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Metaglossia: The Translation World
News about translation, interpreting, intercultural communication, terminology and lexicography - as it happens
Curated by Charles Tiayon
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How infants learn new languages?

An early social behaviour called gaze shifting is linked to infants' ability to learn sounds of new languages, says a new study.




Gaze shifting, when a baby makes eye contact and then looks at the same object that the other person is looking at, is one of the earliest social skills that babies show.

"Our study provides evidence that infants' social skills play a role in cracking the code of the new language," said co-author Patricia Kuhl from the Institute for Learning and Brain Sciences (I-LABS), University of Washington.

Babies about 10 months old who engaged in more gaze shifting during sessions with a foreign language tutor showed a boost in brain response that indicates language learning.

For the study, babies from English speaking households attended foreign language tutoring sessions. Over four weeks, the 17 infants interacted with a tutor during 12 sessions of 25 minutes each.

The tutors read books and talked and played with toys while speaking in Spanish. The more gaze shifting the babies participated in during their tutoring sessions, the greater their brain responses were to the Spanish language sounds.

"We found that the degree to which infants visually tracked the tutors and the toys they held was linked to brain measures of infant learning, showing that social behaviours give helpful information to babies in a complex natural language learning situation," Kuhl said in Developmental Neuropsychology.

"Our findings show that young babies' social engagement contributes to their own language learning - they're not just passive listeners of language," said co-author Rechele Brooks, assistant professor at I-LABS.

"Babies learn best from people. During playtime your child is learning so much from you. Spending time with your child matters. Keeping them engaged -- that's what helps them learn language," Brooks said.
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Hasidic Teenager’s Poem Goes Viral, Already Being Translated Into Several Languages |

One young Hasidic teenager’s poem, which went viral after it was posted online, seems to be offering hope to people throughout the world.

According to JTA, the poem “Worst Day Ever?” by 11th grader Chanie Gorkin was first posted last year on the Poetry Nation website, which she is a member of, after she created it for a class project.

It was published in a collection of poems titled “Beyond the Sea: Odyssey” and put the Crown Heights resident in the semifinals of the website’s July to December 2014 contest.



A copy of the poem, about a day in Gorkin’s life, was hung last week on a grocery store bulletin board, photographed and posted online. It was shared and liked thousands of times on social media, according to Poetry Nation.

When the poem is initially read it appears she had a bad day, but once we reach the bottom it prompts us to read it backwards. Gorkin successfully uses her clever writing style to almost immediately change the mood you had moments ago into a more positive outlook.

Although Gorkin is at camp, without access to modern technology and has yet to find out about the popularity her poem has gained, she is unknowingly providing a glimmer of hope to people from various countries. It reportedly has been translated into several languages, including Hebrew, Chinese and Russian.

Dena Gorkin, the teenager’s mother, said she was “glad that it’s having a positive effect on people.”

“I think Chanie’s poem has become popular because there’s a lot of darkness in this world, and something uplifting like this really resonates,” Gorkin was quoted as saying by Chabad.org. “Words from the heart enter the heart. I think Chanie’s sincerity was felt through her words.”

Worst Day Ever?

Today was the absolute worst day ever
And don’t try to convince me that
There’s something good in every day
Because, when you take a closer look,
This world is a pretty evil place.
Even if
Some goodness does shine through once in a while
Satisfaction and happiness don’t last.
And it’s not true that
It’s all in the mind and heart
Because
True happiness can be attained
Only if one’s surroundings are good
It’s not true that good exists
I’m sure you can agree that
The reality
Creates
My attitude
It’s all beyond my control
And you’ll never in a million years hear me say

Today was a very good day

Now read it from bottom to top, the other way,
And see what I really feel about my day.
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Origin and Development of Indian Languages - The Hans India

Ever since human beings have invented scripts, writing has reflected the culture, lifestyle, society and the polity of contemporary society. In the process, each culture evolved its own language and created a huge literary base. This literary base of a civilisation tells us about the evolution of each of its languages and culture through the span of centuries. 

Role of Sanskrit

Sanskrit is the mother of many Indian languages. The Vedas, Upanishads, Puranas and Dharmasutras are all written in Sanskrit. There is also a variety of secular and regional literature. By reading about the languages and literature created in the past, we shall be able to understand our civilization better and appreciate the diversity and richness of our culture. 



All this was possible because of the language that developed during that time. Sanskrit is the most ancient language of our country. It is one of the twenty-two languages listed in the Indian Constitution .The literature in Sanskrit is vast, beginning with the most ancient thought embodied in the Rig Veda, the oldest literary heritage of mankind, and the Zend Avesta. 



It was Sanskrit that gave impetus to the study of linguistics scientifically during the eighteenth century. The great grammarian Panini, analysed Sanskrit and its word formation in his unrivalled descriptive grammar Ashtadhyayi. The Buddhist Sanskrit literature includes the rich literature of the Mahayana school and the Hinayana school also. 



The most important work of the Hinayana school is the Mahavastu which is a storehouse of stories. While the Lalitavistara is the most sacred Mahayana text which supplied literary material for the Buddhacarita of Asvaghosa. Sanskrit is perhaps the only language that transcended the barriers of regions and boundaries. 



From the north to the south and the east to the west there is no part of India that has not contributed to or been affected by this language. Kalhan’s Rajatarangini gives a detailed account of the kings of Kashmir whereas with Jonaraja we share the glory of Prithviraj. The writings of Kalidasa have added beauty to the storehouse of Sanskrit writings.



Other great literacy works, which marked the golden era of Indian literature include ‘Abhijanam Shakuntalam’ and ‘Meghdoot’ by Kalidasa, ‘Mricchakatika’ by Shudraka, ‘Swapna Vasavadattam’ by Bhasa, and ‘Ratnavali’ by Sri Harsha. Some other famous works are Chanakya’s ‘Arthashastra’ and Vatsyayana’s “Kamasutra’

 

Vedas

The Vedas are the earliest known literature in India. The Vedas were written in Sanskrit and were handed down orally from one generation to the other. Do you know that preservation of the Vedas till today is one of our most remarkable achievements. To be able to keep such a literary wealth as the Vedas intact when the art of writing was not there and there was a paucity of writing material is unprecedented in world history. The word ‘Veda’ literally means knowledge. 



In Hindu culture, Vedas are considered as eternal and divine revelations. They treat the whole world as one human family Vasudev Kutumbakam. There are four Vedas, namely, the- Rig Veda, Yajur Veda, Sama Veda and Atharva Veda. Each Veda consists of the Brahmanas, the Upanishads and the Aranyakas. The Rig Veda, Sama Veda and the Yajur Veda are collectively known an Traji. In later years the Atharava Veda was incorporated in this group.



Rig Veda

The Rig Veda is the earliest of the Vedas. It is a collection of 1028 hymns in Vedic Sanskrit. Many of these are beautiful descriptions of nature. The prayers are largely for seeking worldly prosperity. It is believed that these recitations are the natural outpouring of Vedic rishis experiencing a mentally transcendental stage. 



Some of the well-known rishis are Vasistha, Gautama, Gritasamada, Vamadeva, Vishvamitra and Atri. The prominent gods of the Rig Veda are Indra, Agni, Varun, Rudra, Aditya, Vayu, Aditi and the Ashwini twins. Some of the prominent goddesses are Usha - the goddess of dawn, Vak - the goddess of speech and Prithvi - the goddess of earth. 



Do you know that most of the hymns spoke of universally recognised higher values of life such as truthfulness, honesty, dedication, sacrifice, politeness and culture. The prayers are for seeking worldly prosperity and for the development of a highly cultured society. Along with religion Rig Veda provides us knowledge about social, political and economic condition of ancient India.



Yajur Veda 

Yajur means sacrifice or worship. This Veda is concerned mostly with rites and mantras of different sacrifices. It gives directions for the performance of the yajnas. It has both poetic and prose renderings. Being a treatise on rituals, it is the most popular of the four Vedas. There are two major branches of Yajur Veda, namely Shukla and Krishna Yajur Veda i.e. Vajasaneyi Samhita and Taitriya Samhita. 



Sama Veda 

Sama means melody or songs. This Veda consists of 16,000 ragas and raginis or musical notes. Out of total 1875 verses only 75 are original and others are from the Rig Veda. The Sama Veda prescribes the tunes for the recitation of the hymns of the Rig Veda. It may be called the book of Chants (Saman). This book is an evidence of the development of Indian music during this period.



Atharva Veda 

The Atharva Veda is also known as the Brahma Veda. It contains treatment for ninety-nine diseases. The source of this Veda is traced to two rishis called Atharvah and Angiras. The Atharva Veda is of immense value as it represents the religious ideas at an early period of civilisation. It has two branches, the Paippalada and the Saunaka. 



This book gives detailed information about the family, social and political life of later Vedic period. In order to understand the Vedas, it is necessary to learn the Vedangas or the limbs of the Vedas. These supplements of the Vedas provide education (siksha), grammar (vyakarana), ritual (kalpa), etymology (nirukta), metrics (chhanda) and astronomy (Jyotisha). A good deal of literature grew around these subjects. 



It was written in the form of precepts in the sutra style. A precept was called sutra because of its brevity. The most famous example of this is Panini’s grammar, Ashtadhyayi, which illustrates the rules of grammar and also throws light on society, economy and culture of those times.



Brahmanas and Aranyakas 

After the four Vedas, a number of works called the Brahmanas were developed. These books gave a detailed explanation of Vedic rituals and instructions and deal with the science of sacrifice. The latter portions of the Brahmanas were called the Aranyakas while the final parts of the Aranyakas are philosophic books named Upanishads which belong to the later stage of the Brahmana literature. Each of the four Vedas have their own Brahmana books. 



Rig Veda had Kaushitaki and Aitreya. Taitteriya belongs to Krishna Yajur Veda and Shatpath belongs to Shukla Yajur Veda. Tandav, Panchvish and Jaimaniya belongs to Atharva Veda. It is through them that we get a detailed information of the social, political and religious life of the people. The Arayankas deal with soul, birth and death and life beyond it. These were studied and taught by men in Vanprastha i.e. Munis and the inhabitants living inside the forests. 
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The power of translation (National Science Foundation)

The power of translation (National Science Foundation)

Date: 
27 July, 2015
Credit: 
National Science Foundation
Category: 
Audiology
Communication Health Assistants
Students
For the Public
An American organization has partnered with the U.S. Agency for International Development to take sign language translation software to Morocco. The Institute for Disabilities Research and Training Inc. previously developed software to translate between English and American Sign Language. The technology for Morocco can translate Standard Arabic into Moroccan Sign Language in real time. It also has games and quizzes for students.
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Learn 40 Aboriginal Hand Signs Used to Communicate Across Western Australia’s Desert · Global Voices

With its rough terrain and harsh climate, the Great Sandy Desert in Western Australia can be a challenging place to live. For those carving out a life in this sparsely populated region, the vast distances of Australia's second largest desert can also prove to be challenging for those wanting to communicate with neighbors.


Balgo, Western Australia
Hand signs have traditionally served as a way of communicating for the Aboriginal peoples who have been on this land for centuries, long before the arrival of mobile and digital technologies.
To recognize this practical means of communication, local producer Willi Lempert partnered with a group of enthusiastic Aboriginal women elders from the community of Balgo. Together, they created a video that told the story of 40 hand signs.

Lempert had been working in the area when the idea for an explanatory video came up. He explained the importance of these hand signs:

While many visitors quickly learn the standard “what now?” sign, it is easy to miss the dozens of diverse hand signals being subtly exchanged in conversation. As in all languages, some elements are traditional and others are recent innovations… hand signs are not only a way of communicating information, but also serve as full-bodied ways of expressing nuance, humor, and individual personality.
The video, which is part of the “Mother Tongue” project organized by ABC Open and First Languages Australia, also serves to promote the local language of Kukatja, a vulnerable language with less than 1,000 current speakers. In the video, for each hand sign that the women demonstrate there is the corresponding word in Kukatja along with its English-language translation.

Lamprey wrote about how much fun he and the women had during the making of the video in a blog post.

The women elders, such as Payi Payi and Manaya who are featured in the video, play a central role in the life of the community. As members of the Kapululangu Women’s Law and Culture Centre, they are instrumental in determining the way forward for the community. The website for the centre states, “Nothing that happens at Kapululangu can happen without the Elders.”

Kapululangu’s Elders were born in the desert, and grew up and were trained in the Old Ways before the arrival of Kartiya/non-Indigenous people in their ancestral countries. This makes them custodians of an immense wealth of stories,skills and cultural knowledge. They want to share this wealth […] The Elders want their young people to grow up strong and resilient, proud of and knowledgeable in the ways of their people, secure in their peoples’ Law and Culture knowledge, so that they can better cope with the changing world.   A peoples’ own Law and Culture is the glue that holds life together.
By teaming up with local producers committed to helping them tell their own story in their own language, they are ensuring that this wealth of knowledge is shared with the next generation.
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Northern Colorado medical groups work to bridge language barriers in health care | GreeleyTribune.com

The barriers between patient and doctor often go beyond just language. Marcia Carteret, the director of intercultural communications for Dimensions of Culture, part of the nonprofit Colorado Children’s Healthcare Access Program, said there’s a triple-threat healthcare providers face. Language, cultural norms and low health literacy can all be obstacles to connecting with patients, which leads to disparities in health between different ethnic groups.

“The need is already tremendous,” Carteret said. “We’re sort of already in catch-up mode on a lot of this.”

Dimensions of Culture goes into practices which are part of the CCHAP network and help on-site training for cultural and communication sensitivity. These trainings go all the way up the chain of command from the first person a patient speaks to in the lobby to the head of the medical practice.

The cultural barriers that crop up can be anything from the perception of gender roles to respect for positions of authority. For examples, some cultures view doctors as authority figures and don’t want to ask many questions for fear of being disrespectful. In some cultures, it would be inappropriate for a male doctor to shake a female patient’s hand. In many cultures, mental health is very taboo, so a referral to a specialist could cause distress.

Oftentimes, because of both language barriers and cultural stigmas, people don’t ask questions at the doctor’s office, which Carteret said is the single most important behavior to change.

It’s important for medical facilities to start making adjustments now and to incorporate more cultural sensitivity training to catch up to the changing demographics in Colorado, she said.

“If we don’t make some pretty significant strides, give us 15 years, the problem is only going to become more and more significant,” she said.

As a Somali interpreter at Sunrise Community Health, it’s up to Kuresha Noor to make sure patients can talk to their doctors. When they can’t, bad things happen. Noor remembers one patient in particular, a Somali woman who dropped a television on her foot.

The woman went to an emergency room. None of the staff at the hospital spoke Somali, and a translator wasn’t available. Her 6-year-old son tried to interpret for her but couldn’t. When trying to say his mother was allergic to penicillin, the child said his mom couldn’t have any medicine. She left the hospital that day with no treatment.

By the time she hobbled through Sunrise’s doors, her entire foot and calf were horribly swollen, and she was screaming in pain. Noor said the woman had cellulitis, a skin infection that can be life threatening.

With a growing refugee population as well as a large Spanish-speaking community in Greeley, area medical providers are pressed now more than ever to bridge language barriers. Even patients who speak some English may need help, as medical terminology and instructions for care are too important to leave up for interpretation.

“It can be a scary situation for anybody,” said Jonathan Salazar, interpreter coordinator for Poudre Valley Hospital in Fort Collins and oncology line.

Salazar, who has interpreted for his Spanish-speaking parents his entire life, knows how important it is to be understood. Without help, non-English speaking patients can leave doctor appointments without getting questions answered, without understanding treatment options or even with the wrong diagnosis.

Having Spanish-speaking interpreters ready to help anywhere from the reception desk to the operation room is important for UC Health, he said. Salazar works with oncology patients from across northern Colorado and said having in-person translators offers patients comfort in upsetting situations. He spends time with patients in routine appointments and chemotherapy treatments.

There are six interpreters on staff at the Poudre Valley Campus in Fort Collins and two at Medical Center of the Rockies, and UC Health contracts with an outside company for interpreters in different languages, including American Sign Language. There’s a huge community need for translation services, he said, explaining that some months, Poudre Valley Hospital will have more than 200 separate appointments with Spanish-speaking patients.

When a staff member isn’t available, UC Health’s hospitals use a telephone interpretation service, which offers more than 200 languages.

Banner Health also uses the telephone service and offers on-site translation whenever possible. Judy Taylor, director of supply chain management at North Colorado Medical Center, said last year an average of 20 different languages were spoken at the hospital, including multiple dialects of Burmese, another growing Greeley population.

North Colorado Medical Center employs three full-time Spanish medical interpreters, as well as one in the maternity ward and another on call.

“We do it because it’s the right thing to do,” Taylor said. “If we’re anywhere, we want to get good medical care, so we want to make sure all of our patients, whether they’re limited English proficient or not, get the best care possible.”

Banner Health also uses a Skype-like program on a laptop that connects the patient and the physician to a face-to-face interpretation service.

At Kaiser Permanente Colorado’s Greeley Medical Offices, pediatrician Amanda Hill uses a similar technology to help communicate with patients and their families.

Because Hill treats mostly children, having an interpretation service has helped eliminate the need for children to have to relay information about their care to their parents. Instead, now the parents can effectively communicate with the doctor about their child’s health.

“I can tell just with my visits that it’s vastly superior to using the phone,” Hill said. “I think that in our whole clinic, we’re probably using the iPad every day for something.”

Pam Strahan, registered nurse and nurse manager for the northern Colorado Kaiser clinics, was instrumental in getting the face-to-face program to the Greeley location. One of the biggest advantages is the patient can take the iPad with them every step of the appointment, from check-in to pharmacy.

“It’s not just connecting to a patient,” Strahan said. “We have to connect to the person and make sure we’re meeting their needs.”

North Range Behavioral Health, Greeley’s primary behavioral and mental health provider, tries to keep a multilingual staff that can communicate with as many different people as possible. Michael Gallegos, North Range program director of quality assurance, said the need for high-quality interpretive services is still greater than they can provide in-house, so they often use a language telephone service.

At Sunrise Community Health, where Noor helps Somali and Swahili patients, 42 percent of the clinicians are at least bilingual, with the majority speaking Spanish. The population they serve is 59 percent Latino, so it’s important to be able to offer them care in their native language, said Mitzi Moran, CEO of Sunrise.

“We try very hard to provide care in the language the patient is most comfortable in,” she said. Moran used to work as a Spanish interpreter, but even at her most fluent, she wouldn’t have been comfortable with receiving health care in any language but English. As a mother who had to provide health care for her children, she said she couldn’t imagine not knowing how to communicate with doctors and nurses.

Forty percent of Sunrise’s patients speak a language other than English, so translation services like those provided by Noor and an interpreter who speaks Burmese are vital, Moran said.

Martha Montes Sotelo is being treated for colon cancer at UC Health’s Cancer Care and Hematology. When she comes in for chemotherapy and other treatments, an interpreter stays with her through the appointment. One of those interpretors is Malissa Nava, manager of office operations in Loveland and Greeley who helps with translation when possible.

Before Montes Sotelo began chemo, she was afraid. She didn’t know what to expect, but she didn’t expect the attention and caring treatment she received.

Her nurse, Nicole Rivers, tried to speak as much conversational Spanish as she could during the appointment and was answered each time with a wide smile from the small 65-year-old woman. Despite being scared during her first week in chemotherapy, Montes Sotelo said the care she was receiving was very beneficial.

“Everything has been really good for me,” Montes Sotelo said in her native Spanish, smiling widely as Nava interpreted.
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Translation and Interpreting Firm Global Language Solutions Ranked Among the World's Largest Language Services Providers - Press Release - Digital Journal

Professional translation and interpreting company Global Language Solutions (GLS) announced today its official ranking as one of the world's largest 100 language services providers (LSPs) in the industry. Issued July 2015 by independent market research firm, Common Sense Advisory, the report titled "The Language Services Market: 2015" ranked GLS as the 46th top-grossing language service provider in the US$38.16 billion global market for outsourced language services and technology, moving up from the 55th spot in last year’s list. GLS was also named as the 11th largest translation agency in all of North America and is the largest in Orange County, CA.

CSA Research, which has published market size estimates and global rankings for the past 10 years, found that the demand for language services continues, and is growing at an annual rate of 6.46%. As part of the study, the firm surveyed language service providers to collect actual reported revenue for 2013, 2014, and expected revenue for 2015.

“The market for outsourced language services and supporting technology is immensely important to the organizations and individuals that produce or consume information,” comments founder of CSA Research Don DePalma. “We predict that the industry will continue to grow and that the market will increase to US$49.8 billion by 2019.”

GLS is a full-service ISO 9001:2008 and ISO 17100 certified translation and interpreting company delivering solutions in over 100 languages since 1994. This is the fifth consecutive year it has been recognized as a top LSP by CSA Research.

Adds Olga Smirnova, CEO of GLS, "This year we moved up the rankings by several spots on both the global and North American lists. We are proud to celebrate another year as the top performing LSP in Orange County, CA, along with many other recent local and global accolades. We would not be able to achieve these milestones without the hard work and dedication of the entire GLS team."

About Global Language Solutions

Global Language Solutions (GLS) is a full-service ISO 9001:2008 and EN 15038:2006 certified translation and interpreting firm specializing in over 100 languages. GLS provides culturally and linguistically accurate document translations, website localization, multilingual typesetting/graphic design, and translation project management. The company's clients include leaders in the financial, legal, life sciences, healthcare, manufacturing, and technology industries. GLS is a WBENC-certified Women's Business Enterprise (WBE). For more information, visit www.globallanguages.com. Follow GLS on twitter at http://www.twitter.com/OneStopGlobal.

About Common Sense Advisory

Common Sense Advisory is an independent market research company specializing in translation, localization, interpreting, globalization, and internationalization analysis and consulting. www.commonsenseadvisory.com / @CSA_Research

Company 517303 Newsroom

Original Source: http://www.newswire.com/press-release/translation-and-interpreting-firm-global-language-solutions
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Relative value: Jumping between the ships of language - Mumbai Mirror -

Translating Anant Samant's Aiwa Maru, Prashant Pethe accessed a world that was familiar and daunting.

It's hamaali work," says Marathi novelist Anant Samant impatiently. His award-winning novel, M.T. Aiwa Maru (1989), a brooding, cryptic account of a voyage gone terribly wrong, has just been translated into English and released by Penguin Random House. Samant is full of respect for his translator Prashant Pethe. "Translation is hard," he says vehemently. "It's easier to write one's own book."

It's those words on the page that yoke an author and translator together; rather, decisions about words, scenes, characters start to match the extent of attentiveness one lavishes on the other's offspring. And it is a difficult enterprise when the book, "is like the sea being poured out on to paper," as Anant's mother had said. It was Anant's way of venting his idealism and frustration at the wrongdoing and corruption taking place around him — on land and sea. Born in 1952, he had grown up on stories of his freedom fighter mother going to jail with Sarojini Naidu, even as the family kept moving from place to place whenever his father, an upright police officer, would get transferred for exposing the venality within the workforce and outside. Anant did not intend the book to be published at all when he wrote it in 1983. With a friend's active prodding, the novel finally saw the light of day in 1989 and went on to win many awards.

Prashant Pethe, a seaman too, had read the book as a youth when his uncle had introduced him to the novel and its graphic description of a mariner's hardships to dissuade him from going out to sea. That had a completely opposite effect! Maybe they were just meant to meet. In 2011, two decades after he had first read the novel, Prashant felt impelled to revisit and translate it. He had produced two Marathi films, Valu (2008) and Gabhricha Paus (2009). He had also worked on the subtitles for Gabhricha Paus and Umesh Kulkarni's Deool (2011). This, he found, was a good precursor to translation. He contacted Anant that same year.

"Of a text, the critic is only the fleeting wooer, the author is father and husband, while the translator is the lover," Italian writer, poet and aphorist G Bufalino has said. Here now was a text that made many demands on Prashant — and not only on his linguistic skills.

Anant and he were both shippies and recreating the complex claustrophobia of ship dynamics came easily to him. They shared a similar middle-class Maharashtrian background too and did not actively cultivate the literary circuit. The book, though, would test the translator's maturity and sense of restraint in choosing to leave things unsaid the way the author had done, while also staying true to a narrative that is both racy, edge-of-the-seat thriller and a fiery social comment. A lover's job is clearly not an easy one. Anant had earlier seen two attempts at translating M.T. Aiwa Maru fail.

The title is Japanese for a ship (maru) that signifies "the life that is born when love and eternity come together (aiwa)". This sounds abstract when he says it, but Anant, author of nine novels and four short story collections, (Aiwa Maru being his debut outing), became popular because of 'their unknown worlds', as also their intriguing titles. One of them, Oshtoris, is about the art of photography, while Mitwa has Nature as the main character. Trima Kasi Madam, which is 'Thank You' in Indonesian, recounts his experiences as a chief steward on a ship.

His love of travel led Anant to join a Hong Kong-based American shipping company as first steward after completing his degree in hotel management in 1973. He sailed until 1980, a time that yielded an ocean of incidents and observations. Aiwa Maru is a story that captures a slice of a mariner's life in all its rawness and physicality: there is an accidental death, a near collision, humiliation that characters inflict on one another wantonly. "Everyone becomes a pawn in a plot that Aiwa Maru devises, and their fate is sealed," points out Anant.

The narrative, which unfolds in diary format, akin to a ship's logbook, does so through dialogue that is bursting with expletives, "as these are sailors talking, not corporates," Prashant says. "I could identify with Anant and the experiences that befell him and the others, for even though ships were sturdier in my time, and there was better management, a seaman's vulnerability to nature does not change," he adds.

"But I had to rein him in when he was on the portions that dealt with the collision or with violence. He was explaining too much," Anant says. Prashant agrees he tended to do this, but appreciates that Anant never interfered unless he sought his help for a clarification. "He used to say to me, 'The Marathi is mine, the English version is yours'." Prashant, who works on an oil rig, wants to make a movie out of the novel and return to movie production full time.

What also binds them in a symbiotic way is another piece of irony. "I was a cadet on Aiwa Maru once. Prashant is now doing his 'cadetship' on Aiwa Maru 20 years later," says Anant.
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Mini Krishnan on the importance of translation in literature

Why not live more than one life? And through writers who lead us to the language-experiences of which we know so little?

My characters are not great thinkers or rebels. They belong to the land.

Imayam, Tamil writer

India is not non-West. It is India.

Ashis Nandy

In this space, I hope to discuss different Indian languages and writers as they ghost-walk in English through different periods, institutions and disciplines, and to foreground, with examples, the most marginalized professionals in the knowledge industry: translators. These people are forgotten, pushed off book covers, sometimes even title pages. They go missing in the section marked ‘about the contributors’ in books from famous imprints. They are underpaid and over-worked, discouraged by copyright laws, and exploited by publishers. Their work is feared by religious orders and by the guardians of status quo, who view with suspicion any attempt to transport information and ideas across linguistic borders. Well, the selfie of us with our Indian-language writers shows that the rest of the globe is fairly safe from us: our writers have not penetrated any other culture’s consciousness deeply.

Mini Krishnan
Both serious studies and hastily cobbled articles based on interviews with writers and publishers over the last two years reveal that outside India, very little of our huge literary output — contemporary or otherwise — is being read anywhere in the world. We are a literary supercontinent but as dark as Krishna and as difficult to reach. Yet one half of the literary brigade of India — in which I include myself — loves to daydream that its indigenous literature simply has to find its way to readerships outside the country. Should we worry so much about exporting our writings? Right here in our midst are readers who could enjoy Indian writing — except that they do not know what is available out there. Millions of Indians can read, but know nothing or very little about Indian writers simply because they have not been introduced to them or trained to admire them: great, not so great, old, modern and very new and nearly all of them unheard of outside their regional-language islands.

The other half of the book-brigade lives in English and thinks that Indian-language writers have nothing of interest to say to them. “All those sad stories of bullock-carts and rivers and caste conflicts — go get a life.” The training ground for this situation begins very early, when — to paraphrase writer and literary critic, Judith Thurman — we deprive a child of her language at the sponge-time of life, the precious learning years, and never allow her to build a bond with a past of many centuries. So it might take a decade or two before she realises she could relearn, and rediscover what she has missed. This can happen through the only language she has: English. Even though English sets literary limits, even though it is taught imperfectly, it is still the fastest way to drill through language barriers. Alongside is the social change brought on by technology which has shaped a mindset, and not just altered a change in the way life itself is viewed. What was considered valuable by a former generation may just not be that important to the present one. Perhaps here too, translation could play a role in what many see as a no-man’s land — the space between the past and what lies ahead. Can we tackle the future if we have no understanding of our past?

U.R. Ananthamurthy said that there is a co-existence of centuries in us and that an Indian language writer might set his story in a century long gone but use very contemporary strategies and language. Precisely because of this, before us are questions which crucially define creativity, productivity and therefore certainly, the market. Qurratulain Hyder said nearly the same thing: “In India various epochs co-exist and intermingle freely on the sociological and psychological planes. You have to be born and bred in this land to understand the syntheses and cultural richness as well as the contradictions inherent in this situation.” And perhaps it is time to admit that someone who does not share this DNA will find it difficult to enter this experience.

Miriam bi stood there a minute and wondered if she should participate in the duva. But where did she have the time? She was thinking of the lamb soup that she could never once give Haseena who had just delivered. Not even an egg or a spoonful of ghee. In fact for the last two days she had not eaten even a single dry roti. A fire erupted in her stomach. Daane daane pe likha hai khaanewaale ka naam. Every grain bears the name of the person who would eat it. O what imagination! The leavings of the rich went through the sink to the gutter to mix with human waste. O God, who created the rich, why didn’t you create morsels in the names of poor like me? Banu Mushtaq’s story about Miriam who waits for women in her community to die so that she might earn a fee by washing and dressing corpses is translated from Kannada by Tulasi Venugopal for Sparrow and edited by Arundathi Subramaniam.

Go get a life.

The agraharam reverberated with the news of Sharma’s rescue. Madiga Elli pulled Somasekhara Sharma out of the tank; she dragged him out when he was drowning; she touched him. No she dragged him by his hair; that Madiga Elli touched our boy… a massive debate ensued about the ways of cleansing a brahmin who had been touched by an untouchable — and that too a woman…(Gogu Shyamala’s story is translated from Telugu by A. Suneetha for Navayana)

Why not live more than one life? And through writers who lead us to the language-experiences of which we know so little? We need to dispel our own darkness before waving torches for readers outside the country.

Speaking of the human condition an Urdu poet said that we have lost the Earth but not yet gained Heaven. There is still time. We haven’t lost the stories of our homeland and a young man named Ravi Shankar is making India’s first animation feature film in Sanskrit based on a Kannada folktale: Punyakoti is crowd-sourced and crowd-funded by animators and people from all over the world. Interest in one’s roots can only strengthen what everyone is searching for: emotional and cultural identity.

Mini Krishnan edits literary translations for Oxford University Press. minioup@gmail.com

Keywords: This Word For That, Mini Krishnan, translations, Indian literature
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CATALUNYA.-'Wordreference.com' incorpora el catalán a su oferta de herramientas lingüísticas en línea. Noticias de agencia, eldia.es

CATALUNYA.-'Wordreference.com' incorpora el catalán a su oferta de herramientas lingüísticas en línea
Barcelona, Europa Press El portal de diccionarios en línea 'Wordreference.com' ha ampliado su oferta con un diccionario de definiciones en lengua catalana, a propuesta de la dirección general de Política Lingüística de la Conselleria de Cultura de la Generalitat.

'Wordreference.com' se creó en 1999 con el objetivo de proporcionar herramientas y diccionarios bilingües gratuitos en línea y actualmente se encuentra entre los 500 sitios web más visitados del mundo y entre los 100 sitios más visitados de España, ha informado la Conselleria en un comunicado este martes.

La dirección general de Política Lingüística realizó un estudio sobre diccionarios multilingües en línea entre profesores de facultades de traducción y profesionales de la lengua a partir del cual constató que 'Wordreference.com' es una de las herramientas más utilizadas por los aprendices de lenguas.

Fruto de este estudio, la directora general de Política Lingüística, Ester Franquesa, propuso al presidente y fundador de 'wordreference.com', Michael Kellogg, que incorporara el catalán a su oferta de diccionarios en línea.

La respuesta positiva ha sido la inclusión del diccionario monolingüe en el portal y la previsión de incluir en un futuro un diccionario bilingüe inglés-catalán y catalán-inglés.
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Pablo Domínguez: "Saber inglés es una ventaja laboral"

Pablo Domínguez González es catedrático emérito de Lengua Inglesa en la Universidad de La Laguna. Además es Licenciado en Derecho por la Universidad de Barcelona y se ha dedicado a la enseñanza de idiomas. Ahora publica un diccionario lúdico de compuestos inventados en inglés, el 'Concise Pun-ishing Dictionary for English Speakers'. Reconoce como modelo de esta obra el célebre diccionario que escribió José Luis Coll

¿Cómo se le ocurrió hacer este diccionario?Desde siempre me ha gustado jugar con las palabras. Además de...
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Oaxaca: San Pedro Ixcatlán publicará diccionario en lengua Mazateca

Oaxaca, 27 de julio 2015.-El municipio de San Pedro Ixcatlán , ubicado en el distrito de Tuxtepec, da claro ejemplo de lo que se debe hacer en el tema del rescate de la cultura y del origen de una comunidad.
El presidente municipal Benito Fernández Figueroa tiene como una de las principales metas fortalecer su lengua madre: el mazateco, y en coordinación con su cabildo y la población dar un nuevo auge a su idioma, ya que los procesos de modernización han hecho que mucho jóvenes lo dejen de hablar.
Las principales actividades es la traducción de algunas obras importantes al mazateco, como es el nuevo testamento, entre otros libros.
El proyecto más ambicioso del munícipe es la publicación de un diccionario en lengua mazateca; al respecto, el edil declaró que lleva más de 14 años trabajando en este proyecto al que sólo le falta una corrección lingüística para ser publicado.
Las obras para la comunidad no sólo se limitan al rescate de la lengua y la cultura, ya que actualmente -dice- existen proyectos de infraestructura como: instalación del drenaje y agua potable para una mejor calidad de vida para el pueblo.
El funcionario anunció una inversión de más de 7 millones para realizar pozos para el abastecimiento adecuado de agua potable para la población.
 
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BBC defends translation of ‘Jews’ as ‘Israel’ in Gaza doc

The Jewish Chronicle of London, which reported last week on the translation, quoted the filmmaker Doucet as saying, “We talked to people in Gaza, we talked to translators. When [the children] say ‘Jews,’ they mean ‘Israelis.’ We felt it was a better translation of it.”

She added that the translation was rechecked.

“We are not trying to cover it up,” Doucet said.

Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu and other Israeli officials have accused Palestinian leaders of inciting against Jews and rejecting the legitimacy of a Jewish national homeland in parts of the Land of Israel
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Video: hilarious reaction of Corrie actors to sign language interpreter

ITV Signpost, which is based in Gateshead, provides signers for programmes across the ITV network.

Alex Duguid was the signer who appeared to scare off Liz and Michelle and has worked at Signpost as an on-screen signer for 17 years. He was on holiday when a colleague contacted him to tell him he'd gone viral. He watched the clip and said he "didn't think much of it."

When he came back to work the various versions of the clip had racked up around 2,000,000 views.
I was lost for words really. I only hope that this publicity will raise people's awareness of sign language and the problems deaf people face.

– ALEX DUGUID, ITV SIGNPOST
Alex said soaps can be some of the hardest programmes to sign because of the large numbers of characters and personalities he has to switch between.
Last updated Fri 17 Jul 2015
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Legal Semantic Project Intern (French Speaking)

Vacancy Notice

Position:Legal Semantic Project Intern (French Speaking)

Location: Bangkok, Thailand

Starting date: Mid of August

Duration: Six Months

Reports to:Project Coordinator, Terminology and Semantics Project, ECPAT Luxembourg/ Head of Legal Programme, ECPAT International

Grading: INTERN

Organisational Background

ECPAT International is a global network of organisations working to eliminate all forms of sexual exploitation of children. The ECPAT network has 85 member organizations in 77 countries in Africa, Americas, Europe and the CIS, Asia and the Pacific. All of these members are independent organisations or coalitions working for the eradication of sexual exploitation of children. The ECPAT International Secretariat coordinates the global work of ECPAT International and is based in Bangkok, Thailand. A key priority for ECPAT International is to engage in international research projects, to strengthen and support the work of its network members.

Terminology and Semantics Project

Words matter. The decision to use one word over another can radically alter our reaction to a situation. The meaning ascribed to a term can dramatically change our conceptualisation of an issue, often leading to an entirely different understanding of the same problem. For example, the term ‘child prostitute’ conjures a different mental image from, ‘sexually abused child through prostitution.’ Equally, hearing the words ‘child sexual abuse material’ evokes a different emotional response from ‘child pornography’.

Disagreement over terminology and semantics has consumed significant time and resources. Stakeholders often make hasty decisions to use one term over another, or worse even continue to use a term that is outdated or damaging to the dignity of the child victim.

Working across languages raises further challenges. Direct translations often do not convey the same meaning, especially when addressing complex terms or behavior. Without clear guidance from linguists or experts on sexual exploitation of children, stakeholders are left to manage these difficult questions relating to terminology on their own. With the global epidemic of child sexual exploitation growing at an exponential rate, the need for conceptual clarity and precision in terminology is all the more important.

ECPAT International in partnership with ECPAT Luxembourg began a process in 2014 to establish international guidelines on terminology through an inter-agency working group of leading international institutions: non-governmental organizations, UN agencies, inter-governmental organizations, academic institutions, and law enforcement agencies. This Inter-agency Working Group has met over the past 6 months to jointly discuss and develop guidelines on the terminology on sexual exploitation of children. The objective is to create a process where key child rights stakeholders and organizations themselves have ownership over all aspects of the process, from conceptualization to drafting the guidelines. As part of this process, ECPAT is also leading a consultation process to develop the guidelines in Spanish and French. The French and Spanish Guidelines are meant to be substantive rather than literal translations of the English Guidelines.

ECPAT International seeks an intern to assist in the development of the Terminology Guidelines in French.

Major Tasks and Responsibilities

The Legal Intern will work closely with the Project Coordinator to develop Terminology Guidelines and Travaux Preparatoiresin French, based on the work of the International Working Group. The Legal Intern will assist the Coordinator in:

· Revising the initial translation of the French Guidelines and Travaux Preparatoires to ensure it accurately reflects the substance of the English version;

· Assist in eliciting feedback on the French experts on the Guidelines and Travaux Preparatoires;

· Coordinate the collection of feedback on the French text from members of the IWG;

· Work to compile and incorporate the revisions and comments from Francophone Experts and IWG members into the French texts as well as the English texts;

· Support the Project Coordinator in the organization of Interagency Working Group meetings, teleconferences, briefing notes, representation at the key events, dissemination of the project outcomes/progress to the network and key stakeholders;

· Provide assistance to the Project Coordinator as required on any other matters relating to the Terminology and Semantics Project.

Required qualifications

· Masters level degree (or equivalent) in law, human rights or other related discipline;

· Native French speaker;

· Demonstrated knowledge of child rights instruments and monitoring processes;

· Work experience with non-government organizations would be an asset;

· Fluency in written and spoken English and Spanish is an asset.

Competencies

· Demonstrated commitment to ECPAT’s vision, values and principles;

· Communication: excellent writing, speaking and presentation skills;

· Planning and Organizing: setting of clearly defined objectives, activity planning and monitoring, and ability to adapt as required;

· The ability to analyse complex and/or multi-sourced information and summarise it for a range of different audiences;

· Excellent interpersonal skills and ability to work in a team.

Internship Conditions

A modest stipend of 10,000 Bath/month (around $300 USD) will be made available to interns who are not sponsored by other organizations or institutions. All other costs related to the internship, i.e., travel, passport, visa or living costs in Bangkok, are to be borne by the intern or his/her sponsoring institution or organization. Interns who are performing their duties for academic credit or as part of requisite coursework are ineligible for a stipend.

HOW TO APPLY:
To apply, please e-mail your CV and cover letter, with your name and the position title in the subject line to vacancy@ecpat.net

For further information on the application process, please visit:

http://www.ecpat.net/employment
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Lexifone's Translation Service to Be Integrated on ONEm's Global Platform

Lexifone's Translation Service to Be Integrated on ONEm's Global Platform
SAN FRANCISCO, CA--(Marketwired - July 16, 2015) - Lexifone is pleased to announce a new partnership with ONEm that will allow Lexifone’s automatic, in-call translation services to be integrated on the ONEm global platform.
ONEm is a global platform for mobile operators to offer unlimited membership services to their subscribers over voice and SMS -- essentially allowing a world of Internet-based services to reach mobile users without traditional Internet access. ONEm has developed a unique marketplace for mobile operators and service providers, enabling them to easily integrate and select innovative technologies, like Lexifone. The partnership with Lexifone enables ONEm to become a platform more in tune with the needs of the growing requirements for multi-lingual interaction.
“We are excited about the beneficial effects this partnership with ONEm presents to mobile users across the world,” says Itay Sagie, Lexifone’s vice president of business development. “Bridging language barriers is a tremendous leap towards the globalization of business and education, and Lexifone is pleased to be able to broaden the distribution and exposure of our services through this partnership with ONEm. We see this as yet another step toward helping businesses, families and the population in general, when it comes to the realm of communications.”
Lexifone’s services currently offer 16 different languages, with the capability to understand variations of the major regional accents. Lexifone is an invaluable tool for business, education and entertainment and presents a first time opportunity for people to be able to communicate in their natural language and have an accurate translation delivered instantaneously in another language on the other end of the communication transaction.
Lexifone vocal language translation will be available to ONEm advanced voice members as a freemium service with 10 minutes free use per month and for those users who want more than 10 minutes per month, on a premium basis. Both Lexifone and ONEm agree that this is the best way to give people a chance to experience the benefits of on-the-fly language services. Over time, billions of users will have access to this service through their mobile operators, with many more languages and dialects added over time.
“Lexifone evens up the playing field by providing on-the-fly verbal language translation services within the reach of ordinary people with any type of mobile device over the global ONEm Mobile Operator Supported Network,” says Christopher Richardson, CEO of ONEm. “That is a very powerful reason for why we have teamed up with Lexifone for deployment on our platform.”
To view videos and learn more about Lexifone’s services visit the Lexifone YouTube channel.
About Lexifone
Lexifone is the world’s only privately-held automated technology for in-call interpretation. Lexifone translates outgoing and incoming calls in 16 different languages on any landline or mobile phone. Both sides of the call simply speak their language, and Lexifone will translate both ends of the conversation in real time. Lexifone’s service differs from current translation apps in that it goes beyond just text and email translation by delivering voice translation instead. This allows for more fluid conversations, appropriate pronunciation, and the ability for users to hear the tone of the conversation they are having. Lexifone is also the biggest automatic voice interpreter service, enabling calls to 500 destinations within more than 100 countries.
The company is headquartered in New York, with an R & D center in Haifa, Israel, and Business Development office in San Francisco, California. To learn more about Lexifone visit www.lexifone.com.
About ONEm
ONEm is a UK High-Tech company that has developed a membership-based global mobile platform for mobile operators to offer Internet-style services to their subscribers. The main office is headquartered and located in London, England, with branch offices in Bucharest, Romania and Dubai, UAE. To learn more about ONEm visit www.onem.com.
CONTACT INFORMATION
Media Contact:
Itay Sagie
Vice President of Business Development
415-358-5236
www.lexifone.com
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Translation And Reason Of KILIKKI Language Used In Baahubali

To say that the level of detailing in S.S. Rajamouli’s Baahubali has been great would be an disgrace to the movie and director. The two-part dream epic, which has broken film industry records all over, was released in Tamil and Telugu, alongside Hindi and Malayalam versions, last Friday.



Translation And Reason Of KILIKKI Language Used In Baahubali :

In the mean time, another dialect included in all renditions of the film — talked by the warrior crowds headed by warlord Kalakeya — has been earning some consideration since the film’s release. Madhan Karky, who composed the verses and dialogs for both of the film’s renditions, is credited with making an altogether new dialect he calls ‘Kiliki’, and composed dialogs particularly to be talked in this dialect by individuals from the tribe. It isn’t simply negligible babble — Kiliki gloats of a 750-word vocabulary and more than 40 strong punctuation rules.


Translation And Reason Of KILIKKI Language Used In Baahubali
In a telephone discussion with HuffPost India, Karky said he proposed the thought to Rajamouli around two years back, referring to samples of invented dialects that exist in contemporary writing and mainstream culture. These incorporate Elvish (from J.R.R. Tolkien’s The Lord Of The Rings arrangement), Klingon (from the Star Trek arrangement); and Dothraki and Valyrian (from George R.R. Martin’s A Song Of Ice And Fire arrangement).



“Around 6 years prior, I was doing my PhD in Australia,” I would attempt and show them the contrasts between different dialects.” During one such session, Karky thought it would be enjoyable to attempt and make an altogether new dialect which would have no ambiguities, which they called Cliq. “We thought of essential words — ‘min’, which signifies ‘me’, and ‘nim’, which signifies “you” — and after that made some straightforward builds. In the long run, we thought of a vocabulary of 100 words, of which we even made melodies.”

This 100-word vocabulary of Cliq came to be the premise for Kiliki, as Karky then continued to grow it to fit the prerequisites of Rajamouli’s story. Case in point, subsequent to the bits including the dialect were not going to accompany subtitles (“We needed to pass on the sentiment fear when you hear an adversary talking an obscure dialect on the front line,” he clarifies), he attempted to verify that the phonetics of different words additionally passed on the feelings behind them.

“I utilized hard consonants and delicate consonants relying upon whether the word was “hard” or ‘delicate’,” he said. For instance, the Kiliki word for “blood” is ‘brrusla’, with accentuation on the moved Rs to make it sound primal and forceful.

He then continued to compose sentence structure standards, including two diverse sort of “snap” sounds — one that signifies a plural (the sound one makes to express objection) and another that shows a possessive (the sound you make in the event that you attempt and purport a hard “T” without really saying it so everyone can hear).
Here are a few sentences in English and their translation in Kiliki, provided by Karky:
1. English: He should be alive.

Kiliki: Ta beet-qruvool dunkra.
2. English: Is it true?
Kiliki: Loursha-quay?
3. English: Drop your weapons in the field and run away.
Kiliki: Nim*kle gadeetvoo*tta corota-jra reyy… fuhoo*kle.
(* denotes the click sound for either plural or possessive, as per the context)

4. English: Can you give me a cup of water?
Kiliki: Nim shweek min surrp unoa dhab saasslaa finhee-quay?
5. English: Don’t talk like a fool.
Kiliki: Dambadamba jivla baahaa-na.

Here is the link of a video featuring on-screen character prabhakar, who plays kalakeya, talking in kiliki at the “baahubali” audio release.
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Language translation market at $1.6 billion in 2012 are anticipated to grow to $6.9 billion by 2019 - WhaTech

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Worldwide markets are poised to achieve continuing growth as the language translation software systems are put in place to support mobile end point information collections that are localized. 

  Enterprise server has reached a long sought after milestone.  With language translation software technology reaching a more mature state, comprehensive solutions are available that have never been available before.

Comprehensive solutions combine the best attributes of rule-based and statistical machine translation.  These integrated systems are able to meet the full range of translation needs on an enterprise scale.     

Systems are powered by hybrid machine translation (MT) engines. 

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IT enterprise-level machine translation combines rules systems and statistical systems to achieve a hybrid solution. 
These are a “black-box solution” due to the complexity of the software implementation and resources needed to successful train an engine.      

Iterative software releases are evolving.  They represent a goal executives want to reach.  

Iterative software releases allow larger vendors to compete with smaller, more nimble companies by making their feature function packages more robust.  Meeting the Iterative software releases challenge depends on achieving an agile software development environment. 

Continuous localization represents automation of localization resource bundles.  Implementing internationalization depends on best practice systems use at the engineering level and further down the production chain. 

The largest IT localization are approached by bridging the gap between development and reuse of existing code modules.  Products are positioned to address challenges directly.     

Browse Report with TOC @ http://www.marketresearchstore.com/report/language-translation-software-market-shares-strategies-and-forecasts-2303#reportTableOfContent

The concept of bringing translation management practices to overall software development is significant.  Because language translation systems implement such robust content management solutions, a company can leverage its language translation expertise to offer hybrid sophisticated content management systems. 

These have the prospect of building much broader markets for localization for all software applications.   

Language translation software market driving forces relate to localization at all levels of business process.  Smart phones are the latest market driver for software language translation. 

Every enterprise has to make its web sites user friendly in every locality in which it has a market.  Globally integrated enterprises generally have a presence in from 80 to 170 countries. 

Localization is equivalent to translation.  People then access these web sites and buy from the sites using their smart phones. 

The Samsung Galaxy S IV can translate several languages in real time.  It has the ability to translate off a piece of paper from the camera.   

  Cloud business solutions, social media, and platform systems of engagement represent major IT market shifts that have been incorporated by language translation software systems.  The lines of business have taking over from the IT departments, but with cloud computing there is a transition back to IT.   

  Systems of engagement leverage the apps market segment that is defined by the line of business more often than by IT.  A key cloud computing segment relates to development of apps for every industry. 

Visual feature and discovery decision tablets permit decision making.  Visual decision making components can be exported.     

Language translation is used in big data to mine the social media information for comments about products and companies.  This data can be used for marketing decision making. 

Language translation is needed to achieve use of discovery features 

  Language translation software market driving forces are related to the Internet usefulness to people in every locality.  Smart phones are the latest market driver for software language translation. 

Every enterprise has to make its web sites user friendly in every locality in which it has a market.     

People then access these web sites and buy from the sites using their smart phones.  The Samsung Galaxy S IV can translate several languages in real time. 

It has the ability to translate off a piece of paper from the camera.     

Cloud business solutions, social media, and platform systems of engagement represent major IT market shifts. The lines of business are taking over from the IT departments. 

Systems of engagement leverage the apps market segment that is defined by the line of business more often than by IT.  A key cloud computing segment relates to development of apps for every industry. 

Visual feature and discovery decision tablets permit decision making.  Visual decision making components can be exported.   

Language translation is used in big data to mine the social media information for comments about products and companies.  This data can be used for marketing decision making. 

Language translation is needed to achieve use of discovery features 

  A trapped decision discovery feature is not too useful.  What the systems of engagement seek to do is to capture institutional knowledge, social media knowledge and make it accessible to a broader group of people. 

Solutions are global.  They are based on language translation that makes apps useful globally. 

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Apps have support mobile devices.  Cloud providers are able to develop custom mobile applications that include toolkits and accelerated systems with common functions that are part of process delivery. 

Buttons, cameras, geo specific features are available in the apps.  It is possible to build composite solutions from within the cloud.

Cloud mobile solutions tools mean users can build mobile composite applications that span two platforms.   

The brand support provided by the Lionbridge platform is compelling.  The ability to support large web-architected brand projects depends on a language platform. 

Lionbridge has 52,000 individual client translation memories and 14,000 individual translators serving more than 700 clients.  These people are supported by the software brand platform.   

  The company continues to improve the grid architecture of this platform to enable 2,000 concurrent users with 99.9% uptime.  Freeway™ is Lionbridge’s free, web-based translation management platform.

Lionbridge provides the world's leading companies with localization solutions for their software, product documentation, marketing materials, training content and web sites to ensure a consistent user experience for their global customers.  Localization is a complex process involving many steps all of which are needed to keep a brand intact as it is rolled out to 177 countries with web sites that are all localized to have appeal to the local people: 

  Hybrid MT systems combine statistical and rules based translation to achieve a degree of accuracy not achievable by either system alone.  Hybrid MT systems represent a major shift in language translation markets. 

It initiates the ability to combine two entirely different ways of achieving machine translation.  The two together deliver a level of accuracy that is to be desired.   

  Statistical MT systems apply statistical techniques to language data.  They learn from text alignment. 

Rules based systems use in depth grammatical rules to achieve knowledge.  Linguistic rules are applied to words and phrases for translation based on an in-depth knowledge of the language. 

MT takes into account the grammatical structure of each language and uses contextual rules to select among multiple meanings.  Sentences are translated into the target language.  

  Rule-based machine translation (RBMT) provides more of a human element to the translation because the rules are user-defined based on an understanding of the target language.  The rules can be implemented iteratively, creating a way to achieve greater accuracy as the system is used over the years. 

  SDL, Lionbridge, IBM and other vendors have positioned to provide industry specific product systems.  Solutions are based on an in-depth knowledge of the issues and requirements that drive businesses. 

SDL takes content, communications, and products worldwide. 

Language translation is used in big data to mine the social media information for comments about products and companies.  This data can be used for marketing decision making. 

Language translation is needed to achieve use of discovery features 

  A trapped decision discovery feature is not too useful.  What the systems of engagement seek to do is to capture institutional knowledge, social media knowledge and make it accessible to a broader group of people. 

Solutions are global.  They are based on language translation that makes apps useful globally. 

  Apps have support mobile devices.  Cloud providers are able to develop custom mobile applications that include toolkits and accelerated systems with common functions that are part of process delivery. 

Buttons, cameras, geo specific features are available in the apps.  It is possible to build composite solutions from within the cloud.

Cloud mobile solutions tools mean users can build mobile composite applications that span two platforms. 

  The brand support provided by the Lionbridge platform is compelling.  The ability to support large web-architected brand projects depends on a language platform. 

Lionbridge has 52,000 individual client translation memories and 14,000 individual translators serving more than 700 clients.  These people are supported by the software brand platform.   

  The company continues to improve the grid architecture of this platform to enable 2,000 concurrent users with 99.9% uptime.  Freeway™ is Lionbridge’s free, web-based translation management platform.

Lionbridge provides the world's leading companies with localization solutions for their software, product documentation, marketing materials, training content and web sites to ensure a consistent user experience for their global customers.  Localization is a complex process involving many steps all of which are needed to keep a brand intact as it is rolled out to 177 countries with web sites that are all localized to have appeal to the local people: 

  Hybrid MT systems combine statistical and rules based translation to achieve a degree of accuracy not achievable by either system alone.  Hybrid MT systems represent a major shift in language translation markets. 

It initiates the ability to combine two entirely different ways of achieving machine translation.  The two together deliver a level of accuracy that is to be desired.   

  Statistical MT systems apply statistical techniques to language data.  They learn from text alignment. 

Rules based systems use in depth grammatical rules to achieve knowledge.  Linguistic rules are applied to words and phrases for translation based on an in-depth knowledge of the language. 

MT takes into account the grammatical structure of each language and uses contextual rules to select among multiple meanings.  Sentences are translated into the target language.  

  Rule-based machine translation (RBMT) provides more of a human element to the translation because the rules are user-defined based on an understanding of the target language.  The rules can be implemented iteratively, creating a way to achieve greater accuracy as the system is used over the years.   

SDL, Lionbridge, IBM and other vendors have positioned to provide industry specific product systems.  Solutions are based on an in-depth knowledge of the issues and requirements that drive businesses. 

SDL takes content, communications, and products worldwide. 

Companies Profiled

Market Leaders

Lionbridge
SDL / Trados
Babylon
Microsoft
Systran
Softissimo
IBM
Google
Asia Online
Language Engineering, LLC (LEC)

Market Participants
AlphaCRC
American Translators Association (ATA)
Asia Online
Bablefish
Babylon
The Big Word
Bitext
CallMiner
China Translation Industry
Cloudwords
Duolingo
Globalization and Localization Association (GALA)
Google
Hewlett Packard
IBM
Jonckers
Kilgray
Language Engineering, LLC (LEC)
Lingo24
Lingotek
Lionbridge
Lloyd International Translations
Mission Essential Personnel (MEP)
Moravia
MultiCorpora
Niemanlab.Org
Nuance
OpenAmplify
Pactera Technology / HiSoft
Plunet BusinessManager
ProZ.com
Reverso-Softissimo
RWS Legal Translation
SDL
Star Group
Symbio
Systran
Translations.com
Translators Without Borders
Veveo
Vignette Content Management (VCM)
WorldLingo

Key Topics

Language Translation Software
Language Translation
Machine Language
Hybrid Translation
Software Localization
Language Teams
Key Translation Parameters
Rule-Based Machine
Translation
Statistical Machine
Translation
Rules Based Machine Translation
Linguistic Services
Language Translation Shares
Machine Language
Translation Localization
Translation Localization
Growth
Translation Memory
Systems of Engagement
Mobile End Points
Social Media Apps
Social Cloud
Combined Statistical and
Rules Based Translation
Linguistic Rules
Chinese-English Machine Translation
English-Chinese Machine
Translation
Rule-Based Machine
Translation System
Hybrid Approach
Statistical Post-Editing
Translation Localization

For more information:

www.marketresearchstore.com/report/language-translation-s…;
www.marketresearchstore.com/report/language-translation-s…;
www.marketresearchstore.com/report/language-translation-s…;
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Van Gaal speaks Spanish to Italian Darmian to translate for English | Daily Mail Online

Manchester United manager Louis van Gaal reveals how knowledge of many languages is useful as he speaks Spanish with new defender Darmian in order to relay his thoughts with the English press.
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Translate more books: Sim Ann

English translations of literature in the mother tongue languages can help break down the language barrier between the different communities in Singapore, and Minister of State for Education and Communications and Information Sim Ann wants to see more such works published here.

She has just contributed one, translating Chasing Rainbows, or Zhui Hong in Chinese, the book her retired TV-producer mother Choo Lian Liang wrote on their family's history, which spans from the late 1890s in China to Singapore today.

Speaking to The Straits Times ahead of the translation's launch today, she said English is a must today, to appeal to the younger generation. "However attractive your content is, if it remains in the mother tongue, its appeal to the young will be constrained," she said.

But Ms Sim, who also chairs the National Translation Committee formed last March to raise the standard of translation in Singapore, noted that translation of literary works requires not only technical proficiency but also artistic sensitivity on the part of the translators. "It is not an easy job and these translators are hard to find, but over time I believe this sector of the market here will develop," she said.

Because of the bilingual education policy, she said, there is now a growing pool of local translators and interpreters and, hence, there has been a rising number of English translations of local Chinese literary works, as well those in Malay and Tamil, published recently.

Among them is writer Lai Yong Taw's Deep In The Jungle (2010), which is about the communists' armed struggle in British Malaya, and a series of about 10 Cultural Medallion winners' works published by Epigram Books since 2012. They include the works of Yeng Pway Ngon, You Jin and Xi Ni Er.

They are all Singaporean authors.

Without these translations, Ms Sim said, English-language readers would "be the poorer for it". As to the Government's role, she said: "We are concentrating on building a sound bilingual foundation in schools by exposing students to two languages early, hoping that over the years some of them may flower and be effectively bilingual."

She confessed she was a "reluctant translator" for her mother as she had been pressed for time, and took more than four years to complete the task. Ms Sim, who has a younger brother and sister, said it was through the translation that she got to know older members of her family better.

Prime Minister Lee Hsien Loong will launch the English translation of Chasing Rainbows at the National Library Building in Victoria Street today at 7pm. The book will be on sale at major bookshops after the launch at $28 before GST.

wengkam@sph.com.sg


This article was first published on July 16, 2015.
Get a copy of The Straits Times or go to straitstimes.com for more stories.
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Translated American Novel Presented in Almaty

BY YERBOLAT UATKHANOV in SOCIETY on 17 JULY 2015

“Drums, Girls & Dangerous Pie,” a book aimed at children and young teenagers by American author Jordan Sonnenblick, was presented in the Sapargali Begalin State Children’s Library in Almaty, according to Today website.


Potential readers at the launch of “Drums, Girls & Dangerous Pie” in Almaty. Photo: today.kz

“We will estimate readers’ reaction to American literature. It would be great if Kazakh novels, tales and other pieces of art are translated to English,” said U.S. Consulate General Public Affairs Officer Charles Martin. As he greeted visitors to the event, Martin noted the importance of such cultural exchanges between the two peoples.

An English teacher and former student of author Frank McCourt, Sonnenblick was inspired to write the novel by the real-life story of one of his pupils. The book is about 13-year-old Steven, who has a totally normal life: he plays drums in jazz band, has a crush on the hottest girl in his school and is constantly annoyed by his 5-year-old brother, Jeffrey. But Steven’s world is turned upside down when Jeffrey is diagnosed with leukemia. He is forced to deal with his brother’s illness and his parents’ attempts to keep the family in one piece. “Drums, Girls & Dangerous Pie” contains humour and devastating realities and narrates a year in the life of the family in hard times, according to Amazon’s website.

Kazakh actor and protagonist of the movie “Reketir” Sayat Issembayev read some parts of the book, containing funny and tragic moments.

Book translator, international journalist and politologist Mukhtar Sengirbai spoke about the time he discussed the future translation of the book with children’s library director Sofiya Rayeva. He noted she was interested in his family. Sengirbai mentioned that Rayeva considered only a man with children could accurately translate this book.

“It is necessary to know children’s psychology, to know the problems in his life and understand who helps him in hard times,” she said.


Children discuss the newly translated book at the launch. Photo today.kz

Sengirbai discussed Jeffrey’s victory over cancer, both biological and psychological, and the issues in Steven’s life, who has a lot of dilemmas like many thousands of other teenagers. He also spoke about the illness, feelings and great trial for the whole family. He added it was very difficult to translate slang terms from English to Kazakh.

Three girls, Adelina, Yana and Aigerim, talked about the book after reading it in English. They explained that the story is not only very interesting for children and teenagers, but it is very useful for their parents, too, because it helps to understand the inward kid. The girls felt the story described a lot of typical teenage problems, such as looking after younger children, the requirements of parents to act as adults and others.

The U.S. Consulate General book translation project has existed for five years and five stories by famous American writers have already been transcribed. Martin stated he hopes one more book will be translated into Kazakh in the next year.
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INTERPRETER FOR KINYARWANDA OR KIRUNDI

This independent and neutral humanitarian organization operating worldwide in armed conflict contexts has a vacant position of Interpreter for Kinyarwanda or Kirundi.

TASKS AND RESPONSIBILITIES

Oral interpretation: from the given language to English, and English to the given language during confidential interviews with people deprived of liberty, institutional dissemination, dialogue with authorities, activities to establish the family links, including messages delivery, family tracing and visits to families of detainees;
Written translation: translation of the given language (newspaper articles, correspondence, etc.) into written English;
Analysis and reporting: analysis of conditions of detention, security.
REQUIRED SKILLS AND EXPERIENCE

Excellent command of English;
Very good command of the given language (Kinyarwanda or Kirundi);
University education, degree in interpretation or translation an advantage;
2 years of professional experience as interpreter or translator an advantage;
Familiarity with word processing and spreadsheet software;
Prepared to accept unaccompanied field postings during the first 24 months of collaboration.
YOUR PROFILE

Strongly motivated by humanitarian work;
Open-minded and adaptable, able to work in a team;
Neat appearance, good speaker, well-developed writing and summarizing skills;
Able to work under pressure in a potentially dangerous environment.
CONDITIONS

A three-week orientation course in Switzerland prior to posting abroad;
An opportunity to help the victims of conflict;
Engrossing, rewarding work in unusual situations;
Ample support in integrating into the new working environment.
HOW TO APPLY:
To apply, qualified applicants should send a CV and Cover Letter with salary requirements to ngo.recruitment@europeansolutions.nl
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Deaf will soon get the call for jury service

For years, deaf Bay Staters weren’t able to serve on a jury, a constitutional duty that many of us take for granted — or even brush aside as an inconvenience.

But that’s all about to change.

Eligible deaf residents will be able to serve on juries throughout the commonwealth starting this time next year, according to Heidi Reed, commissioner of the Massachusetts Commission for the Deaf and Hard of Hearing. The state is two years into a three-year pilot program designed to work the kinks out of the process.

“We will put together a set of procedures in Massachusetts where prospective deaf jurors will be called to come in. They will appear for jury duty,” Reed told me. “This is an important civic duty, and deaf people have been asking around the state for answers. So this is a milestone.”

Before the pilot program, which launched in 2013, deaf people would receive a jury summons but wouldn’t be able to get an interpreter because there was no effective system in place, Reed said. There were about 400 prospective calls to deaf jurors per year that couldn’t be answered.

Under the pilot program, the Office of Jury Commissioner will go to a district court once a quarter and put two deaf people in a large jury pool, so not to tamper with the makeup of a potential jury. Two specialized interpreters are on hand to assist the potential jurors, and if they are chosen, they move forward with the trial.

“It’s been a great success. We didn’t anticipate how successful this would be. We thought there would be more growing pains,” said Pamela J. Wood, the state’s jury commissioner.

There are some practical concerns with having interpreters involved in the process. If the deaf juror has to go to a sidebar with the judge, people in the gallery could read what an interpreter is signing. To remedy that, screens are set up to block the conversation.

Then there’s deliberations — that ultra-secretive time when jurors pass judgement without any outside influence. The interpreter is there, giving the deaf juror a voice. But how can that person remain a shadow in a room of decision making?

“Our goal is to be as subtle and neutral as we can. We want to blend in to the process,” said Denise Martinez, one of the state’s 23 legally trained sign language interpreters. “It’s almost as if there is no interpreter there, and the deaf person has a way to communicate to their peers.”

Reed was one of the first deaf people to test the pilot program and appeared at the Edward W. Brooke Courthouse in downtown Boston for jury duty. An interpreter took her through the check-in process and orientation. She was eventually picked as a finalist — “I was excited about that” — but was excused.

“I would have loved to have been able to serve on the jury, but I think we all know that there is no guarantee,” she said. “But the most important thing is that you have the experience — that you get to go through the process.”

Author(s):

Bob McGovern
@bobmcgovernjr
 
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Top Youtube channel Telugu Filmnagar crosses 1.5 million subscriber mark

As per a recent survey, in India, 78 percent of online video users prefer watching content in their native languages. To cater to this increasing demand of local content, it is important to create relevant local language content. And providing this service to regional language viewers online is, Telugu Filmnagar, Whacked Out Media's in-house content brand.
By: ANI | July 23, 2015 11:59 AM
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As per a recent survey, in India, 78 percent of online video users prefer watching content in their native languages. To cater to this increasing demand of local content, it is important to create relevant local language content. And providing this service to regional language viewers online is, Telugu Filmnagar, Whacked Out Media’s in-house content brand.
Witnessing this huge demand for local language content, this online entertainment brand has crossed the 1.5 million-subscriber mark. By far, this is one of the most popular regional entertainment brands online with its Facebook page also recently crossing the one million organic fans milestone.
Telugu Filmnagar provides its subscribers with exclusive film and entertainment updates, movie trailers, and exclusive celebrity content. It is the one-stop-shop for all Tollywood updates. This exponential increase in their viewership has been because of the creatively packaged entertainment content for the digital generation by Whacked Out.
Commenting on Telugu Filmnagar’s achievement, Ram Veerapaneni, Managing Director, Whacked Out, said,”A number of viewers online are looking for an alternative to traditional TV and Telugu Filmnagar provides just that. We are delighted to see the increase in their viewership. He further added, “Search and social have always influenced which online videos get watched in addition to people following their favorite YouTube channels. Therefore online video creators and YouTube channels need to use innovative tools and the techniques to build and monetize the ever-evolving audiences. We hope to work closely with our partners and continue to generate value for them with our industry insights and cutting-edge technology.”
Brand Telugu Filmnagar has built loyalty over four years with lots of great content and interactive audience programs and is all set to soon launch its ultimate destination portal for Tollywood, thetelugufilmnagar.com. It is the official destination for Telugu movie lovers. Viewers log on to find exclusive movie updates, pictures and videos here.
Whacked Out Media is a next-gen media company based out of Hyderabad and is focused on digital marketing since 2011. It is today Asia’s largest and fastest growing YouTube Multi-Channel Network Partner, and also publishes video across several other models as well.
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