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Metaglossia: The Translation World
News about translation, interpreting, intercultural communication, terminology and lexicography - as it happens
Curated by Charles Tiayon
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Une invitation au voyage des cultures

La 3e édition du Festival des langues, organisée par le centre social Dou Boucaou, aura lieu ce samedi 21 et dimanche 22 septembre, au centre culturel Paul-Vaillant-Couturier, rue...
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Des contes étrangers bientôt traduits en malgache (Livre) - actualités en direct avec l'Express de Madagascar

Les contes de Charles Perrault, des frères Grimm, de Léon Tolstoï et de Carlo Collodi seront bientôt traduits en malgache. L'initiative émane du linguiste Fetra Ramamonjy, à la tête de Vision actuelle qui travaille depuis quelques temps sur le projet. L'idée consiste à relancer les réflexions sur les enjeux culturels de la traduction et à faire du malgache une langue d'ouverture, de culture et de connaissances.
« L'idée est simple, jeter un pont entre les cultures. La traduction étant la clé de la compréhension de l'autre, nous nous sommes dits : pourquoi ne pas traduire les cultures étrangères pour faire du malgache une langue de développement », confie l'initiateur du projet.
Le linguiste évoque l'exemple japonais qui, dès le commencement de l'ère Meiji, a pratiqué la traduction en vue de la modernisation. Le Japon voulait constituer une nation moderne, civilisée, rivalisant avec les pays occidentaux. Pendant 40 ans, le grand projet de traductionnisme a permis à l’ancien empire du soleil levant d'avoir toute l'information par le moyen de la traduction. 
Dictionnaire
« Deux mille mots se créent tous les jours dans le monde. Des néologismes dans différents domaines. On refuse la traduction. Par conséquent, la langue malgache s'appauvrit car dès qu'on touche à des domaines techniques, elle est en difficulté. Et pourtant, pour le Japon, la traduction a considérablement influencé la syntaxe», soutient Fetra Ramamonjy.
La traduction des contes n'est que le début du projet car la maison d'édition aligne déjà un certain nombre d'ouvrages sur sa liste. En particulier, des livres pour enfants afin de leur permettre de connaître la culture des autres. Mais les négociations sont en cours pour la traduction d'un roman populaire. Ainsi, Vision actuelle a déjà publiée des ouvrages comme Iza no iza et des périodiques comme Feeling ou encore Kitra.

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The What and Why of Writing: Stakes | My Book Therapy

Why should anyone care about the story you’re writing? Before you launch into an explanation of how your stoic hero is also tenderhearted and how your heroine helps heal his wounded heart, step back for a moment. Yes, compelling characters are vital to a good novel, but you also need to consider the big picture and ask the question: What’s at stake?

What: There are three different types of stakes: public, private and personal.

Public stakes are what we care about as a culture: an alien invasion of our planet (Independence Day) or some sort of global attack on humanity. The movie Sahara has public stakes because an unknown toxin threatens the world’s entire water supply.Personal stakes hurt the heart of your main character. Think about it: How often in a movie does a global threat laser in on someone the hero cares about? Superman’s love interest, Lois Lane, was always being threatened. Ditto for Batman, Iron Man, Thor … pick a superhero. In my novelCatch a Falling Star, my heroine is a family physician. I threatened her patients — specifically some of the children she cared for.Private stakes involve a character’s values. As your story progresses, force a character to choose between two competing values, creating inner dissonance or turmoil. My Book Therapy founder Susan May Warren does this beautifully in her book You Don’t Know Me. The heroine has been in the Witness Protection Program for years — but now the bad guy knows where she is. Her safety — and that of her family — is threatened. Her value of protecting her family (by leaving them) competes with her love for her family (and wanting to stay with them).
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Urdu Legal Dictionary Published For The First Time

First Urdu Legal Dictionary Published

http://zeenews.india.com/news/nation/first-urdu-law-dictionary-released_876641.html

Mumbai: ‘Kanoon Lugat’, an Urdu law dictionary, billed as a first of its kind in the country, was released here today in the presence of legal luminaries.

The dictionary, encompassing 52,000 legal terms, has been translated in Urdu for the first time, said chief translator and Supreme Court advocate Muhammad Irshad Hanif, at a function here.

Advocate Hanif has also translated Indian Penal Code and Indian Evidence Act in Urdu, besides publishing two books ‘Taziraat-e-Hind’ and ‘Qanoon Shahadat-e-Hind’.
The Urdu legal dictionary has a foreword written by Chief Justice of India Altamas Kabir. Though the dictionary is focused on the Indian legal system, it will have wide usage even in the international sphere, Hanif said.

“Justice (retd) Markandey Katju has been very kind enough to pen a foreword for the translations of the laws, which has been a matter of great encouragement,” Hanif told mediapersons here.

Top criminal lawyer Majeed Memon said these three translations would greatly benefit the legal fraternity.

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Supporters of city pension changes sue over ballot language - Cincinnati Business Courier

Supporters of a controversial amendment to Cincinnati’s charter that would change its pension system have sued the Hamilton County Board of Elections over language that will be used to describe their proposal on November’s ballot.

The description of the charter amendment says the city may have to increase taxes or cut programs in order to implement it. Cincinnati for Pension Reform believes the language is unfair and has asked the Ohio Supreme Court to change it.

The language was drafted by the city and tweaked by the Board of Elections before members approved it.

“The idea is to twist the proposal on the ballot to be unrecognizable as compared to the petition language so as to maximize the ‘no’ votes on the initiative,” according to a blog post by the Coalition Opposed to Additional Spending and Taxes, whose attorney, Chris Finney, is helping the pro-amendment group in its lawsuit

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Ten English words you didn't know existed

The English language is full of quirky, pointless and downright strange words, and they're all sitting in your average dictionary, just waiting to be discovered.

It's OK. We know you're not actually going to read the whole thing. So we've picked out ten of the coolest words you never knew existed.

Impress your friends by casually slipping these words into a conversation at your next big social event.

Win the heart of that guy/girl you like by showing off your unmatched command of the English language.

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Translation contest can launch writing career - People's Daily Online

The China International Translation Contest 2013, launched recently in Beijing, is callingfor entries from skilled translators from home and abroad.

The winner will be awarded a prize of $5,000, a certificate and the chance to be publishedinternationally and attract a contract to pursue a career in writing.

Initiated by the State Council Information Office, Chinese Writers Association and ChinaInternational Publishing Group, the contest is also supported by international publishersincluding Penguin, French publisher Hachette Livre, Spanish Editorial Popular and RussianOriental Literature Publisher.

"We aim to locate talent, to show our cultural creativity, as well as further enlarge thecountry's international appeal in culture," says Zhang Yanbin, with the State CouncilInformation Office.

For the same purpose, the Information Office and the State General Administration ofPress, Publication, Radio, Film and Television joined hands to launch two projects, theChina Book International and China Translation International, respectively, in 2006 and2009, offering sponsoring fees in translation and publicity to domestic and foreignpublishers.

The writers association is also pushing translations of Chinese literary classics.

"The projects have achieved much. Ten years ago, we couldn't find many eligible foreigntranslators of Chinese books," says Li Jingze with the association. "But we'd like to move astep forward into the mainstream."

Participants in the contest are invited to select from 30 short stories in Chinese to translateinto any of the five languages - English, French, Russian, Spanish or Arabic.

For each language, there will be one first prizewinner, two second prizewinners and severalthird prizewinners.

"To ensure fair play, we'll only publicize the list of judges after the result is announced,"Zhang says.

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What’s the Difference Between Writing and Editing?

Editing has always been a fundamental component of writing as well as a separate function, but as self-publishing, online and in print, has become ubiquitous, it’s important for writers to realize the distinction. A discussion of the differences may also help you confirm where your strength lies.

It is common for people to double up as editors and writers; I am among the many who do it. But most people feel more adept in one role or the other. I’ve written news and feature articles and opinion pieces and other content for newspapers and other media, as well as these posts — I’ll have written nearly a thousand of them by the end of this year — but although I enjoy writing, I actually prefer editing.

Writing is a proactive process: Whether one is given a topic or comes up with one, writing is an act of creation in which the writer calls forth the idea, the scope, the tone, and the structure of the work. It is also a challenge, in that it is the writer’s responsibility to produce a complete piece of content. Editing, by contrast, is reactive: One is assigned a piece of content, and one’s task is to refine the writer’s effort, helping him or her achieve the goal he or she was reaching for. This assistance may be minimal, or it may amount to intermittent or wholesale rewriting, but it is a response to the initial product. The challenge, too, lies not in completing the creative act but in carefully, consistently, and thoroughly evaluating and amending the piece.

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mightymoose's curator insight, September 18, 2013 4:41 AM

Writing versus editing

Claire Williams's curator insight, September 19, 2013 6:57 PM

This artical does not have any listed credibility but as you read through it you see that there are educated and backed up iformation through out it. 

And in this aretical the author talks about how we need to double up as not only writers but also editors. To help us see where we are going with our writing and how it will be protrayed to the aduience.

Iraqi translator who assisted U.S. troops is sentenced in rape

A former translator for U.S. troops in Iraq wept and proclaimed his innocence Monday as he was sentenced to 16 years-to-life in prison for his role in a brutal sexual assault that left a Colorado Springs woman battling for her life. Sarmad Fadhi "Levi" Mohammed, 26, choked back tears and repeatedly said he didn't touch a woman he was convicted of raping at a June trial. "I don't even know what I'm doing here," he sobbed during a more than 10-minute address in which he acknowledged misleading Colorado Springs police during their investigation, but said he told the truth after seeing photographs of her injuries. Mohammed is among five men, all Iraqi immigrants, who were charged in the brutal crime - two on suspicion of carrying out sex acts, and three for lying to police about it. The victim, a woman in her 50s, was sodomized with such force that she could have died without back-to-back emergency surgeries to repair internal injuries, authorities say. The assault occurred July 22, 2012, shortly after the woman met Mohammed and the others and accompanied them to their apartment for drinks. While prosecutors blame the injuries on another man, Jasim Mohammed Rasin Ramadon, a jury convicted Mohammed of rape and other crimes on allegations that he forced his penis into the intoxicated woman's mouth. The jury also found him guilty of orchestrating a cover-up in which he and others claimed the woman left their apartment with a stranger.
Read more at http://gazette.com/iraqi-translator-who-assisted-u.s.-troops-is-sentenced-in-rape/article/1506329#xss8olmwUUmajxoO.99

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Iran Book News Agency (IBNA) - Simone de Beauvoir’s ‘A Very Easy Death’ to hit Iranian bookshelves

‘A Very Easy Death’, a book written by Simone de Beauvoir and translated by Mohammad Majlesi, will be released in Iran presently. The book holds the memories and emotions of de Beauvoir’s family members during the final days of her mother’s life.

IBNA: The French writer depicts the sorrow and pain and her quiet acceptance of her mother's last days before death from cancer. 

‘Simone de Beauvoir’ was a French writer, intellectual, existentialist philosopher, political activist, feminist, and social theorist. While she did not consider herself a philosopher, Beauvoir had a significant influence on both feminist existentialism and feminist theory. Beauvoir wrote novels, essays, biographies, an autobiography, monographs on philosophy, politics, and social issues. 

‘Le deuxième sexe’ (translated as ‘The Second Sex’) is her most famous book which was penned in 1949. The book was rendered into Persian by Qasem San’avi and released in Iran.
 
Beauvoir died of pneumonia in Paris, aged 78. She is buried next to Sartre at the Cimetière du Montparnasse in Paris. 
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Not a good use of school time - Cape Argus | IOL.co.za

The reality is acquiring a new indigenous language is unlikely to do much to enhance one’s overall level of employability, says Matthew Thomas.

Cape Town - Lengthening the school day by up to an hour to accommodate an African language is unlikely to reduce unemployment, and the time would be better spent on subjects that improve students’ overall employability.

South Africa has an unenviable position in global educational rankings. A recent World Economic Forum report places South Africa second to last in maths and science globally, and ranks the overall education system 140th of 144 countries.

A 2008 survey by the department of education said 80 percent of schools had no library, 70 percent no computers and that 42 percent were overcrowded.

The situation doesn’t improve in the secondary and tertiary tiers of education. Last year the national average matric pass rate in maths was a disappointing 54 percent and the science pass rate was only marginally better at 61 percent. Bearing in mind that the pass rate is now set at only 30 percent, these figures aren’t exactly cause for celebration.

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Translations: A shortcut into different worlds | TwoCircles.net

New Delhi : In a land of cultural diversities like India, language is the glue that binds us together - and separates as well. Literature from the mofussil Indian landscape is a window of its indigenous socio-political turmoil and publishers are translating poignant tales of struggle, freedom, history and injustice to transport readers into other worlds.

"Translations are a shortcut into another world or, you can say, a bridge between two different worlds. Translations connect India and its people," Mini Krishnan, publishing consultant and editor, translations, Oxford University Press (OUP), told IANS.

"What is the worth of travelling Madras (Chennai) to Delhi and not knowing the culture? Literature introduces you to it," she added.

Translations have the ability to foster culture - linking between people, languages and culture, across history, across caste, class and religion, through its storytelling means.

It isn't a new phenomenon, though. Bengali and Marathi translations have always had a strong foothold, thanks to some prominent names.

Nobel laureate Rabindranath Tagore's warm story "Kabuliwalla" has been read by many. Tagore's stories have been translated in many languages and hence Bengal's strong literary roots have resonated with urban audiences and the this legacy has been carried forward by Satyait Ray's "Feluda" and Mahasweta Devi's "Dust On The Road" and with their many other stories.

Among contemporary writers, Suchitra Bhattacharya, Bani Basu, Tilottama Majumdar, Shirshendu Mukherjee, Nabaneeta Deb Sen are writing on wider issues, interspersing them with emotional settings.

Playwright Vijay Tendulkar's strong ideology on social issues and political vendetta has annoyed many, but all this has made his writings informative and given Marathi literature a strong foundation in the world of translation.

Now venturing into other states are publishers who feel stories are the only way to preserve culture and develop active tolerance for other cultures.

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Speed Reading Is Proven to Improve Grades, eReflect Announces

eReflect, the parent company behind 7 Speed Reading™ software, revealed today that people who have mastered speed reading are more likely to have better grades than their counterparts who read at a conventional pace (approximately 175 to 215 words per minute). As a spokesperson noted in the latest briefing from the company, speed reading is not a skill but rather a prerequisite in the demanding and fast-pacing lives that most people lead. Speed reading makes knowledge absorption much more efficient, allowing people to gather extraordinary amounts of new knowledge when they consistently practice speed reading.

Reading faster is especially important for high school and college students. According to eReflect, there are many software products and other utilities that can help people boost their reading speed without sacrificing comprehension. Such products use tried and tested speed reading strategies that have been proven capable of boosting reading speed and comprehension at the same time, making readers truly efficient in acquiring new knowledge. This is a must-have skill for university studentswho need to take in a lot of new information for various exams and other assessment-related activities, such as essay writing or researching, the spokesperson pointed out.

 
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Iran Book News Agency (IBNA) - American novelist’s book to be introduced to Iranians

Iranian translator Soheil Sommi has finished translating ‘The Great Man’, a novel by American author Kate Christensen.

IBNA: The first translation of Kate Christensen’s works will be marketed in Iran holding Soheil Sommi’s rendition. 

Kate Christensen (born August 22, 1962) is an American novelist. ‘The Great Man’ won the 2008 PEN/Faulkner Award for Fiction, beating nearly 350 other submissions and earning Christensen the $15,000 top prize. 

The story takes place five years after the death, at 78, of celebrated painter Oscar Feldman, the "great man" of the title. 
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Bollywood: Did you know...? | Central - ITV News

Bollywood is defined by the Oxford English Dictionary as ‘a name for the Indian popular film industry, based in Mumbai (Bombay)’. It’s a blend of the words Bombay and Hollywood.The longest on-screen kiss in the history of Bollywood was in a film called Karma (1933) which starred Devika Rani and her husband Himanshu Rai. The kiss lasted four minutes.Mother India (1957) is hailed as one of the most important films in the industry's history. It tells the story of a poor villager who raises her family without her husband and struggles with a money-lender. The film is hugely respected for highlighting the socio-economic and political problems the country and its people faced at the time.
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Dictionary of legal terms translated in Urdu

16.9.2013 (UNI) For the first time in India, dictionary of legal terms has been translated in Urdu and made available for readers. 
'The Urdu Law Dictionary 'Qanon Lugat' is billed as the first of its kind in the country, and encompasses over 52,000 legal terms,' said chief translator Muhammad Irshad Hanif who is also advocate on record in the Supreme Court. 

Mr Irshad Hanif has also translated Indian Penal Code, 1860, Indian Evidence Act, 1872 in Urdu and has published two books namely 'Taziraat-e-Hind' 'Qanoon Shahadat-e-Hind'

'It has a foreword written by Chief Justice of India Altamas Kabir. Though the dictionary is focused on the Indian legal system, it will have wide usage even in the international sphere,' Hanif told reporters here. 

'Justice (retd) Markandey Katju has been very kind enough to pen a foreword for the translations of the laws, which has been a matter of great encouragement,' Hanif added. 

Top criminal lawyer Majeed Memon said these three translations would greatly benefit the legal fraternity. 

Jamiat Ulama-e-Maharashtra legal panel member lawyer Shahid N Ansari said this is the first time that the line-to-line translation of the two laws is available in Urdu. 

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Learning cursive in the first grade helps students

By 2014, 45 American states will stop teaching cursive writing in favour of keyboard proficiency. In Québec, there are no plans for the moment to abandon this type of writing. "Teaching and daily use of handwriting are essential, if only to avoid being at the mercy of technology," says Professor Isabelle Montésinos-Gelet at the University of Montreal's Faculty of Education. Although she welcomes the idea of young people learning to handle a computer keyboard, she believes it should be introduced in the school curriculum when students are already proficient in one style of writing: print (separate letters) or cursive (joined letters).

Read more at: http://phys.org/news/2013-09-cursive-grade-students.html#jCp

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Google veut supprimer la barrière linguistique avec la traduction universelle

Selon le quotidien allemand Der Spiegel, Google aurait confié à l’une de ses équipes la lourde tâche de créer un nouveau service qui briserait les barrières linguistiques et permettrait à deux parfaits inconnus d’entreprendre une conversation dans deux langues différentes.

Depuis des années maintenant, Google s’est imposé comme l’une des acteurs majeurs des traductions en ligne. Son application Google Traductions est utilisée par la majorité des possesseurs de Smartphones Android, et le géant américain est parvenu à se faire une place au soleil dans le portefeuille d’applications de l’App Store.

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Translations: A shortcut into different worlds (Publishing Trend)

New Delhi, Sep 16 (IANS) In a land of cultural diversities like India, language is the glue that binds us together - and separates as well. Literature from the mofussil Indian landscape is a window of its indigenous socio-political turmoil and publishers are translating poignant tales of struggle, freedom, history and injustice to transport readers into other worlds.

"Translations are a shortcut into another world or, you can say, a bridge between two different worlds. Translations connect India and its people," Mini Krishnan, publishing consultant and editor, translations, Oxford University Press (OUP), told IANS.

"What is the worth of travelling Madras (Chennai) to Delhi and not knowing the culture? Literature introduces you to it," she added.

Translations have the ability to foster culture - linking between people, languages and culture, across history, across caste, class and religion, through its storytelling means.

It isn't a new phenomenon, though. Bengali and Marathi translations have always had a strong foothold, thanks to some prominent names.

Nobel laureate Rabindranath Tagore's warm story "Kabuliwalla" has been read by many. Tagore's stories have been translated in many languages and hence Bengal's strong literary roots have resonated with urban audiences and the this legacy has been carried forward by Satyait Ray's "Feluda" and Mahasweta Devi's "Dust On The Road" and with their many other stories.

Among contemporary writers, Suchitra Bhattacharya, Bani Basu, Tilottama Majumdar, Shirshendu Mukherjee, Nabaneeta Deb Sen are writing on wider issues, interspersing them with emotional settings.

Playwright Vijay Tendulkar's strong ideology on social issues and political vendetta has annoyed many, but all this has made his writings informative and given Marathi literature a strong foundation in the world of translation.

Now venturing into other states are publishers who feel stories are the only way to preserve culture and develop active tolerance for other cultures.

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NRTIS 2013 - New Research in Translation and Interpreting Studies 2013

The Intercultural Studies Group is pleased to announce its sixth international conference for graduate students and young scholars: New Research in Translation and Interpreting Studies 2013.

Languages: English, Spanish.

Format: Speakers will be given 20 minutes to present their project; each presentation will be followed by 15 minutes of discussion. This format is designed to promote international contacts among novice researchers and to encourage extensive feedback from peers.

Deadlines: Proposals by January 18, 2013. Notification of acceptance by March 5, 2013.

Publication: Selected speakers will later be invited to present 3,000-word papers for publication (style sheet here). (Previous publications: Translation Research Projects 1, Translation Research Projects 2,Translation Research Projects 3 and Translation Research Projects 4)

The conference is organized by the Intercultural Studies Group as part of its doctoral program in Translation and Intercultural Studies.

 
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TAUS Translation Technology Showcase Webinar - David Canek, MemSource Technologies

David Canek (CEO MemSource Technologies) talks about MemSource Cloud, the API-enabled Translation Environment during the TAUS Translation Technology Showcase Webinar on September 4, 2013

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Oirata language in danger of extinction - ANTARA News

Jakarta (ANTARA News) - The endangered Oirata language in Indonesia has a rich oral culture, with stories, songs, and histories passed on from one generation to the next.

According to the National Language Centre at the Ministry of Education and Culture, Indonesia is home to more than 746 ethnic languages.

Unfortunately, it is predicted that about 90 percent of these ethnic languages will disappear by the end of the 21st century because the number of speakers is shrinking rapidly.

The ethnic languages in Indonesia belong to both the Austronesian or Malay-speaking families, and non-Austronesian or Trans-New Guinea-speaking families.

Particularly, the languages in the eastern part of Indonesia are classified as languages of the minority because of a sharp decrease in the number of speakers, and the endangered Oirata language is one of them.

This language is spoken by the people of Oirata Barat and Oirata Timur villages on the island of Kisar, Southwest Maluku (MBD) District, Maluku.

Based on the results of the 2010 census, these two villages have a total population of 1,566, but only a few of them are able to communicate in the Oirata language, while the rest communicate in the Ambonese Malay dialect.

In reality, less than 500 people above the age of 50 are able to communicate well in the Oirata language while their children and grandchildren are unable to do so.

"If nothing is done, the Oirata language is feared to become extinct," said Prof. Tanwey Gerson Ratumanan, who works at Ambon Pattimura University (Unpatti).

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Estelblau's curator insight, September 16, 2013 6:18 AM

Via @metaglossia

Aletha Rossiter's curator insight, October 1, 2013 10:40 AM

746 ethnic languages in Indonesia! But 90% will disappear by the end of the 21st century... should we care?

The magic of the physical book

MASSACHUSETTS, USA - I had to move away for graduate school a few weeks ago. It was a frenzy of shopping, packing, weighing suitcases, repacking, all on an endless loop until I decided to make drastic cuts.

First to go: the books. When I would ask people how many books I should bring with me to graduate school, I got varying answers: “All of them! But you’re talking about the ones on your iPad, right?”

“None! The libraries have everything!”

“As many as you can — who knows what you’ll feel like reading when you get there?”

“Just the ones you feel attached to,” and so on in a series of puzzling answers.

As I sat amidst my discarded towers of books, I began to look at them with a bit of resentment. What were these archaic masses of woodpulp and glue even doing with me? And why did so many of them seem to be recent purchases, still acquired after I’d bought an e-reader?

This big move and the books I have had to jettison have led me to think about books, and how and why they matter — or even if they still do.

In the age of digital reading and human hypermobility, purchasing and collecting physical books seem to be going out of style.

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Recent Serbian literature in translation: Fear and Servant by Mirjana Novaković – InSerbia News

Serbia has a very long and proud literary tradition, but in poetry and prose alike. This isn’t just a historical tradition, but an ongoing one with ample exciting examples of contemporary Serbian literature, too.

The only problem is, some of this literature—perhaps much of it—doesn’t make it beyond a Serbo-Croatian readership because it is not translated into English and other languages spoken elsewhere. Thankfully, that is changing to a degree and a variety of publishers have made efforts to expand their Serbian-language works into translated editions. No publisher is probably more committed to this mission overall than GeoPoetika is with its “Serbian Prose in Translation” series. Funded in part by a grant from the Serbian Ministry of Culture, this project aims to bring contemporary Serbian novels into English translation so that those who can read English but do not know Serbo-Croatian are thus able to enjoy some of the best authors writing in Serbia today.

While all the titles in their series are very exciting to me and represent some very respected and very important contemporary Serbian writers, the first one I want to draw readers’ attention to would be Fear and Servant by Mirjana Novaković. In part, this novel stands out because its historical setting and theme: it is set in Belgrade of the 1700s, where as Habsburg princess in Belgrade provides one of the central characters, while another one is found in that of a vampire and by extension, the devil himself. But this isn’t your typical vampire tale—neither Dracula nor Twilight—but based to a degree in the authentic conventions of Slavic vampire lore, which indeed are quite different from the Dracula variant of westernized vampire of which the world is more aware. Drawing from centuries-old vampire folklore of Serbia, the author returns to the mystical origins of the undead, which in Serbia and elsewhere in the Balkans was mainly a fear of the departed returning to the land of the living and causing serious problems. 

http://inserbia.info/news/2013/09/recent-serbian-literature-in-translation-fear-and-servant-by-mirjana-novakovic/

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allAfrica.com: Zimbabwe: Time to Go Beyond Literacy (Page 1 of 2)

Zimbabwe needs to adopt information literacy policies and programmes that will help the country to go beyond the limited view of literacy that has dominated in the past in order to consolidate the country's top literacy ranking on the continent, library information experts say. Harare Polytechnic principal information science lecturer Mr Collence Chisita told a gathering to commemorate the International Literacy Day recently that even though the country was ranked highly on the continent in terms of literacy levels, it needed to take bold steps to promote information literacy as opposed to basic literacy -- "reading, writing and calculating."

"We need to have information literacy. We need to go beyond just reading, writing and calculating," he said. "Having a literacy rate of over 90 percent is a commendable achievement but cementing and consolidating this with information literacy will help grow the country's learning horizon."

Information literacy, he said, involved developing literary skills that enable citizens to learn new forms of literacy and to develop the ability to locate, evaluate and effectively use information in a variety of ways for their own survival.

Said US public affairs library information expert Mr Stephen Mushonga: "When it comes to information literacy, I think we are just under 20 percent. Only a few Zimbabweans have information literacy. These may include a few in universities, colleges and other professional sectors.

"Most people use Wikipedia as a source of information, but this is not acceptable in the academia. Most people are searching for information from sources which are not credible."

Zimbabwe Open University library information expert Mr Edwin Madziwo said the teaching of information literacy and critical thinking should be taught across all levels from primary to college and university level to help people to develop and value information literacy and critical thinking.

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