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Metaglossia: The Translation World
News about translation, interpreting, intercultural communication, terminology and lexicography - as it happens
Curated by Charles Tiayon
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Better Translating–Part IX: Get people to pay you

Better Translating–Part IX: Get people to pay you | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it
People love writing about this topic; after all, we’re all in in for the money. No-one can claim they are still having that much fun doing translations after a couple of years in the business. All ...

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Dividing A Long Translation Between Many Translators Is Always A Recipe for Disaster

Dividing A Long Translation Between Many Translators Is Always A Recipe for Disaster | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it
Many translation agencies use complex flowcharts to explain to potential customers their intricate and unique Translation Quality Control Process. The marketing people who create these flowcharts p...

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Interpreter Training (Part 2)

Part 2 of a video correcting common interpreting mistakes...
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Translation Tribulations: Hacking Trados Freelance Languages

Translation Tribulations: Hacking Trados Freelance Languages | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it

Hacking Trados Freelance Languages
One of the great nuisances for me in working with Trados is the limitation of the freelance version with respect to the languages that can be set. Only five are permitted at a time. If for some reason you need to make changes, the standard advice is to uninstall the application, clean the registry and re-install. All in all a fairly time-consuming process if you are used to more streamlined CAT tools that install in 5 minutes or less. And work afterward. Also, when I install SDL Trados Anything on my Windows 7 system with all the latest schnick-schnack and see Win XP components and runtime engines with dates like 2005 being hammered onto my system, I am... well... just a little concerned. One of these days I expect SDL will refactor its software to make it more scalable and able to match the performance of other leading applications. Until then I will tread carefully with anything involving installation.

All in all, registry hacking, though generally spoken of in fearful terms, is probably the safer, gentler alternative for adjusting the five languages set for Trados. Why would I want to do that, you ask? Although I actually only work with two languages and amuse myself with another two, I get sample files in various combinations I would never dream of handling with requests to look briefly at some technical issue. This week it involves Polish. Up to now my main concern with the Polish language has been to discipline myself not to mistake it for Russian when I've passed 20 shots sampling the variety of vodkas in polite company in that fine country. But today I had to open a TWB TM with English and Polish, and my friend the Flagman said it was verboten.

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Mir for translating literary works into Kashmiri Lastupdate:- Sun, 15 Jul 2012 18:30:00 GMT GreaterKashmir.com

Mir for translating literary works into Kashmiri Lastupdate:- Sun, 15 Jul 2012 18:30:00 GMT GreaterKashmir.com | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it
Srinagar Jul 14 Stressing the need for translating various literature works of different language in Kashmiri Minister for Agriculture Ghulam Hassan Mir said that this is necessary for revival preservation and propagation of Kashmiri language...
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No room for African languages at IntwasaIntwasa

No room for African languages at IntwasaIntwasa | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it

Bulawayo 2012 Festival organisers have indicated that the African language will not be used in the short story competition for this year whose deadline is July 31, 2012. Both Shona and Ndebele are excluded from the annual writing feast.

Shona is accommodated in the WIN Global Arts Trust Short Story Writing Competition whose deadline is Friday July 20, 2012. The 2012 www.goldenbaobab.org short story writing competition for children’s stories has been in English with a deadline of June 24, 2012.

The competitions in short story writing would seem to use more of English than the African language. It is possible too that in Portuguese, Spanish, French, German, Italian- Africa, etc., the writing will be more dominant in the external language – known in linguistic parlance as languages of wider communication (LWC) or lingua francae.

Irele Amuta, Chinua Achebe, Ngugi wa’Thiongo, among many African writers, have argued at one time or another, for the use of the African language in writing African poetry, drama, short stories and novels. Some of these authors have been more famous through writing in an LWC! The manner in which competition writing sticks to the medium of English in Zimbabwe might be indicative of the limited success that has been associated with writing in the African language!

It is not necessary to go through all the arguments for the use of the African language, but it is disturbing that the trend is more toward English than the African language in the writing of stories in 2012.The concern should be addressed to Ndebele which would seem not to have been accommodated in writings for2012.

The dearth of works in Ndebele writing affecting Intwasa could be linked to a variety of reasons in addition to justification for Ndebele exclusion offered by Intwasa. Intwasa insists that Ndebele could not be competed for in Bulawayo – the presumed seat of professional Ndebele writers; if Ndebele cannot be written in its own backyard then there is a cause for absolute concern because potential Ndebele writers, like the Bulawayo industrial potential, have located to Harare.

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gulftoday.ae | Public speaking culture in Dubai gets boost

gulftoday.ae | Public speaking culture in Dubai gets boost | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it

DUBAI: The importance of public speaking in one’s daily life in a fast growing metropolitan culture as that of Dubai cannot be understated. Realising this, members of an amateur speaking forum approached officials of Area 33, Division J, District 20 of Toastmasters International, a communication and leadership development major, who have 260,000 members that are part of 13,000 clubs in over 80 countries.

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Student heading for New Guinea with Bible translation group

Jessica Gettemy has never spent much time away from home and family.
That's about to change for the University of Georgia linguistics major as she embarks today for a month-long trip to Papua New Guinea to work on translations of the Holy Bible.
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Signed languages for professional purposes

Signed languages for professional purposes | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it
European Centre for Modern Languages (ECML), Centre européen pour les langues vivantes (CELV)...
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On translating Joseph Roth | The Dublin Review

On translating Joseph Roth | The Dublin Review | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it

Michael Hoffman

I was first offered a Joseph Roth novel to translate in 1988. The book was Right and Left. Roth’s previous translator, John Hoare, I think had died. I had been reading Roth for some years, reviewed some of the books – Weights and Measures, Job, Hotel Savoy, The Spider’s Web, Zipper and his Father – and written an introduction for a paperback edition of one: Flight Without End. A bit of Zipper had even made its way into a poem I wrote in the mid eighties: ‘Once, I left a bit of Joseph Roth bleeding on your desk’ (the pun on ‘Roth’, red, and ‘bleeding’). I had done some translations, and thought of it as something I would do from time to time, but I had no ambitions for myself as a translator.

I should perhaps mention that I was born in Germany, of German parents, came to England at the age of four, and was brought up in a German-speaking household; after my parents returned to Germany and left me in an English boarding-school, I spent the holidays there, and read German easily and relatively uncomplainingly. My German is familial and somewhat literary: that of a child who’s read Thomas Mann, as I’ve sometimes described it. There are things in German I find difficult or distasteful – contemporary slang, bureaucratic language, technical terms of all sorts – but it is not a language I’ve ever had to learn.

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El amigo alemán y Thomas Bernhard, el duro

El amigo alemán y Thomas Bernhard, el duro | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it

Una excusa perfecta me da alas para entrevistar a Miguel Sáenz –seguramente, el mejor traductor de literatura alemana- con el objeto de preguntarle sobre Thomas Bernhard: la editorial Cómplices acaba de publicar en español su traducción de Correspondencia, una selección de las cartas que el autor de Trastorno intercambió con su editor alemán, Sigfried Unseld, de quien hace poco declaró Sáenz que este libro supone una revelación de la personalidad de uno de los grandes editores de la historia, aparte de tener más paciencia que el santo Job con el muy ególatra de Bernhard.

“Leí hace mucho su libro El autor y su editor (Taurus, 1985) e incluso llegué a conocerlo fugazmente en Madrid, pero sólo al traducir ahora sus cartas y los informes de viajes de alimentaron luego su Chronik (1970-2000) me he dado cuenta de su verdadera talla”, dice Sáenz, que aporta lo que el propio Bernhard escribió en una de las cartas, de 1986: “Tarde, pero no demasiado tarde, reconocerán los alemanes, aun aplicando los más altos criterios, que nunca ha existido un editor más importante”. Lo que no le impidió mandarle a hacer puñetas cuando el pobre Unseld, ante las muestras de egolatría persistentes de su autor, le confesó que tiraba la toalla.

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Language translators volunteer to assist international visitors at the World Choir Games | Language Translation

Language translators volunteer to assist international visitors at the World Choir Games | Language Translation | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it
As Cincinnati begins to host the 2012 World Choir Games, a small army of volunteers is on hand to provide language translation for thousands of international visitors who are expected to attend the event.
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Google Traduction : nouvelle fonctionnalité avec exemples de phrases

Google Traduction : nouvelle fonctionnalité avec exemples de phrases | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it
Google vient d'annoncer une nouvelle fonctionnalité dans Google Traduction. Il s'agit de proposer un exemple de phrase tiré du web pour n'importe quel terme.
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The Banks vs. Translators: What do freelancers think about how they get paid?

The Banks vs. Translators: What do freelancers think about how they get paid? | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it
After you’ve done the hard work – it’s great to get paid. But getting paid is not always as straightforward as we might prefer it to be. In a previous post I posed the question &#... (The Banks vs.

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The Field of Translation Ranks among Top Recession-Proof Industries

The Field of Translation Ranks among Top Recession-Proof Industries | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it
Overall, the translation industry has experienced a compound annual growth rate of 12.17%.

With the global economy still feeling the effects of the recession, some industries are holding their own while others are floundering. Fortunately, the prospects for the field of translation look extremely promising, with the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) projecting industry growth of 42% during this decade, a figure that exceeds growth estimates for other industries evaluated by the BLS. As the U.S. population continues to become more diverse, the demand for interpreters and translators will also grow.

According to a market research study by the firm Common Sense Advisory, the market for language services will total $33.5 billion this year. Overall, the translation industry has experienced a compound annual growth rate of 12.17%. Unlike many industries where a handful of top performers dominate the business landscape, the market for translation and interpretation is splintered, with over 26,000 companies worldwide offering translation services. Only nine of those companies reported revenue in excess of $100 million last year.

Despite the proliferation of machine translation tools such as Google Translate and BabelFish, the market for language services has not suffered a downturn. While machine translation tools do offer insight into the meaning of a text, computers fail to render the nuanced, culturally correct translations created by humans. Given the current limitations of machine translation, it would seem that translators’ jobs are safe.

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Google Traduction propose de remettre les mots dans leur contexte

Google Traduction propose de remettre les mots dans leur contexte | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it
Une nouvelle fonctionnalité est apparue dans Google Traduction : un bouton qui permet d'obtenir des exemples d'utilisation d'un mot traduit. La traduction,...
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MA Translation Studies News: Extended deadline for abstracts for IPCITI postgraduate conference, November 2012

MA Translation Studies News: Extended deadline for abstracts for IPCITI postgraduate conference, November 2012 | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it

Extended deadline for abstracts for IPCITI postgraduate conference, November 2012
Received from Dorothy Kenny at Dublin City University:

IPCITI 2012
8-10 November 2012
Centre for Translation and Textual Studies
School of Applied Language and Intercultural Studies
Dublin City University, Ireland

Dear colleagues and students,

This is to inform you that the deadline for submission of abstracts to the 8th International Postgraduate Conference in Translating and Interpreting has been extended to 23rd July 2012.

IPCITI is designed to provide *new* researchers from all areas of translation and interpreting studies with the opportunity to share their research with peers in a supportive and intellectually stimulating environment. Day one of IPCITI is devoted to pre-conference workshops; days two and three are devoted to keynote lectures and parallel conference sessions.

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Dictionary of Christian Spirituality

Dictionary of Christian Spirituality | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it

I’m a bit late in getting around to this, but I wanted to offer up a plug for a great new resource: the Dictionary of Christian Spirituality, edited by Glen Scorgie (general editor), Simon Chan, Gordon T. Smith and James D. Smith. The book recently wasannounced (this spring) as the winner of the Christian Book Awards’ Bible Reference category. I’m proud to call both Glen and Jim colleagues of mine (they teach at Bethel Seminary’s San Diego campus, where those of us in St. Paul wish we are when January rolls around). The book is an impressive collection of authors covering a remarkable range of topics. It’s organized under two main sections: (1) a series of 34 integrative perspective essays on topics such as Old and New Testament foundations, spirituality in community, education and spirituality, eschatology and hope, Jesus, the Holy Spirit, and various historical perspectives, (2) a collection of 700 or so alphabetized entries on a vast array of topics related to Christian spirituality.

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HOPE CHANNEL ADDS THIRD CHANNEL FOR AFRICA: HOPE CHANNEL

A new television channel for speakers of major indigenous African languages will soon launch as part of Hope Channel, the global television network of the Seventh-day Adventist Church.

Three divisions of the Seventh-day Adventist Church in Africa are joining together to enhance the culturally-relevant Hope Channels available to everyone across the African continent.

The new indigenous African language channel will cover sub-Sahara Africa with a signal broadcasting from the Intelsat-10 satellite. It will be added to the network’s current 13 satellite broadcast channels to provide possibility for programming in languages such as Swahili, Bemba, Afrikaans, Xhosa, French, Zulu, and other key languages. Each selected language will receive a regular time slot.

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The hazard factor in public speaking

The hazard factor in public speaking | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it

Email Print 15 July 2012 | last updated at 12:15AM
The hazard factor in public speaking

By Paddy Bowie 0 comments

MIX-UPS: Word traps can have the same effect as jokes, only this time the joke is on us
IN a preceding article, I spoke of how tricky words can be. We can pride ourselves on how sophisticated Kuala Lumpur has become. One intriguing development is the advent of "an obedient wives club".
Members are advised to consult a "professional" i.e. a prostitute for advice on the art and skills of pleasuring men. It only needs a slight adjustment to the title which would then be the Club of Obedient Wives, the acronym for which is "COW".
Other examples abound. "Menopause", according to my business partner, encourages "men" to "pause" before venturing on anything risky. We wrote earlier of the universal addiction to "hot gos" whereas "hot air" means something totally without meaning.

Read more: The hazard factor in public speaking - Columnist - New Straits Times http://www.nst.com.my/opinion/columnist/the-hazard-factor-in-public-speaking-1.107567#ixzz20eZVWFf9

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Translation, Localisation, Interpreting and Website Translation Articles

Articles about language translation services, localization, website translation, being an translator or interpreter and translation terminology.
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10 rules for writing fiction - Will Self

10 rules for writing fiction - Will Self | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it

Will Self’s 10 rules for writing fiction, from the Guardian Review:

1. Don’t look back until you’ve written an entire draft, just begin each day from the last sentence you wrote the preceding day. This prevents those cringing feelings, and means that you have a substantial body of work before you get down to the real work, which is all in …

2. The edit.

3. Always carry a notebook. And I mean always. The short-term memory only retains information for three minutes; unless it is committed to paper, you can lose an idea for ever.

4. Stop reading fiction – it’s all lies anyway, and it doesn’t have anything to tell you that you don’t know already (assuming, that is, you’ve read a great deal of fiction in the past; if you haven’t, you have no business whatsoever being a writer of fiction).

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Why we still need more good translators | The Big Wave

Why we still need more good translators | The Big Wave | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it

B y: Inger Larsen

I did a little poll recently. It showed that the failure rate for translators passing professional test translations is about 70%. These are qualified translators, many of them with quite a lot of experience. Why is the failure rate so high? What makes a good translator?

The poll was fairly informal, just a few phone calls to translation managers working with large translation companies. Some said 60%, others said it was as high as 80%. But I come across the same issue practically every day in my work and I think that the 70% rate is fairly accurate.

Although I started out as a translator about 25 years ago, for the last 12 years I have been running my own recruitment company for the translation industry. At one point we were recruiting for a project assistant position. One of the applicants had a degree in linguistics, an MA in translation and some relevant work experience as an in-house translator and project assistant. I asked for her references. The first I contacted was her linguistics course tutor. Glowing references – one of the best linguistic talents they had had for a long time. So far, so good. Then I contacted her most recent employer. Nice girl, but she hadn’t worked out as a translator. She just hadn’t grasped either the language part or the technical part of the job, her referee said. So it’s possible to be a brilliant linguist but a poor translator. Most of us probably know that already. But what does it take?

What makes a good translator?

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JWOP demands speedy translation of draft constitution | Zambia Daily Mail

JWOP demands speedy translation of draft constitution | Zambia Daily Mail | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it

JUSTICE for Widows and Orphans Project (JWOP) project manager Felix Kunda has advised the Technical Committee on Drafting the Zambian Constitution (TCDZC) to expedite the translation of the Constitution into local languages to give more widows an opportunity to read and offer concrete submissions to it.
Mr Kunda told the Femail News in an interview recently that much as his organisation supports the extension of the consultation period for the first Draft Constitution the process to translate it into local languages should be hasten.
He said the move to extend the consultation period would also help more Zambians, especially widows and orphans to make comprehensive comments and submissions to the document which is currently in public domain.

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Un os dans la traduction. À propos de la côte d’Adam (Genèse 20,21-22) | Langues de feu

Un os dans la traduction. À propos de la côte d’Adam (Genèse 20,21-22) | Langues de feu | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it

Par Claire Placial
Un billet de Pierre Barthélémy publié le 11 juillet sur Passeur de Sciences, blog hébergé par le site du Monde, a déjà beaucoup circulé (le 12 juillet en début d’après-midi, c’était l’article le plus partagé du site). Ce billet, intitulé « Quel os Dieu a-t-il vraiment pris à Adam pour créer Ève ? », fait état, sur un ton non dénué d’humour et de prise de distances, de l’hypothèse développée par Scott Gilbert, professeur de biologie au Swarthmore College, avec l’assistance de Ziony Zevit, spécialiste de langues sémitiques. Ève n’aurait pas été créée à partir d’une côte d’Adam, mais à partir du baculum, os pénien que possèdent certains mammifères (dont le gorille) et qui facilite l’érection, mais que l’homme n’a pas, comme on sait ; l’évocation du mot « côte » résulterait d’une erreur de traduction.

Plusieurs amis m’ont relayé l’information ; de fait, l’alliance de traductologie biblique, d’« improbabologie » pour reprendre le nom de la chronique de Pierre Barthélémy, et de grivoiserie n’est pas pour me déplaire.

Me voici donc à ajouter un billet au billet, et à élucubrer sur l’os traductologique (ou autre) duquel est issue Ève notre mère à tous (depuis ma campagne bretonne, sans dictionnaires d’hébreu, concordances, bibliothèques, Bibles imprimées : la scientificité de ce qui suit est relative).

La côte d’Adam dans les traductions françaises

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