Metaglossia: The Translation World
295.8K views | +42 today
Follow
Metaglossia: The Translation World
News about translation, interpreting, intercultural communication, terminology and lexicography - as it happens
Curated by Charles Tiayon
Your new post is loading...

Writing workshop: Turning memories into memoir

The Estes Valley Library is pleased to host a special free workshop this month to guide participants in the steps to turning their life stories into a personal narrative. The workshop will be led by author and retired University of Colorado instructor Dr. Kayann Short, a specialist in the field of ecobiography who teaches workshops at her farm in Colorado. The two-hour session takes place on Saturday, May 17 at 3 p.m. at the library. Advance sign-up at estesvalleylibrary.org is required to assure seating.

Dr. Short will begin the workshop by reading a few selections from her recent book, "A Bushel's Worth: an Ecobiography", followed by a discussion of techniques for writing personal and family stories around important life experiences. Participants will leave the workshop with the beginning structures of a personal narrative that they can continue to build upon later. She invites attendees to consider writing about last fall's flood, and Dr. Short will share ideas from her own flood story, which was published in a recent anthology in Longmont.

"A Bushel's Worth" was a recent finalist for the Sarton Memoir Award and a silver medalist in green living and sustainability for the Nautilus Better Books for a Better World Award. Dr. Short writes a blog about books, writing, food, and farming at pearlmoonplenty.wordpress.com

For additional information on this or other upcoming library events, visit estesvalleylibrary.org or call (970) 586-8116.

Scoop.it!
No comment yet.

Writing always needs rewriting

I went to college so long ago that I wrote my numerous English papers on an electric typewriter. Because I was 18 or 19 or so, I left every assignment until the last possible minute.

That meant that what I typed first is what I handed in. That may explain why I still have nightmares about not being able to find the typewriter or typing paper with a term paper due the next day.

By the time I was a college senior, I was slightly more disciplined. That year I took a course on the poetry of John Milton. I never knew what to write about Milton. I spent a lot of time stuck between Chaos and Hell.

That was apparent to my professor. She told me that I must buy a word processor. She said it was essential for writing papers because you could easily move chunks of text from one spot to another. Ideas would be simple to organize. Revising would be a breeze.

I couldn’t comprehend her crazy talk. Nothing was wrong with my typewriter. A word processor would cost a fortune. I was 21, and I knew everything.

Well, times change. I realized I didn’t know everything.

No, I don’t have a word processor now. I have a genuine computer.

Most important, I’ve learned that my professor was right about one key thing: rewriting can be your friend.

Many people dislike the idea of rewriting. Human nature makes us believe what we have written is golden. But few pieces of writing are perfect, even after the 10th round of rewriting.

Maybe the idea sounds less severe when you call it revising, tinkering, altering, modifying or changing.

The process needn’t apply to only academic writing. Whether you’re writing an autobiography, a complaint about too much pulp in your orange juice, a Dear John letter or a job application, you can afford to revise.

Ask yourself a few questions: Is this the best way to start this paper? Does the rest of what I’ve written support my premise? Could this sentence be written in active voice instead of passive? Why did I write “the’’ twice? Can I use a better verb here? Can I use a better transition there? Do I have enough information?

Do I really need this sentence? What words can I cut out? Is this a cliche? Is this paragraph clear? Am I repeating things? Have I checked the grammar, punctuation and spelling?

Then, guess what? You need ask yourself all those questions again.

Ernest Hemingway explained his iceberg method of writing. “There is seven-eighths of it under the water for every part that shows. Anything you know you can eliminate and it only strengthens your iceberg.”

Whenever you can, give yourself some breathing room before you rewrite. If something needs to be finished on Wednesday morning, try to complete it by Monday. Then wait a day before you look at it again. You may be surprised at what jumps out at you. (When you’re just starting out, you may need safety goggles.)

The poet Horace recommended that people wait nine years before going back to rewrite. I guess life moved a lot slower during the Roman Empire.

The distance helps you to refocus. When you return to your paper or letter or project, you will look at it with new eyes. (No, not literally.)

Sometimes printing the story can help you see something that needs fixing. Mark the changes on the printout, then, when you’re sure about them, make the changes on the document.

It may be hard to accept that what you wrote wasn’t perfect the first time, but do your best.

Prolific writer Roald Dahl said, “By the time I am nearing the end of a story, the first part will have been reread and altered and corrected at least one hundred and fifty times. I am suspicious of both facility and speed. Good writing is essentially rewriting. I am positive of this.” I can’t imagine where he found the time.

Scoop.it!
No comment yet.

Muslims-Christians dialogues needed to solve Kalimah Allah issue - Latest - New Straits Times

SHAH ALAM: The Muslims and Christians community are encouraged to hold public dialogues on the usage of kalimah Allah in the Malay translation of the bibles to end public confusion as well as to solve the issue once and for all.
Bandung University theology professor Prof Dr Menehim Ali said that the discussion on kalimah Allah should be within the linguistics, sociological and historical context.
 
"The usage of 'Allah' in the Malay and Indonesian-language bibles is mainly a linguistics issue. 
 
"For the Muslims, the word 'Allah' is a proper noun referring specifically to the one god that all Muslims believed in while in the new bible translation the world 'Allah' is used as a common noun as a similar word to god," he said at the 'Kalimah Allah in Nusantara' 
seminar at Universiti Teknologi Mara (UiTM) Shah Alam, today morning. 
 
Menehim said that the same issue is facing the Muslims and Christians community in Indonesia. 
 
"The early translation of the New Testament in Indonesia actually used the word 'Allah' as a proper noun instead of as a common noun. 
 
Only the modern version of the translation that has such linguistic problem. 
 
"The Muslim community in Indonesia, the scholars, actually wrote a letter to the Indonesia Bible Society, asking them to change the usage of 'Allah' to it's original context. 
 
"However the letter was never entertained. This issue had stirred some dissatisfaction among the Muslims and in response, Muslim scholars organized peaceful dialogue sessions with the Christians to discuss the issue of origin, linguistics, the history of Christianity and Islam in Nusantara and other issues," he said.
 
Menehim added that the case in Malaysia is similar but noted the lack of public discourse to enlighten the public on the issue. 
 
"Without a proper discussion, there could be discontent within these two communities because both sides do not understand each other's stand. How can we achieve peace and common understanding if we can't even sit together to talk?," he said. 
 
He added that in Indonesia, the government did not intervene with the issue despite calls by the Muslim community.
 
He said that it is important for the government to intervene and act as a mediator to ensure that the public discourse flows smoothly. 
 
Another Indonesian panelist, former Catholic priest, Insan L. S. Mokoginta said there are many similarities between the fundamental teachings of Christianity and Islam. 
 
He said that Jesus is known as one of the most important prophets for the Muslims and cited phrases from the bible where the Jesus had foretell the coming of 'the last prophet' which the Muslims believed to be the prophet Muhammad. 
 
He added that those who followed the history of Jesus's life would notice the similarities between the two religion and perhaps be inclined to accept Islamic teachings. 
 
Late last year, the state religious authorities caused a controversy when they confiscated more than 300 Malay-bibles belonging to the Malaysia Bible Society because of the usage of kalimah Allah. 
 
The issue of kalimah Allah usage among non-Muslims in Malaysia has been a long winding crisis that has yet to be resolved.
 



Read more: Muslims-Christians dialogues needed to solve Kalimah Allah issue - Latest - New Straits Times http://www.nst.com.my/latest/muslims-christians-dialogues-needed-to-solve-kalimah-allah-issue-1.588921?cache=03d163d03edding-pred-1.1176%2F%3Fpfpentwage63dp%3A%2Fhe3d03dn63frea-rti3d19.3d163d03edding-pred-1.1176%2F%3Fpfpentwage63dp%3A%2Fhe3d03dn63frea-rti3d19.111w5ii%2Fed-1.1176%2F%2F2.2525%2F2.2525%2F1.33120%2F7.184928%3Fpage%3D0%3Fpage%3D0%3Fpage%3D0%2F%24m.local.facebook_userInfo.pic_square%2F7.466110%2F7.466110%2F7.490557%2F7.490557%2F7.490557%2F7.541994%2F7.541994%2F7.541994%2F7.541994#ixzz30x8EvouR

Scoop.it!
No comment yet.

Listen to Aural Publications of Spoken Word by SACI Creative Writing Instructor, Lee Foust

SACI's Creative Writing instructor, Lee Foust, read and performed his spoken word live at SACI last week. If you missed it, you can still listen to his musical readings, but you will have to use yo...
Scoop.it!
No comment yet.

Learning to read in Grade 1 is just the first step

I am writing in response to Mike Lacey's column this past Friday, “Why do we take teaching someone to read for granted?”

Congratulations to your son!  He has achieved a major life milestone, and his teacher deserves this kind of public recognition for the key role they have played in his achievement.  Reading is an essential skill that is all too often taken for granted, and can “make or break” opportunities for success in life.  Your son is now “well on his way”, with his new ability to read.

READ MORE: Laced Wisdom: Why do we take teaching someone to read for granted?

At one point in your column you state that “We live in a country where the vast majority of us can read.”  I expect you will be surprised to learn that this is not an accurate statement.

While today there are very few adults who cannot read at all, 42 per cent of Canadian adults do not have sufficient literacy skills to succeed in work and in life, a statistic that has remained essentially unchanged since 1994 (International Adult Literacy and Skills Survey, Statistics Canada, Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development, Human Resources and Skills Development Canada, U.S. National Center for Education Statistics, 2005).

Scoop.it!
No comment yet.

Can you teach your baby to read? Researchers are doubtful.


You’ve got a precocious baby who seems to love books (chewing them, at least). And you’ve seen the advertisements for products that say your infant can get a head start on that all-important skill of reading.

But can babies really learn to read?

(iStockphoto) - “Your baby can actually learn to read beginning at 3 months of age,” says Intellectual Baby, which sells reading kits for $139.95.

More health and science news

Researchers seek a link between genes and brain injury

Eric Niiler

Genes may play a more important role in the extent of injury than the number of blows a person sustains.

Can babies learn to read? It depends what ‘read’ means.

Rachel Saslow

Companies provide books, DVDs. But researchers say young babies can’t really understand the words.

Why routine screening for Alzheimer’s may not be worth it

Michelle Andrews

Medicare now covers screening for cognitive impairment, but experts say the evidence is lacking.

Not really, according to researchers who took 117 babies and had half the group use flashcards, DVDs and books while half did not. In 13 of 14 assessments, which included the ability to recognize letter names, letter sounds and vocabulary, the researchersfound no difference between the two groups. The one category in which there was a difference: The parents of children exposed to the reading product were convinced their children were, in fact, learning new words and reading.

“The results really surprised us,” says Susan Neuman of New York University’s Steinhardt School of Culture, Education and Human Development, who led the research, which involved babies 9 to 18 months old. “We thought that at least some rudimentary skills would show up, but none did.”

Scoop.it!
No comment yet.

The 18 Most Incriminating Google Search Histories Possible

Google is great for a lot of things. But what's not great is the unfortunate way it can reveal to loved ones how screwed up your life really is.

We asked our readers to compile the most disturbing Google searches ever, gave money to the most messed up, and then realized that these were probably based on their own lives ...

#1

Scoop.it!
No comment yet.

The best books on writing you’ve probably never read.

It may be hyperbole to say that I feel despondent when I see Stephen King’s On Writing listed on yet another “Best Books About Writing” list somewhere, and yet the feeling that I do have is pretty damn close. I’ll give a nickel to anyone who can send me a published list of this ilk that doesn’t include any of the following: Bird by Bird, anything by Natalie Goldberg, On Writing, or anything by Julia Cameron. (Kidding about the nickels. I keep my coins close at hand.)

What irks me about such lists isn’t that they exist, and I don’t actually have anything against Bird by Bird — the only book on that list that I strongly disagree with is King’s — but such lists tend to leave out so many truly astounding books about the craft. The following books are ones that I’ve consulted time and again for insights on prose writing; the focus is on fiction, but there’s plenty to gawk at for folks who write, full stop.

Note: The books that I’ve linked to are affiliate links. 

BURNING DOWN THE HOUSE: ESSAYS ON FICTION / Charles Baxter

Though this book is probably most read by fiction writers who’ve been at it for a while, getting a head start with Baxter in your back pocket isn’t a bad way to begin. The first time I read Burning Down the House, I must admit that my cheeks burned a bit — as a slightly intermediate novice, I was guilty of plenty of the things Baxter notes as exceedingly common in first books. A smart kick in the pants.

WRITING PAST DARK: ENVY, FEAR, DISTRACTION, AND OTHER DILEMMAS IN THE WRITER’S LIFE / Bonnie Campbell

This slim volume is like that soothing friend who’s been where you’ve been and knows exactly where you’re at. The chapter on envy alone is worth the price of admission. You may, as I did, recognize yourself in several places; this isn’t a book about craft so much as it is about the writing life.

Scoop.it!
No comment yet.

Tanzania: Chinese - Swahili Dictionary On Cards

Beijing — CHINA'S Ministry of Culture has started the process of writing a Chinese-Swahili dictionary, the first of its kind.

The project if concluded will create the first Chinese-Swahili dictionary thus increasing the cooperation between the two countries that has clocked 50 years.

China's Ministry of Culture, Director of Conference Interpreter, Dr Jiang Haoshu, said the preliminary preparations have started by short-listing a team of experts.

"We are gathering a list of professionals (linguistics) in China from various institutions," Dr Jiang said. She said, "it will be followed by selecting a team of scholars (mainly) from Tanzania".

The two teams, according to the Ministry's Division of Translation and Interpretation under the Bureau for External Cultural Relations, will meet and given terms of reference.

The Director could not specify whether the first dictionary will be in Chinese-Swahili and either general or specialized dictionary, but said the project has been approved and ground work started.

Though the first bilingual Swahili dictionaries started to appear in the 20th century, the Chinese on other hand were published as earlier as 16th century during Ming and Qing Dynasties. The dictionary English-Chinese was compiled by foreigners who wanted to learn Chinese.

Westerners adapted the Latin alphabet to represent Chinese pronunciation, and arranged their dictionaries accordingly. According to language experts, a dictionary may be regarded as a lexicographical product that is characterised by significant features namely it has been prepared for one or more functions.

Other features are, it contains data that have been selected for the purpose of fulfilling those functions; and its lexicographic structures link and establish relationships to meet the needs of users and fulfill the functions of the dictionary.

The simplest dictionary, a defining dictionary, provides a core glossary of the meanings of the simplest concepts. From these, other concepts can be explained and defined, in particular for those who are first learning a language.

Scoop.it!
No comment yet.

Take a walk and be creative

If you find yourself in a creative slump, scientists have a suggestion: Take a walk.

People generate more creative ideas when they walk than when they sit, according to new research published in the Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning, Memory and Cognition.

"Everyone always says going on a walk gives you new ideas, but nobody had ever proved it before," said Marily Oppezzo, a professor of psychology at Santa Clara University and the study's lead author. In fact, Dr Oppezzo got the inspiration for the research while she was taking a stroll as a graduate student with her thesis adviser, Stanford University education professor Daniel Schwartz.

To measure creativity, Dr Oppezzo recruited 176 people and gave them various verbal tests. For instance, some volunteers were asked to come up with alternative uses for a common item, like a button. Dr Oppezzo defined a creative response as one that was both appropriate (a button could serve as a tiny strainer or the eye for a doll, but it wouldn't work as a light bulb) and original, meaning no-one else in the study had said it.

In the first experiment, volunteers were asked to complete the creativity test twice — first while sitting at a desk in a small room for four minutes, and then while walking on a treadmill for the same amount of time. Researchers found that 81 per cent of the participants improved their creative output when walking.

Walkers were more talkative than sitters, but, Dr Oppezzo said, the increased output of creative ideas while ambulatory was not simply the result of having more ideas in general.

"We took everything they said and divided the total creative ideas by the total ideas mentioned," she said. "Walkers had more thoughts, but they also had a higher density of creative thoughts than sitters."

To see whether walking improves brain power overall, Dr Oppezzo and her team had volunteers complete a task that measures convergent thinking. Study participants were given three words and asked to come up with another word that would combine with each of them to make a common phrase. For example, "Swiss", "cake" and "cottage" can all be combined with "cheese".

On this test, volunteers performed slightly worse when walking compared with when sitting. That led the researchers to conclude that the cognitive benefits of walking were specific to creative thought.

Scoop.it!
No comment yet.

Kréol noute bien-d-fon

On a toujours dit que pour qu’une langue vive et se développe, il est nécessaire que trois conditions soient remplies :

1) Un engagement des intellectuels pratiquant cette langue.
2) Une volonté de participation des responsables politiques.
3) Et surtout une pratique populaire consciente et constante.

Pour ma part, j’ai toujours voulu croire que ces conditions devaient être soutenues, à ces trois niveaux, par un sentiment de fierté à l’égard de la dite langue. A mon avis la présence de ce sentiment conditionne la volonté, l’énergie et l’efficacité de la participation de ceux que l’on pourra alors qualifier de militants.

Cela étant dit, que penser des conditions dans lesquelles baigne le créole de La Réunion ? Mais avant de développer ce point, rappelons la situation de diglossie que nous connaissons, avec la présence sur le même territoire de deux langues, le français et le créole, au prestige social et culturel différent et avec une pression de la première dans tous les domaines.

Pour commencer donc, qu’en est-il de ce sentiment de fierté que j’ai évoqué plus haut ? Est-il partagé par toute la population réunionnaise ? Notre langue régionale mérite-t-elle d’en être bénéficiaire ? Cette dernière question m’interpelle si vivement que j’ai envie d’y répondre immédiatement par l’affirmative. En effet, je pense que notre langue maternelle peut être considérée comme le plus important héritage que nous aient légué nos ancêtres. C’est en tout cas leur première création, une création vitale qui a permis le partage, la mise en commun et surtout le futur vivre ensemble dont le peuple réunionnais paraît si fier aujourd’hui et qui fait qu’on le cite souvent en exemple ici et là.

Le créole, à l’instar du métissage sanguin, est le résultat d’un mélange créé par la nécessité et imposé par l’Histoire bien sûr et donc né dans la violence, une violence multiple mais qui sera plus tard ressenti par beaucoup d’entre nous comme fondateur de bienfaits et partant, accepté, revendiqué sans désir de vengeance. Alors que la langue de chaque ethnie (à l’arrivée dans l’île) condamnée à vivre avec les autres ne pouvait pas permettre la communication, ni le partage, alors que cette langue était manifestement une barrière, ou comme j’aime à le dire « in baro také »,« in porte baskilé », le créole a été, lui, dès ses premiers balbutiements « in baro gran rouvèr », une porte ouverte.

Elément déterminant d’un peuple

Peut-on imaginer élément plus déterminant pour la naissance et le développement d’un peuple ? Une langue est la base indispensable pour que des êtres humains se rencontrent, essayent de mettre des choses en commun, éprouvent le besoin de créer ensemble. À l’image du français, qui est vraiment devenu la langue de la France pendant la première guerre mondiale — car il était alors le seul langage permettant à tous les combattants français, de quelque région qu’ils fussent, de se comprendre —, le créole a permis à tous les habitants de l’île de communiquer entre eux et donc de partager une vie solidaire. Actuellement encore, il nous lie, nous Réunionnais utilisateurs d’un héritage linguistique, à nos ancêtres, à nos racines, à nos trésors génétiques.

Oui, il mérite donc d’être l’objet de notre fierté à tous. En sommes-nous conscients les uns et les autres ? Je n’en suis pas sûr car depuis ces dernières décennies, ceux qui osent se réclamer d’essence créole, de la culture et du parler de La Réunion — comme cela se faisait tout naturellement autrefois — sont, me semble-t-il, de moins en moins nombreux.

Scoop.it!
No comment yet.

Fêter le multilinguisme européen le 8 mai à Montreuil


Fêter le multilinguisme européen le 8 mai à Montreuil


Le multilinguisme européen est à l’honneur le 8 mai à Montreuil (93). Un spectacle quadrilingue, pour enfants de 3 à 12 ans, fête l’Europe et ses multiples langues. Il est basé sur le livre “L’Arbre” de Jerca Legan Cviki.

L’Europe solidaire vue par Jerca Legan Cviki
Jerca Legan Cviki, de nationalité slovène, est journaliste, spécialiste des médias et des stratégies de communication, chercheuse, productrice et auteure. Son contequadrilingue Drevo / Baum / Tree / Arbre, publié en 2012, est son huitième livre. Il est illustré par l’artiste et architecte slovène, Taja Sever. Elle l’a dédié “à tous les enfants, les parents et les grands-parents, pour toujours davantage d’amour inconditionnel.” Mais aussi “aux enfants qui grandissent, à leurs parents et grands-parents qui passent le plus de temps possible avec eux en les instruisant dans la joie.” 
Deux garçons, les personnages principaux, doivent sauver leur amie Fleur… “C’est un conte sur les valeurs humaines dont nous avons besoin pour nous réaliser nous-mêmes dans notre vie ainsi qu’un appel à contribuer à des missions humanitaires.” Les dons recueillis lors de ces représentations sont reversés à des jardins d’enfants slovènes ainsi qu’à des groupes d’enfants qui ne peuvent acquérir de livres neufs. 


L’Europe artistique vue par Lauréline Romuald
Lauréline Romuald, comédienne, joue la partie francophone de ce spectacle et se passionne pour ce nouveau défi artistico-linguistique. Après avoir “inventé” un langage préhistorique pour les besoins d’un autre de ses spectacles, la voici qui donne la réplique à ses collègues locuteurs natifs de Croatie, d’Italie et d’Angleterre. “C’est très enrichissant pour un artiste de traiter un spectacle par le bais des langues”. Il s’agit d’un véritable travail d’équipe, pas seulement multilinguistique, mais aussi multiculturel. En effet, d’une culture à une autre, les techniques de jeu et les représentations mentales diffèrent. Dans ce cas précis, il a fallu “amener de la fluidité artistique, car toutes ces langues sont très différentes. Il a aussi fallu des codes de jeu spécifiques pour s’adresser aux enfants et que tout soit compréhensible.”


L’Europe culturo-économique vue par Mojca Bozic
Mojca Bozic, de nationalité slovène, fonctionnaire de la Commission européenne, est en poste à la Direction générale de la traduction à Paris, dont la mission est la promotion du multilinguisme et de la traduction. 24 langues officielles auxquelles s’ajoutent les langues des communautés d’immigrés et les langues locales témoignent de la richesse linguistique de l’Europe. Ses 1500 traducteurs, soit le plus grand service de traduction institutionnelle au monde, lui confèrent un savoir-faire qu’elle transmet à d’autres organisations internationales, telle que l’Union africaine. Pourtant, la traduction de cette “immensité linguistique” ne correspond qu’à 1 % du budget de fonctionnement de l’institution, soit 2 euros par an et par citoyen. 
“L'un des objectifs de nos actions de sensibilisation au multilinguisme est d'encourager les jeunes à saisir les opportunités de mobilités offertes par de nombreux programmes et initiatives de l'Union européenne, tels que le Service volontaire européen” explique Mojca Bozic.. “Car les jeunes ayant été sensibilisés au plurilinguisme, seront davantage mobiles et polyglottes. Les élèves des lycées professionnels sont particulièrement visés. (métiers de l'hôtellerie et de la restauration, par exemple). En effet, contrairement à certaines professions qui sont peut-être plus ancrées localement, leur formation leur permet d’être mobiles.” Le compte Facebook de ce projet est : Translating for Europe.Des études récentes ont montré qu’en Europe, un nombre important de marchés étaient perdus par les entreprises par manque de compétences linguistiques entre partenaires... Des élèves issus de bac pro et parlant plusieurs langues ont donc de réelles opportunités.


Scoop.it!
No comment yet.

Chinese translation for Thomas poems

Titulaire d’un doctorat de 3e cycle et d’un doctorat d’Etat, Dalila Morsly est professeur émérite à l’université d’Angers, en France. Elle est aussi membre fondatrice du laboratoire de recherche, SLADD, de Constantine.

-La notion de pluralisme linguistique était considérée comme un handicap et, paradoxalement, à l’ère de la mondialisation, le même concept est devenu un excellent vecteur de richesse linguistique. Comment expliquez-vous ce bouleversement conceptuel ?

Le concept du plurilinguisme n’était pas considéré comme un handicap linguistique. C’est plutôt la mise en évidence de l’ensemble des langues parlées par un locuteur, quel qu’il soit, qui était considéré comme un handicap dans le domaine de l’acquisition des langues et du savoir dans les deux niveaux, scolaire et universitaire.On avait l’impression qu’il y avait une difficulté à apprendre plusieurs langues à la fois et que cela pouvait gêner l’apprentissage, en particulier de la langue de l’école. Aujourd’hui, on a beaucoup évolué sur ces questions-là.
Le plurilinguisme est une donnée de la situation linguistique dans la majorité des pays du monde, en d’autres termes, c’est mille et une réalités sociales. Il faut savoir qu’en cours d’apprentissage d’une langue, l’apprenant ne met pas dans sa poche toutes les autres langues qu’il parle, lit ou écrit. Nous avions intérêt à développer ce qu’on appelle les compétences de communication en mettant en exergue le bagage pluriel des individus afin de rendre plus performante l’acquisition des savoirs. A l’ère des échanges internationaux de plus en plus intenses dans tous les domaines de la vie économique, sociale, culturelle… il devient difficile d’imaginer une société unilingue. En Algérie, on voit que cette question se développe de plus en plus. A titre d’exemple, on enseigne des langues qui, jusqu’ici, n’étaient pas vraiment présentes dans le système éducatif, comme le chinois et le turc.

-Cinquante ans après l’indépendance, quel bilan faites-vous des pratiques linguistiques algériennes ?

Il est difficile de cerner ce sujet en quelques mots. Ce colloque se veut une opportunité d’étudier les usages, les variétés, les langues que des Algériens d’aujourd’hui parlent. Nous nous posons cette question parce qu’il y a eu, chez nous, une évolution à différents niveaux. Celle-ci se manifeste tout d’abord dans la politique linguistique ; pendant longtemps, on a refusé de parler au niveau institutionnel de la langue amazighe. Maintenant, elle est reconnue comme langue nationale, au même titre que l’arabe. L’introduction de tamazight a eu nécessairement une incidence sur les pratiques linguistiques algériennes. Il ne faut pas oublier, par ailleurs, qu’au bout de 50 ans, le secteur de l’enseignement a été largement arabisé et que cette démarche a été accompagnée par la généralisation de l’enseignement. La scolarisation de la femme et son intégration dans le monde du travail ont aussi contribué dans l’émergence du plurilinguisme chez nous.

-L’Algérien est plurilingue. En général, il s’exprime en arabe dialectal mélangé avec des mots français algérianisés ou en tamazight. Comment jugez-vous l’alternance avec laquelle le citoyen algérien passe d’une langue à une autre ?

L’alternance des langues est une donnée inévitable chez tous les citoyens du monde qui parlent plusieurs langues. Il y a tout un discours qu’on entend dans la société et même chez certains professeurs. Ce discours consiste à dire que le locuteur qui passe du français vers l’arabe, par exemple, est handicapé, c’est pourquoi il change de langue. Et ce n’est pas du tout cela. Quand vous prenez les textes de la presse arabophone, par exemple, ils sont écrits en «ârabia fos’ha», l’arabe écrit, et puis il y a des passages en arabe parlé, souvent sous forme de proverbes ou d’expressions idiomatiques. Cela veut dire que le rédacteur de l’article trouve que cette forme établit une connivence beaucoup plus importante avec son public que le fait d’illustrer ses propos dans une langue parlée par tout le monde. C’est pareil en français, c’est un mode de communication jugé efficace pour créer des effets humoristiques ou pour mieux faire passer le sens de ce que l’on veut dire. Donc l’Algérien passe bien souvent d’une langue à une autre pour établir une connivence.

-Les langues berbères, comme tamazight, reviennent souvent dans vos exposés et recherches. Quelle analyse faites-vous de la position de cette langue, instrumentalisée lors de la campagne présidentielle du 17 avril ?

La langue amazighe revient dans mes recherches parce que je suis une sociolinguiste, je travaille sur les réalités langagières du pays. Tamazight constitue une des dimensions du plurilinguisme algérien. Je ne serais pas sérieuse si je ne prenais pas en compte cette dimension. Cette langue est maintenant enseignée, il est donc intéressant d’observer les dynamiques qu’entoure cet apprentissage en classe. Les questions d’ordre didactique mais aussi sociolinguistique intéressent nécessairement un sociolinguiste. Quand une langue qui était essentiellement la langue de la maison devient une langue d’enseignement, qu’elle est utilisée dans les médias parce que nous avons maintenant une chaîne de télévision amazighe, comment va-t-elle répondre aux besoins nouveaux auxquels elle doit faire face ?

Par exemple, tamazight, étant une langue de la maison, n’a jamais été utilisée comme langue pour le domaine professionnel, qu’il s’agisse du monde économique ou de la médecine. Aujourd’hui, les journalistes, au journal télévisé, parlent d’économie, de technologie, etc. Comment font-ils ? A partir de quel corpus ? De nombreux travaux essayent de créer de nouvelles terminologies et de nouveaux concepts pour permettre au journaliste de parler en tamazight de tout cela. Des efforts immenses visent cela, de même qu’au niveau de l’écriture. La question de la graphie amazighe a créé un débat contradictoire souvent houleux.

On se demande toujours s’il faut adopter les caractères arabes, le tifinagh ou la transcription latine. Evidemment, comme la reconnaissance de la langue et de la culture amazighes est née dans un contexte idéologique, que son émergence en tant que langue nationale est le résultat d’un travail militant important sur le terrain mais aussi par les associations qui diffusent la culture amazighe ou encore la chanson, c’est là que le tamazight a été instrumentalisé politiquement.

Scoop.it!
No comment yet.

«Le plurilinguisme est une donnée de la situation linguistique dans le monde» - Actualité - El Watan

Titulaire d’un doctorat de 3e cycle et d’un doctorat d’Etat, Dalila Morsly est professeur émérite à l’université d’Angers, en France. Elle est aussi membre fondatrice du laboratoire de recherche, SLADD, de Constantine.


-La notion de pluralisme linguistique était considérée comme un handicap et, paradoxalement, à l’ère de la mondialisation, le même concept est devenu un excellent vecteur de richesse linguistique. Comment expliquez-vous ce bouleversement conceptuel ?

Le concept du plurilinguisme n’était pas considéré comme un handicap linguistique. C’est plutôt la mise en évidence de l’ensemble des langues parlées par un locuteur, quel qu’il soit, qui était considéré comme un handicap dans le domaine de l’acquisition des langues et du savoir dans les deux niveaux, scolaire et universitaire.On avait l’impression qu’il y avait une difficulté à apprendre plusieurs langues à la fois et que cela pouvait gêner l’apprentissage, en particulier de la langue de l’école. Aujourd’hui, on a beaucoup évolué sur ces questions-là.
Le plurilinguisme est une donnée de la situation linguistique dans la majorité des pays du monde, en d’autres termes, c’est mille et une réalités sociales. Il faut savoir qu’en cours d’apprentissage d’une langue, l’apprenant ne met pas dans sa poche toutes les autres langues qu’il parle, lit ou écrit. Nous avions intérêt à développer ce qu’on appelle les compétences de communication en mettant en exergue le bagage pluriel des individus afin de rendre plus performante l’acquisition des savoirs. A l’ère des échanges internationaux de plus en plus intenses dans tous les domaines de la vie économique, sociale, culturelle… il devient difficile d’imaginer une société unilingue. En Algérie, on voit que cette question se développe de plus en plus. A titre d’exemple, on enseigne des langues qui, jusqu’ici, n’étaient pas vraiment présentes dans le système éducatif, comme le chinois et le turc.

-Cinquante ans après l’indépendance, quel bilan faites-vous des pratiques linguistiques algériennes ?

Il est difficile de cerner ce sujet en quelques mots. Ce colloque se veut une opportunité d’étudier les usages, les variétés, les langues que des Algériens d’aujourd’hui parlent. Nous nous posons cette question parce qu’il y a eu, chez nous, une évolution à différents niveaux. Celle-ci se manifeste tout d’abord dans la politique linguistique ; pendant longtemps, on a refusé de parler au niveau institutionnel de la langue amazighe. Maintenant, elle est reconnue comme langue nationale, au même titre que l’arabe. L’introduction de tamazight a eu nécessairement une incidence sur les pratiques linguistiques algériennes. Il ne faut pas oublier, par ailleurs, qu’au bout de 50 ans, le secteur de l’enseignement a été largement arabisé et que cette démarche a été accompagnée par la généralisation de l’enseignement. La scolarisation de la femme et son intégration dans le monde du travail ont aussi contribué dans l’émergence du plurilinguisme chez nous.

-L’Algérien est plurilingue. En général, il s’exprime en arabe dialectal mélangé avec des mots français algérianisés ou en tamazight. Comment jugez-vous l’alternance avec laquelle le citoyen algérien passe d’une langue à une autre ?

L’alternance des langues est une donnée inévitable chez tous les citoyens du monde qui parlent plusieurs langues. Il y a tout un discours qu’on entend dans la société et même chez certains professeurs. Ce discours consiste à dire que le locuteur qui passe du français vers l’arabe, par exemple, est handicapé, c’est pourquoi il change de langue. Et ce n’est pas du tout cela. Quand vous prenez les textes de la presse arabophone, par exemple, ils sont écrits en «ârabia fos’ha», l’arabe écrit, et puis il y a des passages en arabe parlé, souvent sous forme de proverbes ou d’expressions idiomatiques. Cela veut dire que le rédacteur de l’article trouve que cette forme établit une connivence beaucoup plus importante avec son public que le fait d’illustrer ses propos dans une langue parlée par tout le monde. C’est pareil en français, c’est un mode de communication jugé efficace pour créer des effets humoristiques ou pour mieux faire passer le sens de ce que l’on veut dire. Donc l’Algérien passe bien souvent d’une langue à une autre pour établir une connivence.

-Les langues berbères, comme tamazight, reviennent souvent dans vos exposés et recherches. Quelle analyse faites-vous de la position de cette langue, instrumentalisée lors de la campagne présidentielle du 17 avril ?

La langue amazighe revient dans mes recherches parce que je suis une sociolinguiste, je travaille sur les réalités langagières du pays. Tamazight constitue une des dimensions du plurilinguisme algérien. Je ne serais pas sérieuse si je ne prenais pas en compte cette dimension. Cette langue est maintenant enseignée, il est donc intéressant d’observer les dynamiques qu’entoure cet apprentissage en classe. Les questions d’ordre didactique mais aussi sociolinguistique intéressent nécessairement un sociolinguiste. Quand une langue qui était essentiellement la langue de la maison devient une langue d’enseignement, qu’elle est utilisée dans les médias parce que nous avons maintenant une chaîne de télévision amazighe, comment va-t-elle répondre aux besoins nouveaux auxquels elle doit faire face ?

Par exemple, tamazight, étant une langue de la maison, n’a jamais été utilisée comme langue pour le domaine professionnel, qu’il s’agisse du monde économique ou de la médecine. Aujourd’hui, les journalistes, au journal télévisé, parlent d’économie, de technologie, etc. Comment font-ils ? A partir de quel corpus ? De nombreux travaux essayent de créer de nouvelles terminologies et de nouveaux concepts pour permettre au journaliste de parler en tamazight de tout cela. Des efforts immenses visent cela, de même qu’au niveau de l’écriture. La question de la graphie amazighe a créé un débat contradictoire souvent houleux.

On se demande toujours s’il faut adopter les caractères arabes, le tifinagh ou la transcription latine. Evidemment, comme la reconnaissance de la langue et de la culture amazighes est née dans un contexte idéologique, que son émergence en tant que langue nationale est le résultat d’un travail militant important sur le terrain mais aussi par les associations qui diffusent la culture amazighe ou encore la chanson, c’est là que le tamazight a été instrumentalisé politiquement.

Scoop.it!
No comment yet.

The Literal or Figurative Translation of Torah

This is a quick post born out of a question posed to me today. For the context of this question (and this answer) please read the previous two articles about marketing Torah: When Torah Goes Viral and Keeping Haredim Excited About Torah.

The question was about translating Torah. How should one translate Torah?

First to clarify. We are not speaking about the words of the Five Books of Moses, the Prophets or Writings, because there are many more factor at play (e.g., whether to include the words of the commentator Rashi into the translation itself, etc…).

Instead we are speaking primarily speaking about the translation of writings based on the Oral Tradition. Either the revealed, legal dimension of the Torah included in the Mishnah, Talmud, and legal works thereafter, or the inner dimension of the Torah, first taught in Kabbalah then later Chassidut. Important to note is that the approach we are now presenting in brief holds true whether we are translating within the same language or to another language. What is important  to keep in mind is the conceptual difference in approach.

For instance, even when a workbook for students remains in the original Hebrew, according to what was said in keeping haredim excited, an emphasis should be placed on incorporating hiddurim (lit. beautifications),  the inner soul of the Torah into the text.

When translating to a more modern audience, however, the focus should be on explaining the unifications between Torah and science (as explained in the viral Torah article). When “translating” Torah to be exciting and relevant to a modern audience, the first challenge is to explain its relevance.

There is an important distinction between translating the revealed dimension of the Torah (i.e., Talmud and Jewish law) and the inner dimension (Kabbalah and Chassidut). Both require precision, but Chassidut was meant to be adapted; to be thirstilly drank in by its readers and applied to the life of each Chassid according to their capabilities and soul root.

For this reason it is questionable whether a literal translation is the correct approach when translating Chassidut. Even if the intent is to translate a specific text, Chassidut itself expects that these teachings should affect the heart and enter the phyche. When carried out in a heartfelt and true manner, then this translation that may otherwise be called an adaptation, deserves to rightfully bear the title of a translation.

But the law is the law. When translating the law, the focus should be on setting one’s personal sentiments aside in order to convey the rulings with clarity.

For instance, the Lubavitcher Rebbe went to great length to explain when Maimonides included a personal prayer in his Code of Jewish Law. Since this was not a prayer book, the legal aspect of the inclusion of these prayers needed to be explained.

The thing to keep in mind is the audience. Again when marketing to haredim, the focus is on the hiddurim and how this new publication is further beautifying the pure and holy study of Torah and practice of mitzvot. But when “translating” Torah for a modern audience, the challenge is to explain the Torah according to the language of the times. For instance, we learn about the concept of drawing down (hamshachah) Godliness from higher to lower worlds. But if we want to speak in more accesible terms, instead of  “drawing down” we can use the word “download.”

Scoop.it!
No comment yet.

On translating God

Every now and then some issue of translation flares up into heated words and over-wrought rhetoric.

So it was recently, as a misunderstanding about translation the word “God” led to misplaced outrage. More about that later.

But first, let’s remind ourselves that the God being discussed is the God of Abraham and Isaac and Jacob. How should His name be translated into other languages?

The Hebrews used two principal words for God in their scripture. One is the sacred proper name of the deity, represented by the four letters YHWH. In most translations into English, THE LORD, in small capital letters is used for this word, traditionally unspoken and unsayable to the Jews.

Although there are several Hebrew words for God, Elohim is the common noun. In English this word is translated variously as “gods,” “a god” or “God.”

The word Elohim is grammatically plural, leading to much commentary, ancient and modern. What is clear is that the word derives from a Semitic noun, “il” or “el” which is a generic word meaning god.

This Semitic root was used in various cognates by other non-Hebrew languages, including Ugaritic, Syriac, Aramaic and Arabic.

The Arabic word Allah is pre-Islamic, and means “the god.” Unlike YHWH, it is not a proper name. Semitic-speaking Christians have long used the word Allah for God. The Bishop of Haran in the late 8th century A.D. translates the Greek word Theos as Allah in John 1:1 “The Word was with Allah.”

In a scholarly but accessible article, Kenneth J. Thomas says that Allah has been used in Bible translations not only in Arabic-speaking countries, but also in such languages as Turkish, Azarbaijani, Malay, Javanese, and Sudanese.

Scoop.it!
No comment yet.

What I've learned by teaching writing

Can you teach someone to write?

Recently there’s been a lot of talk about whether there’s any value in creative writing courses, after author Hanif Kureishi described them as a ‘waste of time (http://www.theguardian.com/books/2014/mar/04/creative-writing-courses-waste-of-time-hanif-kureishi)’. It’s a new take on the old question of whether you can teach someone to write. I’m a little biased on this one, as for the past two years I’ve been very fortunate to teach on the first-ever Crime Writing MA, at City University London.

(http://www.city.ac.uk/creative-writing)

On this unique course, our students write a novel over two years, while the writers who run the course provide mentoring and support to turn it into a market-ready book. We then help them send it out to agents and make sure they understand how the industry works. We have all kinds of books on the go in my class –historical, futuristic, noir, comic, psychological. I feel that, no, you can’t give someone talent or teach them to get ideas for fiction if they don’t naturally have them, but you can teach them how to read their own work critically, and most importantly, to tell the difference between writing that’s good and writing that’s rubbish. We also give our students the structure and support to actually finish something – they don’t pass the course otherwise. We like to say we help them to write their third novel, not their first.

As well as being very rewarding, I’ve learned a lot from my students, both in seeing how they tackle certain writing problems, and in clarifying what I actually think about various issues such as prologues, the present tense, intrusive narratorial voice, and other issues you should be mulling over if you’re writing a book. Here are a few things I’ve learned from teaching:

 

  1. It’s a very different thing to teach someone a lesson, and actually learn it yourself. Dissecting my students’ work for pace, plot holes, and prose style does make me more aware of what I need to change in my own work, but it doesn’t come naturally, and I have to remind myself every time to try and do better. Lessons don’t stay learned unless you put them into practice!
  2. Trusting the process is key. Again and again I see my students hit the same hurdles of self-doubt, plot complications, and word count woes. I remind them that a book doesn’t have to be perfect to be good, and it will go through many stages of editing once you think you’re done with it. What matters is that you keep working on it day after day.
  3. You can always cut something. In the first term of our course, we do an exercise where the students have to cut a piece of writing in half. They nearly always grumble, but usually they can see afterwards that nothing important is lost – because almost everyone over-writes, especially when they’re starting.
  4. It’s worth starting a book before you start it. By which I mean thinking about premise, character, viewpoint and set-up and working out ways you can make each as strong as possible.
  5. Just finish the book! I see a lot of people who have talent and a great idea and writing skill, but the thing that really sets apart those who get published is that they finish their books. It sounds obvious, but sometimes ploughing on and getting something on paper, then fixing it afterwards, is much better than crafting the same three chapters over and over.

 

So yes, I do think doing a creative writing course will teach you a lot and help you progress to your goal of being published and being a good writer. I also think it’s worth studying creative writing bec

Scoop.it!
No comment yet.

The Free Three: Tips on How to Teach APA to Any Student

Over the past few weeks, students have been coming into our services at a rising rate seeking help with APA citation and formatting. One particular student expressed how an instructor explained the importance of citation by showing particular examples of correct citation—only in-text, mind you—and then continuing to express how the Writing Center provides services to address issues with APA citation and formatting. Considering the coincidence here, I then placed myself into the instructor’s shoes and instantly remembered that teaching APA, in general, can be likened to watching paint dry. Therefore, in an attempt to get teachers to enjoy teaching APA again, or, in some extreme cases, teaching the practice in the first place, I came up with a list of three relatively simple ways to introduce APA to students that can easily be used in any composition course.

1.)  Introduce Yourself, Introduce APA!

From my experience, students enjoy being informed. I know this sounds very basic and bland, but the simplicity here remains key: Inform your students that they will be utilizing APA format and citation in your writing course from day one. This way, with some planning, you can introduce APA to your students at a steadier pace than one seminar session. The benefit here is pacing, planning, and practicing—you know, what we teach our students in regards to writing their papers. Most, if not all, writing instructors agree that writing is a practice, so why would we stop at citation? Try breaking citation up over the course of three or four weeks, covering the information in smaller portions rather than exposing all at once and expecting perfect citations. In fact, here is a great, free resource that covers in-text citations in a fantastic medium:http://www.screencast.com/t/rSRUZtYa

2.)  Your Best Resource: Student Papers.

I will always remember the way that I was taught citation. During my freshman writing course, we began our exposure to citation by a short lecture, some questions, and then a rather playful sink-or-swim approach that challenged the students to produce citations. Each student received a particular resource and they were turned to their own devices to find the correct means of citation. We all know what some first-time citations look like, particularly on the reference page—and ours were complete chaos. Most of the class returned with some of the most awkward citations, but this was also a fantastic—and more importantly fun—way to correct some of these horrendous citations. By identifying the issues present within the citation, students worked backward in an attempt to polish the citations to the best of their abilities. With guided help from the instructor, students then presented their proper citation to the class. At the end of the period, if we could not figure out the citation, we then knew our homework—the instructor always included a few tougher citations per week for the class to sit and wonder over. This process would repeat until we all felt comfortable enough with MLA citation that the game became a bore—but we learned! The students responded extremely well and, truth be told, I learned more about citation in that activity than my entire Bachelor’s career.

3.)  When In Doubt, Teach It Out!

At the end of the day, we can discuss multiple—albeit more enjoyable—ways to teach APA citation and format, but there comes a time when a solid lecture on the topic is needed. Regardl

Scoop.it!
No comment yet.

Messengers Booker (and more): Best Translated Book Award and Stella Prize Winners 2014

Last week saw the announcement of two award winners, the United States based Best Translated Book Award and the Australian Stella Prize.
The Best Translated Book Award winner was taken out by László Krasznahorkai for the second year in a row, this year for “Seiobo There Below”, translated  from the Hungarian by Ottilie Mulzet. The jury praised this novel for its breadth, stating “out of a shortlist of ten contenders that did not lack for ambition, Seiobo There Below truly overwhelmed us with its range—this is a book that discusses in minute detail locations from all around the globe, including Japan, Spain, Italy, and Greece, as well as delving into the consciousnesses and practices of individuals from across 2,000 years of human history.”
Runners up were also awarded to “The African Shore” by Rodrigo Rey Rosa (translated from the Spanish by Jeffrey Gray) and “A True Novel” by Minae Mizumura (translated from the Japanese by Juliet Winters Carpenter). Having copies of the winner and “The African Shore” on my shelf at home, reviews will be forthcoming for both of them, as “A True Novel” runs to 880 pages I may not get to that one, but never say never.


The Award also announces a poetry in translation winner and this year it was taken out by “The Guest in the Wood” by Elisa Biagini (translated from the Italian by Diana Thow). According to the jury, “from the first, these surreal, understated poems create an uncanny physical space that is equally domestic, disturbing, and luminous, their airy structure leaving room for the reader-guest to receive their hospitality and offer something in return (the Italian ospite meaning both ‘guest’ and ‘host’). The poet’s and translators’ forceful language presses us to ‘attend and rediscover’ the quotidian and overdetermined realities of, as Angelina Oberdan explains in her introduction, ‘the self, the other, the body, and the private rituals of our lives.’” Runners up in the Poetry Award were “Four Elemental Bodies” by Claude Royet-Journoud (translated from the French by Keith Waldrop) and “The Oasis of Now” by Sohrab Sepehri (translated from the Persian by Kazim Ali and Mohammad Jafar Mahallati).
Scoop.it!
No comment yet.

E.N.S.O.

À l'origine, l'événement E.N.S.O. (El Niño-Southern Oscillation) a d'abord été analysé comme un phénomène climatique résultant des interactions entre l'atmosphère et l'océan et se produisant de façon plus ou moins régulière dans le Pacifique inter-tropical. Cette anomalie a des répercussions sur la variabilité du climat. Par la suite, le phénomène E.N.S.O. a aussi été mis en évidence dans les régions tropicales de l'océan Indien et de l'océan Atlantique. L'E.N.S.O. est donc un phénomène océanique global avec des répercussions sur le climat à l'échelle de la planète. Des travaux récents ont montré qu'il se produit selon des cycles allant du quasi-biennal au quasi-décennal. Cela devrait aider à comprendre les perturbations du climat dues aux interactions très fortes entre les océans tropicaux et l'atmosphère, ce qui n'est pas sans importance dans un contexte de changement climatique global. Des perturbations naturelles de type E.N.S.O. peuvent être « en phase » (océans Indien et Pacifique) ou « en chaîne » (océans Pacifique et Atlantique), et pourraient suffire à expliquer la variabilité climatique à court terme en Inde, en Indonésie, en Australie, en Amérique du Sud et en Afrique.

1.  Le phénomène El Niño

À la fin du XIXe siècle, les géographes se sont intéressés à l'existence d'un courant chaud côtier localisé entre les ports de Paita et de Pascayamo le long de la côte péruvienne, dans le sud-est du Pacifique. Mais ce phénomène avait déjà été observé pour la première fois au milieu du XVIe siècle par les explorateurs espagnols. L'apparition de ce courant à la période de Noël est à l'origine du nom qui lui a été attribué : El Niño, l'Enfant Jésus.

Vidéo

El Niño"Habituellement, dans le Pacifique, le niveau de la mer est plus haut à l'ouest qu'à l'est en raison des alizés (vent d'est) qui poussent les eaux vers l'ouest de l'océan. Les eaux transportées vers l'ouest sont remplacées à l'est le long des côtes de l'Amérique du Sud par des eaux froides riches en… 

Crédits: VMGROUPConsulter

Plus récemment, l'appellation El Niño est donnée uniquement aux anomalies positives importantes de la température de la surface de l'océan Pacifique central et oriental. Ces anomalies se produisent d'ailleurs sur des échelles de temps allant du biennal au décennal. En effet, tous les deux à douze ans environ, une grande partie de l'océan Pacifique tropical « attrape la fièvre ». Il s’ensuit des perturbations de l'atmosphère globale avec modification du temps, d'abord dans les pays riverains du Pacifique. Les conséquences socio-économiques et écologiques sont catastrophiques. Par exemple, aux États-Unis, les orages deviennent plus nombreux le long de la côte californienne, et des pluies intenses inondent le Centre-Sud avec des glissements de terrain. En revanche, les hivers qui suivent ces anomalies sont en général plus doux dans le Nord-Est. La sécheresse domine le long de la bordure ouest du Pacifique, y compris en Indonésie où les eaux de surface se refroidissent. Des feux de forêts font rage à Bornéo (Kalimantan) et en Australie orientale, où des tempêtes de poussière sont observées, notamment dans la région de Melbourne. Le long de la côte ouest de l'Amérique du Sud, les eaux, qui sont normalement les plus productives du monde, deviennent plus chaudes et s'appauvrissent donc en éléments nutritifs, ralentissant ainsi la production primaire du phytoplancton. Au large du Pérou, les petits pélagiques (anchois et sardines) disparaissent en grande partie, pour deux raisons : la modification de la chaîne alimentaire et le déplacement subséquent des sardines plus au sud dans les eaux chiliennes où les poches d'eaux froides, plus étroites, rendent la tâche plus facile aux prédateurs (y compris les pêcheurs). On voit ainsi des écosystèmes entiers disparaître, entraînant la destruction massive d'espèces d'oiseaux océaniques tels que les pieds palmés bleus. L'industrie du guano est aussi considérablement touchée. Il a été récemment démontré que ces phénomènes pourraient aussi être liés à des variations climatiques de périodes plus longues (de 40 à 60 ans).

2.  L'oscillation australe

De 1923 à 1937, sir Gilbert Walker fut le premier à trouver une corrélation entre la variation interannuelle à grande échelle du champ de pression atmosphérique à la surface de l'océan Pacifique équatorial, les anomalies de la température de ce dernier et les fluctuations est-ouest dans le régime des alizés et des pluies. Il appela southern oscillation(oscillation australe) le phénomène atmosphérique : au sud de l'équateur, de hautes pressions dans l'est du Pacifique sont en géné

Scoop.it!
No comment yet.

TAUS Translation Quality Webinar - April 29, 2014 - YouTube

AUTOMATIC EVALUATION Speakers: Lucia Specia (Sheffield University), Maxim Khalilov (BMMT) and Nora Aranberri (University of the Basque Country) Automated met...
Scoop.it!
No comment yet.

How to Speak Well In Public

In 2000, businessman CM Daniel returned to Kochi after spending two decades in Bahrain and the United Arab Emirates. In both these countries, he had been a member of Toastmasters International. This is an institution which helps members to improve their speaking and leadership skills.

 However, when Daniel made inquiries about joining a Toastmasters club he got a shock. There was not a single club in Kochi. It was at this time that he met his Toastmaster friends from Bahrain who had also returned. They included George Mathai, Joseph Lukose and the late Augustine Joseph. They, along with Daniel’s friends, Paul Manjooran and AO Thomas, decided to start a Toastmasters club at Kochi.

The first meeting, which was held, at the YMCA, Palarivattom, on April 26, 2004, was inaugurated by a former resident editor of The New Indian Express. And now, for the tenth anniversary celebrations, held recently at Kochi, Resident Editor Vinod Mathew did the honours. “The New Indian Express is the only newspaper that has supported us through all these years,” says Daniel, who is the founder-president.

 In his speech Vinod Mathew bemoaned the lack of English-speaking skills among students these days. “English is the universal language for communication,” he says. “I interview about 20 wannabe journalists every couple of months. What I have found is that there is no match between the written results and their communication skills. So, there is a need for a holistic development from the school level. The Toastmasters should take an initiative on this.”

Later, founding member George Mathai said that they would be following up on this idea. “One of the aims of the Toastmasters is to impart skills to the youth and uplift them,” he says.

Meanwhile, in his speech, Daniel identified the different types of members. “The story goes that there were three stone cutters employed in a project,” he says. “The first one was asked, ‘What are you doing here?’ He said, ‘I am making a livelihood’. The second one said, ‘I am just raising a wall’. The third one said, ‘I am involved along with a team of people to complete this project, which is meant for serving society’.”

These three types are represented in every Toastmasters club. “We have people who have limited objectives,” says Daniel. “They will complete a few speeches and quit. Or they will reach a certain recognition level, and then leave. But, finally, there are people who are dedicated to spreading the message of Toastmasters.”

Thanks to the hard work of these members, there are 17 clubs in kochi today. Says Lal Xavier, the Divisional Governor of Kerala, “For the past ten years we have expanded through the length and breadth of Kerala. I am sure we will have a club in every district in the future.”

Following the official function, a regular meeting of the Toastmasters took place. And what was striking was the emphasis that the club placed on timings.

So, if a speaker is allotted five minutes to speak, a timekeeper sits at one side with a contraption in front of him. At the conclusion of two minutes, a green light is switched on. A yellow light will come on when one minute is left and a red light when the time is up.

“Apart from speeches, there is a segment called table topics,” says Kochi Toastmasters Club President Dr. Neena Thomas. “A toastmaster will state a subject and the participant will have to answer it within two minutes. The idea is to think swiftly on your feet.”

And whatever speech you give, it is evaluated by members who will state the positive as well as the negative aspects. “This is very helpful in improving a member’s performance,” says senior member, Monish V T.

All the speakers spoke with verve and panache. Ordinary speakers tend to become superlative ones after becoming members. It is clear that the Toastmasters have a very successful programme. Incidentally, the Toastmasters has a worldwide membership of 3 lakh people in 122 countries.

Scoop.it!
No comment yet.

The Beautiful Game’s Best Players Teach the Language of Football

Discover how to speak about football in different languages thanks to a new series of infographics by Kaplan International English.
(PRWEB UK) 6 May 2014
A team of legendary FIFA World Cup players have been selected to teach the language of football through a series of illustrated infographics.
Kaplan International English, a leading provider of English language courses, have collaborated with 8bit-Football.com to create a series of infographics using classic and contemporary World Cup players to translate international football vocabulary into English.
A number of international stars such as Cristiano Ronaldo, Franz Beckenbauer and Dennis Bergkamp have had their likenesses transformed into 8bit graphics to help describe words like “striker,” “captain” and “goal” and translate the vocabulary from the players’ native languages into English.
Some of the most memorable moments from World Cup history are featured on an international infographic that includes key football terms from a number of languages such as Arabic, Portuguese and Italian translated into English.
To complement this international graphic, a series of country-specific infographics have also been created using classic players and moments from the top footballing nations so fans from these countries can learn English more easily.
Martin Hofschroer, Kaplan’s Content Strategist, said: “Many Kaplan students are excited about the World Cup this summer. These infographics aim to teach football vocabulary in an accessible and innovative way.
“English speakers can discover how English words are translated into other languages. However, the really fun challenge is to see how many famous World Cup players and moments you can recognize!”
The identity of the World Cup players and moments are revealed underneath each infographic on their respective webpages. Links to all the infographics can be found in a table underneath the International version.
The full list of infographics includes:


    Brazil
    Colombia
    France
    Germany
    International
    Italy
    Mexico
    Poland
    Russia & Ukraine
    South Korea
    Spain All Kaplan infographics are available in high-resolution. If you would like a print-quality copy, please get in touch via email.
About Kaplan International English
Kaplan International English is part of Kaplan, Inc., an international education services provider offering higher education, professional training, and test preparation. Kaplan is a subsidiary of Graham Holdings Co. http://www.kaplaninternational.com




For the original version on PRWeb visit: http://www.prweb.com/releases/2014/05/prweb11816789.htm
Scoop.it!
No comment yet.

Google Traduction : les avantages de l’application Google Translate pour les Smartphones Android -

Google Translate a déployé, il y a quelques temps déjà, l’application Android pour les tablettes et les Smartphones, qui accordent plusieurs avantages. Découvrez ces avantages et pourquoi ils devraient vous intéresser dans notre article sur Google Traduction.
Scoop.it!
No comment yet.

Colloque international a Oran : « Assia Djebbar : le parcours d’une femme de lettres »

La portée universelle de l'œuvre d'Assia Djebar a été mise en relief, hier à Oran, lors d'un colloque international dédié à cette grande figure de la littérature algérienne. Près de cinquante universitaires algériens et étrangers participent  à cette rencontre qui se tient deux jours durant à l'initiative du Laboratoire  de recherche en "Langues, Discours, Civilisations et Littératures (LADICIL)  de l'Université d'Oran.          "Assia Djebar : le parcours d'une femme de lettres. Littérature, résistance et transmission", constitue le thème générique de cette manifestation scientifique qui a pour objectif de "promouvoir l'œuvre de cette grande romancière en Algérie",  ont souligné les organisateurs. "La présence à ce colloque d'une vingtaine de chercheurs venus des cinq continents est un indicateur supplémentaire de la notoriété mondiale d'Assia  Djebbar dont le corpus est déjà traduit en 23 langues", a indiqué Mme Fatima Grine-Medjad, directrice du LADICIL et présidente du comité d'organisation. "Assia Djebbar a énormément contribué à l'écriture de l'histoire, la mémoire et la lutte de Libération nationale en rendant hommage aux femmes  combattantes", a fait valoir Mme Grine-Medjad qui s'attelle, avec son équipe,  à l'élaboration d'un ouvrage consacré à la grande romancière. Le rayonnement international de ce grand nom de la littérature algérienne a été également mis en avant par les participants, à l'instar de Mme Seza Yilancioglu  de l'Université de Galatasaray (Turquie), notant que "chez Assia Djebbar, l'écriture devient le moteur de l'histoire". "Il y a une fusion étroite entre l'auteur (Assia Djebar) et ses personnages", a observé l'intervenante turque en s'appuyant sur le roman L’Amour, la Fantasia (1985) où "l'écrivaine décrit intelligemment la condition de la femme face au système colonial". De son côté, Mme Kirsten Nusung, de l'université de Linné (Suède) s'est  penchée sur le livre La Femme sans sépulture (2002) pour mettre en exergue "la technique d'Assia Djebbar consistant à fictionnaliser les témoignages pour  mieux intégrer l'histoire dans la mémoire collective". La rencontre a été aussi marquée par la participation de Mme Kiyoko  Ishikawa, une traductrice des écrits d'Assia Djebbar en japonais, qui a proposé  une communication sur La Soif, le premier livre de la romancière algérienne  écrit en 1957. Le colloque a réuni une nombreuse assistance composée d'étudiants et chercheurs de différentes universités du pays, à l'instar de Mohamed Daoud, directeur de l'Unité de recherche sur la Culture, la Communication, les Langues,  les Littératures et les Arts (UCCLLA), basée à Oran. "Assia Djebbar mérite l'hommage qui lui est rendu à travers ce colloque, sachant que cette grande écrivaine algérienne constitue, au plan culturel, une  fierté pour le pays et le monde arabo-musulman", a estimé M. Daoud.          
Née le 30 juin 1936 à Cherchell, Assia Djebar a, à son actif, plusieurs  prix littéraires décernés dans différents pays européens, aux Etats-unis d'Amérique et au Canada.  Elle a été nominée en 2004 pour le prestigieux Prix Nobel de l'Académie suédoise, avant d'être élue, en 2005, à l'Académie française.

Scoop.it!
No comment yet.