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The Writers Alley: Favorite writing quotes

The Writers Alley: Favorite writing quotes | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it
Good writing is like a windowpane. ~ George Orwell   There are three rules for writing a novel. Unfortunately, no one knows what they are. ~ W. Somerset Maugham If you do not breathe through writing, if you do not cry out in writing, or sing in writing, then don't write, because our culture has no use for it. ~ Anais Nin    When writing a novel a writer should create living people; people not characters. A character is a caricature. ~ Ernest Hemingway  Easy reading is hard writing. ~ Nathaniel Hawthorne   To me, the greatest pleasure of writing is not what it's about, but the inner music that words make. ~ Truman Capote   The most important thing is to read as much as you can, like I did. It will give you an understanding of what makes good writing and it will enlarge your vocabulary. ~ J. K. Rowling  
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Good writing is like a windowpane. ~ George Orwell   There are three rules for writing a novel. Unfortunately, no one knows what they are. ~ W. Somerset Maugham If you do not breathe through writing, if you do not cry out in writing, or sing in writing, then don't write, because our culture has no use for it. ~ Anais Nin    When writing a novel a writer should create living people; people not characters. A character is a caricature. ~ Ernest Hemingway  Easy reading is hard writing. ~ Nathaniel Hawthorne   To me, the greatest pleasure of writing is not what it's about, but the inner music that words make. ~ Truman Capote   The most important thing is to read as much as you can, like I did. It will give you an understanding of what makes good writing and it will enlarge your vocabulary. ~ J. K. Rowling  
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UN Careers - jobs in this network (Translators, Revisers, Editors, etc.)

UN Careers -  jobs in this network (Translators, Revisers, Editors, etc.) | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it

Vacancies in this network: Translators, Revisers, Editors, etc.

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Putting Dual Language Learners First in Minnesota - EdCentral

Putting Dual Language Learners First in Minnesota - EdCentral | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it
Minnesota's reforms to how their public schools serve dual language learners are exciting. A new brief explores their strategy for effective implementation.
Charles Tiayon's insight:
It’s hard to see the past decade of education policymaking as anything but a protracted, slouching national shrug when it comes to dual language learners. Think for a moment of the ferocious education fights over the past decade. From intense battles over the appropriate use of student achievement data in teacher accountability systems to the development and raising of common academic standards to school choice, tenure battles, and the many fights to expand quality early education access, there’s been no shortage of activity — but very little of it has directly addressed DLLs’ needs. Insofar as these students have been noticed, it’s usually to use them as political pawns in fights to make various states’ schools as English-only as possible.

This is starting to change. As the number of DLLs continues to grow, educators and other stakeholders are increasingly open to reworking how our public education system serves them. While recent efforts to change New York’s “Blueprint for English Language Learners’ Success” have attracted a fair amount of attention, to my mind, Minnesota’s new DLL reforms are the most exciting in the country.

That’s why New America is excited to announce the publication of a new brief analyzing the promise and implementation strategy for Minnesota’s Learning for English Academic Proficiency and Success Act (LEAPS Act). I co-authored the brief, The Learning for English Academic Proficiency and Success Act: Ensuring Faithful and Timely Implementation with Colleen Gross Ebinger, but it really took shape through substantive discussions with Minnesota educators and community members who offered their own feedback and implementation priorities.

The LEAPS Act became law earlier this year without attracting much attention. But it could make a big difference — a big improvement — in how Minnesota’s schools serve DLLs. For instance, it requires districts to track DLLs’ home language skills in addition to their progress towards proficiency in English. This matches what we know from the research on DLLs’ linguistic development. These students’ home languages are a strength that helps them add English more quickly and completely.

But while this is a laudable legislative priority, it’s going to require careful work to implement well. As we write in the brief,

[D]istricts, charters and educators should be careful to distinguish between assessments designed to measure native language proficiency and those that measure progress towards native language proficiency. With this in mind, districts and charters will need to find appropriate assessments of [English learners’] native language proficiency. For instance, assessments such as the WIDA-PODER and the STEP Literacy Assessment have recently been developed and field-tested for native Spanish-speaking ELs. However, it will be more difficult to find reliable and valid assessments for ELs with native languages that are underrepresented nationally, such as Somali or Hmong.

I should note that this brief is, in conjunction with our release of Chaos for Dual Language Learners, part of a concerted New America effort to focus our attention on DLLs and the policies that affect them. So: Stay tuned for more work along these lines.

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Latin American Spanish Translator at Beyond Violence

Latin American Spanish Translator at Beyond Violence | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it
Latin American Spanish translator at Beyond Violence (unpaid - worldwide)

Do you have experience or enthusiasm for translating texts from English into Latin American Spanish? Do you have a passion for combating violence in the world bit by bit as part of a global movement? Then Beyond Violence is precisely the organisation you will be interested in!
Charles Tiayon's insight:

Do you have experience or enthusiasm for translating texts from English into Latin American Spanish? Do you have a passion for combating violence in the world bit by bit as part of a global movement? Then Beyond Violence is precisely the organisation you will be interested in!

Beyond Violence is centered around a web platform which seeks to engage people across countries and continents in the promotion of non-violent conflict transformation. Through online petitions, forum discussions, digital conferences, and many more ways we are impacting decision makers and key local actors to put down weapons and solve conflict through negotiation and dialogue.

Our Requirements

· High self-motivation and organizational skills

· Good level of English

· Knowledge of Latin American Spanish

· Passion for peace, non-violence, dialogue and understanding

· Proactive use of email communication and Skype

· Ability and willingness to commit up to 10 hours per week

· Good internet connection

· Working experience in translation or development is a plus

Your responsibilities

· Translating various kinds of texts that appear on our website from English into Latin American Spanish.

· Cooperating your tasks with the translation team manager.

· Manage your time sufficiently to work the hours that you want to contribute (estimated 2-10 hrs per week).

What we offer

· Opportunity to gather practical work experience in translation.

· Letter of recommendation or reference for your future employer.

· An informal structure and freedom to complete tasks in your own style.

· Being part of an innovative and quickly expanding movement - be part of creating change.

· Flexible working hours – as an unpaid position we expect you to only contribute the time you are able and willing to.

· Cooperation with inspiring and engaging activists and campaigners from all over the world.

· Experience in building up a non-profit organisation in a relaxed, cooperative, and intercultural work environment.

How to apply:

We look forward to your application

Please send your CV and cover letter to hr@beyondviolence.org . We look forward to hearing from you soon! For more information about Beyond Violence please visit www.beyondviolence.org or find us on Facebook and Twitter “@Beyond_Violence”

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Bath Spa University and Ark Data Centres Announce ‘Creative Thinking Award’ - Yareah Magazine

Bath Spa University and Ark Data Centres Announce ‘Creative Thinking Award’
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Local enterprise encourages Bath Spa students to think big and achieve great things through creative thinking…

Corsham, Wiltshire – 29 September 2014 – Bath Spa University, in partnership withArk Data Centres, has announced its inaugural ‘Creative Thinking Award’. The aim of the award is to challenge students to develop new concepts and ideas that demonstrate 21st century creative thinking with ideas involving some form of imaginary technological solution. Shortlisted applicants will be asked to present their ideas in person to the judging panel who will include Huw Owen, Jeff Thomas and Stephen Hall from Ark Data Centres and Professor Andrew Hugill, Professor of Creative Computing at Bath Spa University. The winner, who will be announced Tuesday 9th December 2014, will then be awarded a £1,500 prize sponsored by Ark Data Centres.

In universities, the divisions into subject disciplines – the distinctions between ‘arts’ and ‘sciences’ – and the demands of a particular type of study can leave no place for the kind of thinking that crosses boundaries or happens ‘in between the cracks’.

“Creative Thinking is the ability to come up with new and unconventional ideas,” explained Professor Andrew Hugill, Bath Spa University. “In a world of digital technology, this skill is all-important but all too often social conventions or educational pressures prevent us from thinking creatively. We are seeking exceptional ideas that offer new potential for technologies and that push the boundaries. This new prize epitomises our vision to be a leading institution for creativity, culture and enterprise.”

The Creative Thinking Award is available to any student undertaking an undergraduate or postgraduate course at Bath Spa University. The judging panel will be looking for lateral thinking, originality and innovation, whatever the area or field within which they occur.

“What we are looking for is the tenacious application of intellect which produces a concisely articulated proposition for an original and useful solution or product that assists people,” said Huw Owen CEO, Ark Data Centres. “As an organisation that encourages excellence amongst our personnel, we wanted to support a local university to discover and nurture this level of brilliance in our professionals of tomorrow. We are looking for something extraordinary and are very excited to see what the students of Bath Spa University are going to deliver.”

The closing date for applications is Friday 28 November. Students interested in participating in the award can find the terms and conditions and the necessary entry form at: http://www.bathspa.ac.uk/about-us/alumni/alumni-bursaries

About Ark Data Centres

Ark Data Centres designs, constructs and operates the UK’s most efficient data centres. It has pioneered the use of free air-cooling, a unique monitoring system, real time dynamic cooling and load matching technology that gives its clients the lowest TCO along with the greatest operational flexibility. Dedicated to innovation, Ark’s modular, state-of-the-art sites in Hampshire and Wiltshire will be the largest in Europe and were the first to contractually guarantee power usage efficiency (PUE) for clients.

An independent company that prides itself on being easy to do business with, Ark Data Centres boasts the lowest total cost of ownership in the world and has saved both millions of pounds and millions of tonnes of carbon for organisations in the defence, telecommunications, government and financial services sectors. Capable of operating at the highest levels of security, Ark’s incremental approach to building out its data centre campuses means it is constantly innovating, building to the latest operational requirements of its clients and minimising the operational legacy. Through an optimised logistics support chain it has and will continue to deliver operational data centres in just 12 weeks.
www.arkdatacentres.co.uk, Tel: 0845 389 3355, Twitter.com/arkdatacentres

About Bath Spa University

Bath Spa University is where creative minds meet. Offering a wide range of courses across the arts, sciences, education, social science and business to 7,000 students, the University employs outstanding creative professionals, which support its aim to be a leading educational institution in creativity, culture and enterprise.

Based in stunning countryside just a few minutes from a World Heritage City, Bath Spa University ensures its students graduate as engaged global citizens who are ready for the world of work. In fact, 93 per cent of graduates find themselves in work or further study within six months. www.bathspa.ac.uk

Press contacts:
Natalie Sutton
Proud PR
+44(0) 1276 682959
ark[at]proudpr.com

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Teacher is a hit with unique covers of popular music videos

Teacher is a hit with unique covers of popular music videos | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it
A teacher is hoping to encourage more kids to learn American Sign Language, with a little help from Taylor Swift. Brittany Adams, who...
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A teacher is hoping to encourage more kids to learn American Sign Language, with a little help from Taylor Swift.

Brittany Adams, who teaches ASL to hearing students at Romeo High School in Romeo, Michigan, has begun creating sign-language versions of popular music videos, including Swift’s “Shake It Off” and “Rather Be” by Clean Bandit.

She selects the signs that best reflect the lyrics, then stars in the YouTube clips, which her husband helps produce. Each has been a hit with her students.

“They absolutely loved it,” Adams told TODAY. “They were able to be engaged by it and essentially as teachers, we want our students to be engaged… we want them to be excited by what they’re learning.”

The process starts with song selection. Adams chooses popular music that would make her students want to listen and dance, she said. It also has to be school-appropriate, so a song like Meghan Trainor’s “All About That Bass,” with all the mentions of “booty” in the lyrics, wouldn’t work, she added.

The hardest part is translating each song into sign language. Every single person interprets a song differently, Adams said, so in Swift's song, the phrase "shake it off" could mean just letting go. Or it could mean brushing something off your shoulder, with each resulting in a different sign, she noted.

The videos take about two weeks to produce, said Adams, who became interested in ASL when she saw a camp counselor signing when she was a child.

“It was pretty beautiful,” she said. “You get to use your body, your face, your hands.”

Her students are the main target audience for the videos, but Adams is hoping the clips get more people interested in learning American Sign Language. The concept is already getting buzz: An ASL teacher in Texas has contacted Adams to see if they could do a duet together.

“Awareness for ASL and deafness is important because we all live hand in hand with one another and we need to be able to communicate,” she said.

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Eternuer, mâcher et ronfler dans toutes les langues

Eternuer, mâcher et ronfler dans toutes les langues | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it
«Zzzzzzz», «De reu rung», «Hurrrrrrr», «Kho kho», «Ron pchi» : autant de mots pour un seul bruit, celui du ronflement, qui à l’oreille sonne pourtant de la même façon sur tous les oreillers (et pour tous les malchanceux réveillés juste à côté). C’est ça, le charme des onomatopées : de Pékin à Madrid en passant par Sydney, les bruits de la vie s’écrivent et se prononcent différemment. Une poésie que l’illustrateur James Chapman saisit dans de petites bande dessinées très mignonnes et très instructives. 


Le bruit des animaux, des battements du cœur, de l’eau qui goutte, ou même les prouts : rien n’échappe au regard du dessinateur. 

A VOIR : Les onomatopées en images par James Chapman 
Charles Tiayon's insight:

«Zzzzzzz»«De reu rung»«Hurrrrrrr»«Kho kho»«Ron pchi» : autant de mots pour un seul bruit, celui du ronflement, qui à l’oreille sonne pourtant de la même façon sur tous les oreillers (et pour tous les malchanceux réveillés juste à côté). C’est ça, le charme des onomatopées : de Pékin à Madrid en passant par Sydney, les bruits de la vie s’écrivent et se prononcent différemment. Une poésie que l’illustrateur James Chapman saisit dans de petites bande dessinées très mignonnes et très instructives. 

Le bruit des animaux, des battements du cœur, de l’eau qui goutte, ou même les prouts : rien n’échappe au regard du dessinateur. 

A VOIR : Les onomatopées en images par James Chapman 

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El comercio prevé tener traductores para los cruceristas en el 2015

El comercio prevé tener traductores para los cruceristas en el 2015 | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it
Acof estima la necesidad de una docena de profesionales por escala
Charles Tiayon's insight:

Los miembros del Centro Comercial Aberto Ferrol-A Magdalena (Acof) son conscientes de la necesidad de disponer de más servicios y reclamos para aprovechar el auge del mercado crucerístico y su consolidación en los próximos ejercicios.

Una de las prioridades para atender a este tipo de turistas es activar una red de traductores en las calles del centro para los días en los que haya escala de cruceros. Tal y como publicó La Voz el pasado 12 de julio, en aquellas fechas el máximo responsable del colectivo gremial, Cristóbal García Nores, ya adelantaba que se estaba trabajando con la Autoridad Portuaria y con la Escola Oficial de Idiomas para poner en marcha la iniciativa.

Nores adelanta ahora que, si no se producen imprevistos, este servicio debería estar operativo para la primera escala de un crucero en el 2015. Bien a través de la Escola Oficial de Idiomas o «mediante una academia».

La cifra

Concretó también que para un crucero de 3.000 personas, como los que envía la naviera alemana Aida a la urbe naval, serían necesarios «una docena de traductores, repartidos por las diferentes manzanas del área comercial».

Y aclaró el presidente de Acof que aunque su principal objetivo sea la traducción para ayudar en las operaciones comerciales tanto al comprador como al vendedor, «también se trata de que ofrezcan todo tipo de información, lugares para comer, indicaciones para llegar a puntos turísticos...».

El objetivo, en definitiva, es poner a disposición de los cruceristas otro elemento que sirva para estimular las compras y que, además, García Nores estima «importante también para la propia imagen de la ciudad y del sector comercial».

Barrera idiomática

Recuerda que «sortear la barrera del idioma puede ser importante, aunque en principio no lo parezca, para que el comercio pueda sacar más provecho a las escalas de cruceros».

Por lo que respecta a cómo está discurriendo el ejercicio, García Nores insistió en que todas las escalas son positivas pero que las más valoradas por parte del gremio de los comerciantes son aquellas de buques medio porte, con alrededor de 3.000 personas en su interior, ya que mejoran el impacto económico.

Destaca, fundamentalmente, los amarres de los cruceros de la naviera alemana Aida, tanto por el volumen de pasajeros como por el perfil de los mismos. Familias y gente joven de procedencia germana, en la mayor parte de los casos, con un poder adquisitivo elevado que se deja notar en sus visitas.

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La imperiosa necesidad de traducir las apps móviles

La imperiosa necesidad de traducir las apps móviles | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it

México, DF. Con motivo del día de San Jerónimo, el 30 de septiembre, cada año se celebra el Día Mundial de la Traducción.

Por primera vez, el Instituto Goethe de México festejará el quehacer de traducir con el acto La traductora transparente, en el que participará Claudia Cabrera (DF, 1970), quien traduce del alemán al español desde 1995.

Cabrera traducirá en vivo y conversará con el público en la Biblioteca del Instituto Goethe de México este martes. La idea es transparentar la intimidad de su trabajo, que normalmente es solitario.

"Generalmente el trabajo del traductor se realiza en su oficina, solo, en silencio, con su material. Este año en el instituto queremos mostrar un poco esta labor y abrir el mundo interno del traductor al público", explicó Sven Mensing, director de la Biblioteca Goethe.

Cabrera traducirá en vivo un pasaje de la novela de Arnold Zweig, Das Beil von Wandsbek (El hacha de Wandsbek) y comentará su trabajo, así como las dificultades que encuentra, las posibilidades que coteja, las elecciones que realiza, mientras el público verá proyectados el texto original y su respectiva traducción en curso. Será partícipe de todo lo que hace el traductor.

La efeméride se conmemora en Alemania desde 2005. Este año se realizarán otros actos en 19 ciudades alemanas y en 17 de otros países en colaboración con el Goethe-Institut. En América Latina se realizará en Argentina y México.

"Llevo traducido una tercera parte del libro y donde me quede el día anterior, retomaré mi trabajo para que sea todo lo más auténtico posible", dice a La Jornada Claudia Cabrera, quien desde pequeña estudió en el Colegio Alemán, donde surgió su pasión por el idioma alemán.

Recuerda que se convirtió en traductora de manera autodidacta: "El alemán me fascina, es un idioma con el que tengo una relación cotidiana y empecé a traducir prácticamente de manera casual aquí en el Instituto Goethe, cuando un día me preguntaron si podía traducir una pequeña reseña, después me empezaron a pasar catálogos de exposiciones, retrospectivas fílmicas, obras de teatro".

Vivir, pensar y soñar en dos idiomas

La trayectoria de Claudia Cabrera como traductora en las editoriales comenzó con libros de divulgación científica, sociología, sicología e historia; continuó con arte, cine, música y teatro, hasta que en 2005 empezó a traducir literatura.

“El primer libro que traduje fue Animal triste, de Monika Maron, que publicó la editorial Herder, la misma que editará el libro de Zweig”, señala Cabrera. Con este proyecto, Herder participó en el programa de Fomento al traductor del Goethe-Institut, el cual apoyó con un porcentaje de la edición.

Aprender idiomas, dice, "le abre a uno la cabeza. Yo vivo, pienso y sueño en los dos idiomas". Cabrera participó en el primer Taller de Traducción Literaria Español-Alemán que se realizó en la Feria Internacional del Libro (FIL) de Guadalajara en 2011, con Alemania como país invitado.

El libro de Zweig, que se traducirá en vivo, narra la historia del carnicero de la ciudad de Wandsbek, Albert Teetjen, quien está al borde de la ruina. Para salvar su existencia está dispuesto a remplazar al verdugo enfermo de la prisión Fuhlsbüttel. Con su hacha ejecutará a cuatro prisioneros. El modesto bienestar que los Teetjen obtienen con el dinero de las ejecuciones durará únicamente hasta que los vecinos se enteren de la procedencia del dinero.

Arnold Zweig es un escritor de origen judío que salió de Alemania en los años 30 del siglo pasado, antes de que empezara la gran persecución nazi contra los judíos. Escribió este libro en el exilio, en Palestina.

La traductora transparente se realiza hoy, a las 18:30 horas, en la Biblioteca Goethe, ubicada en la calle Tonalá 43, colonia Roma.


Charles Tiayon's insight:

México, DF. Con motivo del día de San Jerónimo, el 30 de septiembre, cada año se celebra el Día Mundial de la Traducción.

Por primera vez, el Instituto Goethe de México festejará el quehacer de traducir con el acto La traductora transparente, en el que participará Claudia Cabrera (DF, 1970), quien traduce del alemán al español desde 1995.

Cabrera traducirá en vivo y conversará con el público en la Biblioteca del Instituto Goethe de México este martes. La idea es transparentar la intimidad de su trabajo, que normalmente es solitario.

"Generalmente el trabajo del traductor se realiza en su oficina, solo, en silencio, con su material. Este año en el instituto queremos mostrar un poco esta labor y abrir el mundo interno del traductor al público", explicó Sven Mensing, director de la Biblioteca Goethe.

Cabrera traducirá en vivo un pasaje de la novela de Arnold Zweig, Das Beil von Wandsbek (El hacha de Wandsbek) y comentará su trabajo, así como las dificultades que encuentra, las posibilidades que coteja, las elecciones que realiza, mientras el público verá proyectados el texto original y su respectiva traducción en curso. Será partícipe de todo lo que hace el traductor.

La efeméride se conmemora en Alemania desde 2005. Este año se realizarán otros actos en 19 ciudades alemanas y en 17 de otros países en colaboración con el Goethe-Institut. En América Latina se realizará en Argentina y México.

"Llevo traducido una tercera parte del libro y donde me quede el día anterior, retomaré mi trabajo para que sea todo lo más auténtico posible", dice a La Jornada Claudia Cabrera, quien desde pequeña estudió en el Colegio Alemán, donde surgió su pasión por el idioma alemán.

Recuerda que se convirtió en traductora de manera autodidacta: "El alemán me fascina, es un idioma con el que tengo una relación cotidiana y empecé a traducir prácticamente de manera casual aquí en el Instituto Goethe, cuando un día me preguntaron si podía traducir una pequeña reseña, después me empezaron a pasar catálogos de exposiciones, retrospectivas fílmicas, obras de teatro".

Vivir, pensar y soñar en dos idiomas

La trayectoria de Claudia Cabrera como traductora en las editoriales comenzó con libros de divulgación científica, sociología, sicología e historia; continuó con arte, cine, música y teatro, hasta que en 2005 empezó a traducir literatura.

“El primer libro que traduje fue Animal triste, de Monika Maron, que publicó la editorial Herder, la misma que editará el libro de Zweig”, señala Cabrera. Con este proyecto, Herder participó en el programa de Fomento al traductor del Goethe-Institut, el cual apoyó con un porcentaje de la edición.

Aprender idiomas, dice, "le abre a uno la cabeza. Yo vivo, pienso y sueño en los dos idiomas". Cabrera participó en el primer Taller de Traducción Literaria Español-Alemán que se realizó en la Feria Internacional del Libro (FIL) de Guadalajara en 2011, con Alemania como país invitado.

El libro de Zweig, que se traducirá en vivo, narra la historia del carnicero de la ciudad de Wandsbek, Albert Teetjen, quien está al borde de la ruina. Para salvar su existencia está dispuesto a remplazar al verdugo enfermo de la prisión Fuhlsbüttel. Con su hacha ejecutará a cuatro prisioneros. El modesto bienestar que los Teetjen obtienen con el dinero de las ejecuciones durará únicamente hasta que los vecinos se enteren de la procedencia del dinero.

Arnold Zweig es un escritor de origen judío que salió de Alemania en los años 30 del siglo pasado, antes de que empezara la gran persecución nazi contra los judíos. Escribió este libro en el exilio, en Palestina.

La traductora transparente se realiza hoy, a las 18:30 horas, en la Biblioteca Goethe, ubicada en la calle Tonalá 43, colonia Roma.


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How to write a personal statement for UCAS

How to write the perfect personal statement for UCAS in 4000 characters - or 47 lines.
Charles Tiayon's insight:

Your child's application to university depends not only on their A-level grades, but also on their personal statement and possibly an interview. Between September and October, thousands of teenagers wrestle with their personal statements to secure them an offer of a place on their university degree course. How can they do this in 4000 characters - or 47 lines - the limit UCAS has for personal statements?

Some schools offer substantial help with these, whereas many pupils have to manage as best they can with the school giving the statement a cursory once-over. Parents often step-in to help and it's vital to know what's required.

First, look at the UCAS website which has downloads of the timeline for applications as well as masses of tips.


What to include

James Durant of UCAS says. "Some course tutors believe that personal statements are crucial when making decisions on applicants, so it's vitally important that you are able to make yours stand out.

"Universities like to have an indication of the range of skills that will help you on the course as well as in general at university."

Setting out skills is not as easy as writing a list. Andrew Fleck, Headmaster of Sedburgh School Cumbria, advises: "Set aside enough time. Don't rush it. Start by writing down two columns – one is all the things that you do and have done, and the other is how they might link to your degree course."

William Stadlen of educational consultants Holland Park advises: "Look carefully at the course content because your personal statement has to be relevant to five universities. These will have the same course code and title. Don't make the mistake of thinking that a management course is going to be the same as a slightly different management course – different course codes have different course content."

Fleck emphasises "It's not enough to describe your achievements and say you have experience of teamwork. Thousands of applicants will be able to demonstrate that playing sports or being on a charity committee helped build their teamwork skills. Go one step further – what did you have to do to be a good team player? Did you develop negotiation skills, empathy, self-discipline or mentor someone in the team? Link your achievements to the entry requirements but don't tell the whole story, drop some hooks so that the admissions tutors will want to meet you."

The admissions selectors from the University of Essex have some tips: "Blowing your own trumpet might not be something you're used to doing, but we want to know why to choose you. We're after people who aren't afraid to push boundaries, so don't be shy."

They also remind applicants: "Ensure everything you write in your statement relates to the main point: why you want to study that subject and why we should want you. If you know what you want to do after university, include that as it shows you have thought about the steps in achieving your ambition."

Stadlen agrees that students have to try to find something original to include: "Nowadays, saying you did the Duke of Edinburgh award is not going to have a huge impact because so many people do it- though a Gold is always a worthwhile achievement."

It's also possible to find out through university websites what the specialisms and interests are of admission tutors. If these happen to coincide with your child's, they should ensure that information is in their application.


How to write it

Conveying all of this information within the word limit is no easy task. It's vital though, says Flack that, "Parents do not write their child's statement because admissions staff can spot this a mile off."

Drafting and re-drafting is the key. Stadlen says: "It's not unusual to write five or six drafts before being happy with the final one." All drafts can be saved online on the UCAS website.

Fleck suggests: "Read your application through as if you are the admissions tutor. The best applications come from students who know what they want to study and can match their activities and interests to the course. But don't make it one-dimensional – you need some variety and breadth of interests. And keep it simple. Avoid being pompous and using over-complicated language."

What not to include

The University of Essex suggests these are not included:
Jokes
'What you may find as an example of your razor-sharp wit may not appeal to the admissions tutors.'
Clichés
'Passionate' and 'team player' are overused. We want to see examples of your 'passion' and your 'teamwork'.
Long words
'Longer is not better and will waste some of your 4000 characters'.
Fibs
'Copying a friend's writing or something from the internet may not go unnoticed.'
Spelling mistakes
'These show carelessness. Check and triple check.'

If your child can have a killer opening sentence and a powerful closing line, say the admissions selectors, so much the better. But all personal statements have to be just that – personal. Not contrived and not a copy of someone else's. By all means read your child's application before they press the 'send' button and make suggestions and allow them time between each draft to reconsider and ensure that they are completely satisfied before they submit it.

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Steven Pinker’s Sense of Style

Steven Pinker’s Sense of Style | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it
The Harvard psychologist offers a writing guide based on how the mind works
Charles Tiayon's insight:

Writing guides tend to be pretty unsatisfying. They offer plenty of concrete rules, but why, a reader might ask, should the rules be followed? The answer is usually “because” — as in, “because I say so.” This, of course, is where humanity found itself before the advent of the scientific method: the mystics spoke, and everyone had to decide for themselves whom to believe. Harvard psychologist Steven Pinker takes a different approach, one that is both more ambitious and more modest. In his new book, “The Sense of Style,” he draws on research, and particularly his deep knowledge of linguistics, to give his writing principles a scientific basis. Readers can thus have some assurance that Pinker’s advice is good, and, knowing the reasons why, they will be more likely to know when a rule should be broken. Yet he does not push this method beyond its natural limits. Scientists, after all, still know relatively little about the ways dark squiggles communicate ideas. Instead, he shows readers how to take apart a piece of fine writing to see what makes it tick. He does this with affection and enthusiasm. In Pinker’s hands, we do not feel ordered around capriciously, but truly guided by an inspiring teacher. He was interviewed by Gareth Cook, the editor of Mind Matters.

There are many, many books about writing in the world. What did you hope to add?
Most writing guides recycle a standard set of peeves and superstitions about usage, mixed with useful but vague guidelines like “keep related words together.” None of them take advantage of the tremendous advances in the study of language of the past fifty years — modern grammatical theories that are a vast improvement over the old Latin-based grammars; evidence-based dictionaries which pay attention to how language really is used; research from cognitive science on what makes sentences easy or hard to read; and historical and critical studies of usage, which trace the history of various rules (like the one against ending a sentence with a preposition) so that their rationale can be examined. I wanted to write a style manual for the 21st century.

That’s fascinating. Can you give any examples of writing lessons that come from cognitive science research?
A student press release at Yale advertised “a panel on sex with four professors,” which sounded much racier than it was. These ambiguities are common in careless prose. Usually the unintended meaning is not humorous, just distracting, and often the ambiguity is resolvable a few words downstream, like one that I came across the other day: “John Kerry arrived in Baghdad on Wednesday to endorse the new Iraqi government hours before President Barack Obama will address the American people about his strategy for combating ISIS militants”—it sounded for a second as if he was endorsing government hours (were they now working 9-5?). Text that has a lot of local ambiguities is frustrating to read, because it constantly forces the reader to backtrack and reinterpret. One of the things that differentiates “smooth” from “choppy” prose is the absence of these dead ends.

The authors of traditional style guides, like Strunk and White, were dimly aware of the problem, but lacked the technical concepts to analyze it, and offered useless advice such as “Keep related words together.” The advice is useless for the Yale sentence, the related words panel and on sex in fact are already together; disambiguating it requires moving related words apart to get a panel with four professors on sex. For that matter, if it had been a panel on drugs with four professors, then the word-moving solution would make things worse: a panel with four professors on drugs is just as misleading as the panel on sex with four professors.

Psycholinguists call these temporary ambiguities “garden paths,” and have run hundreds of experiments on what causes them and what prevents them. In the Yale example, the problem is that the human sentence understanding process parses sentences with the help of statistically frequent word pairs that have a standard structure and meaning—in this case, sex with X,and X on drugs. A careful writer has to scan for them and recast the sentence to avoid the ambiguity. The advice is better stated as “pull unrelated (but mutually attracted) phrases apart.”

It seems that it is pretty standard, in books about writing style, to bemoan the decline of the written word. Yet you don’t. Why?
Every generation thinks that “the kids today” are ruining the language. They confuse changes in themselves (people pay more attention to language as they get older and consume more text) with changes in the times. Studies of writing quality in student papers have shown that there has been no deterioration over the decades, and no, today’s college students don’t substitute smiley-faces and texting abbreviations for words and phrases.  

You write of “directing the gaze of the reader to something in the world she can see for herself.” Can you explain what you mean by this and how it defines your view of good writing?
The main difference between good writing and turgid mush—academese, corporatese, and so on—is that good writing is a window onto the world. The writer narrates an ongoing series of events which the reader can see for himself, if only he is given an unobstructed view. In academese, the writer’s chief goal is to defend himself against the accusation that he is naïve about his own enterprise. So academics describe what other academics do instead of what they study (“In recent years there has been increased interest in X”). They use many metaconcepts—concepts about concepts, likelevel, perspective, framework, and approach—instead of writing “call the police,” they write, “approach this problem from a law-enforcement perspective.” They turn verbs into nouns—instead of writing, “People cooperated more,” they write, “Levels of cooperation increased.” And they sprinkle their prose with hedges—somewhat, virtually, partially—in an attempt to get off the hook should anyone ever try to prove them wrong. +

Did working on this book change how you approach your own writing in any ways?
Yes. It made me more aware of the coherence connectors — like “but,” “so,” “after,” “moreover,” and “nonetheless” — which play such an important role in weaving sentences into a coherent argument. And it made me even more dependent on modern dictionaries, which don’t just prescribe correct usage, but in their usage notes, comment insightfully on the history and range of variation in the use of a word or expression.

I really enjoyed the way the book examines examples of good writing, and then explains what makes them good. Why did you decide to do that? 
When I asked some good writers which style manuals they read when they were starting out, the most common answer I got was “none.” Good writers acquire their craft not from memorizing rules but from reading a lot, savoring and reverse-engineering good prose, and assimilating vast numbers of words, idioms, tropes, and stylistic habits and tricks. On top of that, my earlier research on irregularity reminded me how much in language is arbitrary and illogical and must be acquired not by logic or rule but by brute-force memorization—spelling and punctuation being prime examples. I wanted to emphasize how important careful reading is to good writing, so I began by letting readers eavesdrop on my stream of consciousness as I went over a few examples of prose that pleased me and tried to become conscious of what made it so good. That’s a key to becoming a good writer.

Are you a scientist who specializes in neuroscience, cognitive science, or psychology? And have you read a recent peer-reviewed paper that you would like to write about? Please send suggestions to Mind Matters editor Gareth Cook. Gareth, a Pulitzer prize-winning journalist, is the series editor of Best American Infographics and can be reached at garethideas AT gmail.com or Twitter @garethideas.


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Children benefit from learning multiple languages

Children benefit from learning multiple languages | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it
Students who are educated in the U.S. typically need some type of foreign language credit in order to graduate from high school.
Charles Tiayon's insight:

Students who are educated in the U.S. typically need some type of foreign language credit in order to graduate from high school. There is beauty in learning another language and being able to communicate effectively with native speakers of that language.

Usually students are exposed to opportunities to learn another language in middle school but there are other schools that purposely offer it as early as kindergarten. While some parents worry that starting their toddler on a second language will interfere with developing English skills, the opposite is actually true. Children can differentiate between two languages within the first weeks of life. "Learning another language actually enhances a child's overall verbal development," says Roberta Michnick Golinkoff, Ph.D., author of “How Babies Talk.”

Recently, my 5-year-old daughter asked if she could learn some words in Hebrew, which totally shocked me; she is learning Spanish in school now and is also very interested in American Sign Language, as she has been exposed to it since she was a baby. My husband and I discussed it and we are at ease with fostering any and as many languages our daughters are interested in learning.

You may be wondering where you get started if you have a child that isn't being exposed in school to a foreign language? PBS suggests the following tips to parents:

• Bilingual immersion

• Extracurricular programs

• Books and videos

• Speak to them (if you are fluent)

• Take a trip to another country

M• ake it fun

Most of all, don't give up, because as you well know, whether you are a teacher or parent, consistency with children is a difficult task. But the advantages of our children being tolerant, respectful, knowledgeable and more marketable now and in the future is worth considering a life with multilingual benefits.

Tysha K. Pittman is a school counselor with Florida State University Schools.

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Chine du Sud : le cantonais, force linguistique menacée par le mandarin | Geopolis

Chine du Sud : le cantonais, force linguistique menacée par le mandarin | Geopolis | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it
La politique linguistique de Pékin tente d’imposer le mandarin standard dans le sud du pays. Mais dans la métropole de Canton, les habitants défendent leur
Charles Tiayon's insight:

La politique linguistique de Pékin tente d’imposer le mandarin standard dans le sud du pays. Mais dans la métropole de Canton, les habitants défendent leur dialecte local, le cantonais. Quant à l’usage imposé du mandarin, promu langue officielle, il fait toujours débat.

Bataille linguistique. Dans la province de Guandong, dont Canton est la capitale, les autorités menacent de supprimer les programmes de la télé locale en cantonais au profit d’émissions exclusivement en mandarin. Les médias s'en sont fait l'écho, cet été, à Canton, troisième ville de Chine où plus de la moitié des résidents ont le cantonais pour langue maternelle.

Si cantonais et mandarin s'écrivent en utilisant les mêmes caractères, et sont donc mutuellement intelligibles à l'écrit, ces deux langues diffèrent totalement à l'oral. «Je suis opposé à ce que les émissions basculent en mandarin. C'est mauvais de s'attaquer comme ça à notre langue», s’offusque Huang Yankun. Ce lycéen de 17 ans reconnaît que «parler le cantonais, c'est ici une tradition».

Ce n'est pas l'avis de Mme Yang, 58 ans, résidente de Canton originaire du Shandong (nord-est) qui, elle, se plaint de «ne pas comprendre un mot de cantonais», regrettant de ne pouvoir profiter de la télévision locale. En août 2010, la télévision municipale de Canton avait déjà annoncé qu'elle envisageait de bannir le cantonais de son antenne, ce qui avait provoqué des manifestations et, du coup, l’abandon du projet.

Unifier le pays au niveau linguistique
D’après une étude gouvernementale, un tiers des citoyens de la République populaire de Chine, soit plus de 400 millions de personnes, ne sait pas communiquer en mandarin appelé «putonghua», c'est-à-dire «langue commune». Basé sur le chinois traditionnellement parlé à Pékin, le mandarin est pratiqué dans les administrations, les médias nationaux et l'enseignement.

En l'imposant, les autorités communistes ont espéré renforcer le pouvoir central dans un pays linguistiquement morcelé, face aux fortes identités régionales et aux minorités ethniques. Promouvoir le «putonghua» était pour Pékin «dès l'origine une tentative d'unifier le pays linguistiquement, mais l'idée était aussi que le Nord et le mandarin dominent le Sud et ses langues comme le cantonais, le shanghaïen ou le Hakka», explique Victor Mair, sinologue de l'Université de Pennsylvanie.
 
L'usage du cantonais s'est «incroyablement affaibli» dans le Guangdong depuis 1949 et l'arrivée au pouvoir des communistes, note M.Mair.«Beaucoup d'enfants ne parlent que le mandarin à l'école. A la maison, si leur mère les questionne en cantonais, ils répondent en mandarin», déplore Huang Xiaoyu, 28 ans, employé dans la communication.

Le cantonais, langue principale à Hong Kong
«Le mandarin a été élaboré il y a seulement 100 ans environ, alors que le cantonais a 1.000 ans d'histoire. Quand nous lisons des poèmes antiques en cantonais, ils riment toujours», martelle pour sa part l'éditeur Lao Zhenyu, fervent défenseur du cantonais.

C'est aussi la langue principale à Hong Kong, colonie britannique jusqu'en 1997 et aujourd'hui territoire chinois autonome. «S'il n'y avait pas Hong Kong (et sa puissante influence), le cantonais cesserait vite d'être une force linguistique significative», estime M.Mair. Avec l'influence grandissante de Pékin sur Hong Kong, combien de temps encore la défense de la langue cantonaise résistera-t-elle au mandarin?

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How A Second Language Betters Your Brain

How A Second Language Betters Your Brain | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it
By Nathan Collins

Speaking more than one language has some advantages beyond ordering food in the local tongue -- psychologists believe that bilingualism has many other positive side effects. Now, researchers have evidence connecting bilinguals'...
Charles Tiayon's insight:

Speaking more than one language has some advantages beyond ordering food in the local tongue -- psychologists believe that bilingualism has many other positive side effects. Now, researchers have evidence connecting bilinguals' talents to stronger so-called executive control in the brain.

Much has been made recently about growing up learning more than one language, as about one in five do. There's evidence that children who grow up speaking two languages may be more creative, that bilingualism might stave off demefntia, and that bilinguals are better at tasks that involve switching attention between different objects. That led some researchers to suspect that speaking two languages might improve our brains' executive functions, the high-level circuits that control our ability to switch between tasks, among other things.

To get a little more sense of the matter, Andrea Stocco and Chantel Prat of the University of Washington screened 17 bilingual and 14 monolingual people for language proficiency and other factors and then tested them using a series of arithmetic problems. Each problem was defined by a set of operations and two inputs -- divide x by two, add one to y, and subtract the second result from the first, for example -- with x and y specified uniquely for each problem. First, participants ran through 40 practice problems using just two operation sets. Next, they went through another 40 problems, this time a mix of 20 new ones, each with a unique set of operations and inputs, and another 20 featuring the previously studied arithmetic operations, but with new inputs for x and y. Finally, the groups worked through 40 more problems, again a mix of familiar and novel, but this time, they completed them inside a fMRI brain scanner.

While bilinguals and monolinguals solved the problems with equal accuracy and took about the same amount of time on arithmetic with familiar sets of operations, bilinguals beat out monolinguals, on average, by about half a second on novel problems. What's more, fMRI results showed that the basal ganglia, a brain region previously linked to learning about rewards and motor functions, responded more to novel math problems than old ones, but only in bilinguals.

That's interesting, Stocco says, because more recent studies suggest the basal ganglia's real role is to take information and prioritize it before passing it on to the prefrontal cortex, which then processes the information. If that's correct, the new results suggest that learning multiple languages trains the basal ganglia to switch more efficiently between the rules and vocabulary of different languages, and these are skills it can then transfer to other domains such as arithmetic.

"Language is one of the hardest things the brain does," Prat says, though we often realize that only when we try to learn a new language -- a task that is "at least an order of magnitude" more difficult than learning the first one. But just as working on your core has benefits outside the gym, working your basal ganglia hard may be the key to promoting other cognitive skills, especially your hidden math genius.

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Dear work colleagues, let’s stop using this clumsy phrase

Dear work colleagues, let’s stop using this clumsy phrase | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it
Toby Chasseaud: A colleague is someone you work with, so why the pointless prefix?
Charles Tiayon's insight:

“Sorry, I can’t make it to the pub tonight. I have to go to a work colleague’s leaving do,” a friend tells me. This winds me up. It isn’t being deprived of the opportunity to sip a pint that frustrates me. Rather, it is his use of the phrase “work colleague” that I find so offensive. For me, this expression is akin to the sound of fingernails being scraped down a blackboard.

Here is the definition of colleague from the Collins English Dictionary: “a fellow worker or member of a staff, department, profession, etc”. And here is the definition from the Oxford English Dictionary: “A person with whom one works in a profession or business.” So I think it’s safe to say that a colleague is someone you work with in some capacity. What value does “work” add as a prefix? None at all. It is mere tautology.

And yet we at the Guardian are as guilty as anyone of using this clumsy construction. In recent years, our newspaper and website have published “work colleague” hundreds of times, often in reference to office or relationship dilemmas, but also in news stories, obituaries and features. Here are a few examples:

  • “Work colleague broke my phone but won’t pay for a replacement.”
  • “A man has been found guilty of murdering a work colleague who became his lover.”
  • “She was hugely respected by her work colleagues and touched many lives.”
  • “I became obsessed with a work colleague and was devastated when she refused to go out with me. Six years on, I’m still hurting.”

And perhaps most bizarrely:

  • “Witnessing a work colleague’s thigh fuzz isn’t everyone’s cup of tea.”

The Guardian has printed the term 117 times in the past five years, while the Observer, with its 10 times in five years, is less of an offender. It is odd that such examples have made it into our newspapers, where the editing process can be more rigorous and space more limited than on a website. Even stranger is that, when a reader has written in with a dilemma, there are instances where their letter does not contain the prefix but the accompanying headline or caption does. Sometimes, of course, one of my fellow subeditors may insert an extra word to fill out a line. But this can be no defence for writing “work colleague”. Among my pet hates, it is worse than a misplaced apostrophe and clumsier than using “women” as an adjective.

Colleague is a perfectly good word – better than “co-worker” or “member of my team”, more egalitarian than “boss”, “manager” or “employee”. It is capable of standing on its own, without the prefix. There are, though, times when “colleague” is misused. I have been waiting in a shop to pay for something, only to be greeted by the digital display on a vacant till telling me: “Please be patient. A colleague will serve you soon.” This I have no patience for. Call me a luddite, but I think an object cannot class itself as the colleague of a human. Here, “a member of staff” would have been better.

Perhaps in the hope that they will act in a more responsible manner, some colleges encourage their students to call one another colleagues. This would appear to fit the Collins definition (which we at the Guardian prefer) but not the Oxford one, which stipulates that the people in question should work together in a profession or business.

Generally, if you work with someone you can’t go wrong with the word colleague. There are times, when employed in a temporary bar job (as I once was), for example, when colleague may seem excessively formal. In such situations you could opt for “workmate” – though perhaps this assumes a friendship where there is none, or perhaps it may hint at the other sense of “mate”, a lover. (An Observer story in 2008 reported that “One in four Britons has had sex with a work colleague”.) OK, maybe I’m over-thinking things now.

I have, occasionally, heard people at the Guardian (usually those higher up the editorial chain of command) address staff as “comrades”, in what may be an attempt to play up to the Guardianista stereotype.

But I’m sticking with colleague. As for work colleague, it ought to have no place in a newspaper, so let’s drop the pointless prefix.

Toby Chasseaud is an assistant production editor at the Guardian. He tweets @TobyChasseaud 

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Meg Wolitzer On Writing And Reading Young Adult Novels

Meg Wolitzer On Writing And Reading Young Adult Novels | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it
Meg Wolitzer is the author of The Interestings, a novel chronicling the thwarted -- or achieved -- ambitions of a crew of gifted summer campers. Her latest novel, Belzhar, tackles similar themes, but is geared towards the Young Adult audience. Told w...
Charles Tiayon's insight:

Meg Wolitzer is the author of The Interestings, a novel chronicling the thwarted -- or achieved -- ambitions of a crew of gifted summer campers. Her latest novel, Belzhar, tackles similar themes, but is geared towards the Young Adult audience. Told with an immediacy granted from its teenage, first-person narrator, her newest book sheds light on the genre's unique offerings.

Your previous novel The Interestings mostly concerns itself with young, ambitious characters. How does writing young people in an adult novel differ from writing a young adult novel? 
While The Interestings takes place over almost 40 years and is told from a few different third-person points of view, Belzhar takes place over one semester, and is written from a single, first-person point of view. My decision to write Belzhar this way came from my innate sense of how I wanted the narrative to feel. I needed the narrator to be breathless and have her story seem immediate. That struck me as right. She's young, she’s been shaken, she can’t take the long view, and she needs to say things right now.

Why did you decide to write a young adult novel?
Because I often include adolescent characters in my adult novels, it wasn’t a big leap to think of doing this. I like writing about adolescence because it’s a time of firsts, and the experiences are so strong, which all lends itself pretty well to fiction. Also, I had a teenager in the house at the time, and I would pick up some of the YA books he was reading, and I found myself drawn right in to the good ones. 

What did you want to be when you grew up (besides an author)?
For about two minutes as a teenager at summer camp I wanted to be an actress, but I was extremely bad, and essentially had one acting voice –– a strained and artificial voice –– that I used whenever I had to speak onstage. What I realized eventually was that I didn’t love acting, but loved being part of a big project. And to this day I think of writing novels as being part of –– well, making from scratch, I guess –– a very big project.

What books might your readers be surprised that you enjoy?
Patricia Highsmith novels. She’s so dark and unsparing, and I tend not to be that way as writer, particularly, but I am always very excited reading her work. The Talented Mr. Ripley has an inevitability about it; the story unfolds so disturbingly, and everything just gets worse and worse, and the reader can do little but keep reading. This is true of her lesser known books too, and also Strangers on a Train, which everyone knows about because of the Hitchcock movie, but the novel is even darker. 

Who are your literary heroes? 
Virginia Woolf, Willa Cather, E.M. Forster, Evan S. Connell, Grace Paley, Maurice Sendak.

What is the first book you remember reading? 
Charlotte’s Web.

What is the first book you truly loved?
Charlotte's Web. (And if you asked me what was the first book I cried over, the answer would again be Charlotte’s Web.) The intensity of that first reading experience is something I think about sometimes when I'm writing. Most people start out being read to, or reading a book with another person; and reading gets connected with intimacy. For me, novels are always intensely intimate. When things go well, the world falls away and is replaced by this concentrated new world.

Which classic have you not yet read? Do you intend to read it? 
The Brothers Karamazov. And yes, yes, I am filled with shame about this, and I plan to read it soon. Please give me a Brothers K quiz in a couple of months.

If you could only recommend one book, which would it be? 
Mrs. Bridge, by Evan S. Connell. I have recommended this book so many times over the years to friends and readers and students. For people who don’t know it, it’s a 1959 American novel about a Kansas City housewife, set not long before the start of WWII. Mrs. Bridge is a woman who strives for more but is limited not only by outward circumstance but also by the specifics of her own self. The novel is hilarious and tragic, filled with small domestic drama and dips into existential territory. I really don’t know anyone who hasn’t admired this book. For me, it’s a thrilling novel.

What, if anything, do you read while you're working on a project? 
Books that feel like the author was excited when writing them. Anything that feels like the author was really invested in working something out, figuring out an idea, turning it over and over, experimenting and trying new things -- even if the book that resulted ended up being imperfect because of those experiments -- these are the kind of books that remind you of how invested you need to be in your own work, and how open you need to be when you write.

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Teenage 'Hyperpolyglot' Breezes Through 20 Languages in Single Take

Teenage 'Hyperpolyglot' Breezes Through 20 Languages in Single Take | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it
  Timothy Doner is a teenage 'hyperpolyglot' with conversational proficiency in over 20 different languages. While he only considers himself fluent in about five or six tongues, the linguist c...
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Timothy Doner is a teenage ‘hyperpolyglot’ with conversational proficiency in over 20 different languages. While he only considers himself fluent in about five or six tongues, the linguist clearly has a knack (and keen interest) for learning new languages. In the video above (which was actually filmed in 2012 when he was only 16), Doner demonstrates his amazing ability.

For more, check out his YouTube channelFacebook page and Blog.

Languages used (chronologically): English, French, Hausa, Wolof, Russian, German, Yiddish, Hebrew, Arabic, Pashto, Farsi, Chinese, Italian, Turkish, Indonesian, Dutch, Xhosa, Swahili, Hindi, Ojibwe

 

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La nueva edición del diccionario de la RAE, a punto para ver la luz el día 16

La nueva edición del diccionario de la RAE, a punto para ver la luz el día 16 | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it
Irene Dalmases Polinyà (Barcelona), 30 sep.- En las afueras de la pequeña población catalana de Polinyà se ubica la imprenta de CPS-Egedsa, donde centenares de volúmenes de la vigésimo tercera edición del Diccionario de la lengua española (DRAE) esperan transporte para llegar a las librerías de todo el mundo el próximo 16 de octubre. El... Ver más
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Polinyà (Barcelona), 30 sep.- En las afueras de la pequeña población catalana de Polinyà se ubica la imprenta de CPS-Egedsa, donde centenares de volúmenes de la vigésimo tercera edición del Diccionario de la lengua española (DRAE) esperan transporte para llegar a las librerías de todo el mundo el próximo 16 de octubre.

El director de la Real Academia Española (RAE), José Manuel Blecua, junto a un grupo de periodistas, realizaron hoy una visita al lugar para conocer los procesos de alzado, cosido, encuadernado y estuchado del nuevo diccionario, cuya publicación, que se ha adelantado unos días, incluirá en sus 2.376 finas páginas 93.111 artículos, frente a los 84.431 de 2001.

Blecua ha comentado que el motivo de este adelanto tiene que ver con la agenda de los Reyes, puesto que presidirán el acto de presentación el próximo 17 de octubre.

Esta nueva obra panhispánica, editada por Espasa, está considerada el hito más destacado de las conmemoraciones del III Centenario de la RAE y es fruto de la colaboración de las veintidós corporaciones integradas en la Asociación de Academias de la Lengua Española (ASALE).

Viendo los 33 pliegos de 76 páginas cada uno corriendo por diferentes cintas de la imprenta o cómo los operarios van metiendo en estuches cada uno de los volúmenes ya acabados, Blecua ha dicho estar viviendo "un momento emocionante", al que se ha llegado después de muchas horas de trabajo, pues la obra ha sufrido una "profunda" revisión por 13 años desde su última edición.

El Diccionario recogerá 195.439 acepciones, entre ellas cerca de 19.000 americanismos, y se han introducido 140.000 enmiendas, que afectan a 49.000 artículos. Por otra parte, se suprimirán unos 1.350.

Blecua ha destacado que mientras en 2001 no se podía llevar a cabo un trabajo de armonización, hoy gracias a la aparición de la Nueva gramática de la lengua española, de la Ortografía de la lengua española y del Diccionario de americanismos se ha podido consolidar una doctrina lingüística común en toda la producción académica.

Preguntado sobre la utilidad de este tipo de obras, el director de la RAE ha sostenido que aunque la implantación masiva de la informática lo ha cambiado todo (la versión electrónica recibe cada mes entre treinta y cuarenta millones de consultas), los diccionarios de papel siempre quedarán para "consultar una voz, para conocer una característica determinada de esa voz".

Por otra parte, ha recordado que en la nueva edición ya aparecerán palabras como tuit o tuiter y todas las relacionadas con el libro electrónico o las tabletas.

Asimismo, ha desvelado que gracias a la petición del Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas de Barcelona se han cambiado las definiciones de nanotecnología y las de pesos y medidas de la última edición.

A pesar de "lo dicho por lenguas viperinas", ha aseverado que la voz sobre referéndum que se encontrará en el volumen es la misma que se enmendó en 2008 y no ha obviado que no es fácil incluir ahora una definición para matrimonio, puesto que el español es una lengua de casi 500 millones de habitantes y no es lo mismo lo que ocurre en España que en países de América.

En cuanto a la palabra que él escogería de todas las que hay en la obra, José Manuel Blecua no ha dudado en citar "libertad", porque "supone la presencia de la ley". "Supone -ha continuado- que hay una sociedad en la que hay una convivencia regida por leyes que se eligen".

Está previsto que del nuevo diccionario y, tal vez el último que se lleva a imprenta, se editen en una primera tirada 50.000 ejemplares, a un precio de 99 euros. EFE

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Secure, On-Premise Machine Translation Solution Now Available for Government, Defense, Intelligence, and Law Enforcement Agencies

Secure, On-Premise Machine Translation Solution Now Available for Government, Defense, Intelligence, and Law Enforcement Agencies | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it
HERNDON, VA--(Marketwired - Sep 30, 2014) - SDL Government, the leader in secure on-premise Big Language™ solutions, today released SDLGov Language Weaver Enterprise Translation Server for Government (ETS-G). SDLGov ETS-G 5.3.1 provides high-volume, high-accuracy real-time translation capabilities in a secure, standalone, on-premise environment.  SDLGov ETS-G 5.3.1 addresses the ever-growing multilingual...
Charles Tiayon's insight:

SDL Government Releases ETS-G 5.3.1 Standalone Translation Solution to Solve Challenges of Translating Multilingual Big Data in Real Time



HERNDON, VA--(Marketwired - Sep 30, 2014) - SDL Government, the leader in secure on-premise Big Language™ solutions, today released SDLGov Language Weaver Enterprise Translation Server for Government (ETS-G). SDLGov ETS-G 5.3.1 provides high-volume, high-accuracy real-time translation capabilities in a secure, standalone, on-premise environment. 

SDLGov ETS-G 5.3.1 addresses the ever-growing multilingual demands of the defense, intelligence and law enforcement sectors with side-by-side multilingual web browsing, customizable domain dictionaries, and instant content and file translation tools -- all within a new intuitive user interface (UI). Security, usability and source language challenges have been eliminated to provide non-technical, non-linguist analysts with real-time translation capabilities that cover over 46 languages and 93% of the world population. 

"Non-linguist analysts can now access the multilingual information they need for rapid decision making," explains Melchior Baltazar, SDL Government CEO. "They can also better prioritize what content gets escalated to human translators for additional interpretation and analysis, and thereby maximize use of their scarce translation resources."

SDLGov ETS-G 5.3.1 was specifically designed to address digital content, social media and Big Data challenges within government and supporting industries. New features available in the ETS-G 5.3.1 release include: 
 

  • Multilingual Web Browsing -- click-to-translate feature for real-time multilingual browsing with side-by-side viewing
  • Instant and Batch Secure File Translation -- translate one or many types of text, documents and URLs behind the firewall
  • Cross-Platform Translation -- access ETS-G 5.3.1 from virtually any browser securely and efficiently
  • Dictionary Editors -- authorized users can manage custom terminology to improve ETS-G performance within specific domains
  • Admin Tools -- complete control over queue management, user roles and more
  • Translation Tool Integration -- integration with translation memory, terminology management, translation management, content integration and workflow tools 

Real-time Arabic Twitter translation is just one example of how ETS-G is helping organizations modernize their technology and processes for real-time and real-world scenarios. ETS-G technology supports several mission critical applications, including multilingual web browsing, text-to-text translation, multilingual chat, entity extraction, link analysis, social media exploitation (SOMEX), and document exploitation (DOMEX).

ETS-G 5.3.1 can be securely and easily accessed through the new browser-based UI or through SOAP and REST API integration with virtually any third-party software application. By using existing translated content, organizations can also train the ETS-G statistical machine translation technology to produce more fluent, meaningful translations in important subject areas and domains.

For more information on ETS-G 5.3.1, technical specifications, or to schedule a demo, please visit http://www.sdlgov.com/ets-g.

About SDL Government
Based in Herndon, VA, SDL Government (SDLGov) is a technology and services company that provides language translation and strategic communications solutions that are deployed by government organizations worldwide. Our flagship offering, the Government Language Platform (GLP), provides a comprehensive language translation solution that combines translation memory, terminology, workflow, productivity and statistical machine translation technologies.

SDLGov software solutions are designed to stand alone or easily integrate with existing applications through SOAP and REST APIs. SDLGov language solutions are easily adaptable for specific domains and custom applications, providing a universal architecture that can rapidly deliver linguistic technology tailored to a specific deployment scenario. For more information, visit www.sdlgov.com.

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D'autres langues que la mienn Michel Zink (dir.)

D'autres langues que la mienne
Michel Zink (dir.)
Odile Bombarde, Yves Bonnefoy, Pascale Bourgain, A. Compagnon, etc. (Collectif
)

 

DATE DE PARUTION : 27/08/14 EDITEUR : Odile Jacob (Editions) COLLECTION : Collège de France ISBN : 978-2-7381-3114-0 EAN : 9782738131140 PRÉSENTATION : Broché NB. DE PAGES : 286 p.



Écrire dans une langue qui n'est pas sa langue maternelle : du Moyen-Age à l'époque contemporaine, de nombreux poètes ou romanciers l'ont fait, par choix ou par contrainte. Dans maintes civilisations, la vie intellectuelle et la littérature ont même eu recours avec une sorte d'aisance naturelle à une langue étrangère ou apprise : le grec pour les Romains, le chinois pour les japonais, le latin pour l'Occident médiéval.

Écrire dans une autre langue, c'est s'arracher à soi-même, ou simplement se partager : la langue du poète, la langue du mathématicien ne relèvent-elles pas de la catégorie des langues autres ? Et la langue maternelle peut, elle aussi, se faire " autre " : lorsqu'elle est dévoyée ; ou lorsqu'elle est consciemment choisie et modelée ; ou lorsqu'elle préserve au sein de l'écriture la langue de la tribu, de l'enfance, de la fratrie.

Ces questions se posent à tout écrivain si, comme l'écrit Proust : " Les beaux livres sont écrits dans une sorte de langue étrangère. "

 

Sommaire:

A COTE DE LA LANGUE MATERNELLE
La langue que l'on fait sienne : le latin au Moyen-Age
Rerum vulgarium fragmenta ou canzoniere ? Le sens du titre latin des vers en langue vulgaire de Pétrarque
Parler de soi dans une langue autre : un "dialogue au pinceau " en chinois classique entre un Coréen et un Japonais vers l'an 1600

MA LANGUE ET MOI
Quand l'Europe parlait français, Paris était polyglotte
Ma langue d'en France
L'illusion perdue d'une culture européenne ?

LANGUES POETIQUES
Parole, verbe, parlar cantando
La poésie, langue vivante étrangère
"Je n'ai aucune langue, ce n'est pas la mienne" : l'altérité de la langue en poésie

Charles Tiayon's insight:

D'autres langues que la mienne
Michel Zink (dir.)
Odile Bombarde, Yves Bonnefoy, Pascale Bourgain, A. Compagnon, etc. (Collectif
)

 

DATE DE PARUTION : 27/08/14 EDITEUR : Odile Jacob (Editions) COLLECTION : Collège de France ISBN : 978-2-7381-3114-0 EAN : 9782738131140 PRÉSENTATION : Broché NB. DE PAGES : 286 p.



Écrire dans une langue qui n'est pas sa langue maternelle : du Moyen-Age à l'époque contemporaine, de nombreux poètes ou romanciers l'ont fait, par choix ou par contrainte. Dans maintes civilisations, la vie intellectuelle et la littérature ont même eu recours avec une sorte d'aisance naturelle à une langue étrangère ou apprise : le grec pour les Romains, le chinois pour les japonais, le latin pour l'Occident médiéval.

Écrire dans une autre langue, c'est s'arracher à soi-même, ou simplement se partager : la langue du poète, la langue du mathématicien ne relèvent-elles pas de la catégorie des langues autres ? Et la langue maternelle peut, elle aussi, se faire " autre " : lorsqu'elle est dévoyée ; ou lorsqu'elle est consciemment choisie et modelée ; ou lorsqu'elle préserve au sein de l'écriture la langue de la tribu, de l'enfance, de la fratrie.

Ces questions se posent à tout écrivain si, comme l'écrit Proust : " Les beaux livres sont écrits dans une sorte de langue étrangère. "

 

Sommaire:

A COTE DE LA LANGUE MATERNELLE
La langue que l'on fait sienne : le latin au Moyen-Age
Rerum vulgarium fragmenta ou canzoniere ? Le sens du titre latin des vers en langue vulgaire de Pétrarque
Parler de soi dans une langue autre : un "dialogue au pinceau " en chinois classique entre un Coréen et un Japonais vers l'an 1600

MA LANGUE ET MOI
Quand l'Europe parlait français, Paris était polyglotte
Ma langue d'en France
L'illusion perdue d'une culture européenne ?

LANGUES POETIQUES
Parole, verbe, parlar cantando
La poésie, langue vivante étrangère
"Je n'ai aucune langue, ce n'est pas la mienne" : l'altérité de la langue en poésie

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Oferta de trabajo Traductor/a nativo inglés con trados en Madrid, Infoempleo.com

Oferta de trabajo Traductor/a nativo inglés con trados en Madrid, Infoempleo.com | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it
Se busca Traductor/a nativo inglés con trados. Oferta de empleo como Traductor/a nativo inglés con trados en ADECCO, Madrid, ¡inscríbete ahora!
Charles Tiayon's insight:

Adecco, líder mundial en el sector Recursos Humanos, ofrece un servicio integral especializado en todas las áreas: selección, trabajo temporal y fijo, externalización de servicios, formación, prevención de riesgos laborales, gestión de carreras, consultoría y outplacement.

La presencia de Adecco en 70 países garantiza un profundo y amplio conocimiento de cada sector y de cada mercado. Su estructura mundial permite ofrecer un servicio homogéneo en los cinco continentes.

La estrategia de especialización por perfiles profesionales cualificados adoptada por Adecco durante el 2007 se ha llevado a cabo con éxito y sigue en marcha con la apertura de nuevas delegaciones especializadas y Career Centres, espacios en los que el candidato puede satisfacer todas sus necesidades laborales gracias a los consultores que lideran estos centros.

Traductor/a nativo inglés con trados
Detalle de la empresaFecha:30/09/2014Lugar:- Madrid - EspañaPuestos vacantes:1Referencia1722899Funciones:

Adecco selecciona para empresa situada en Madrid un traductor/a de inglés nativo con experiencia para la traducción de documentación jurídica principalmente.

Requisitos:

Se requiere Licenciatura / Ingeniería Superior; Experiencia no requerida.

- Formación miníma de Licenciado/a, preferiblemente en Traducción
- Nivel de inglés Nativo
- Experiencia previa en Traducción de documentación jurídica, Técnico/a, etc. manejo del programa TRADOS
- Posibilidad de incorporarse inmediatamente

Se ofrece

- Contrato a través de Adecco 
- Colaboración estable
- Salario según valía y experiencia

Al pulsar el botón “Inscribirse a la oferta”, Usted consiente que Infoempleo, S.L. comunique sus datos de carácter personal para participar en futuros procesos de selección a los ficheros de ADECCO con domicilio social en Camino del Cerro de los Gamos, 3 28224 Pozuelo de Alarcón, Madrid donde podrá ejercitar sus derechos de acceso, rectificación, cancelación y oposición.

Descubre nuestra sección de empleo internacional con ofertas exclusivas para trabajar en el extranjero. Entrar

Más ofertas similares en Twitter

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Abren al público el mundo interno y solitario del trabajo de traducir

Abren al público el mundo interno y solitario del trabajo de traducir | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it
El Instituto Goethe de México se suma a los festejos por el Día Mundial de la Traducción
Charles Tiayon's insight:

México, DF. Con motivo del día de San Jerónimo, el 30 de septiembre, cada año se celebra el Día Mundial de la Traducción.

Por primera vez, el Instituto Goethe de México festejará el quehacer de traducir con el acto La traductora transparente, en el que participará Claudia Cabrera (DF, 1970), quien traduce del alemán al español desde 1995.

Cabrera traducirá en vivo y conversará con el público en la Biblioteca del Instituto Goethe de México este martes. La idea es transparentar la intimidad de su trabajo, que normalmente es solitario.

"Generalmente el trabajo del traductor se realiza en su oficina, solo, en silencio, con su material. Este año en el instituto queremos mostrar un poco esta labor y abrir el mundo interno del traductor al público", explicó Sven Mensing, director de la Biblioteca Goethe.

Cabrera traducirá en vivo un pasaje de la novela de Arnold Zweig, Das Beil von Wandsbek (El hacha de Wandsbek) y comentará su trabajo, así como las dificultades que encuentra, las posibilidades que coteja, las elecciones que realiza, mientras el público verá proyectados el texto original y su respectiva traducción en curso. Será partícipe de todo lo que hace el traductor.

La efeméride se conmemora en Alemania desde 2005. Este año se realizarán otros actos en 19 ciudades alemanas y en 17 de otros países en colaboración con el Goethe-Institut. En América Latina se realizará en Argentina y México.

"Llevo traducido una tercera parte del libro y donde me quede el día anterior, retomaré mi trabajo para que sea todo lo más auténtico posible", dice a La Jornada Claudia Cabrera, quien desde pequeña estudió en el Colegio Alemán, donde surgió su pasión por el idioma alemán.

Recuerda que se convirtió en traductora de manera autodidacta: "El alemán me fascina, es un idioma con el que tengo una relación cotidiana y empecé a traducir prácticamente de manera casual aquí en el Instituto Goethe, cuando un día me preguntaron si podía traducir una pequeña reseña, después me empezaron a pasar catálogos de exposiciones, retrospectivas fílmicas, obras de teatro".

Vivir, pensar y soñar en dos idiomas

La trayectoria de Claudia Cabrera como traductora en las editoriales comenzó con libros de divulgación científica, sociología, sicología e historia; continuó con arte, cine, música y teatro, hasta que en 2005 empezó a traducir literatura.

“El primer libro que traduje fue Animal triste, de Monika Maron, que publicó la editorial Herder, la misma que editará el libro de Zweig”, señala Cabrera. Con este proyecto, Herder participó en el programa de Fomento al traductor del Goethe-Institut, el cual apoyó con un porcentaje de la edición.

Aprender idiomas, dice, "le abre a uno la cabeza. Yo vivo, pienso y sueño en los dos idiomas". Cabrera participó en el primer Taller de Traducción Literaria Español-Alemán que se realizó en la Feria Internacional del Libro (FIL) de Guadalajara en 2011, con Alemania como país invitado.

El libro de Zweig, que se traducirá en vivo, narra la historia del carnicero de la ciudad de Wandsbek, Albert Teetjen, quien está al borde de la ruina. Para salvar su existencia está dispuesto a remplazar al verdugo enfermo de la prisión Fuhlsbüttel. Con su hacha ejecutará a cuatro prisioneros. El modesto bienestar que los Teetjen obtienen con el dinero de las ejecuciones durará únicamente hasta que los vecinos se enteren de la procedencia del dinero.

Arnold Zweig es un escritor de origen judío que salió de Alemania en los años 30 del siglo pasado, antes de que empezara la gran persecución nazi contra los judíos. Escribió este libro en el exilio, en Palestina.

La traductora transparente se realiza hoy, a las 18:30 horas, en la Biblioteca Goethe, ubicada en la calle Tonalá 43, colonia Roma.


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Five life-changing books - Life & Style - NZ Herald News

Five life-changing books - Life & Style - NZ Herald News | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it
There's one of those Facebook chain letters going on at the moment (when isn't there?!) It's a nomination list that you complete and forward on - this time about books that changed - New Zealand Herald
Charles Tiayon's insight:

There's one of those Facebook "chain letters" going on at the moment (when isn't there?!) It's a nomination list that you complete and forward on - this time about books that changed your life.

Coming up with books wasn't difficult - I love books. Narrowing my list down to only five was far trickier. But here goes, my five life-changing reads.


1. The Life of Pi


Before Ang Lee's spectacular cinematic interpretation, I read Yann Martel's book nearly a decade ago, and knew then I would never look at the world the same way. It's not a book about making you believe in a particular religion - rather it encourages the reader to have faith. In yourself, the strength of the human spirit, a higher power, the world, the universe - whatever really - just the strength to survive insurmountable challenges. A must-read, over and over.


Photo / File, Supplied


2. The Power of One


Bryce Courtenay's brilliant novel is set in South Africa during the 1930s and 1940s. For me, growing up during the transition of a country ruled by apartheid to a democracy, I was faced with conflicting views from adults about how to treat others. My family was liberal and anti-apartheid - but the same couldn't be said for some of my teachers and friends' parents. This book shows how, in a world full of hate, to have faith in the goodness of people and how to show strength through self-preservation. A big read, but an important one.


Photo / Wikimedia Commons


3. The Alchemist


The message behind Paulo Coelho's The Alchemist is similar to, but far less naff than, The Secret that was popular a few years ago. It's the story of a shepherd and his journey to find treasure in Egypt. Perhaps the book's most poignant quote is, "When you really want something to happen, the whole universe conspires so that your wish comes true."


Photo / Wikimedia Commons


4. We Need To Talk About Kevin


Lionel Shriver's novel explores the nature vs nurture debate in a series of letters written by a teen murderer's mother - Eva - to her husband. Kevin is responsible for a school massacre, and killing his sister and father. Eva admits she is not maternal and never showed Kevin affection. All the way through the novel I questioned whether Kevin was born a sociopath, or became that way due to his upbringing.


Photo / File, Supplied


5. Popcorn


I studied this novel by Ben Elton in my final year of school. It has similar themes toNatural Born Killers and Pulp Fiction. The story is of a movie director taken hostage, along with others from the industry, by two murderers who want him to publicly announce that his films encourage violence and killing, and he is responsible for their crimes. During the siege, which is broadcast on live TV, one of the captors holds a ratings monitor and announces that the hostages would be spared if everyone stops watching - which, of course, doesn't happen. Some are killed, but the survivors use different legal pathways to escape any responsibility. The underlying message - we live in a blameless society.


Photo / Wikimedia Commons

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Can We Talk? Finding A Common Security Language

Can We Talk? Finding A Common Security Language | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it
How engineers can get beyond the crippling vocabulary and semantic barrier of infosec and actually communicate about cyber risk with bosses and business colleagues.
Charles Tiayon's insight:

How engineers can get beyond the crippling vocabulary and semantic barrier of infosec and actually communicate about cyber risk with bosses and business colleagues.

Put yourself in the shoes of your CEO.

Good morning, Mr. or Ms. CEO! Quick question -- and I need you to think fast: What’s the top cyber risk to your enterprise this quarter, and how does it affect your business’s bottom line?

It might help to think back to your last status meeting with your security team. In the meeting are all your department heads, including your CFO, COO, CMO, CTO, and CSO.

Imagine that you’ve come to the half-hour set aside for the CSO and his lead infosec engineers, and, on the slides, you see one summarizing your IT security and cyber defense spending over the first half of the year. Things like antivirus, malware detection, and anti-phishing show up, as do $ symbols followed by healthy numbers beside things like IDS/IPS, firewalls, signature detection, log aggregation, netflow analysis, and packet inspection.

Then you see a slide summarizing your top cyber security issues over the first half of the year: words and phrases like Zeus, Citadel Trojan, Backoff POS, Man-in-the-Middle, Dorking, Beaconing, Packet Reflection.

So, what is the top cyber risk to your enterprise this quarter, and how does it really affect your business’s bottom line?

Imagine you still can’t answer? You wouldn’t be alone.

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Displaced Author Russell Kaschula on “Re-imagining the Grammar of Local Languages

Displaced Author Russell Kaschula on “Re-imagining the Grammar of Local Languages | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it
Professor Russell Kaschula is the Head of the School of Languages at Rhodes University and the author of Displaced. Kaschula teaches African Language Studies at Rhodes and his research is concerned with the importance of indigenous languages in education. According to the Mail & Guardian two Research Chairs were awarded in 2012 as part of the South African Chairs Initiative (SARChI) with the focus ...
Charles Tiayon's insight:

Professor Russell Kaschula is the Head of the School of Languages at Rhodes Universityand the author of Displaced. Kaschula teaches African Language Studies at Rhodes and his research is concerned with the importance of indigenous languages in education.

According to the Mail & Guardian two Research Chairs were awarded in 2012 as part of the South African Chairs Initiative (SARChI) with the focus on higher education in an African context.

Kaschula has been awarded the position of Chair of Intellectualisation of African Languages, Multilingualism and Education. In this article he explains the three focus areas of the Chair:

First, linguistics and applied African language studies, which looks at ways to introduce teaching in indigenous languages into the higher education system. One project in this field is looking at translating and developing appropriate terminology and lexicology in various fields of study that is not only relevant but that students can identify with.

This approach is being applied in developing isiXhosa language usage and terminology for information and communication technology subjects.

Allied to this is the development of courses in indigenous languages in subjects ranging from journalism to pharmacy, education and law.

Probably closer to the Chair title of intellectualisation of language is work on what Kaschula terms re-imagining the grammar of local languages that he says had originally been documented by missionaries in the 18th Century.

The third area of the Chair’s research is into Africa literary studies, including its history.

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Clarkson University: Clarkson University Students Learn About Foreign Cultures, Languages Abroad Through Special ROTC Program

Clarkson University: Clarkson University Students Learn About Foreign Cultures, Languages Abroad Through Special ROTC Program | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it

Clarkson cadets Nicholas Zapotoski '17 traveled to Greece, Jacob Cappiello '16 traveled to Cape Verde, Ashley Forshey '16 traveled to Thailand, Nicholas Haluska '16 traveled to Croatia, Timothy Pierce '17 traveled to Germany, Courtney Quinn '16 traveled to Bulgaria and Adam Yates '16 traveled to Hungary to discover how people live in other countries.

Sally Mooney '16, from SUNY Potsdam, and Thomas Plumb '16, from SUNY Canton, also participated in CULP programs in Romania and Poland, respectively.

Zapotoski participated in a military-to-military program where he learned how the military in Greece operates. While there are differences, he said, there are also many similarities.

"It's just neat to see how cadets from other countries train," he said. "I made a lot of cool friends. As cadets, we're not that different."

Forshey said she ate breakfast, lunch and dinner with locals every day as part of her program teaching English in Thailand.

"I hadn't traveled anywhere before," she said, "so it was nice to see how they viewed us as Americans, and I was welcomed into the culture like a family."

Approximately 1,400 Army ROTC cadets traveled to more than 40 countries as part of CULP this year. The program gives cadets an opportunity to explore the globe, spending up to four weeks immersed in foreign cultures, practicing leadership skills, learning more about how other cultures around the world view the U.S. and, in the process, learning more about themselves.

These missions create better military leaders who are educated in world cultures and values, and better equipped to function in a variety of complex circumstances. Cadets also gain valuable experience in today's geo-political and geo-economic world, where countries and economies are tied together. The training prepares them for civilian careers while serving in the reserve components, or in industry and business after their army service.

Professor of Military Science Lt. Col. Abrahm DiMarco said knowledge of other cultures becomes increasingly important as the United States develops international connections. He said students will interact with people from around the globe in higher education, in the military and in the business world.

"In order to work with people in foreign countries in an effective manner, you have to have an understanding of different cultures and you have to understand that not everybody does things or things the way we do," DiMarco said. "We're trying, in some ways, to induce culture shock to give them that exposure and that training."

Cadets participate in CULP programs generally through one of four varieties: teaching English to students and in turn learning the native culture and language; humanitarian missions and service learning projects; military-to-military training with host cadet corps or partner nation military; or State Partnership Program missions with the National Guard.

"It's a great experience that's available to all of our ROTC cadets, and when people think about ROTC they often don't understand the opportunities that go along with that," DiMarco said.

The U.S. Army Cadet Command commissions officers to meet the Army’s leadership requirements at 275 host universities and more than 1,000 affiliated colleges across the nation. Commanded by Brig. Gen. Peggy C. Combs at Fort Knox, Ky., USACC also provides a citizenship program through more than 1,700 high school programs that motivate young people to be strong leaders and better citizens.

Clarkson University launches leaders into the global economy. One in five alumni already leads as a CEO, VP or equivalent senior executive of a company. Located just outside the Adirondack Park in Potsdam, N.Y., Clarkson is a nationally recognized research university for undergraduates with select graduate programs in signature areas of academic excellence directed toward the world’s pressing issues. Through 50 rigorous programs of study in engineering, business, arts, sciences and the health professions, the entire learning-living community spans boundaries across disciplines, nations and cultures to build powers of observation, challenge the status quo, and connect discovery and engineering innovation with enterprise.

Photo caption: Seven Clarkson University students traveled around the world this summer through Army ROTC's Cultural Understanding and Language Proficiency programs. Back row, left to right: Nicholas Zapotoski '17, Timothy Pierce '17, Jacob Cappiello '16, Sally Mooney '16, and Courtney Quinn '16. Front row, left to right: Adam Yates '16, Ashley Forshey '16, Thomas Plumb '16 and Nicholas Haluska '16.

Charles Tiayon's insight:

Clarkson cadets Nicholas Zapotoski '17 traveled to Greece, Jacob Cappiello '16 traveled to Cape Verde, Ashley Forshey '16 traveled to Thailand, Nicholas Haluska '16 traveled to Croatia, Timothy Pierce '17 traveled to Germany, Courtney Quinn '16 traveled to Bulgaria and Adam Yates '16 traveled to Hungary to discover how people live in other countries.

Sally Mooney '16, from SUNY Potsdam, and Thomas Plumb '16, from SUNY Canton, also participated in CULP programs in Romania and Poland, respectively.

Zapotoski participated in a military-to-military program where he learned how the military in Greece operates. While there are differences, he said, there are also many similarities.

"It's just neat to see how cadets from other countries train," he said. "I made a lot of cool friends. As cadets, we're not that different."

Forshey said she ate breakfast, lunch and dinner with locals every day as part of her program teaching English in Thailand.

"I hadn't traveled anywhere before," she said, "so it was nice to see how they viewed us as Americans, and I was welcomed into the culture like a family."

Approximately 1,400 Army ROTC cadets traveled to more than 40 countries as part of CULP this year. The program gives cadets an opportunity to explore the globe, spending up to four weeks immersed in foreign cultures, practicing leadership skills, learning more about how other cultures around the world view the U.S. and, in the process, learning more about themselves.

These missions create better military leaders who are educated in world cultures and values, and better equipped to function in a variety of complex circumstances. Cadets also gain valuable experience in today's geo-political and geo-economic world, where countries and economies are tied together. The training prepares them for civilian careers while serving in the reserve components, or in industry and business after their army service.

Professor of Military Science Lt. Col. Abrahm DiMarco said knowledge of other cultures becomes increasingly important as the United States develops international connections. He said students will interact with people from around the globe in higher education, in the military and in the business world.

"In order to work with people in foreign countries in an effective manner, you have to have an understanding of different cultures and you have to understand that not everybody does things or things the way we do," DiMarco said. "We're trying, in some ways, to induce culture shock to give them that exposure and that training."

Cadets participate in CULP programs generally through one of four varieties: teaching English to students and in turn learning the native culture and language; humanitarian missions and service learning projects; military-to-military training with host cadet corps or partner nation military; or State Partnership Program missions with the National Guard.

"It's a great experience that's available to all of our ROTC cadets, and when people think about ROTC they often don't understand the opportunities that go along with that," DiMarco said.

The U.S. Army Cadet Command commissions officers to meet the Army’s leadership requirements at 275 host universities and more than 1,000 affiliated colleges across the nation. Commanded by Brig. Gen. Peggy C. Combs at Fort Knox, Ky., USACC also provides a citizenship program through more than 1,700 high school programs that motivate young people to be strong leaders and better citizens.

Clarkson University launches leaders into the global economy. One in five alumni already leads as a CEO, VP or equivalent senior executive of a company. Located just outside the Adirondack Park in Potsdam, N.Y., Clarkson is a nationally recognized research university for undergraduates with select graduate programs in signature areas of academic excellence directed toward the world’s pressing issues. Through 50 rigorous programs of study in engineering, business, arts, sciences and the health professions, the entire learning-living community spans boundaries across disciplines, nations and cultures to build powers of observation, challenge the status quo, and connect discovery and engineering innovation with enterprise.

Photo caption: Seven Clarkson University students traveled around the world this summer through Army ROTC's Cultural Understanding and Language Proficiency programs. Back row, left to right: Nicholas Zapotoski '17, Timothy Pierce '17, Jacob Cappiello '16, Sally Mooney '16, and Courtney Quinn '16. Front row, left to right: Adam Yates '16, Ashley Forshey '16, Thomas Plumb '16 and Nicholas Haluska '16.

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Phonics 'helping to boost reading skills' - Teaching Personnel

Phonics 'helping to boost reading skills' - Teaching Personnel | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it
Government figures reveal pupils are benefiting from the phonics teaching method.
Charles Tiayon's insight:

Pupils' reading skills have significantly improved since the introduction of the phonics reading check, the government has announced.

Some 100,000 more children are now on track to become excellent readers since the internationally proven method of teaching was brought in, which boosts reading by giving children the building blocks they need to understand words.

The official figures show that the proportion of six-year-olds achieving the expected standard has risen by 16 percentage points since 2012 to 74 per cent (474,000 pupils). Based on the 2014 cohort, this is equivalent to 102,000 more children doing well.

In addition, the gap between pupils eligible for free school meals and their peers achieving the expected level has narrowed by one percentage point since 2012, while for year two phonics the gap closed by two percentage points.

Some £20 million has been made available by the government to enable schools to purchase and develop resources for teaching phonics.

Extra reading help is available for those who do not reach the threshold in the light-touch check, so that they catch up early in their school career.

There has also been a rise in the number of pupils reaching the expected phonics standard at the age of seven, demonstrating that those having to retake the check are benefiting from increased support from those in teaching jobs.

Extra funding and advice has been made available for teaching phonics, while more emphasis is now placed on the theory during teacher training.

School reform minister Nick Gibb said disadvantaged pupils were previously allowed to fall behind in reading, adding that the government's drive to tackle illiteracy has helped to ameliorate the problem.

"[These] figures provide irrefutable evidence that our plan for education is working for young people across Britain with 100,000 more six-year-olds now on track to become proficient readers as a result of our relentless emphasis on phonics. Had we not done so, those pupils would still be struggling today," he stated.

Posted by Charlotte Michaels

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