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R.E.A.D. dog coming to Federalsburg library

R.E.A.D. dog coming to Federalsburg library | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it
FEDERALSBURG — The Caroline County Public Library’s Federalsburg branch will welcome R.E.A.D.-ing dog Diego from 6 to 7:30 p.m. Jan. 14.
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Metaglossia: The Translation World
News about translation, interpreting, intercultural communication, terminology and lexicography - as it happens
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UN Careers - jobs in this network (Translators, Revisers, Editors, etc.)

UN Careers -  jobs in this network (Translators, Revisers, Editors, etc.) | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it

Vacancies in this network: Translators, Revisers, Editors, etc.

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Indiana BMV Offering 11 New Foreign Language Options - Tristatehomepage - Eyewitness News

Indiana BMV Offering 11 New Foreign Language Options - Tristatehomepage - Eyewitness News | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it
The Hoosier state hopes to break the language barrier.
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"There are different languages everywhere, really. It's not all English."

The Hoosier state hopes to break the language barrier as the Bureau of Motor Vehicles adds several new languages to their drivers test.

Today Fort Wayne and Indianapolis were the first to offer eleven foreign languages to their computerized drivers test.

By the end of this week, they will expand it to six more branches. In about a week the BMV hopes to have all Indiana branches, including Evansville, equipped with the translations.

It's the BMV routine.

You take your ticket, you sit and wait to be called for the test.

The routine seems easy, but for some it's not.

"It can be a little bit of a challenge," says Neeru Tindoni.

The Indiana BMV hopes to make things a little easier by now offering eleven foreign language options on their automated drivers test.

"It's definitely going to be able to help because it will be worded to put them more at a comfort zone." Able to speak several languages, Neeru Tindoni moved to Evansville from the United Kingdom.

She just completed her drivers test and says she's excited for Indiana to make more accommodations.

"Its a pressure in itself. On top of that, when you don't have a better understanding because of the language barrier, then you are really going to be stuck. So, definitely to add the different languages is going to be very, very, helpful indeed."

Even though many people understand English, she says the phrasing can be tricky.

"They might think of the wording and think, does this mean this? It can have two different meanings when you read the sentence. Having it in the different languages is going to be very helpful," says Tindoni.

Indiana BMV Commissioner, Don Snemis, says the idea to translate the computerized test comes in response to numerous requests from businesses, universities and advocacy groups. "The customer service representative just hits a few buttons, the test comes up in the alternative language, they take it, the computer determines whether they passed or failed, and that's it," explains Snemis.

You can only use this new option on the computerized test, not the paper version.

"I don't think that I would be able to go in and be like, yeah I'm going to go in here with confidence. I wasn't even confident to go in there and taking it in my own language," says Nicole Grayson. Grayson says the options make the Hoosier state more welcoming to diversity.

"I think that it will be a good experience for them to be able to go in there with confidence, and know that they can take it and be able to have their own language in there."

The BMV hopes to add even more new languages to the list in the future.

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Nigeria: Interpreting the Interpreter - a Scholar's Deconstruction of Soyinka's Ritual Drama and Social Vision

Nigeria: Interpreting the Interpreter - a Scholar's Deconstruction of Soyinka's Ritual Drama and Social Vision | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it
AN encounter with any literary work by Professor Wole Soyinka easily provokes scholarly or intellectual curiosity. This is because as a literary giant of no mean stature, Soyinka occupies a revered space in world literature, and indeed represents a leading voice on the African literary landscape of modern era. He has equally crowned these feats (in 1986) with his emergence as Africa's first Nobel Prize winner in Literature.
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AN encounter with any literary work by Professor Wole Soyinka easily provokes scholarly or intellectual curiosity. This is because as a literary giant of no mean stature, Soyinka occupies a revered space in world literature, and indeed represents a leading voice on the African literary landscape of modern era. He has equally crowned these feats (in 1986) with his emergence as Africa's first Nobel Prize winner in Literature.

The foregoing achievements and many others expectedly prompted Hakeem Bello, a quiet but painstaking admirer of Soyinka to channel his scholarly interest in the direction of the Nobel laureate. As a young scholar in 1988 (Bachelor of Arts, Ilorin) and 1990 (Master of Arts, Ibadan) respectively, Bello focused his dissertations on the Nobel laureate, with a detailed study of his works and his utilisation of Ritual as a dramatic strategy to engender liberation and regeneration of the society. Bello's new work, which encompasses the two essays, is entitled The Interpreters: Ritual, Violence and Social Regeneration in the Writing of Wole Soyinka (The Interpreters: Ritual, Violence and Social Regeneration in the Writing of Wole Soyinka, Kraft Books Limited, Ibadan; 2014) by Hakeem Bello.

Many years after his scholarly incursions, Bello reworked his long essays on Soyinka into a book form and got it published. And after reading through the book, this reviewer discovered refreshing angles through which Soyinka, a widely studied and criticised writer/dramatist, can be fully understood. First, Bello succeeds in analysing Soyinka's often described difficult texts, in addition to sharing the views of many scholars on his drama. Secondly, Bello uses the book of nine chapters to produce a holistic study of Soyinka's works in both drama and prose forms. This is a rare achievement in the sense that not many of Soyinka's protégés or scholars have undertaken a study of their subject in both popular genres of literature in a single work.

The book of nine chapters is divided into two broad sections. The first five chapters provide an illuminating study of the plays of the Nobel laureate, while the remaining four chapters take a critical look at Soyinka's two novels; Season of Anomy and The Interpreters.

In the first chapter, tagged "The Ritual Imperative in African Drama," the author aptly traces 'ritual' to the primordial beliefs by Africans in gods, divinities and ancestral spirits, a condition which subjects people's aspirations and existence to the mercy and will of the metaphysical entities. The fact that man's existence or survival is always threatened by one problem or the other, makes it necessary for man to appease the higher entities (ancestors and gods) to intervene and restore harmony.

It is against this background that Wole Soyinka relates ritual to revolutionary ideals, using ritual drama as a change agent and as a tool for liberation in most of his works. The famous writer once declared that 'ritual is the language of the masses, and a universal medium', hence he consciously upholds the theory of ritual drama to interpret the African worldview. Bello particularly emphasises how Soyinka, in deploying ritual as dramatic form (and sometimes blending this with western theories of ritual and drama) explores the Yoruba worldview of the living, the dead and the unborn in his literary works. But most essentially, this chapter examines how Soyinka uses ritual to celebrate the 'various ways in which communal dislocations occur in the community and the various attempts at the cosmic restoration of continuity and order.'

Chapter two; Ritual as Form and Matter in the Drama of Communal Regeneration, also lends credence to the central idea in the first chapter. But the author extends this by highlighting how his subject also uses ritual not just to create form, but to also communicate as well as showcase certain aesthetic elements through his drama. Here the author refers to Soyinka's The Strong Breed and Death and the King's Horseman, drawing several instances where the playwright creates or recreates certain tragic characters (such as Ewan, the carrier in The Strong Breed), or uses symbols and effigies, flashbacks and flash forwards to communicate ideas about society and the need for change.

Nigeria
FG Bans Conveyance of Corpses From Ebola-Infected Countries 

-Fashola canvasses closure of some borders as Anambra, Abia, Oyo assure virus not in their domain -Contacts already … see more »

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How networking can make anyone a creative genius | City A.M.

How networking can make anyone a creative genius | City A.M. | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it
It boosts your career and your profile, but also makes you more innovative, says Judith Perle.
 
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It boosts your career and your profile, but also makes you more innovative, says Judith Perle.
 
How often have you been told to network to boost your professional profile, climb the promotion ladder, or to find a new job? But has anyone ever told you that networking will make you more creative? If not, then read on.
 
Ronald Burt of the University of Chicago studied the professional networks of 673 managers running the supply chain of an electronics corporation, and measured two things: the likelihood of their expressing a new idea, and the likelihood that senior management would engage with that idea and judge it to be valuable.
 
Burt’s results show that innovation isn’t necessarily born out of individual genius or, to use a well-worn cliché, “blue-sky thinking”. Instead, he demonstrates that people who build diverse networks, so that they become bridges (or brokers) between different social or professional groups, are at a “greater risk of having a good idea”. Why? Well, as he puts it: “This is not creativity born of genius; it is creativity as an import-export business.” So innovators aren’t necessarily exceptionally smart people with exceptionally creative minds – bright sparks able to think differently. They can be people just like you and me, who do two very important things: they mix with a wide variety of individuals, not just their close friends, and they listen as well as talk.
 
SPREADING THE WORD
But successful innovation isn’t just about having good ideas: you also need to put your idea into practice and get buy-in from colleagues. In a study of a global consulting firm, Louise Mors of London Business School found that managers deal with these challenges by nurturing and tapping into different sorts of personal networks, both within and outside the organisation. As we’ve seen, finding innovative ideas is best done through a wide-ranging, open network in which relatively few people are connected to each other. Interacting with a very wide variety of people, from different backgrounds and with different mindsets, exposes managers to more and more varied ideas. 
 
On the other hand, when you want to implement a new idea or persuade others to do so, it’s easier if your network is denser, with more overlapping connections. Mors doesn’t explain why, but I think we can safely assume that the people in such networks know and respect each other. You don’t necessarily need to convince each and every member of your network separately; by talking to each other, they will help spread the word and do some of the work for you.
 
Interestingly, Burt showed that active networkers reap personal benefits too: “more positive performance evaluations, faster promotions, higher compensation and more successful teams”. Put simply, the evidence shows that, by nurturing a wide-ranging network, you are much more likely to be successful in your career. So what’s good for your employer in terms of fruitful innovation turns out to be good for you too. A pleasing win-win outcome.
 
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Toto language more endangered than tribe

Toto language more endangered than tribe | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it
Language of primitive tribe has no script and is under influence of Nepali and Bengali: researchers
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Language of primitive tribe has no script and is under influence of Nepali and Bengali: researchers

When scientists of the Anthropological Survey of India (AnSI) set out to conduct a study on language of the primitive Toto tribe, whose population has dwindled to 1,536, they did not realise that the language is more endangered than the tribe itself.

During their study they recorded the vocabulary, folklore, and even some songs in Toto language, and realised that the language has no script.

For centuries, the language that belongs to the Tibeto-Burman group of Indian languages, has survived in the small community completely orally without much research, Asok Kumar Mukhopadhyay, research associate, Linguistics (AnSI), one of the prominent members of the research team, who visited the hamlet of Toto tribe, told The Hindu.

“Being a small community, we found that the Totos communicate among themselves in their own language, but the moment they leave their hamlet of Totopara in Madarihaat block of Alipurduar district, they prefer to not communicate in the language even among themselves,” Mr. Mukhopadhyay said.

Under threat

Researchers and even the members of Toto community admit that the language is under threat and influence of others languages, particularly Nepali and Bengali, is increasing day by day.

Interestingly, despite the language lacking a script, members of the community, whose literacy rate as per a sample survey carried out in 2003 was just 33.64 per cent, have penned books and poems in their language albeit in the Bengali script.

Dhaniram Toto, one of the members of the community, has written two books in Toto language over the past two years.

Mr. Toto claims his book, Lokeswar, is about the folk culture of Totos and his other book Uttar Banga Lokpath is about folk tales of the community.

“Since our language does not have a script, I have to take help of the Bengali script,” he says, adding that there is an urgent need to develop a script for the language.

Mr. Toto, who is employed in West Bengal’s Backward Class Welfare Department, says there are others in the community such as Satyajit Toto, who write in the language taking the help of scripts of other languages.

Keep it alive

Their aim is just to keep the language alive. “We carried out this study to keep record of the language. It may happen in a few decades that the language may get extinct. The study of the Toto language is essential to understand the overall cultural ambit of the primitive tribe,” said Kakali Chakraborty, head of office, Eastern Regional Centre of (AnSI).

Day labourers

Totos, one of the primitive Himalayan tribes in the country, usually work as day labourers and porters carrying oranges from Bhutan to the local market in north Bengal.

Despite the geographical isolation of Totopara, the members have started laying emphasis on education, resulting in about half a dozen of graduates, which includes girls. But the elders point out that despite a number of schools being present in the locality, there is no one to teach the children in their own language, and as a result, the children are losing touch with their culture.

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Skills Spotlight: Public Speaking and 16 Related Jobs

Skills Spotlight: Public Speaking and 16 Related Jobs | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it
These roles capitalize on public speaking and presentation skills, giving you the perfect chance to speak up and move up in your career.
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For some, the thought of speaking in front of a large group of people is enough to cause hyperventilating, sweating and hives. For you, it's simply a pleasure. Masterfully articulating yourself and commanding the presence in a room are skills you've had a while or have recently refined, and there are plenty of opportunities for you to have your voice heard.

No worries if you're not a professional public speaker -- these roles capitalize on public speaking and presentation skills, giving you the perfect chance to speak up and move up in your career. Continue reading to learn about the important qualities many public speakers need to be successful, and the roles that can complement your unique voice.

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South African Isango Ensemble Headed to Shakespeare Theatre Company this Fall

South African Isango Ensemble Headed to Shakespeare Theatre Company this Fall | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it
The Shakespeare Theatre Company brings two productions by the Isango Ensemble to Washington, D.C., as part of STC's 2014-2015 Presentation Series. The Isango Ensemble's unique performances reset Western theatre classics within a South African township, utilizing music, dance and elements of South African heritage. The Ensemble will perform an adaption of Mozart's opera The Magic Flute- Impempe Yomlingo and Shakespeare's epic love poem Venus and Adonis in repertory at the Lansburgh Theatre September 12-21, 2014. Tickets for non-subscribers will be available starting August 1, when individual tickets for the 2014-2015 STC Season go on sale.
Charles Tiayon's insight:

The Shakespeare Theatre Company brings two productions by the Isango Ensemble to Washington, D.C., as part of STC's 2014-2015 Presentation Series. The Isango Ensemble's unique performances reset Western theatre classics within a South African township, utilizing music, dance and elements of South African heritage. The Ensemble will perform an adaption of Mozart's opera The Magic Flute- Impempe Yomlingo and Shakespeare's epic love poem Venus and Adonis in repertory at the Lansburgh Theatre September 12-21, 2014. Tickets for non-subscribers will be available starting August 1, when individual tickets for the 2014-2015 STC Season go on sale.

"Isango's repertory takes two pieces from the Western canon and frames them in a very particular time and place-modern South Africa," says STC Artistic Director Michael Kahn. "We are inspired by the ingenuity with which they make classic work relevant to their audiences, and are honored to bring them to the Lansburgh stage."

The Isango Ensemble was developed by Director Mark Dornford-May and Music Director Paulien Malefane in Cape Town in 2000, and draws its performers from the townships surrounding the city. Their productions speak to a broad and open-minded multicultural audience and have played to sold-out theatres around the world.

The Magic Flute - Impempe Yomlingo reinterprets the story in contemporary South Africa, performing the play's score on marimbas, drums and South African percussion. This Olivier Award-winner for Best Musical Revival has thrilled audiences in London, Dublin, Tokyo and Singapore, and received the Globes de Cristal for Best Opera Production following a sold-out season at the Théâtre du Châtelet in Paris. Venus and Adonis, Shakespeare's epic poem of love and seduction, is reborn with this adaption that takes the heart of the original work and reimagines it with carnival-like theatricality, music and dance, in English and three African languages.

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Traductor Jurado Francés - sunotadeprensa.com

Ofeta en traducción jurada de francés. Traductor jurado de francés.
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Now Appearing: Breaking the writing rules

Now Appearing: Breaking the writing rules | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it

Now, one rule of advertising is Don't use too many words. People switch off. Get your message across with images and a few snappy words. (You can have small, secondary text to give follow-on information, but the main message should be short and big.) If you look at adverts on Tube stations these days, for instance, that's generally the case. But when I regularly caught the Tube when I worked at Hatton Cross, one company thought differently.

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Now, one rule of advertising is Don't use too many words. People switch off. Get your message across with images and a few snappy words. (You can have small, secondary text to give follow-on information, but the main message should be short and big.) If you look at adverts on Tube stations these days, for instance, that's generally the case. But when I regularly caught the Tube when I worked at Hatton Cross, one company thought differently.

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Calling all writers— can you create a story in 100 words or less? | www.toacorn.com | Thousand Oaks Acorn

Calling all writers— can you create a story in 100 words or less? | www.toacorn.com | Thousand Oaks Acorn | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it

The fiction genre is limitless. You can choose sci-fi, drama, adventure, romance or anything else from the world of makebelieve. You’ll be judged on writing, creativity and topic.

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The fiction genre is limitless. You can choose sci-fi, drama, adventure, romance or anything else from the world of makebelieve. You’ll be judged on writing, creativity and topic.

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Biblioteca Nacional anuncia vencedores de bolsas

Biblioteca Nacional anuncia vencedores de bolsas | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it
Iniciativa concedeu apoio para tradução e publicação de obras nacionais no exterior e intercâmbio de autores brasileiros
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Venter Hires Google Translate Leader at Human Longevity Startup | Xconomy

Venter Hires Google Translate Leader at Human Longevity Startup | Xconomy | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it
Human Longevity, the San Diego startup founded by human genomics pioneer J. Craig Venter, says it has recruited Franz Och, a 42-year-old expert in machine
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Och has worked as a distinguished research scientist at Google for the past decade, and led Google’s machine translation group to develop better ways for computers to translate information from one language into another. Today, Google Translate has more than 200 million active users, and can be used to translate over 80 different languages, including Swahili, Yiddish, and Esperanto.

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La Bible existe dans sept nouvelles langues | Riposte-catholique

La Bible existe dans sept nouvelles langues | Riposte-catholique | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it

La Bible complète est désormais traduite en sept nouvelles langues : trois en Afrique, deux en Asie, une en Amérique et une en Europe, La Bible complète existe ainsi en 511 langues et le Nouveau Testament est traduit en 1.295 langues.

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La Bible complète est désormais traduite en sept nouvelles langues : trois en Afrique, deux en Asie, une en Amérique et une en Europe, La Bible complète existe ainsi en 511 langues et le Nouveau Testament est traduit en 1.295 langues.

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PittyTiger spearphishing campaign speaks multiple languages

PittyTiger spearphishing campaign speaks multiple languages | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it
A threat group operating out of China continues does its damage using older exploits, FireEye researchers said.
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A group of attackers known as PittyTiger that use social engineering to deliver spearphishing emails in numerous languages to their targets are likely operating out of China, according to researchers at FireEye.

Citing a report titled “Eye of the Tiger” — and released by Airbus Defence and Space — that details the attacks and actions of the group since 2011 (PittyTiger may have begun operations in 2008), FireEye said in a blog post that the group uses various malware and tools to “maintain command and control (C2) and move laterally through their targets' networks.”

Nart Villeneuve, senior threat intelligence researcher and co-author of the blog post (along with Joshua Homan), confirmed to SCMagazine.com in an email correspondence that “the attacks conducted by this group are consistent with the TTPs associated with threat actors operating from China.”  

The group recently launched an attack against a French company, using free mail addresses under the names of actual company employees to send “simple, straightforward messages” in French and English. 

FireEye has observed the attackers using a Yahoo! email phishing pages kit that boasts phishing pages in different languages and aimed at multiple regions.

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Sanskrit Language and Literature of Nepal

Sanskrit Language and Literature of Nepal | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it
Mrs. Nirmala Pokhrel, Culture Department, TU, Nepal, Nepal Sanskrit language, nepali literature, Licchavi Period Nepal, Max Muller, Vedas Nepal, Agnidhar, Modern Nepal, Telegraph national
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Different languages and literature have been found to be flourishing in Nepal from ancient time. From the perspective of civilization, culture, and language, Nepal is as glorious ancient country as India and China. The Sanskrit literature was in its developed status in ancient Nepal. Nepal is known as a country where language and literature were in the best position from the very starting time of proven history.


Nepal is a multi-lingual and multi-cultural independent state. All the languages spoken in different parts of the country as mother-tongue are the national languages of Nepal. According to the census of 2068 BS, 123 national languages or mother-tongues are spoken in Nepal. Nepali, Maithili, Bhojpuri, Tharu, Tamang and Newari can be taken as the major languages among the languages spoken in Nepal. Out of the total population, 44.6 percent people speak Nepali language, 11.7 percent people speak Maithili language, 6 percent people speak Bhojpuri language, 5.8 percent people speak Tharu language, 5.1 percent people speak Tamang language and 3.2 percent people speak Newari language.

From more than 200 archaeological evidences available of the Lichhavi period, the high standard of the language and literature of that period can be seen easily. Through the Lichhavi script and Sanskrit language used in such inscriptions the maturity and high standard of the language can be felt clearly.

There was a great development in literature and art in the Medieval Nepal. Specially, providence of royal residence to the intellectual Pandits in Nepal Valley and the outer states of that time, king himself and ministers having interested in writing and literature, to be competition among different places in building temples, monasteries, layaku (palaces) etc. were some of the reasons which became the encouraging aspect for the development of literature and art. Sanskrit among the Hindus, Tibetan in the northern part, Maithili, Bhojpuri and Awadhi in the southern part, Newari in the Nepal Valley, Nepali in the hilly region and Kirati language and literature in the eastern hilly region had been always progressing. The ethnic groups of Nepal have been always remained conscious about their language and identity.

Though the practice of Sanskrit language was prevailing among the elite group and priest community before the unification of Nepal, Nepali language started to develop and spread out rapidly later after the unification. The language and literature of other castes and ethnic groups remained constricted within their communities and region. In Rana period, Sanskrit and Nepali languages and the works of literature written in those languages were only delimited to the subject matter of religious and social activities. After the mount of Rana regime, very illiberal policies started to be levied upon ethnic languages. As a result, public consciousness against the Rana rule started to emerge nationally. The writing of literature in Nepali, Newari, Limbu languages started even from outside the country and inside the prison. The messages of social and political change started to be echoed in those works of literature.

After the downfall of Rana regime, a trend of writing literature in Nepali, Newari, Limbu, Maithili, Bhojpuri Awadhi languages etc. in the effort of the people themselves started being popular. Even Radio Nepal started broadcasting news bulletin in Nepali, Newari, Hindi and English languages. The extension of education also supported to activate the growth of literature. However, from the year 2022 BS the broadcasting of news bulletin in Newari language was ended.

After the Peoples’ Revolution of 2046 BS, in the multi-party democracy system the national policy upon language was again made liberal. After 2047 BS, Radio Nepal again started to broadcast news bulletin in Newari and Hindi languages whereas, Radio Nepal, Nepal Television, and other private media also started broadcasting the songs and dances of other castes and ethnic groups.

Emphasis to Inclusive Democracy was started to be given after the declaration of Nepal as a republican state. Regarding language, Interim Constitution of Nepal, 2063 has stated thus: 1) All the mother-tongues spoken in Nepal are national languages.

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5 ideas for cultivating screen resistance

5 ideas for cultivating screen resistance | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it
This writer finds it necessary to take small steps away from the Internet in order to maintain perspective and fuel creativity.
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This writer finds it necessary to take small steps away from the Internet in order to maintain perspective and fuel creativity.

The hours of my day are increasingly occupied by the Internet. It didn’t start out this way. I used to blog daily, spending minimal time writing and often sketching out my ideas by hand before approaching the laptop. Then a dream came true and I got hired as an online writer. Suddenly I became accountable to an editor, a group of fellow writers, and a company that sends me a paycheck.

Now the Internet is my job, and the amount of time I spend staring at the computer screen has increased along with the number of weekly posts I’m required to write. There is reading, research, writing, linking, and editing to be done, as well as post promotion and follow-ups. Add the endless barrage of emails, as well as Facebook and Twitter accounts, and all of a sudden there are days when it feels like the Internet has taken over my life.

I absolutely love my job, but I don’t like that feeling described above, which is why I’m trying to implement what I call “acts of screen resistance” into my life. They are meant to counteract the Internet’s dominance of my time in simple, small ways, and to remind me to prioritize people over screens. They force me to pull back, to think again, and to divert my attention elsewhere. These include:

Stepping outside to check the temperature. It’s embarrassingly easy to open The Weather Network app first thing in the morning. Opening the door to greet the day has positive connotations. Sometimes I wave at a neighbour, notice a thirsty plant that needs watering, or remember it’s recycling day. Most importantly, I exercise my own senses in determining how to dress my kids that day, and that feels good.

Avoiding Google as the all-knowing fount of wisdom. Google is glorious for many things, and I do rely on it heavily, but it’s easy to forget that people are incredibly knowledgeable. If I know someone who is an expert in a particular field, I try to call or email them, instead of searching online. Human knowledge, when pooled among a circle of acquaintances, can be surprisingly vast and deep, and much more interesting than a page of Google search results.

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Anthropological Scientists Find the Toto Language More Endangered than the Tribe Itself

Anthropological Scientists Find the Toto Language More Endangered than the Tribe Itself | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it
Anthropologists from India found during their survey that the Toto language of the Toto tribe is more endangered than the primitive tribe itself.
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Scientists from the Anthropological Survey of India (AnSI) went to study the isolated Toto tribe, which currently has a population of 1,536, only to find out the Toto language is more endangered than the primitive tribe.

Study methodology and findings

As scientists studied the Toto language, called Yaa Waa, they recorded some songs, folklore and vocabulary. Only then did they realize that the Toto language has no script and is rapidly being influenced by Bengali and Nepali.

The Toto language is part of the Tibeto-Burman group of India’s many languages and without much research it had survived in the small community orally, according to research associate in Linguistics of AnSI, Kumar Mukhopadhyay, one of the top members of the research team.

They also found out that the members of the small community speak Toto when they communicate among themselves within their village but they will not use their own language when they leave their Totopara village located in Madarihaat in the district of Alipurduar. They would not even speak the Toto language among themselves if they are outside their village.

Threatened language

The threat to the language is real, according to the members of the community as well as the researchers, as the language is being overtaken by other languages, primarily by Bengali and Nepali, continuously.

In a sample survey done in 2003, it was found out that the literacy rate in the Toto community was about 33.64%. But even without its own script, members of the community have written poems and books in their own language, using the script of the Bengali language. One example is Dhaniram Toto, who has written two books in the Toto language. According to him, one of his books, entitled “Uttar Banga Lokpath,” is about his community’s folk tales, while his other book, “Lokeswar,” deals with the Toto’s folk culture. Mr. Toto wants to have a script developed for the Toto language. According to him there are other authors, such as Satyajit Toto who had to borrow scripts from other languages to be able to write in their own language.

Fighting for their language to survive

The Totos wish for their language to survive and the scientists conducted the study to keep a record of the language that might go extinct in a few decades. Most of the Totos work as porters and day laborers. They carry oranges from Bhutan to north Bengal’s local market. While Totopara is geographically isolated, the community members are putting emphasis on education now and even girls were able to graduate. However, the elders are lamenting the fact that there is no one to teach their children the Toto language.

Despite their dwindling numbers and their land holdings getting smaller, they are fighting to keep their language alive, in a country where indigenous languages are getting lost faster than in any place on earth. In 1961, it was estimated that about 1,600 languages were spoken in India. Today the number is down to 900, with the Census recognizing only 122 of these distinct languages.

In the case of Yaa Waa, an elderly man, Bhakta Toto, has written a manuscript that took him about 10 years to write. It contains 2,500 words in Yaa Waa that will be published as a dictionary, with pronunciations in English and word meanings in English and Bengali.

- See more at: http://www.daynews.com/world/language/2014/08/anthropological-scientists-find-toto-language-endangered-tribe-24228#sthash.sz6w8Na3.dpuf

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PETE’s Aggressive New Translation of Chekhov’s 'The Three Sisters'

PETE’s Aggressive New Translation of Chekhov’s 'The Three Sisters' | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it
Portland Experimental Theatre Ensemble premieres a reinvigorated interpretation of the Russian classic by a Lewis & Clark professor. July 31–Aug 17
Charles Tiayon's insight:

Critics have named Anton Chekhov one of literature’s greatest writers for his skill with subtext and meaning expressed in the pauses following one-word replies and sudden stops. At the same time, English translators with romantic stereotypes of soulful Russians have dulled the author’s play The Three Sisters with ornate, ostantatious language, making its characters lace together complex words while managing to say nothing of consequence.  

Bored by diluted English translations, Lewis & Clark theater professor Stepan Simek, who has worked as a director in Switzerland and is one of the leading translators of Czech playwright and anti-Communist dissident Vaclav Havel, was awed when he first heard the intensity in a Russian recording of the play. Wanting English-speaking audiences to experience the same, he went back to the original Russian script and stripped the play to its basics, returning to Chekhov’s limited vocabulary (the smallest of any Russian writer). Big words tumble only from the mouths of bumbling or emotionally crippled characters.

“These characters seem literally ‘glued’ to the floor of their existence and are working as hard as they can to ‘unglue’ themselves,” says Simek.

Russian, Simek says, is a hard-driving, aggressive language that demands fierce gestures and delivery from the gut, something most earlier translations ignored. For example:

Constance Garnett’s 1916 translation:
MASHA: In this town to know three languages is an unnecessary luxury! Not even a luxury, but an unnecessary encumbrance, like a sixth finger.

Gerlad Ledger’s 1998 translation:
MASHA: In this town to know three languages is an unnecessary luxury. It's not even a luxury, but a sort of unnecessary addition, like a sixth finger. We have a great deal of superfluous knowledge.

Simek’s translation:
MASHA: To know three languages in this shithole is an unnecessary luxury. It's not even a luxury; it's more like some sort of an unnecessary add-on, like having a sixth finger.

The Three Sisters 
Reed College’s Diver Studio Theatre 
July 31–Aug 17
Simek turned to Portland Experimental Theatre Ensemble to debut the script at Reed College’s new state-of-the-art Diver Studio Theatre. PETE will invite just 35 audience members beneath a skeletal house built into the black box for the birthday party of 20-year old Irina Prozorova, where tension grows as the characters balance nostalgia and dreams of the future. Simek will direct the cast of fourteen, which features some of Portland’s best, including Isaac Lamb, Rebecca Lingafelter, Chris Murray, Cristi Miles, and John San Nicolas.

“PETE is known for it’s extremely, yes almost otherworldly, commitment to a sort of physically and vocally muscular directness in acting,” Simek says. “It is exactly the kind of approach that the original Russian demands.”

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UPSC row: Big language barrie Aspirants blame Google translation, English bia

The UPSC must be increasingly realising that it’s not such a good idea to bank on Google translator to translate English passages into Hindi for the all important Civil Services Examination (CSE) which annually gets nearly five lakh applicants.

Reason: no Hindi medium applicant will get the answer right if the question comprises faulty translation of an expression. For instance, who can comprehend a passage if “land reform” is translated into “aarthik sudhaar” in Hindi version of the paper?

Govt against scrapping, delaying exam on Aug 24

Even as the government panel looking into the UPSC row in its report has advised against scrapping or advancing the upcoming prelims exam on August 24, inquiries reveal complex translations in one of the two papers of CSE Prelims are at the heart of ongoing protests in which Hindi-speaking applicants are demanding scrapping of one particular paper.

The new pattern

CSE pattern was revised in 2011. The new pattern comprises two papers in Prelims exam – General Studies 1 (to which students have no objection) and Civil Services Aptitude Test-CSAT to which students have several objections.

While both these prelims papers carry 200 marks each, General Studies paper tests general subject knowledge of applicants and CSAT tests their analytical, decision making and English comprehension skills.

The problems

The first problem candidates have is — 35 questions in CSAT relate to a candidate’s ability to comprehend language. Now picture this: CSE exam is set in two languages, English and Hindi, the official languages of India. Students’ main problem is that the UPSC is using Google translator to translate 35 CSAT questions related to comprehension. These questions are too literally translated from English to Hindi compromising the soul of the language and making comprehension for readers difficult.

For instance, “Steel plant” is being translated as “Ispat ka paudha” in the Hindi version of the paper. “Such translations are putting Hindi-medium applicants out of competition as each question carries two marks,” says Imran Ansari, a protester.

Another problem of Hindi-medium applicants is — 11 questions in CSAT test English comprehension of a candidate; each bears two marks totaling 22 marks. Birender Kumar, another protesting applicant, says: “UPSC already has a full-fledged English paper in the Mains. Every candidate must qualify that exam to be eligible to appear for the interview. Why should CSAT then additionally test us on English knowledge?”

CSE Mains’ English qualifier exam is of 300 marks and candidates must score 75 to qualify. CSAT is of 200 marks and 70 are needed to pass.

What both sides say

Candidates further feel that CSAT questions are more favourable for applicants with technical background vis-a-vis humanities. “Most questions in CSAT test mathematics and reasoning and are difficult for non-technical students. IITians and IIM graduates have an edge. CSAT must be scrapped as it is creating a bias against non-English and non-technical background students,” says Mahesh Singh, another protester.

UPSC sources, however, say while the translation concerns can be addressed, the mental block against a 22-mark set of English knowledge questions is uncalled for. “English is the working language of the world. The few English passages which test candidates’ English knowledge are of Class 10. That should not be a problem,” said a former UPSC member who was at the helm when the CSE pattern changed in 2011.

Hindi representation in services dipping

* UPSC data shows between 2005 and 2010, an average of 40% Hindi-speaking applicants used to clear prelims, which has come down to 15 per cent since 2011 when CSAT was introduced

* Hindi-speaking applicants who succeeded in CSE between 2005 and 2010 averaged 15%; in 2009 the percentage shot to 25; in 2013, the post-CSAT era, it came down to 2.3%

* 1,122 candidates succeeded in CSE 2013. Of these, only 23 were Hindi medium, 53 were Hindi and other language medium educated and the rest were English medium

What is CSAT

* The CSAT-II paper carries questions on comprehension, interpersonal skills, including communication skills, logical reasoning and analytical ability, decision-making and problem-solving, general mental ability, basic numeracy, and English language comprehension skills

* Under the revised pattern, there are two papers now each of 200 marks. Also, there would be two common papers in the preliminary examination which provides a level playing field for all candidates

Charles Tiayon's insight:

The UPSC must be increasingly realising that it’s not such a good idea to bank on Google translator to translate English passages into Hindi for the all important Civil Services Examination (CSE) which annually gets nearly five lakh applicants.

Reason: no Hindi medium applicant will get the answer right if the question comprises faulty translation of an expression. For instance, who can comprehend a passage if “land reform” is translated into “aarthik sudhaar” in Hindi version of the paper?

Govt against scrapping, delaying exam on Aug 24

Even as the government panel looking into the UPSC row in its report has advised against scrapping or advancing the upcoming prelims exam on August 24, inquiries reveal complex translations in one of the two papers of CSE Prelims are at the heart of ongoing protests in which Hindi-speaking applicants are demanding scrapping of one particular paper.

The new pattern

CSE pattern was revised in 2011. The new pattern comprises two papers in Prelims exam – General Studies 1 (to which students have no objection) and Civil Services Aptitude Test-CSAT to which students have several objections.

While both these prelims papers carry 200 marks each, General Studies paper tests general subject knowledge of applicants and CSAT tests their analytical, decision making and English comprehension skills.

The problems

The first problem candidates have is — 35 questions in CSAT relate to a candidate’s ability to comprehend language. Now picture this: CSE exam is set in two languages, English and Hindi, the official languages of India. Students’ main problem is that the UPSC is using Google translator to translate 35 CSAT questions related to comprehension. These questions are too literally translated from English to Hindi compromising the soul of the language and making comprehension for readers difficult.

For instance, “Steel plant” is being translated as “Ispat ka paudha” in the Hindi version of the paper. “Such translations are putting Hindi-medium applicants out of competition as each question carries two marks,” says Imran Ansari, a protester.

Another problem of Hindi-medium applicants is — 11 questions in CSAT test English comprehension of a candidate; each bears two marks totaling 22 marks. Birender Kumar, another protesting applicant, says: “UPSC already has a full-fledged English paper in the Mains. Every candidate must qualify that exam to be eligible to appear for the interview. Why should CSAT then additionally test us on English knowledge?”

CSE Mains’ English qualifier exam is of 300 marks and candidates must score 75 to qualify. CSAT is of 200 marks and 70 are needed to pass.

What both sides say

Candidates further feel that CSAT questions are more favourable for applicants with technical background vis-a-vis humanities. “Most questions in CSAT test mathematics and reasoning and are difficult for non-technical students. IITians and IIM graduates have an edge. CSAT must be scrapped as it is creating a bias against non-English and non-technical background students,” says Mahesh Singh, another protester.

UPSC sources, however, say while the translation concerns can be addressed, the mental block against a 22-mark set of English knowledge questions is uncalled for. “English is the working language of the world. The few English passages which test candidates’ English knowledge are of Class 10. That should not be a problem,” said a former UPSC member who was at the helm when the CSE pattern changed in 2011.

Hindi representation in services dipping

* UPSC data shows between 2005 and 2010, an average of 40% Hindi-speaking applicants used to clear prelims, which has come down to 15 per cent since 2011 when CSAT was introduced

* Hindi-speaking applicants who succeeded in CSE between 2005 and 2010 averaged 15%; in 2009 the percentage shot to 25; in 2013, the post-CSAT era, it came down to 2.3%

* 1,122 candidates succeeded in CSE 2013. Of these, only 23 were Hindi medium, 53 were Hindi and other language medium educated and the rest were English medium

What is CSAT

* The CSAT-II paper carries questions on comprehension, interpersonal skills, including communication skills, logical reasoning and analytical ability, decision-making and problem-solving, general mental ability, basic numeracy, and English language comprehension skills

* Under the revised pattern, there are two papers now each of 200 marks. Also, there would be two common papers in the preliminary examination which provides a level playing field for all candidates

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Actualización de Traducción: Prison Architect Alpha 23 » Traducciones Tapia

Para los jugadores de Steam, ya está actualizada la traducción en el Workshop de Prison Architect, así que solo tenéis que iniciar Steam y se descargará la actualización de la traducción automáticamente, y sino también podéis usar la versión que está en Descargas.

Charles Tiayon's insight:

Para los jugadores de Steam, ya está actualizada la traducción en el Workshop de Prison Architect, así que solo tenéis que iniciar Steam y se descargará la actualización de la traducción automáticamente, y sino también podéis usar la versión que está en Descargas.

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Traductor para Nokia Lumia actualizado a la versión 3.0.1

Traductor para Nokia Lumia actualizado a la versión 3.0.1 | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it
Traductor para Nokia Lumia se acaba de actualizar a la versión 3.0.1, sólo para Windows Phone 8.1, con la que se añaden los Live Tiles Tranparentes, además
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Les directives européennes au secours des droits de la défense

Les directives européennes au secours des droits de la défense | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it
Qui l’eut cru, c’est de Bruxelles qui vient à notre salut. Après avoir invoqué les dispositions constitutionnelles, internationales, presque le droit naturel, ce sont désormais les directives européennes qui obligent les Etats parties comme la France, a réformer leur droit national....
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Vin Diesel quadrilingue pour Les Gardiens de la Galaxie

Vin Diesel quadrilingue pour Les Gardiens de la Galaxie | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it
L'acteur Vin Diesel sera à l'affiche le 13 août prochain du très attendu film de science-fiction, Les Gardiens de la Galaxie. A cette occasion, Jimmy Fallon s'est moqué de lui dans son Tonight Show, en insistant sur le fait qu'il n'avait qu'une seule réplique :
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In Defense of Changing the Terminology

In Defense of Changing the Terminology | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it

It's been almost laughable to watch how the term "objective" has changed. At first, it was an objective. Then it was a content objective. Then it was a learning goal. Then it was a learning target. It's one of the many areas where education has taken an old idea and rebranded it as the newest, latest thing. Initially, I brace against the new terms. It seems silly that the visual vocabulary chart is now called an anchor chart. Similarly, it's odd that independent projects have to be called Genius Hour or Twenty Percent Time (or, if you are more quirky Seventeen and Three Quarters Percent Time). 


Charles Tiayon's insight:

It's been almost laughable to watch how the term "objective" has changed. At first, it was an objective. Then it was a content objective. Then it was a learning goal. Then it was a learning target. It's one of the many areas where education has taken an old idea and rebranded it as the newest, latest thing. Initially, I brace against the new terms. It seems silly that the visual vocabulary chart is now called an anchor chart. Similarly, it's odd that independent projects have to be called Genius Hour or Twenty Percent Time (or, if you are more quirky Seventeen and Three Quarters Percent Time). 


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Savoir écrire le phwaxumwââk | Les Nouvelles calédoniennes

Savoir écrire le phwaxumwââk | Les Nouvelles calédoniennes | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it

«La langue parlée de chez nous, le phwaxumwââk, se perd. En perdant la langue, nous perdons progressivement notre identité, nos gestes, nos coutumes… Nous avons organisé ce concours de dictée pour promouvoir et valoriser la langue de la région Nixumwââk (Koumac) », souligne Ginette Arhou, membre de la Commission de la culture à la mairie.

Charles Tiayon's insight:

«La langue parlée de chez nous, le phwaxumwââk, se perd. En perdant la langue, nous perdons progressivement notre identité, nos gestes, nos coutumes… Nous avons organisé ce concours de dictée pour promouvoir et valoriser la langue de la région Nixumwââk (Koumac) », souligne Ginette Arhou, membre de la Commission de la culture à la mairie.

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Translation Management: Across

Translation Management: Across | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it
Übersetzungsmanagement mit dem Across Language Server. Übersetzungskosten um 70% senken, Qualität neu definieren. Über 25.000 zufriedene Kunden aus allen Branchen.
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