Metaglossia: The Translation World
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Metaglossia: The Translation World
News about translation, interpreting, intercultural communication, terminology and lexicography - as it happens
Curated by Charles Tiayon
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Zimbabwe: The Language, Culture and Development Matrix

THE development and promotion of indigenous languages is a crucial endeavour needing urgent national discourse particularly at this juncture when most African countries are battling to find a suitable developmental model for the broader social and economic transformation of people.

After experimenting with various economic models without tangible results, African governments now need to realise that as long as African languages are restricted to oral use while children learn in foreign tongues, underdevelopment will remain a living reality on the continent.

It is thus crucial for political leaders to move away from paying lip service to the promotion of African languages and come up with policies that can restore the dignity of Africans, their languages and cultures.

The development and promotion of indigenous languages must be informed by the fact that the physical departure of European colonisers from the continent was not synonymous with the end of European presence on the continent.

While the departure demonstrated the end of physical or formal domination, its residual effects are now being reflected on the cultural front as they manifest as mental enslavement and economic servitude.

Acknowledging the devastating effects of colonialism on local languages, the director of the Africa Studies Centre at the University of London, Dr Kimani Nehusi says the continued use of foreign languages as the language of instruction has been a major ingredient for economic underdevelopment in Africa.

"The ways of thinking and behaviouring engendered by the colonial system, as well as institutional arrangement that continually reproduces them, were left intact."

Dr Nehusi argues that the domination of African communities and society by European languages is the major cause of the continued stultification of development and the failure to restore African languages to a position of centrality in the conduct of all African affairs; political, economic, legal, social or educational. He says the failure to embrace African languages as the basis for all daily interactions has been the major impediment in the restoration of African cultural autonomy, personality, self-confidence, creativity and sustained development.

Not long ago, Frantz Omar Fanon remarked that: "To speak a language is to take on a world, a culture." Fanon's view is shared by the director of the Centre of Advanced Studies of African Society in Cape Town, South Africa Professor Kwesi Kwaa Prah, who says; "Language is the dominant feature in any culture. More than any other aspects of culture, it is in language that the whole cultural heritage of any people is registered and catalogued . . . language is the root directory of the culture of 'speech community."

In the context of Zimbabwe, the influence of colonial languages is so pervasive that it seems like a difficult task to start rewinding the mental genocide inflicted on people through the use of colonial languages and the denigration of indigenous languages.

The use of colonial or foreign languages is so embedded in the country's social fabric to a level where it assumes some kind of a status symbol where in church the pastor speaks in English even though the whole congregation is conversant in Shona or Ndebele. It is even worse at institutions of higher learning where students studying Shona or Ndebele are forced to write their assignments and examinations in English.

Aware of the effect of language as a profoundly powerful tool, the colonisers pervasively enforced it in schools, churches and all other important facets of governance. The colonisers understood that as an important tool in defining one's identity, language was at its core a carrier of a value system. It is so because to speak is to think, and every individual thinks in language, mostly his or her mother tongue.

Zimbabwe
First Lady, VP Mujuru Graduate 

The First Lady Amai Grace Mugabe and Vice President Joice Mujuru yesterday graduated with Doctor of Philosophy Degrees … see more »

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Crowdfund the translation of new Science Fiction from China, and more!

A project looking to translate award-winning sci-fi from Chinese writers spearheads this week's look at crowdfunding, but that's not all - there's a short movie about Bears learning to use fire, a card game about the Periodic table and a lot more.
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Government pays £1.5m to translate entire works of Shakespeare into Chinese - Telegraph

The government has pledged a £1.5 million grant to the Royal Shakespeare Company, to translate the entire works of Shakespeare into Chinese.

The Department for Culture, Media and Sport will give the RSC a further £300,000 to tour through China, in the hopes of boosting tourism and "cultural links".

The money will allow the RSC to translate every Shakespeare play into Mandarin, in the hopes of introducing them to a new audience.

The translated texts will then allow Chinese theatre companies to stage their own versions of the Bard's best-loved work, for home-grown audiences.

The scheme, announced by culture secretary Sajid Javid, is aimed a improving economic links with China and encouraging more tourists to visit the home of Shakespeare.

It will also see translation of 14 Chinese plays into English, in what the DCMS hopes will allow "audiences here to experience the best of Chinese culture for the first time".

The plans, announced as part of an "economic and financial dialogue" with Chinese Vice President Ma Kai, will "boost business through culture" to foster mutual understanding, while "promoting the best of Britain’s unique and varied cultural scene on an international stage", a spokesman said.

Mr Javid said: “Creating stronger links with China is a top priority for the Government, and sharing the very best of our respective cultures is a brilliant way to make this happen. This funding means Western and Eastern cultures can learn from and be enriched by one another and what better way than using the works of Shakespeare. The package marks a really important step for both China and the UK to grow a strong and progressive relationship.

“Our culture and heritage is what makes the UK GREAT and by making them accessible to new audiences abroad it will also help drive more visitors to our shores.”

Gregory Doran, the RSC's artistic director, said: “I profoundly believe that we foster deeper understanding between cultures by sharing and telling each other our stories.

"Therefore, I am hugely excited by the ambitions of our Chinese cultural partners and their interest in working with the Royal Shakespeare Company on these new collaborations. China has a rich dramatic heritage that mirrors the epic scale, complexity and universality of Shakespeare’s work and a national curriculum which requires young people to study his plays.

“Our plans to translate Shakespeare into Mandarin, to see translation and performance of more Chinese classics in the UK and to tour RSC productions to China will celebrate the arts and culture of both nations. We are delighted that the DCMS and the Treasury are able so generously to support our artistic vision and bring more Shakespeare and classical drama to new audiences both here and in China.”

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100 Best Novels, in Translation, Since 1900 » CounterPunch: Tells the Facts, Names the Names

Cockburn calls one morning back in 2005.

“Jeffrey, don’t you think Frankie could play Behemoth in the movie?”

Frankie was Alex’s gregarious black cat, rather hefty with feline dreadlocks and an imperious manner.

“Which movie would that be?”

The Master and Margarita, of course. Don’t tell me you haven’t read your Bulgakov? I’m astonished. Simply astonished.”

Three days later, I had indeed read Bulgakov, laughing most of the way through his satiric underground masterpiece of life in Stalin’s Soviet Union. I finished the novel and immediately plunged back in for a second helping. So it’s no surprise then that Bulgakov heads our list of the best novels in translation written since 1900 or that an equally surreal, though less comic, novel of oppressive bureaucracy, Kafka’s The Trial, follows it. As for Proust, Alex and I both made pilgrimages to the wonderful Musée Carnavalet in Paris to see the recreation of the divine Marcel’s cork-walled room.

Alex and I both studied English Literature, Cockburn at Oxford, me at American University in DC 15 years later. During our 20 year friendship, we talked about novels, films and poems nearly as much as we did politics and certainly found greater enjoyment in long-ranging debates about the relative merits of Waugh, Stendahl and Proust. Before Alex died, we’d been working on putting together two lists of our favorite novels written since 1900, similar to the very popular lists we’d done years before for nonfiction books in English and in translation. Last month we published our list of the 100 best novels in English written since 1900. Here is our list of the 100 best novels in translation written since 1900.

We set some ground rules. First, one of us had to have actually read the book and convincingly described its merits to the other. Second, we limited each writer to one entry; otherwise, novels by Georges Simenon and Roberto Bolañ0 might have dominated the list. Third, each of us had unlimited preemptory challenges to be invoked against writers we hated. Thus no: Gunter Grass or Michel Houellebecq. Fourth: the novels had to have been published after 1899, which meant that Lou Andreas-Salome’s strange novels just missed the cut. We didn’t distinguish between so-called genre fiction and serious literature, thus you’ll find a thrillers like Henning Mankell’s Sidetracked ranked adjacent to Nathalie Sarraute’s challenging Portrait of a Man Unknown.

Unlike our previous lists, this time we chose to rank the books. Why? Because people tend to feel more passionately about novels than treatises on the surplus-value theory and we hoped that our list would give CounterPunchers something new to fight over. Here though the rankings are tilted more toward my own biases, since Alex and I had only gotten round to slotting the first 25 or so books before he died.

We hope that our novels list confirms some of your own tastes and at other times confounds you, irritates you and turns you on to some fresh reading pleasures. As Alex was fond of saying: “By the quality of life, art and freedom that radicals commend, so will radicals prevail.”

There’s much reading to be done. Hurry, before all the beaches disappear…

–Jeffrey St. Clair

 

1. The Master and Margarita by Mikhail Bulgakov [Russian] 1966

2. The Trial by Franz Kafka [German] 1925

3.  In Search of Lost Time by Marcel Proust [French] 1913-1927

4.  100 Years of Solitude by Gabriel Garcia Marquez [Spanish] 1967

5.  The Man Without Qualities by Robert Musil [German] 1942

6.  The Stranger by Albert Camus [French] 1942

7. The Magic Mountain by Thomas Mann [German] 1924

8. Memoirs of Hadrian by Marguerite Yourcenar [French] 1951

9. The Little Prince by Antoine Saint-Expurey [French] 1943

10. The Wind-Up Bird Chronicle by Haruki Murakami [Japanese] 1995

 

11. Journey to the End of the Night by Louis-Ferdinand Celine [French] 1932

12.  A Book of Memories by Peter Nadas [Hungarian] 1986

13.  History: a Novel by Elsa Morante [Italian] 1974

14.  How It Is by Samuel Beckett [French] 1961

15. The Death of Virgil by Hermann Broch [German] 1945

16. The Conformist by Alberto Moravia [Italian] 1951

17. My Name is Red by Orhan Pamuk [Turkish] 1998

18.  The Lover by Marguerite Duras [French] 1984

19.  Zeno’s Conscience by Italo Svevo [Italian] 1923

20.  The Savage Detectives by Roberto Bolaño [Spanish] 1998

 

21. One Day in the Life of Ivan Denisovich by Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn [Russian] 1962

22. Nausea by Jean-Paul Sartre [French] 1938

23. The President by Miguel Angel Asturias [Spanish] 1946

24. All Our Yesterdays by Natalia Ginzburg [Italian] 1952

25. The Name of the Rose by Umberto Eco [Italian] 1980

26. The Erasers by Alain Robbe-Grillet [French] 1953

27. Spring Snow by Yukio Mishima [Japanese] 1969

28.  The Feast of the Goat by Mario Vargas Llosa [Spanish] 2000

29. Despair by Vladimir Nabokov [Russian] 1934

30. The Gospel According to Jesus Christ by Jose Saramago [Spanish] 1991

 

31. Fatelessness by Imre Kertesz [Hungarian] 1975

32. Children of Gebelawi by Naguib Mahfouz [Arabic] 1959

33. Snow Country by Yasunari Kawabata [Japanese] 1947

34. Beware of Pity by Stefan Zweig [German] 1939

35. The Joke by Milan Kundera [Czech] 1969

36. The Growth of the Soil by Knut Hamsun [Norwegian] 1920

37. The Land of Green Plums by Herte Muller [German] 1994

38. The Thief’s Journal by Jean Genet [French] 1949

39. Summer in Baden Baden by Leonid Tsypkin [Russian] 1981

40. The Piano Teacher by Elfriede Jelinek [German] 1983

 

41. The Mandarins by Simone de Beauvoir [French] 1954

42. The Counterfeiters by Andre Gide [French] 1925

43. Sidetracked by Henning Mankell [Swedish] 1995

44. Portrait of a Man Unknown by Nathalie Sarraute [French] 1948

45. The Devil to Pay in the Backlands by Joao Guimaraes Rosa [Portuguese] 1956

46. Man’s Fate by Andre Malraux [French] 1933

47. Journey by Moonlight by Antal Szerb [Hungarian] 1937

48. Berlin Alexanderplatz by Alfred Döblin [German] 1929

49. Bonjour Tristesse by Francoise Sagan [French] 1954

50. The Passion According to GH by Clarice Lispector [Portuguese] 1964

 

51. Life: a User’s Manual by Georges Perec [French] 1978

52. The Story of O by Pauline Réage [French] 1954

53. Nadja by Andre Breton [French] 1928

54.  This Life by Karel Schoeman [Afrikaans] 2005

55. Yo-Yo Boing! by Giannina Braschi [Spanglish] 1998

56. The Moon and the Bonfires by Cesar Pavese [Italian] 1950

57. The Tartar Steppe by Dino Buzatti [Italian] 1940

58. The Kingdom of This World by Alejo Carpentier [Spanish] 1949

59. Terra Nostra by Carlos Fuentes [Spanish] 1975

60. Red Lights by Georges Simenon [French] 1953

 

61. The Dwarf by Par Lagerkvist [Swedish] 1944

62. Zorba the Greek by Nikos Kazantzakis [Greek] 1946

63. Furdeydurke by Witold Gombrowicz [Polish] 1937

64. Steppenwolf by Herman Hesse [German] 1927

65. The True Story of Ah Q by Lu Xun [Chinese] 1921

66. A Heart So White by Javier Marias [Spanish] 1992

67. Three Trapped Tigers by Guillermo Cabrera Infante [Spanish] 1967

68. Happy Moscow by Andrey Platonov [Russian] 1991

69. Pedro Paramo by Juan Rulfo [Spanish] 1955

70. Century of Locusts by Malika Mokedden [French] 1991

 

71. The Blind Owl by Sadegh Hedayat [Persian] 1937

72. Solaris by Stanislaw Lem [Polish] 1961

73. No Longer Human by Osamu Dazai [Japanese] 1948

74. The Great House by Mohammed Dib [French] 1952

75. The Girl With the Dragon Tattoo by Steig Larsson [Swedish] 2005

76. Hotel Splendid by Marie Redonnet [French] 1988

77. A Dark Night’s Passing by Naoya Shiga [Japanese] 1937

78. The Seventh Cross by Anna Seghers [German] 1942

79. The Conspiracy by Paul Nizan [French] 1938

80. Memed, My Hawk by Yashar Kemal [Turkish] 1955

 

81. The Ragazzi by Pier Paolo Pasolini [Italian] 1955

82. The Shadow of the Wind by Carlos Ruiz Zafon [Spanish] 2001

83. Stolen Spring b

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Bard to be translated into Mandarin

The UK government is donating £1.5m for the translation of all William Shakespeare's works into Mandarin for audiences in China.

Plans for cultural co-operation with China also include making 14 important Chinese plays available in English.

Culture secretary Sajid Javid also announced £300,000 for a Royal Shakespeare Company (RSC) tour of China.

He said culture was a "brilliant" way of fostering closer UK-China ties.

"This funding means Western and Eastern cultures can learn from and be enriched by one another and what better way than using the works of Shakespeare," said Mr Javid.

"The package marks a really important step for both China and the UK to grow a strong and progressive relationship."

The RSC will undertake the first translation of the Bard's complete works in Mandarin.

Artistic director Gregory Doran said: "I profoundly believe that we foster deeper understanding between cultures by sharing and telling each other our stories.

"Our plans to translate Shakespeare into Mandarin, to see translation and performance of more Chinese classics in the UK and to tour RSC productions to China will celebrate the arts and culture of both nations," he added.

Mr Doran also said that the initiative would help attract more visitors to the UK.

Other plans, which were announced today by Mr Javid and Chinese vice-president Ma Kai, include £300,000 of funds for a series of museum exchanges with the British Museum.

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The Read Russia Prize is awarded in Moscow | Russia Beyond The Headlines

The winners have been announced for the best translations in four categories encompassing contemporary and classic Russian prose and poetry. This year, the winning languages were English, Spanish, German and Chinese. inShare Share by e-mail RELATED Book Expo America Review: Bringing unsung Russian authors into the light From Boris Turnip to Leo Plumper: The hidden meaning of Russian writers’ surnames Two Joseph Brodsky house museums set to open in Russia TAGS RUSSIAN LANGUAGE READ RUSSIA! REPORTS AND ESSAYS ARTS & LIVING HEADLINES A labor of love or a science? Experts gather in Moscow to discuss translation The Soviet breakfast of champions Spasskaya Tower festival wows Moscow onlookers with spectacle and emotion Summer’s last hurrah: Watermelon and brynza salad The Read Russia Prize ceremony: (L-R) Liu Wenfei, Alexander Nitzberg, Marian Schwartz, Alejandro Ariel Gonzales. Source: Mikhail Sinitsyn / RG The awards ceremony for the Read Russia Prize has taken place on September, 6 within the stately confines of Moscow’s Pashkov House, part of the Russian State Library. This biennial event, which is supported by the Moscow Institute of Translation, is designed to honor the best translators working in any language and to facilitate the further translation of Russian literature. It encompasses four categories: Classic Russian Literature, 20th Century Russian Literature (published before 1990), Contemporary Russian Literature (published after 1990), and Poetry. The winner of each category receives a special diploma and a medal, as well as a cash prize of 5,000 euros and a 3,000 euro grant that enables the winner’s publishing house to cover the cost of translating another Russian work of their choosing. New translation brings Soviet magic realism to US readers The nominees for the first category – Classic 19th Century Russian Literature – were Vera Bischitzky for her German translation of Ivan Goncharov’s “Oblomov,” Alejandro Ariel Gonzales for his Spanish translation of Fyodor Dostoevsky’s “The Double,” and Jorge Ferrer Diaz for his Spanish translation of Alexander Herzen’s “My Past and Thoughts.” The winner was Alejandro Ariel Gonzales, who seemed genuinely overcome with gratitude as he accepted the award. The next prize – 20th Century Russian Literature – had five nominees: Alexander Nitzberg for his German translation of Mikhail Bulgakov’s “Master and Margarita,” Daniela Rizzi for her Italian translation of Osip Mandelstam’s “The Noise of Time,” Joanne Turnbull and Nikolai Formozov for their English translation of Sigizmund Krzhizhanovsky’s “Autobiography of a Corpse,” Henryk Chlystowski for his Polish translation of Mikhail Slonimsky’s “Warsaw,” and Elizabeth and Robert Chandler for their English translation of Vasiliy Grossman’s “An Armenian Sketchbook.” The award went to Alexander Nitzberg, who commented on the mystical symmetry of receiving this award in Pashkov house, which plays such a significant role in “Master and Margarita.” The nominees for the Contemporary Russian Literature category were Julie Bouvard for her French translation of Eduard Kochergin’s “Christened with Crosses,” Ives Gauthier for her French translation of Andrei Rubanov’s “A Successful Life,” Nicoletta Marcialis for her Italian translation of Zakhar Prilepin’s “Sin,” Ljubinka Milincic for her Serbian translation of Georgy Vladimov’s “The General and His Army,” Ewa Rojewska-Olejarczuk for her Polish translation of Viktor Pelevin’s “T,” and Marian Schwartz for her English translation of Leonid Yuzefovich’s “Harlequin’s Costume.” The winner was Marian Schwartz, who was emotional and grateful as she accepted her award. A labor of love or a science? Experts gather in Moscow to discuss translation Finally, there were three nominees for the Poetry category: Abderrahim Lataoui for his Moroccan translation of “Selected XIX and XX Russian poetry,” Liu Wenfei for his Chinese translation of lyrical works by Alexander Pushkin, and Martina Yakobson for her German translation of Areseny Tarkovsky’s “A Herd of Deer.” The winner was Liu Wenfei, who gave a touching speech that went right to the heart of why the congress is important and what the Read Russia prize itself means. He commented that both enable deep cultural exchanges and facilitate humanitarian friendship. “Translation is a lonely business,” he said, “Thanks for making it less so.” The winners are chosen by a panel of international judges that included leading literary figures such as Vsevolod Bagno, the director of the Institute of Russian Literature (the Pushkin House), Peter Mayer, the president of the American publishing house Overlook Press, Raphael Gusman Tirado, the vice-president of the International Association of Russian Language and Literature Professors, and many more. The ceremony was hosted by Mikhail Shvydkoy, Special Envoy for International Cultural Cooperation to the Russian President. “The prize showcases the last two years of Russian literature in translation,” said Shvydkoy in his speech. “The translators have their own vision of world events, and the exchange of opinions on these subjects is especially relevant now.” One award was presented by Grigory Ivliev, Russian Deputy Minister for Culture, who remarked that literary translators “are capable of reaching creative heights inaccessible to many of us. Thanks to their work Russian culture is spread across the entire world.” Special project: RBTH Literature The Read Russia prize served as the closing ceremony for the Third International Congress of Translators. The theme of this year’s congress was “Translation as a Method of Cultural Diplomacy,” and the Read Russia ceremony’s opening speech emphasized a translator’s opportunity to promote greater understanding between different cultures, unite people of varying ethnicities, and generally contribute to global peace.   “In these difficult geopolitical times, it is vital that we continue our conversations on the common humanity between Russia and foreign countries,” said Tatyana Voskovskaya, the ceremony’s presenter.  
Source: Russia Beyond the Headlines - http://rbth.com/literature/2014/09/12/the_read_russia_prize_is_awarded_in_moscow_39735.html)

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Language Revitalization: Three Children’s Books Translated to Ojibwemowin

A mixture of elders/first speakers, teachers, and staff for Red Lake’s Ojibwemowin Advisory Committee met at the Seven Clans Casino in Thief River Falls, Minnesota on August 20 to develop language materials and teaching tools for the Head Start Ojibwe Immersion School.

The group broke into three smaller groups to work on classroom material development, specifically children’s book translation from English to Ojibwemowin.

One group worked on a book about how different seeds grow into different plants, another was about animals of the world, and the third was a book titled “My First Powwow.”

One book translated was “My First Powwow.” (Michael Meuers)

Sentence by sentence, page by page, elders on one side of the table with a young speaker acting as scribe on the opposite side, pooled their wisdom and knowledge of the language translating each and every word of the book. When there was variation or disagreement as to the translation, both were used.

After finishing their respective assignments, the small groups presented their work to the larger group. It was a kind of editing session as young speakers typed the translations—and their English equivalents—projected on a screen. Now all first-speaker elders were able to discuss, confirm or modify a translated word.

All concurred that Red Lake immersion programs will use the “double vowel” system as developed and presented in the Nichols/Nyholm dictionary. The double vowel system is used at Ojibwemowin immersion schools, public schools, and colleges. It is the preferred spelling used in Ojibwemowin books.

The effort is part of the coming Head Start Immersion Classroom. Zack Mitteness will be the lead teacher along with Marcus Tyler. They will join guiding elders, Frances Miller and Elizabeth “Pug” Kingbird. Elizabeth Strong is the program coordinator and Liz White is the family coordinator for the program. The first immersion Head Start school classroom will open this fall.

The group hopes to develop immersion school project partners, including a collaboration of skilled and fluent speaking community members. Partners would include the Red Lake School District, Head Start, and Red Lake Nation College.

Anna Gibbs, Mary Lou Stillday and Susan Johnson translate while Marcus Tyler writes assisted by Elizabeth Strong (hidden) and Sam Strong. (Michael Meuers)

Guiding Elders, teachers and other staff have been observing and learning for some time at Niigaane Immersion School near Cass Lake, Minnesota. The Master Apprentice Program will work on strategies for learning the language.

“Fluent speaking elders will be key,” said Frances Miller. “They may need to be encouraged to share their knowledge, give advice, and participate in this important initiative.”

Red Lake Nation Language Revitalization Plan, Vision and Mission  

It is our vision that within 10 years Red Lake will have a younger generation of fluent speakers that promote the language and culture in our communities and act as leaders for the next seven generations. It is our mission to promote this vision through an immersion school as well as through a variety of other initiatives.

The team meets monthly at various locations. Red Lake Economic Development and Planning office invites anyone to contact their office if you would like to get involved or have project ideas for Ojibwemowin Language Revitalization within the Red Lake Nation community.


Read more athttps://indiancountrytodaymedianetwork.com/2014/09/13/language-revitalization-three-childrens-books-translated-ojibwemowin-156802
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Language Revitalization: Three Children’s Books Translated to Ojibwemowin

A mixture of elders/first speakers, teachers, and staff for Red Lake’s Ojibwemowin Advisory Committee met at the Seven Clans Casino in Thief River Falls, Minnesota on August 20 to develop language materials and teaching tools for the Head Start Ojibwe Immersion School.

The group broke into three smaller groups to work on classroom material development, specifically children’s book translation from English to Ojibwemowin.

One group worked on a book about how different seeds grow into different plants, another was about animals of the world, and the third was a book titled “My First Powwow.”

One book translated was “My First Powwow.” (Michael Meuers)

Sentence by sentence, page by page, elders on one side of the table with a young speaker acting as scribe on the opposite side, pooled their wisdom and knowledge of the language translating each and every word of the book. When there was variation or disagreement as to the translation, both were used.

After finishing their respective assignments, the small groups presented their work to the larger group. It was a kind of editing session as young speakers typed the translations—and their English equivalents—projected on a screen. Now all first-speaker elders were able to discuss, confirm or modify a translated word.

All concurred that Red Lake immersion programs will use the “double vowel” system as developed and presented in the Nichols/Nyholm dictionary. The double vowel system is used at Ojibwemowin immersion schools, public schools, and colleges. It is the preferred spelling used in Ojibwemowin books.

The effort is part of the coming Head Start Immersion Classroom. Zack Mitteness will be the lead teacher along with Marcus Tyler. They will join guiding elders, Frances Miller and Elizabeth “Pug” Kingbird. Elizabeth Strong is the program coordinator and Liz White is the family coordinator for the program. The first immersion Head Start school classroom will open this fall.

The group hopes to develop immersion school project partners, including a collaboration of skilled and fluent speaking community members. Partners would include the Red Lake School District, Head Start, and Red Lake Nation College.

Anna Gibbs, Mary Lou Stillday and Susan Johnson translate while Marcus Tyler writes assisted by Elizabeth Strong (hidden) and Sam Strong. (Michael Meuers)

Guiding Elders, teachers and other staff have been observing and learning for some time at Niigaane Immersion School near Cass Lake, Minnesota. The Master Apprentice Program will work on strategies for learning the language.

“Fluent speaking elders will be key,” said Frances Miller. “They may need to be encouraged to share their knowledge, give advice, and participate in this important initiative.”

Red Lake Nation Language Revitalization Plan, Vision and Mission  

It is our vision that within 10 years Red Lake will have a younger generation of fluent speakers that promote the language and culture in our communities and act as leaders for the next seven generations. It is our mission to promote this vision through an immersion school as well as through a variety of other initiatives.

The team meets monthly at various locations. Red Lake Economic Development and Planning office invites anyone to contact their office if you would like to get involved or have project ideas for Ojibwemowin Language Revitalization within the Red Lake Nation community.


Read more athttps://indiancountrytodaymedianetwork.com/2014/09/13/language-revitalization-three-childrens-books-translated-ojibwemowin-156802
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Questão de vocabulário

Caramba, nós temos parede, muro, muralha e cada uma dessas palavras dá uma ideia bem diferente uma da outra. E eles têm wall?
por Menalton Braff — publicado 12/09/2014 18:11

Tenho um amigo cujos conhecimentos da língua inglesa, que, para usar a medida de sua modéstia, é apenas razoável. Ter um amigo, nestes tempos sombrios em que o mundo se contorce com suas dores (e principalmente sua dor de barriga), já é uma grande vantagem. Pois tenho um amigo. Mas ter um amigo que se comunica na língua de William Shakespeare, bom, isso já é coisa para poucos. Sou um deles.

Este amigo, que me pediu para não revelar seu nome, disse que tinha vontade de traduzir um livro meu. Além de um amigo, a quem muito prezo, tenho um romance de minha própria lavra, como se dizia no tempo dos meus avós, e o romance, por uma série de razões, que não cabe aqui discutir, acabou levando o pomposo título de A muralha de Adriano. Vocês já devem estar imaginando que essa muralha é aquela que o imperador Adriano, não o brasileiro que já teve pés inteligentes, mas o romano, o imperador de verdade, pouco mais de cem anos de nossa era, construiu para isolar os pictos, também chamados de caledônios, por serem excessivamente selvagens. Vejam só, e hoje os tais, que passaram a se chamar apenas de escoceses, andam querendo se separar da Grã-Bretanha. Vê se pode. A muralha tem cerca de cento e vinte quilômetros de extensão, fechando o gargalo da Inglaterra inteiramente. Tinha, naqueles tempos, de três a cinco metros de altura. Razão para que eu julgue tratar-se de uma senhora muralha.

Pois bem, meu amigo desistiu da tradução e isso por uma razão muito simples. Ousei, com palavras nem tão ácidas, debochar de sua tradução do título.

Um dia depois de minha anuência para que traduzisse, me chegou com uma folha de papel, que logo de cara chamei de estúpida, porque, em letras enormes (metalinguisticamente?) trazia o título traduzido: The wall of Adriano. Quando me parei a rir de seu título, concordou que poderia mudar, talvez para Adriano’s wall. Agora já me deu vontade de chorar. Piorou, gritei, piorou muito.

Meu amigo, a quem muito prezo, quis saber a causa de meu riso. Expliquei a ele que wall, em inglês, significa parede. Seu olhar perdeu-se, passando acima de minha cabeça, indo chocar-se na parede bem atrás de mim. Tem razão, ele concordou depois de certo tempo, wall é parede. Comecei a ficar irritado, porque a muralha de que estava falando não podia ser posta ao lado de algo tão desprezível como uma reles parede. Perguntei se não havia palavra melhor e ele, meu amigo a quem tanto prezo, expulsou um pigarro, pensou um pouco, e me respondeu que não, era wall mesmo.

Estávamos perto da janela, e apontei para o fundo do quintal, perguntando a ele como designaria em inglês a construção que limitava o terreno de minha casa. Muito esperto, meu amigo, que já começava a me desprezar, disse que era isso mesmo, o que eu estava pensando. Wall!?, gritei. Ele confirmou sacudindo a cabeça.

Caramba, exclamei, nós temos parede, muro, muralha e cada uma dessas palavras dá uma ideia bem diferente uma da outra. Nossos muros jamais serão confundidos com paredes ou muralhas. E eles têm wall?

Meu amigo dobrou a folha de papel, enfiou-a num dos bolsos, e a tradução parou por ali mesmo.

E agora, meu caro leitor, se você disser que eu não sei o que é polissemia, vai errar, pois conheço também em nossa língua uma carrada de termos polissêmicos. Mas chamar a muralha de wall, num título, ah, não, isso deixa meu romance meio xinfrim.

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Preserving the Yiddish language

NEW YORK (MYFOXNY) -

We came to the YIVO Institute for Jewish Research to hear Dr. Chava Lapin -- "Bubby" to her grandchildren -- and Rabbi Shimon Josef Meller speak some kosher Yiddish, and to save ourselves from klutzily shvitzing, kvetching and schmoozing in search of the language on the street.

"One thing I want to get clear: Yiddish is a language among languages," YIVO Executive Director Jonathan Brent said. "It isn't a cute language. It's a language."

So much for the shtick I had planned for telling this story.

"It's been made into cuteness and therefore smallness," Brent said.

Founded in 1925, YIVO's first directors sought, among other things, to establish Yiddish as a modern language.

"Albert Einstein and Sigmund Freud were honorary members," Brent said of YIVO's original board of directors.

The academy moved to New York City in 1941 when the Nazis seized its 18,000 linear feet of documents -- a collection of one-of-a-kinds and great works of art the U.S. Army recovered in its entirety after World War II.

Originally, Yiddish fused Hebrew, Slavic, German and French into a language with many dialects spoken by 5 million people in Eastern Europe.

"The Jews always lived between worlds," Brent said. "They lived between the Russians and the Poles, and the Poles and the Ukrainians, and the aristocrats and the peasants."

Outside of YIVO, Brent admitted, most people speaking Yiddish in this country today live in Orthodox communities.

"However, there is a growing number of young people, not Orthodox but secular, who speak Yiddish," he said.

"Better a Jew without a beard than a beard without a Jew," Stanford PhD candidate Joshua Meyers said to us in Yiddish.

Intellectuals like Joshua Meyers, Jennifer Young and Leyzer Burko represent Brent's hope for the future of the language.

"It could be worse," Burko said in Yiddish.

Orthodox parents teach Yiddish to their children. But according to Brent, who you might detect harbors a slight bias, interest in Yiddish outside of places like Williamsburg began to grow within the last five years.

"I do not go to sleep at night thinking that Yiddish is a dying language," Brent said. "Please believe me."

Not cute and not dying. At least not at YIVO. Where you hear the language and from whom may change, but Yiddish, apparently, lives on.

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IU researcher looks to save endangered language

BLOOMINGTON, Ind. (AP) – An Indiana University researcher has won more than $250,000 in federal grants to document and preserve an endangered language that’s spoken by only a few thousand people in rural Mexico.

Linguistic anthropologist Dan Suslak will work with documentary filmmaker Ben Levine on a two-year project to document the Ayook language that’s spoken only in a mountainous region of southern Mexico’s Oaxaca (wuh-HAH’-kah) state.

The university says Suslak and Levine will document the Ayook language and create an online archive of high-resolution videos with Ayook, Spanish and English subtitles.

That database will serve as a resource for Ayook speakers in the region and for scholars who are interested in studying the language and culture.

Researchers believe the Ayook language was influenced by and also influenced the Aztec and Mayan languages.

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Sign Language at Center of Hospital Lawsuit

South Miami Hospital is being sued by an expectant mother who says she wants changes to the medical center’s policy on dealing with deaf patients.

Cheylla Silva gave is expecting her second child and is in the middle of a high-risk pregnancy. When her first child was born at South Miami Hospital, Silva said she was overwhelmed because of poor communication with the staff.

“During the whole time, I had no interpreter for any kind of service,” Silva said. “I did ask for an interpreter various times and every single time I asked, I was just dismissed.”

Silva said the hospital has provided a video relay interpreter in the past, but she wants a live certified interpreter for her high-risk pregnancy.

“The issue with the video remote interpreter is, it’s like any issues people have with their cell phones when you’re in a hospital,” said Matthew Dietz, Silva’s attorney, “sometimes, reception is just not good. And you cannot have bad reception when it comes to learning about issues regarding your health.”

In a statement, South Miami Hospital said, “Our actions are consistent with our long-standing policies that ensure we provide effective methods of communication for hearing-impaired patients to be able to understand and participate in their care.”

The hospital said it has agreed in writing to provide an interpreter for her birth and did so before the lawsuit was filed. Silva’s attorney said the lawsuit will proceed in hopes of changing the hospital’s policies to have sign language interpreters available in an emergency or critical situation for deaf patients.

“My desires, it’s not just me,” Cheylla said. “It’s for the deaf community. We really need the hospitals, really need to understand the necessity and we need to comply with the law.”

If the two sides can’t resolve the lawsuit, it will go before a local jury.

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SAGU Alumna assists translation of the Modern English Version Bible

Southwestern Assemblies of God University Alumna Dr. Verna Linzey served on a team of 47 translators for the new Modern English Version which was released September 2.

Verna Linzey attended what was then Southwestern Bible School in Enid, Oklahoma, from 1936 to 1938. She later received an honorary doctor of divinity degree from Fuller Theological Seminary to honor her accomplishments in the ministry. She has served as an essential player in several Bible translations, even translating the entire book of Proverbs for the MEV text. Her son and chief editor of the MEV, James F. Linzey, began the production of the MEV in 2005.

"The Modern English Version is an outstanding update of the King James Version that is based on a modern English vernacular," Verna Linzey said. "I highly recommend it.”

The MEV is a literal, modernized translation of the Holy Bible that is based on the same texts as the original King James Version. After inaugurating the project in 2005, James Linzey formed a team of 47 scholars who would make it a priority to preserve a great amount of the original wording, rhythm and flow of the KJV.

These scholars were able to accurately update the KJV by translating its Old Testament Masoretic Text and New Testament Textus Receptus by taking into consideration certain discoveries, information, and resources that were not available when King James I commissioned the KJV in 1611. As a result, the MEV has become the KJV in a more modern dialect of the English language.

Stanley M. Horton, the Senior Editorial Advisor of the MEV, has worked with Verna Linzey on other Bible translations, namely the New Tyndale Translation, for which she served as the chief editor.

"The MEV is a clear and concise translation that will appeal to modern Bible readers” Horton said. 

The MEV New Testament was completed in 2011 for the 400th anniversary of the King James Version's publication, and the completed version was made available for purchase on September 2. Overall, it took nine years to complete the Bible.

Contact Bethany Peterson at 469-517-1450 or email bethany.peterson@waxahachietx.com. Follow her on Facebook at www.facebook.com/MidlothianMirror or on Twitter at@BethPonyexpress.

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John Kerry: 'War' Is Wrong Terminology for What US is Doing to Islamic State

Speaking to CNN on Thursday, Secretary of State John Kerry refused to describe the current undertaking against the Islamic State jihadist terror group as a "war," instead opting to call it "a very significant counterterrorism operation" and emphasizing the involvement of the international community in the effort.

Kerry made the unusual pronouncement as he travels the world attempting to persuade nations, particularly those in the Middle East, to help the United States vanquish the Islamic State. The Secretary of State explained to CNN's Elise Labott that "war" is, to him, too limited a term for the situation in which the United States currently finds itself, and that the operation consists of "many different things that one doesn't think of normally in context of war."

Instead, Kerry suggested, the endeavor is "a very significant counterterrorism operation" that will take "some period of time" and "have many different moving parts." He heavily emphasized the need for an international coalition to defeat the Islamic State.

Kerry's statements echoed the words of President Obama in his highly anticipated speech this past Wednesday, in which he outlined an offensive consisting of air strikes and diplomacy with neighboring countries to help establish an international effort against the terrorist group. “American power,” the President asserted in his speech, “can make a decisive difference, but we cannot do for Iraqis what they must do for themselves, nor can we take the place of Arab partners in securing the region.” 

To build that coalition, Secretary of State Kerry landed in Ankara, the capital of Turkey, Friday, where he is expected to meet with President Recep Tayyip Erdogan and other Turkish leaders to discuss operations against the Islamic State moving forward. Turkey, a NATO member nation, refused to allow the United States to use its air bases to launch attacks against the Islamic State. As Turkey shares what many consider a fairly open border with Syria, Westerners joining the Islamic State often fly to Turkey first to cross the border towards Aleppo and Iraq. What's more, Turkish border towns often provide a willing market for Islamic State oil, which allows the terrorist group to fund its operations in the region.

Efforts against the Islamic State become more necessary every day, as its recruitment efforts have exhibited unprecedented success in the West among terrorist groups. The CIAannounced Friday that allegedly between 20,000 and 31,000 people are active fighters within the Islamic State ranks, triple the number previously believed.

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Terminology databases - UN Resources - Research Guides at United Nations Dag Hammarskjöld Library


Terminology databases
  • AGROVOC
    AGROVOC is a controlled vocabulary covering all areas of interest to the Food and Agricultural Organization of the UN (FAO), including food, nutrition, agriculture, fisheries, forestry, environment etc.
  • INIS/ETDE Thesaurus
    The Joint INIS/ETDE Thesaurus includes physics, chemistry, materials science, earth sciences, radiation biology, radioisotope effects and kinetics, applied life sciences, radiology and nuclear medicine, isotope and radiation source technology, radiation protection, radiation applications, engineering, instrumentation, fossil fuels, synthetic fuels, renewable energy sources, advanced energy systems, fission and fusion reactor technology, safeguards and inspection, waste management, environmental aspects of the production and consumption of energy from nuclear and non-nuclear sources, energy efficiency and energy conservation, economics and sociology of energy production and use, energy policy, and nuclear law.
  • IPCC Glossary
    Glossary of terms used in publications published by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC).
  • Terminology of Telecommunications
    Database of telecommunications related database maintained by the International Telecommunications Union (ITU).
  • Terminology on DRR
    The UN Office for Disaster Risk Reduction (UNISDR) develops these basic definitions on Disaster Risk Reduction (DRR) to promote a common understanding on the subject for use by the public, authorities and practitioners.
  • TourisTerm
    TourisTerm is the World Tourism Organization's (UNWTO) terminological database, in the five official languages of the Organization (Arabic, English, French, Russian and Spanish). There are also links to online references and other useful information.
  • UNBISnet Thesaurus
    The multilingual UNBIS Thesaurus contains the terminology used in subject analysis of documents and other materials relevant to United Nations programmes and activities. Available in Arabic, Chinese, English, French, Russian and Spanish.
  • UNICRI - Criminological Thesaurus
    The UNICRI (United Nations Interregional Crime and Justice Research Institute) Thesaurus lists the keywords used by UNICRI Documentation Service to index its Library Collection documents and by users to retrieve catalogue information. It covers all subjects related to crime prevention and criminal justice in the widest sense.
  • UNTERM
    United Nations Multilingual Terminology Database (UNTERM) is a linguistic tool that provides access to a diverse multilingual terminology and nomenclature of UN documents.
  • WTOTERM
    Terminology database of the World Trade Organization (WTO) for translators where one can find the terminology of the organization in its three official languages (English, French, Spanish).
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Viggo Mortensen Comes to Toronto Speaking Four Languages - But Not English - TheWrap

Toronto 2014: In “Far From Men” and “Jauja,” the actor appears onscreen speaking French, Danish, Spanish and Arabic

Several actors appeared in more than one movie at this year's Toronto International Film Festival:Keira Knightley in “The Imitation Game” and “Laggies,” Mark Ruffalo in “Foxcatcher” and “Infinitely Polar Bear,” Simon Pegg in “Kill Me Three Times” and “Horace and the Search for Happiness,” Patricia Clarkson in “October Gale” and “Learning to Drive” and Kristen Stewart in “Still Alice” and “Sils Maria,” among others.

But Viggo Mortensen holds the unusual distinction of having two TIFF movies in which he speaks four different languages … none of which are English, the language that moviegoers are accustomed to hearing Mortensen speak.

The 55-year-old Mortensen, born in New York to an American mother and a Danish father, speaks both Danish and Spanish in “Jauja,” a beautiful and forbidding art film from Argentinian director Lisandro Alonso, and French (with an Algerian accent) and Arabic in “Far From Men,” a David Oelhoffen Western of sorts set during the Algerian war for independence.

Also readViggo Mortensen: Why Don't Spanish-Language Films Get Any Respect?

Mortensen, who calls himself “a restless person,” has also spoken Russian, Swedish, German and Lakota onscreen in other films — plus, of course, the bit of Elvish he speaks in the three “Lord of the Rings” movies.

“Jauja,” which premiered in Toronto on Wednesday after debuting in May at Cannes, features the actor as a European officer who ends up wandering through the South American desert looking for his daughter, who may have run off with her boyfriend. His journey gets stranger and more mystical as it progresses, and so does the film — though to be fair, it starts out pretty strange and mystical, too.

The film is largely wordless and entirely arty, composed in the nearly square 4:3 aspect ratio and so determinedly slow-paced that viewers can either be mesmerized or bored stiff, or both at the same time. As a cinematic artifact, it's fascinating — and while it has more of a story than some of Alonso's past films, its commercial prospects would appear to be minimal.

Also readBold Brian Wilson Biopic ‘Love & Mercy’ Takes Two Actors, Paul Dano and John Cusack, to Play One Troubled Genius

His other TIFF entry, “Far From Men,” which premiered on Tuesday, is bigger and a little more mainstream. Set in Algeria during the early days of that country's war for independence from the French, it features Mortensen as the Algerian-born son of immigrants from the Andalusian region of Spain.

“To the French, I'm an Arab,” he explains at one point. “To the Algerians, I'm a foreigner.”

As a schoolteacher and World War II vet who reluctantly agrees to take an Algerian prisoner through the rebel-infested mountains to a town where the prisoner will no doubt be executed, Mortensen speaks Algerian-accented French throughout the film, except for a few conversations in Arabic.

Loosely-based on the Camus short story “The Guest,” “Far From Men” is a quietly gripping character study of a good man caught in bad times with nothing but bad options; it's also an effective suspense tale, with the likelihood of success always in doubt and no tidy resolutions in sight.

See videoViggo Mortensen And Kirsten Dunst Are Big Trouble for Oscar Isaac in ‘Two Faces of January’ Trailer (Video)

With Mortensen's 2014 movie “Everybody Has a Plan” filmed entirely in Spanish, the two new films mean that three of the actor's last four films have been in languages other than English. Only the upcoming “Two Faces of January” is an English-language production.

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The Beautiful, Untranslatable Words That Don't Exist In English

Aside from sneakily listening in on good-looking tourists' conversations on the subway, the joy of learning another language comes with a whole new perspective on expression and articulation. The more dialects you explore, the more you come to realize that there are certain emotions and phenomena that — while common feelings amongst all humans — manifest themselves particularly well in a certain language. 

Lost In Translation, a thoroughly fascinating new book by Ella Frances Sanders, opens up that world of "untranslatable" words for even those of us who flunked out of freshman-year French. 

The book began with one simple blog post, and morphed into a final product that Sanders calls "beautiful, manic, incredibly interesting...actually, I might need to write another book to explain the process of making this one." Over the course of three months, she put together a list of words that simply can only be said one way, accompanied by beautiful illustrations you almost want to rip out and hang on your wall (which would be totally blasphemous to do to this endearing little tome). Sanders and the good people of Ten Speed Press graciously allowed us to republish a handful of our favorite words and illustrations here, for your polyglot pleasure. 

Check it out, then pick up a copy of the book for yourself! 

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Wotif.com to improve search and mobile experience

Travel website, Wotif.com is making easier for users to find information while providing them with a more consistent experience on mobile devices.

The organisation has started using Hypermedia as the Engine of Application State (HATEOAS), a constraint of the REST application architecture that links relevant resources together, allowing users to discover information more easily.

This ensures they can explore content freely and in a non-prescribed fashion to not only find the best deals but also explore information that will help make their decisions, CIO Janet Sutherland and front-end team leader, Scott Horn told CIO Australia

“The key is to be able to discover where services are with a machine. So say you were using a mobile device and you had all these great services, all of a sudden you would have some more great services you need. That’s done automatically," said Horn, who spoke at the YOW! Connected conference in Melbourne.

“Also, in the past, we had our search technology that gave you the ability to go and find things by choosing some regions and so on to find a potential hotel. Now we have got the ability to find things via packages, to look for things through flights and to be able to do free text search and things like that,” he added.

Wotif has also recently implemented a date-specific search feature and is displaying images of hotels that match the specific date in its search results. Hotel reviews or scores have also been added under each search result, with the site having an excess of 1.2 million authentic hotel reviews for the Australia and New Zealand region.

This feature is still in user testing stage and is only visible to 50 per cent of people who land on the home page.

Sutherland added that the tech team has adopted a continuous delivery methodology, with small enhancements to the site being pushed out sometimes two to three times a day.

Read more: ASX rebounds 2% - whiplash anyone?

Wotif is also enabling its back end systems to better correlate a user’s search with information on deals and offers from its suppliers. The systems will allow hotels to enter information about their three-day deals, for example, and not just their daily rates.

“A hotel could have a mechanism for giving a customer a really good deal, but under certain circumstances like you have to stay a certain amount of time in order to get the deal. The more ways our systems can understand that and make that easily searchable, the better chance someone can find it,” Horn said.

“So when you are doing a search, and you know how many days someone is going to stay for, you can show them the deals really quickly and easily.”

Responsive Web design is also another key focus for the Wotif tech team. Sutherland said 49 per cent of the website’s hotel traffic comes from mobile devices, with 7.3 million downloads of its mobile app for iOS and Android since it was released in 2012.

“Responsive design enables us to have that consistent look and feel across multiple devices. Whether you are working on your desktop at home or the office or on your mobile device, you are going to have a consistent look and feel to your application,” Sutherland said.

Diversity driving ideas


Wotif ran its first hackathon in mid-July this year, with about 120 participants that formed 17 teams. The 24-hour event took place in its head office in Brisbane, with one idea being selected to go ahead and be delivered by the end of this year.

Read more: Wotif.com forecasts up to $56m profit for FY10

Sutherland and Horn did not want to discuss the idea before its release but said it is an offering that greatly enhances the customer experience. Other ideas involved improving the look and feel of the website and improving Wotif’s internal work processes.

“You put the right people together, you enable and open forum for collaboration and creation of these services, and you do the best thing you can to ensure that any work that is created along the way is immediately available for everybody to see,” Horn said.

Key to making a hackathon and innovation successful is having diversity in the teams, Sutherland said. This includes a mix of gender, cultures and skills.

“We are very gender diverse and multicultural and I think that has brought in ideas and thinking from a lot of different angles with no pre-set group of ideas. We workshop, we involve people across the business in developing ideas and developing our projects,” she said.

Last week, Alexandra Spillane, senior system administrator at Wotif, won the Women in IT (WiT) Professional Award.

“We are very keen to promote females in the technology industry. We are well balanced in our leadership, in our executive, as well our developers. We’ve got some really serious techie female geeks here – everything from software developers to system administrators,” Sutherland said.

Read more: Wotif.com expects 20% profit lift for FY10

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La aplicación de diccionarios de idiomas Ultralingua llega a la plataforma Android

Como venimos diciendo, ya no queda lugar a dudas de que a través de nuestros dispositivos móviles, les podemos dar diferentes usos en función de las
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Aware launches INQUIRE textual identity software | Planet Biometrics News

Biometrics software and services provider Aware on Thursday introduced a new software development kit product that uses biometric search and match operations in combination with text-based filter, search, match, and link algorithms to provide identity data.

Aware say that its INQUIRE software, an acronym for "INformation QUality and Identity Resolution Engine," includes data integration, data quality analysis, identity resolution and fuzzy text search, as well as address matching, link analysis, and biometric pre- and post-search filtering.

"Aware's introduction of INQUIRE reflects the usefulness of text-based identity data in biometric systems," commented David Benini, VP of Marketing at Aware.

"The ability to interpret textual identity data adds a dimension of analysis that is powerful not only for discovery of insightful identity information, but also towards characterizing identity data and optimizing its effectiveness," he added.

Aware noted plans to provide demonstrations of INQUIRE and other software products in its booth at the Global Identity Summit taking place September 16-18 in Tampa.

On 22 July, Aware revealed that its revenue for the second quarter of 2014 was US$6.8 million, an increase of 53% compared to US$4.4 million in the same quarter last year.

“"The second quarter was an eventful quarter for us in three respects, “ said Rick Moberg, Aware's co-chief executive officer and chief financial officer. 

“First, we were able to deliver solid operating earnings despite increased spending on new product development initiatives. Second, our engineering teams continued to make progress in the accuracy and scalability of our biometric matching technology which currently is offered through our NEXA product line.”

Earlier this year, Aware released the Nexa Fingerprint, Nexa Face, and Nexa Iris biometric search SDKs, with the firm saying these were designed to offer search and match algorithms that “deliver high accuracy and fast search speeds”.

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US Military Action against Isis Stokes 'War' of Words over Terminology

US officials are said to be in a dilemma over the terminology to be employed to describe the US offensive against Isis in Iraq and Syria.

A day after US Secretary of State John Kerry refused to use the word war, Obama administration officials have begun to use the word to describe the action.

"This is not also America's war with ISIL. The world is joining us in the fight because of the threat they pose to countries in the regions. So we are at war with ISIL in the same way we are at war with al-Qaeda and its affiliates around the world," State Department spokesperson Marie Harf told reporters.

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Flyers' Pierre-Edouard Bellemare: Reports of past skull fracture was language translation error

 Part of the reported backstory to new Flyers forward Pierre-Edouard Bellemare is wrong.

Blame Google.

The search engine’s translation of a stomach injury from French to Swedish somehow turned into a skull fracture.

“It went all over the world,” said Bellemore, a 29-year-old center/left wing who is a strong candidate to make the Flyers’ season-opening roster.

Here's the real story, according to Bellemare:

The 29-year-old native of France, a pro the last eight seasons in Sweden, did suffer a head injury playing a March 2013 Swedish Hockey League playoff game.

And he did come close to signing with an NHL team for the first time two summers ago.

However, there’s no truth to reports that negotiations with the Chicago Blackhawks ended because his head injury was a skull fracture, Bellemore told NJ.com on Friday.

The mix-up, he says, occurred when he told reporters in France that he was recovering from an offseason stomach injury while he was in talks with the Blackhawks.

“I got hit (in the head) in the playoffs and the newspapers said I had a stomach injury, and when you Google stomach injury from Swedish to French, it looked like I had a crack in my skull,” Bellemore said.

As for not signing with the Blackhawks and playing an eighth pro season in Sweden, Bellemore says, “The stomach injury wasn’t the reason I didn’t sign. It was more that the timing wasn’t right. I didn’t feel I’d get a real shot.”

Bellemore wound up returning to Sweden and scored 20 goals in 52 games last season, his best total in his five Swedish Hockey League seasons, then he performed very well for France last spring at the IIHF World Championships.

By June, the timing for a first season of North America hockey was right, as the Flyers made a one-year, $600,000 contract offer that Bellemare accepted.

R

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Google Traduction : devant Reverso avec un taux de réussite de 83% ?

Le site 60canard.com a procédé à la comparaison d’une bonne douzaine de plates-formes de traduction en ligne afin d’en établir un classement. La grande majorité des plates-formes célèbres comme Systran, Yahoo Babel Fish, Babylon, Reverso ou encore Google Traduction ont été testées. Le résultat du test est sans surprise, le traducteur de Google sort du lot avec des performances satisfaisantes.

83 % de traduction valable pour Google Traduction

Pour procéder au test, le site a soumis 25 textes rédigés en anglais aux douze plates-formes de traduction. Les résultats du test sont incontestables, Google Traduction est le meilleur traducteur en ligne avec 83 % de traduction valable contre seulement 45 à 59 % pour les autres outils. Cette performance explique certainement la grande popularité de Google Traduction qui ne cesse pourtant pas de s’améliorer.

Une vaste base de données, le point fort de Google Traduction

60canards.com a trouvé le secret de Google Traduction. Selon le site, l’efficacité de la plate-forme de Google s’explique par la taille de sa base de données. En effet, le géant américain repose ses traductions sur une énorme base de données qui manque souvent aux autres plates-formes.

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Ces titres français qui ne pensent qu'à ça !

"Sex Academy", "Sex Friends", "Sexe Intentions"... Parfois, le mot "sexe" est utilisé pour nos titres français alors que ce n'est pas le cas dans la version originale (contrairement à "Sex Tape") ! Démasquage de ces titres filous sous forme de test !
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English to continue as link language in Puducherry: Court - The Times of India

CHENNAI: Refusing to interfere with the four-language formula in the Union Territory of Puducherry, Madras high court has said English would continue to be the link language for transaction of official business and in the interest of public service. 

According to language policy of Puducherry, Tamil will be the official language for all or any of official purposes, whereas Malayalam may be used for official purposes in Mahe region and Telugu in Yanam region. English may be used for all or the official purposes, meaning it could act as link languages common to all regions in the Union Territory. The PIL, filed by Puduvai Kalai Ilakkia Peru Mandram wanted to direct the territorial administration to adhere to its language policy in 'letter and spirit.'' 

The first bench comprising Chief Justice Sanjay Kishan Kaul and Justice M Sathyanarayanan, concurring with the submissions of senior government pleader and public prosecutor T Murugesan on Thursday, refused to issue any direction to that effect saying: "The notification has been issued keeping in mind the peculiarity of the Union Territory of Puducherry, where there are people from different regions speaking different languages. The local languages are three in number and that is why Section 3 refers to the area and the respective language for that area, with a non-obstante clause for official communication in English on account of there being really three local languages. Thus, a four-language formula is applied specially, as even the officers may be using one language or the other in their respective areas." 

The counter-affidavit of the territorial administration too made it clear that English language continued to be the link language among all officers working in all the four regions - Puducherry, Karaikal, Mahe and Yanam - to avoid deviation in official business and in the interest of public service. 

As for the PIL's give Tamil its due importance, it said separate cell - Tamil Development Wing - is proposed to be created in the chief secretariat. The legislative business is also carried out in Tamil, it said, adding: "The determination of government of Puducherry to implement the use of Tamil in all official correspondence in a phase manner has been set out, and a separate cell is created involving a cost of 10 crore per annum."

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