeline constructed underground that’ll directly funnel the hydrogen into the Olympic Village. It’s part of a bigger plan for Japan as a whole to gin up non-nuclear energy sources after the Fukushima disaster.

Fuel cells are becoming more popular worldwide, and the model of using them in Tokyo 2020 could be easily replicated elsewhere, so long as governments make it a priority: To promote better air quality, the Tokyo municipal government is going so far as to spend $385 million to subsidize purchases of Toyota’s new fuel-cell vehicles.



Toyota, the world’s largest auto manufacturer, debuted its hydrogen-powered fuel cell car last year, called Mirai (meaning “future”). The Japanese government wants fuel cell stations throughout Japan. Credit: AP

7. Artificial Meteor Light Shows

A Japanese astronomy startup called ALE, CNET, RocketNews24 and the Japan Times report, wants to shower streams of manmade meteors across the sky, which could make for the most badass opening ceremony ever.

ALE was launched by Lena Okajima, an astronomy professor. The idea is pretty out there—literally. The team is working with Japanese universities to design a cube-shaped microsatellite that’ll be launched into space and, in the world’s first project of its kind, shoot out tiny, inch-wide spheres made out of a secret material. Friction in the air will cause them to glow while racing at five miles per second. Space.com reports that there’s no worry for space junk, since the fake stars burn up upon reentry, like real space projectiles.

Okajima says their carefully guarded chemical makeup lets them glow as much as a magnitude-3 star, making them visible from even smoggy urban centers filled with light-polluting high-rises. She wants them to mimic asteroid shower patterns that are rare in nature.



Japanese astronomy startup ALE plans to create man-made meteors

Okajima says she’ll continue working with scientists and engineers at top Japan universities to make the pie-in-the-sky idea into an actual-in-the-sky show. The individual pellets’ makeup can be tinkered with so that individual stars shine different colors. Sounds like the show would be worth the estimated $4 million price tag. It’s also a valuable study tool: Since real asteroid showers are unpredictable and can’t be controlled, this system could allow scientists to study projectile movement and temperature while they fly through Earth’s atmosphere.

8. Even More Maglev Trains

Japan brought humankind high-speed rail with its shinkansen bullet trains 50 years ago, and now it’s eyeing next-gen rail travel: magnetic levitation. While some countries are arguably more advanced in this area—China’s operated a maglev in Shanghai for 11 years—Japan wants to bring the maglev to Tokyoites by 2020. JR Central, the railroad company that oversees Japan’s maglev train, hopes to have the train running to Tokyo in time for the 2020 Games, and then to Osaka by 2045.

Earlier this year, Japan broke a land speed record for rail with its maglev train at 374 miles per hour. The country’s looking to further develop its maglev system (the train’s not yet ridable for passengers), as well as expand to countries like the US, going so far as to bankroll half the cost for linking Boston to DC by maglev.



Japan’s looking to expand the network of its record-breaking maglev trains, which can hit nearly 400 mph, by 2020—both in Japan and in places like the US. Credit: Getty

Experimental, emerging technologies are always a challenge to bring to market—throw in the logistical nightmare that is the Olympic Games and there’s plenty of reason to be skeptical of how readily available these innovations will be by 2020. We’ve already covered the Tokyo Games’ two major hiccups: The botched billion-dollar stadium and the plagiarism drama that swirled around the Games’ official logo the entire summer. For a country known for perfectionism and attention to detail, the two very public, embarrassing flubs may make the ambitious plans for 2020 seem even more farfetched.

And yet there have been several incredible moments in Olympics history where the host nation actually debuted technologies that transformed the world. At the 1912 Olympics in Stockholm, electronic timepieces were used on a mass scale for the first time, to measure athlete performance. The event’s huge international crowd also prompted development of the world’s first PA system.

The 1936 Summer Games in Berlin took advantage of recent developments in camera and television technology, making them the sports event to be broadcast on TV. At the 2008 Beijing Olympics, an IBM supercomputer helped predict weather and pollution. And just last month, IBM announced continued plans to use Watson-grade AI to map pollution trends in the atmosphere in Beijing and beyond.

Considering Tokyo’s status as a tech hub, we could see some of the most badass engineering and technology to come out of an Olympics yet. If robots can provide great customer service during the Tokyo Olympics—a dense urban maze packed with millions of people in humankind’s biggest party—then they have a chance everywhere.

Contact the author at bryan@gizmodo.com, or follow him on Twitter.
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Shalyn Jooste's curator insight, September 30, 2015 4:33 AM

Something to look forward to. 

Hydrogen powered Busses, 400mph trains, Light shows and much more. Oh Yeah, Im Excited.

 

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Baidu Microsoft's default search engine in China

Chinese Internet giant Baidu Inc has struck a deal with Microsoft Corp to make Baidu.com the default home page and search engine for the US behemoth's Edge browser in China. [Photo / China Daily] 
Chinese Internet giant Baidu Inc has struck a deal with Microsoft Corp to make Baidu.com the default home page and search engine for the US behemoth's Edge browser in China, the companies announced in Seattle on Wednesday.

Baidu.com, which has more than 600 million active users, will in return bring its search, video, cloud, and map apps to Microsoft's Windows 10 software.

The partnership is set to make it easier for Baidu.com users to update to Windows 10 and help the US company gain more users for its new operating system.

Windows 10 is innovative, user-friendly and very promising in China, said Baidu's president Zhang Yaqin, adding that he was glad to partner with Microsoft and jointly make it easier and more effective to obtain Web information for customers while using and upgrading Windows 10.

The operating system was launched globally in July.

Microsoft said it isn't giving up on its own search engine, Bing, in China but with a negligible market share in the country it makes sense to play down Bing to promote its more popular Windows software, the Wall Street Journal quoted Danny Sullivan, founding editor of website Search Engine Land, as saying.

The newspaper cited the China Internet Network Information Center, saying more than 92 percent of Internet users in China have used Baidu for searching, while less than 2 percent use Bing.
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Microsoft announces partnership with China's largest search engine, Baidu

Microsoft has announced a new partnership with Chinese internet service company, Baidu in a deal which will see the platform serve as Windows’ default search engine in China.

Baidu is China’s most used search engine with over 600 million active users and will now become the default homepage and search for the Microsoft Edge browser in Windows 10 in the region.

Windows said the deal would “make it easy for Baidu customers to upgrade to Windows 10 and we will deliver a custom experience for customers in China, providing local browsing and search experiences2.

Following the agreement Microsoft will expect to see an increase in Windows 10 take up thanks to the new Windows 10 distribution channel, Baidu “Windows 10 Express”, which will make it easy for Chinese Internet users to download Windows 10.

In the official statement on the Window’s blog the tech giant confirmed its partnership with Bing would be unaffected by the new deal. The blog post said Windows remained “deeply committed to delivering Bing around the world and we’re also committed to offering locally relevant experiences – like Baidu in China – to provide great Windows 10 experiences”.

Baidu’s has been listed on Forbes list of the world’s most innovative companies four years running. It currently sites at number 11 and has a market value of $71.4bn.

The Baidu partnership is just one of many which Microsoft has made with Chinese companies and government institutions this year including as deal with electronics company, Xiaomi, that will see the firm use Microsoft’s Windows Azure.
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How to make Cortana search with Google instead of Bing in Windows 10

Windows 10's Cortana provides a great way to quickly launch a web search, but you may not appreciate that Microsoft’s digital assistant defaults to Bing—and there’s no built-in way to get Cortana to switch to Google instead.

The lack of multi-search engine integration makes a certain amount of sense since Cortana's cloud-based brains are powered by Bing. That works out fine for tracking flights, solving math problems, and telling you the weather. But when it comes to simply displaying search results, many people prefer Google to Microsoft’s search engine.

Fortunately, there are a few solutions that can redirect your Cortana web searches from Bing to Google.

The downside is these solutions only work with Chrome or Firefox. That means if Microsoft Edge, Opera, or Internet Explorer is your browser of choice you’ll have to make due with Bing or switch your default browser.

If you’re not big on Google, these solutions also work with other search engines, such as DuckDuckGo and Yahoo.
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Google to Help Hacked Websites Regain Good Standing in Search Results

The company has begun beta testing a tool that will automatically remove restrictions on hacked sites in some cases.


Google is working on improving the process by which administrators of hacked Websites can get their sites restored to good standing in search engine results.
The company on Sept. 23 announced that it has begun beta testing the automated removal, or reversal, of certain actions that it takes on Websites that are identified as being maliciously hacked.
Currently, Google takes two kinds of what it describes as "manual actions" on breached Websites: partial and site-wide. A partial manual action impacts just the URLs or portions of a Website that appear to contain maliciously hacked content, while a site-wide action impacts the entire site.
Sites that are hit with such manual actions typically show up in Google search engine results with a warning about being unsafe or compromised and often fall in search engine rankings as well.
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Google offers a reconsideration process through which Webmasters can ask for the manual actions to be lifted once the malicious content has been removed. Manual actions are usually lifted after Google reviews the reconsideration request and confirms that all malicious content has been removed from the hacked Website.

The process that Google is beta testing is designed to automatically lift any restrictions imposed on a site if the company's systems determine that a hacked site has been remediated. The automatic removal is available only for sites that have partial actions against them and even then only in "some cases," according to Google.
"We still recommend that you submit a reconsideration request if you see any manual actions," Josh Feira and Yuan Niu, two members of Google's Search Quality team, said in the blog post announcing the new feature. "But don't be surprised if a 'Hacked site' manual action disappears and saves you the trouble!"
Google said it actions to label a hacked Website as being compromised, or to limit its exposure in search engine results, are designed to prevent maliciously implanted code on a hacked Website from impacting others.
Malicious hackers compromise thousands of sites on a daily basis. Many of the intrusions are completely invisible to the site owners, Google notes in a primer for Webmasters on the topic. Such hacks pose a danger to anyone visiting the site and can result in malicious actions like keystroke logging, log-in credential theft and malware downloads. By warning others of the danger, Google says it is limiting damage while alerting Website owners of a compromise of their site.
Wednesday's announcement continues a string of actions that Google has taken over the last year or so to help sites deal with manual actions, Feira and Niu said.
For example, last year, the company introduced a new feature in the reconsideration process as a result of which Google now provides specific and detailed guidance on where Webmasters can find malicious content hosted on their site that they might have missed initially. So far this year, Google has sent such customized notes to some 70 percent of the Webmasters whose reconsideration requests were rejected by Google, Feira and Niu said.
Google also has an ongoing #NoHacked campaign, where it provides Website owners and administrators with help on how to bolster the security of their sites and how to detect malicious intrusions, the two researchers said.
 
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Baidu will be default Windows 10 search engine in China - Liliputing

When you use Windows 10 in the US, Europe, and most of the world, the default search engine for the Microsoft Edge web browser is Bing. But when Chinese users open the Edge browser for the first time, they’ll be able to use Baidu to search.

Microsoft has announced a partnership with the Chinese software and internet company to not only set Baidu as the default search engine, but also for Baidu to offer a series of Universal Windows apps for search, maps, and video services.



While a lot of people change the default search provider moments after opening a browser, this is a pretty big deal for a few reasons.

First, many people don’t bother to change the default search engine, and one of Microsoft’s key tools for competing with rival Google is to set its own search tools as the default. Ceding this to Baidu in China may help take a little bit of market share away from Google, but it doesn’t do much to help Microsoft increase the number of folks using Bing.

On the other hand, Baidu is huge in China, with hundreds of millions of active users. Setting Baidu as the default service could help users feel comfortable with Windows 10 from day one… and Microsoft may have decided it’s more important to get people using Windows 10 than it is to get them using Bing.



In fact, in the Chinese version of the announcement, Microsoft points out that Windows 10 is a free upgrade for Windows 7 and 8 users (which is true globally), and that the company has partnered with Baidu so that users that search for “Win10” and other related keywords will see links to a Baidu Upgrade Assistant that makes it easy to upgrade licensed copies of Windows 7 or later to Windows 10.
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Moray charity welcomes sign language bill

Moray charity welcomes sign language bill
A MORAY charity is welcoming a new sign language bill, which has been passed unanimously by the Scottish Parliament.

The British Sign Language (BSL) (Scotland) Bill will require public authorities in Scotland – including the NHS, Crown Office and Court Service – to support BSL users by providing interpreters and online translations.

The Scottish Government has also committed to developing an action plan to improve access to information using sign language. The bill, which it is said will help deaf people who use BSL as their first language, just needs royal assent before it comes law.

North East Sensory Services (NESS), which has offices in Elgin, Aberdeen and Dundee, said it supports people who are visually and/or hearing impaired, blind and/or deaf.

Chief executive Graham Findlay said NESS supports people with serious sight or hearing loss to overcome practical and emotional challenges and achieve independence.

"This is a historic moment for deaf people in Scotland," he said.

"For many people who were born deaf, BSL is their first language and primary means of communication. This bill will enable deaf people to access public services, including doctors and hospitals, in a way that has not been possible before.

"In particular, I am pleased for younger people who being given equal opportunities will feel more included in society.

"As a Scottish charity, we are delighted that the first BSL act has been passed in Scotland. Hopefully, the rest of the UK will see the advantages of including deaf people in society and will follow suit."
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AP PHOTOS: Catalans fly the flag in campaign on independence : News

In this Sunday, Sept. 20, 2015 photo, a sign language interpreter, right, translates as the leader of the radical left party CUP David Fernandez speaks, next to a picture of Spain's King Felipe VI, during a political meeting in Barcelona, Spain. Catalans vote Sunday in regional parliamentary elections that the breakaway camp hopes will give them a mandate to put their region on a path toward independence _ a goal the Madrid central government says would be illegal. (AP Photo/Emilio Morenatti)
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DIS Announces Expansion and Growth

SAN ANTONIO--(BUSINESS WIRE)--

Deaf Interpreter Services, Inc. (DIS), an organization specializing in sign language and oral interpretation, video remote interpreting (VRI), captioning/CART services and video production, announces its impressive growth over the last year, including opening a new south Texas regional office in Corpus Christi, adding 25 new team members and increasing its reach across the country. The company is continuing to expand with estimates to hire at least 15 more employees by the end of 2015.

"We have had a really fantastic year, and I’m looking forward to what’s to come from our great team in the future,” said Marilyn Weber, president and CEO, DIS. “Our new hires, studios and systems are all about bringing the best that we can to our clients. We want to provide the most cutting-edge and comprehensive offerings, while continuing our mission of being a supportive and strong part of the deaf community across the country.”

DIS opened their first location outside of the San Antonio headquarters in Corpus Christi in mid-2014. There are currently seven employees based there. In addition to providing interpreting services to the south Texas region, this location also houses a dedicated VRI center with impressive Internet speeds of over 100 Mbps, and assists with nationwide scheduling.

DIS brought on 25 new employees in the last year to keep up with the demand from more than 60 new clients from industries, including education, business, legal, medical and social services. In the past year, DIS has also opened three video production studios as a resource for businesses to further grow their impact and outreach to the deaf community.

“We have seen a strong expansion in our client base across the country in the last year,” continues Weber. “We are continuing to grow our team considerably in 2015 to keep up with demand.”

DIS remains committed to their initiatives in the deaf community through advocating, service coordinating and pro bono interpreting in special situations for deaf clients. The team continues to give back at events, including ‘AccessAbility Fest,’ San Antonio Independent Living Services (SAILS) ADA Celebrations, Alamo Community Association of the Deaf (ACAD), the MS Society, the UT Health Science Center – School of Nursing, and numerous educational fundraisers and galas. DIS has also offered law enforcement pro bono interpreting services for deaf and hard-of-hearing victims of human trafficking.

About DIS

Deaf Interpreter Services, Inc. (DIS) provides professional, nationally-certified sign language and oral interpreters, video remote interpreting (VRI) captioning/CART services, and video production. Since 1993, DIS has worked with thousands of clients enabling successful communication between persons who are deaf, hard-of-hearing, and hearing through the use of sign language, oral interpreting and captioning. Based in San Antonio, the woman-owned, HUB-certified company provides 24/7 services across the country.

The team at DIS has provided hundreds of thousands of hours of interpreting service. The company has won numerous industry awards, including the National Innovation Award from the Women Presidents Organization (WPO), Promoting Inclusion and Accessibility Award from the Americans with Disabilities (ADA) Celebration – San Antonio, Outstanding Philanthropic Small Corporation Award from the Association of Fundraising Professionals (AFP), and the finalist award for the San Antonio Ethics in Business from the City of San Antonio and the Ecumenical Center. Industries DIS serves include education, business, health care, legal, government agencies and nonprofits.

For more information, please visit www.deaf-interpreter.com and follow us on Twitter @DeafInterpSvc.


View source version on businesswire.com: http://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20150924005801/en/

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Leslie Silver, ext. 104
Leslie@anthonybarnum.com
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Sorenson Communications Announces Dayton Video Relay Service Interpreting Center

SALT LAKE CITY, UT--(Marketwired - Sep 24, 2015) - Today, Sorenson Communications®, the leading provider of Video Relay Service (VRS) for people who are deaf and use sign language to communicate, announced the opening of a new Sorenson Video Relay Service® (SVRS®) interpreting center in Dayton, Ohio. The new center will operate in conjunction with the 100-plus other Sorenson VRS interpreting centers in major cities throughout the U.S.
"Sorenson is committed to empowering the Deaf community to communicate in real time, in our native language -- American Sign Language (ASL)," notes Ron Burdett, Sorenson vice president of community relations. "Opening the Dayton SVRS interpreting center, which provides access to professional SVRS interpreters, is another way Sorenson shows its commitment to the Deaf community." 
SVRS, a service paid for by the U.S. government's Telecommunications Relay Service (TRS) fund, empowers deaf people who use ASL to conduct video relay calls with hearing people, 24/7, through a qualified ASL interpreter. Calls are placed using a videophone, a high-speed internet connection and a standard TV. Calls may also be placed through a mobile device, such as a smartphone with a front-facing camera or a computer. When a deaf caller places a VRS call to a hearing person, an ASL interpreter appears on the screen. The deaf caller signs to the interpreter, who is fluent in ASL and spoken English. The interpreter then speaks the message to the hearing recipient. The hearing caller responds and the interpreter signs the message back to the deaf person, thus "relaying" the conversation between them.
SVRS closely simulates a conversation between two hearing people, something the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) calls "functional equivalency." Title IV of the ADA mandates access to functionally-equivalent communications for deaf people. 
"Sorenson Communications is dedicated to providing the best-possible SVRS experience for deaf and hearing callers," notes Chris Wakeland, vice president of interpreting for Sorenson. "That means the new Dayton center and each Sorenson VRS interpreting center in the U.S. is staffed with the highest-quality interpreters -- professionals who are dedicated to providing excellent interpreting for every call."
About Sorenson Communications
Sorenson Communications® (www.sorenson.com) is a provider of industry-leading communications products and services for the deaf. The company's offerings include Sorenson Video Relay Service® (SVRS®), the highest-quality video interpreting service; the Sorenson ntouch® VP videophone, designed especially for use by deaf individuals; ntouch® PC, software that connects users to SVRS by using a PC and webcam; ntouch® for Mac®, software that connects users to SVRS by using an Apple® computer; ntouch® Tablet, which turns the Apple iPad® with a front-facing camera into a larger-screen mobile VP; and ntouch® Mobile, an application empowering SVRS communication via mobile devices.
Disclaimer
If you choose Sorenson as your default provider, you can port your existing 10-digit number to Sorenson from another provider or Sorenson can provide you with one for the geographic area where you live or work. If you later change your default provider, you can port your number to that provider. When selecting Sorenson, you must provide to Sorenson the physical address (i.e., the Registered Location) from which you are placing the call, so that Sorenson can properly route any 911 calls you may make. If you move or change your location, you must notify Sorenson immediately. You can update your Registered Location from your Sorenson videophone by calling 800-659-4810 FREE or by visiting www.svrs.com/moving. Sorenson will confirm receipt of your Registered Location information. Emergency calls made via internet-based TRS may not function the same as traditional E911 service. For example, you may not be able to dial 911 if there is an internet-service failure or if you lose electrical power, and your 911 call may not be routed correctly if you have not updated your Registered Location. For more information on the process of obtaining 10-digit numbers and the limitations and risks associated with using Sorenson's VRS to place a 911 call, please visit Sorenson's website: www.sorenson.com/disclaimer. For information on toll-free numbering, please visit www.svrs.com/tollfree.
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Deaf Interpreter Services Inc. eyes staff expansion in San Antonio - San Antonio Business Journal

Deaf Interpreter Services Inc. is seeing a rise in demand for its services from the business community and plans to grow its staff as a result.
DIS, a woman-owned business — which specializes in sign language and oral interpretation, video remote interpreting, captioning and video production, expects to hire at least 15 more employees by the end of 2015. DIS currently has 65 employees in its San Antonio office.

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Deaf Interpreter Services Inc. will add more employees at its San Antonio headquarters to… more

COURTESY OF DIS

“We have seen a strong expansion in our client base across the country in the last year,” said DIS President and CEO Marilyn Weber. “We are continuing to grow our team considerably in 2015 to keep up with demand.”
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Clients in the legal, medical, education, government and social service sectors are creating that demand, said Weber, who noted that DIS brought on 25 new employees in 2014 to help serve 60 new customers from those industries.
In the past year, DIS has also opened three video production studios as a resource for businesses to further grow their impact and outreach to the deaf community.
DIS also expanded outside its San Antonio base in 2014, opening a South Texas regional office in Corpus Christi with seven employees to increase its reach across the country. This location also houses a dedicated video remote interpreting center with Internet speeds of over 100 Mbps, and assists with nationwide scheduling.

Weber said that even with its growth, it will remain committed to its initiatives in the deaf community through advocating, service coordination and pro bono interpreting in special situations for deaf clients. DIS also has offered law enforcement pro bono interpreting services for deaf and hard-of-hearing victims of human trafficking.
Since its founding in 1993, DIS has worked with thousands of clients enabling successful communication between persons who are deaf, hard-of-hearing, and hearing through the use of sign language, oral interpreting and captioning.
“We have had a really fantastic year, and I’m looking forward to what’s to come from our great team in the future,” said Weber. “Our new hires, studios and systems are all about bringing the best that we can to our clients. We want to provide the most cutting-edge and comprehensive offerings, while continuing our mission of being a supportive and strong part of the deaf community across the country.”
Assists editor in managing the newsroom; handles some special publications
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UW-Milwaukee Shares Deaf Culture with the Community

Newswise — A nursing student who was fluent in American Sign Language, Brice Christianson spent a lot of time at Wisconsin’s Gundersen Lutheran Hospital as a phlebotomist working with deaf patients.
“I decided I enjoyed that interaction, and I really wanted to work with the deaf and hard of hearing rather than becoming a nurse,” said Christianson, who earned his bachelor’s in 2013 from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee’s Interpreter Training Program.
UWM is a center for educating students about deaf education and culture, with Wisconsin’s only four-year American Sign Language (ASL) program and the state’s only four-year bachelor’s degree that prepares students to become sign language interpreters. Both programs are part of the School of Education.
Christianson, whose parents are deaf, learned ASL while growing up in Appleton, Wisconsin. After graduating from UW-Milwaukee, he worked as a staff community interpreter for Professional Interpreting Enterprise before accepting a job in January as a staff sign language interpreter for the Department of Public Instruction’s WESP-DHH Outreach (Wisconsin Educational Services Program for the Deaf and Hard of Hearing).
He said he never regretted transferring from Western Technical College’s nursing program to UWM or changing majors from nursing to ASL/English Interpretation.
“I took a gamble, but it was the best decision of my life,” Christianson said.
“UWM gave me the perfect balance of refining my ASL and cultivating a commitment to the craft of sign language interpreting. Having teachers who were all fluent in ASL as well as leaders provided inspirational examples of being allies within the deaf community.”
The ASL program is growing, including many students who may not go into education but simply want to learn the language. Last year, more than 500 students enrolled, and there is always a waiting list for the basic ASL language courses, according to program co-coordinators Marika Kovacs-Houlihan and Erin Wiggins. Every fall, the university celebrates deaf culture with a Deaf Awareness Week featuring entertainment, mini-lessons in ASL storytelling, trivia and other events that allow the deaf and hearing communities to come together.
“ASL is one of the four most commonly used languages in the U.S.,” Kovacs-Houlihan said. “There is a high demand for people who are proficient in ASL.”
One exceptional feature of UWM’s programs is that all the instructors are native ASL users. “Students are immersed in it from the first day of class,” Wiggins said.
The program attracts students who study ASL as a foreign language, as well as those in health care, criminal justice and social work, who may find the language helpful.
The beauty of the language attracts others. “It’s very popular with artists and theater majors,” Kovacs-Houlihan said.
The number of deaf and hard-of-hearing students attending schools with their peers, rather than special schools, has increased the demand for trained interpreters, said Pam Conine, director of the Interpreter Training Program.
In addition, deaf and hard of hearing individuals are increasingly moving into professional and leadership positions, creating demand for interpreters. New technologies such as the Sorenson VRS – that allows deaf and hard-of-hearing people to talk to friends and colleagues through an interpreter online – also offer opportunities for interpreters.
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UAB - Student Media - SafeZone hosts peer training session for LGBT awareness

On Sep. 16, UAB’s SafeZone program hosted a peer training class called Safezone 101 for LGBT counseling and awareness.

SafeZone is a part of the Gender and Sexuality Diversity program and functions as a resource to the UAB community. The program consists of people who are trained to serve as a safe haven for LGBT-identifying students and staff. The SafeZone curriculum consists of three classes this semester: SafeZone 101, SafeZone 201 and Trans 101.

SafeZone 101, hosted in the Cahaba Room of the new freshman residence hall was an introduction to the terminology involved, and it took a close look at the nature of coming out, what it entails for individuals and what it means to be SafeZone certified. SafeZone 201 will take place on Oct. 21 and will be an exploration of identities, “systematic privilege, oppression and social justice,” according to the SafeZone website. Trans 101 will take place on Nov. 18 and will be an introduction to an “in-depth understanding of Trans identities and issues Trans people face on campus.”

“The goal is to make the campus safer for LGBT students, to give them support and to encourage them to be more out with themselves,” said Isaac Jones, a peer educator with the program. “We have certain events that happen on campus that you can find through Bsync. We have Out Week that’s coming up in October, which is a whole week of LGBT-themed events.”

There were about 18 people present at the class, including the three peer educators, and undergraduate and graduate students, alumni and teachers.

The discussion covered the concepts of sex, gender and sexuality. There was also an exercise focused on the intricacies and challenges that are involved with coming out, and how it can affect an individual’s life. The program also featured scenarios where the individuals explored how they could use the knowledge gained in the class and the resources they learned about to benefit the parties involved. Afterward, there was a question-and-answer session between the peer educators and the trainees.

“It helps educate people who are not LGBT in how to talk to those people and how to make them feel safer,” Breezy Ivey, a student present at the class said about the SafeZone program. “In general, being LGBT is still not safe no matter how many strides we make towards it, but it’s getting here and programs like this help.”
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Clayton Hunt: Why Should Libertarians Care about Terminology?

The first thing in any argument that must be done before any actual attempts to reason with another individual is a defining of terminology that is to be used in an argument — that’s basic debate tactics. How can anyone have a rational discussion with another person if the two or more sides are using the same terms, but are talking about completely different topics? The problem is that, especially in the weaker libertarian spheres, the types of people that are transitioning to or are marginally libertarian, defining terms seems to be forbidden.

If there is an attempt to develop a concrete definition of what a libertarian is, or what a libertarian believes, that person is often labeled a purist or exclusionary for limiting what is, or can be properly called, a libertarian. There’s the Emo Phillips joke about Christian sectarianism, just with Baptist replaced with libertarian, but it really doesn’t fit the situation. Take for example, if I, a devout Pastafarian minister, were to start calling myself a Jehovah’s Witness. In this example, I don’t change my beliefs, or the expression of them to others, who might inquire as to what they are, but I just call myself a Jehovah’s Witness, nonetheless. If someone asks me, “What do Jehovah’s Witnesses believe?” I could start going on about a beer volcano, a stripper factory, and a giant floating ball of spaghetti and meatballs, then if this person encounters another actual Jehovah’s Witness and they give a totally different account, that person will likely feel that the whole religion is inconsistent and dishonest. They might think I’m a liar, or that the second person is a liar, and denounce the whole kit and caboodle.

Can you imagine how frustrating the job of the second person must be? They’re trying to win converts to their chosen ideology with potential members coming in with an idea that is wildly different than what it really is. The same is true for libertarians that are trying to convince people to accept libertarianism. It’s easier to reach people who have no idea, but are curious, than those who have some idea, but the idea that they have is completely false.

Believe me, this is by design. Often the marginally libertarian, or transitional libertarians, are not quite sold on the whole scope of the ideology themselves, and they feel that any attempt to define it will kick them out, and make them go back to their previous ideology — usually conservatism — with their tails between their legs. The crisis this is causing is wider than a few people hanging onto the fringe of what it means to be a libertarian. News media is picking up on the growing segment of libertarians in society, and sprinkling the term in where it shouldn’t be. There will references to Rand Paul, Ted Cruz, Paul Ryan, and the Tea Party — none of which are actually libertarian, but have been labeled as such in an attempt to obfuscate what a libertarian actually is. Again, this is by design. All of these groups represent a dying segment of the U.S. political sphere, and the tying in of libertarians is an attempt to stymie the amazing growth of what was once, itself, considered a dying ideology.

So I’ll leave you with my definition of what a libertarian is, and I bet it’ll surprise a few in how broad it really is:
Libertarian; an individual that consistently opposes the initiation of force to achieve social or economic goals, ranging from classical liberals, to anarchists.

Clayton Hunt is a Houston, Texas Libertarian Party activist and voluntaryist Clayton Hunt at libertariangaming.org
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Caught in translation: Live insights from the French debate

Caught in translation: Live insights from the French debate
By iPolitics | Sep 24, 2015 7:53 pm |
Tom Mulcair is clearly the marked man in tonight’s French language debate, but each leader heads into the contest with their own set of strategic considerations.

For Gilles Duceppe, it’s about his party’s survival an votes in the only arena it’s contesting: Quebec. Stephen Harper, meanwhile, has to stare down the possibility of a minority rule surviving on Bloc support — Mulcair and Justin Trudeau having recently ruled out any possibility of backing the Conservatives. Trudeau, for his part, might have the most to gain. Growing Liberal fortunes in Ontario makes a government based on seats in Canada’s two largest provinces an obvious goal. Then there’s Elizabeth May, who faces a tough election in which Canadian progressives are looking for somewhere to coalesce against the Conservatives.
If you needed reminding, a recent Bloc ad featuring an animated pipeline pouring out a viscous niqab proved once again that the political landscape often has different contours in Quebec. To help make sense of the debate, follow along with iPolitics reporters in the live Twitter feed on this page.
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