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Metaglossia: The Translation World
News about translation, interpreting, intercultural communication, terminology and lexicography - as it happens
Curated by Charles Tiayon
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UN Careers - jobs in this network (Translators, Revisers, Editors, etc.)

UN Careers -  jobs in this network (Translators, Revisers, Editors, etc.) | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it

Vacancies in this network: Translators, Revisers, Editors, etc.

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Call emergency services in seven languages

Call emergency services in seven languages | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it
The first day activities at Hyatt Plaza start with Shaun the Sheep at 4pm.



 

DOHA: People will be able to call emergency number 999 round-the-clock during Eid Al Adha holidays in different languages, including Chinese, Hindi, Tagalog,.
Charles Tiayon's insight:

DOHA: People will be able to call emergency number 999 round-the-clock during Eid Al Adha holidays in different languages, including Chinese, Hindi, Tagalog, Persian and French, apart from Arabic and English.

Qatar News Agency (QNA) reported yesterday quoting the official in-charge of the central operation room (999) that they respond to an emergency call within 10 seconds.

Lieutenant-Colonel Hassan Mohamed Al Kuwari said that those who are hearing impaired can also call the emergency number but only in Arabic and English.

Meanwhile, banks will have five days of Eid Al Adha holidays beginning from October 5 until October 11, but they will in effect be closed for 10 days considering their weekly days off on Fridays and Saturdays.

Eid holidays in the government sector, including ministries and state agencies, will also be for five days until October 11. But the government sector will, in effect, also be closed for 10 days.

Civil Defence officials said they will be increasing the number of  personnel in the Sealine area during Eid holidays.

The traffic department said they will be deploying patrol teams on all busy roads during the holidays and send text messages  to people regarding road safety and jams.

At the airport immigration, the exit permit counter will work 24 hours during Eid holidays, Colonel Mohamed Rashid Al Marzui told QNA. The director of Abu Samra check-post said five lanes will be for customs clearance while nine will be for travellers.

Out of these nine, five will be reserved for families crossing the border or entering Qatar. Brigadier Sheikh Nasser bin Abdullah Al Thani said clearance will take just a few minutes.

The Peninsula

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Langues nationales: le Grand Conseil neuchâtelois s'est montré soudé

Langues nationales: le Grand Conseil neuchâtelois s'est montré soudé | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it
Le Grand Conseil neuchâtelois a rejoint mardi les parlements vaudois et fribourgeois sur la question de l'enseignement des langues nationales en Suisse.
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Le Grand Conseil neuchâtelois a rejoint mardi les parlements vaudois et fribourgeois sur la question de l'enseignement des langues nationales en Suisse.

Le Grand Conseil neuchâtelois s'est montré soudé mardi sur le front de l'enseignement des langues nationales en Suisse. Rejoignant le mouvement des parlements fribourgeois et vaudois, il a adopté à la quasi-unanimité une résolution urgente à ce sujet.

La majorité qualifiée des deux tiers était requise, soit 73 voix sur les 110 députés présents. Le texte élaboré par le groupe libéral-radical en a récolté 108, avec deux abstentions mais sans opposition.

Le texte invite le Conseil fédéral à engager plus de moyens dans la promotion de la compréhension mutuelle entre cultures nationales, et à veiller au bon apprentissage d'une deuxième langue nationale à l'école primaire. Il demande aussi à la Conférence des directeurs cantonaux de l'instruction publique (CDIP) de veiller à cet enseignement et de combler les lacunes existantes.

Le Conseil d'Etat a soutenu la résolution. Les débats prévus à la CDIP fin octobre promettent d'être nourris entre Romands et Alémaniques, a dit la conseillère d'Etat Monika Maire-Hefti. Toutefois, "nous sommes suffisamment subtils et malins pour ne pas aller à l'affrontement - puisque nous sommes minoritaires - mais pour défendre notre langue" efficacement, a-t-elle commenté.

Les parlements fribourgeois et vaudois ont aussi adopté ce mois-ci des résolutions similaires à celle de Neuchâtel. Ces réactions font suite aux projets de renoncer à l'enseignement du français à l'école primaire dans plusieurs cantons alémaniques.

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Mohanlal to dub in Kannada for Mythri - The Times of India

Mollywood superstar Mohanlal, who plays a DRDO engineer in Kannada film Mythri, will dub in his own voice for the film.

Mythri director Giri Raj says, "Mohanlal is a dedicated actor. When he was shooting for the film, he had written down the Kannada lines in Malayalam and used to practice the dialogues with the assistant directors. He also used to talk to the light boys in Kannada because he knew they would either laugh or wink if his pronunciation or lines are incorrect."

Mythri, which is an issue-based film, highlights child rights issues and other social problems. It will be released in Malayalam, Tamil and Kannada.

The actor has earlier worked for Kannada film Love, helmed by S V Rajendra Singh Babu for which he had dubbed in the language for the first time. "It is Mohanlal who insisted that he will dub. It is indeed a privilege to work with him," added Giri Raj.

The director was in Kochi 10 days ago for the dubbing, but had to return as Mohanlal had sore throat and was unwell. The director will come to Kochi again for the same. Currently, Mohanlal is shooting for Joshiy's Lailaa O Lailaa opposite Amala Paul in Kochi.

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Mollywood superstar Mohanlal, who plays a DRDO engineer in Kannada film Mythri, will dub in his own voice for the film.

Mythri director Giri Raj says, "Mohanlal is a dedicated actor. When he was shooting for the film, he had written down the Kannada lines in Malayalam and used to practice the dialogues with the assistant directors. He also used to talk to the light boys in Kannada because he knew they would either laugh or wink if his pronunciation or lines are incorrect."

Mythri, which is an issue-based film, highlights child rights issues and other social problems. It will be released in Malayalam, Tamil and Kannada.

The actor has earlier worked for Kannada film Love, helmed by S V Rajendra Singh Babu for which he had dubbed in the language for the first time. "It is Mohanlal who insisted that he will dub. It is indeed a privilege to work with him," added Giri Raj.

The director was in Kochi 10 days ago for the dubbing, but had to return as Mohanlal had sore throat and was unwell. The director will come to Kochi again for the same. Currently, Mohanlal is shooting for Joshiy's Lailaa O Lailaa opposite Amala Paul in Kochi.

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Writing almost as much fun as reading

Writing almost as much fun as reading | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it
For about 4½ years, I’ve been writing twice a month about the books I love and the joy I derive from reading them.
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The startup that auto-dubs movies - Start-up of the Week

The startup that auto-dubs movies  - Start-up of the Week | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it
Most viewers can't stand subtitles but dubbing is an expensive luxury and takes ages. This startup says it can be done in minutes, at low cost.
Charles Tiayon's insight:

Some people watch foreign movies with subtitles. That's the norm in Israel, for instance. Other countries, such as India, Russia and China, prefer their screen entertainment dubbed.

Dubbing is labor-intensive and costs a lot. The Israeli startup VideoDubber is working on automating the process, starting however from the subtitled product, not from scratch. There are limits.

The process starts with having a film (say, in English) and a file with subtitles in the target language (say, Hindi). The customer uploads the film and subtitles file to the Videodubber server.

The company's software now matches the two, and puts out the film automatically dubbed into the target language, at a fraction of the cost of manual dubbing.

"Non-automatic dubbing can cost $1,000 an hour or more. Our prices range from $5 to $10 per minute, so the cost is a function of the movie but in any case our cost is a small fraction, especially if you consider that we enable a range of voices. Japanese dubbing for instance run very expensive - $24 per minute, but on our platform, it costs the same as English," says Rossano.

At this point its software can automatically dub subtitled movies into 35 languages and dialects, claims Boaz Rossano, VideoDubber's CEO. The startup uses synthetic voices but it has a wide range to tap, with more than 120 in its "bank".

It doesn't sound like Google Translate," claims Rossano – it sounds natural and human, with one codicil. For the time being the company is confining itself to non-dramatic productions that require neutral tones, such as documentaries, talk shows, and lifestyle pieces for instance on travel. Not telenovellas, for instance. That could come later, though.

Its software is clever at getting intonation right based on sentence structures, explains Rossano, and the company is working on developing its software for the next stage – intonation based on the original actors on the movie. "Say the actor is angry or sad – we can get that right in the dubbed version," he says (this is part of where the company's patent lies).

The company is also working on distinguishing between male and female roles (on the meantime, the genders are manually tagged in the text file). "We have developed algorithms and are working on the code," Rossano says.

Founded "in a garage" in 2011 and with one patent with 24 claims already preapproved by the PCT in Geneva, the company is gearing up for product launch and foresees selling its service to broadcast companies around the world.

Recently VideoDubber entered into an agreement with RR Media (formerly RRSat), which will distribute the auto-dubbing product to broadcast bodies around the world. RR Media says it foresees giants such as Sky and the BBC using the Israeli startup's auto-dubbing technology to dub their content within minutes rather than months.

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Psychology major discovers catharsis and confidence through creative expression

Psychology major discovers catharsis and confidence through creative expression | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it

One Keene State College student decided to face her darkest thoughts and then publish them. 

“This summer I was a sad lady,” KSC senior Liz Bolduc said, “I knew I had to do something.”

That August, Bolduc said she sat down and began to dispel her negative thoughts on paper. Bolduc’s final product, “LIZ: the zine,” is a 16-page miniature magazine that displays Bolduc’s personal thoughts and illustrations as well as contributions from close friends.

She titled her first edition “New Beginnings.” The issue skipped across her bout with emotional pressure. A zine is a small, non-commercial or homemade magazine.

Zines typically run under 20 pages and focus their content on a theme or personal interest of the creator.

Matt Allen / Equinox Staff

Bolduc said she first thought of producing a zine of her own after seeing another girl’s take it on.

“Last year a girl—she has a band—brought a zine to the show she played at my house,” Bolduc said.

“I felt like I wanted to do something like that. I’ve always been interested in the outlet of zines,” Bolduc said.

She said she hoped to make a zine that her friend group and peers could relate to. Her friends contributed drawings, personal poetry and self-made graphics.

Contributor and KSC alumnus Tim Gagnon said he helped Bolduc take the first step.

“She was thinking about it and I told her, ‘No, you have to do it,’” Gagnon said.

He offered a two-leaf long faux letter, or as Gagnon described it “rambling,” at the end of the zine describing muddled childhood memories and the emotional angst that accompanied it.

“I think it’s awesome that she assembled all of these friends with very different styles,” Gagnon said.

Justyna Dabrowski, UHart student, contributed a personal graphic to “LIZ: the zine.”

The collage includes images of meaningful things, according to Dabrowski.

“Liz is one of my best friends so I wanted to help her zine,” Dabrowski said, “There was a lot of thought and process that went into it.”

Bolduc decided to distribute her first edition free through social media. She said she mostly promoted the issue through personal Instagram and Facebook accounts and mailed copies to out-of-state friends reaching as far as Washington and Canada.

“I’m still in the process of figuring out how I want to do this for the future,” Bolduc said.

“Printing thankfully is free here [at Keene State College] so I abuse the hell out of that,” Bolduc said.

She is unsure how printing costs will affect the continuation of her zine once unlimited printing is inaccessible.

Gagnon said he is “really proud of [Bolduc]” and the final product. Dabrowski also expressed pride for “LIZ: the zine.”

“I think she portrayed her thoughts precisely the way she wanted to,” Dabrowski said. Bolduc said that the zine served more than one purpose to her.

It began as a personal art project to last over the course of her senior year, but it also presented a way of pushing depressive thoughts out of her head.

“I thought this could be something beneficial for my brain,” Bolduc said, “I wanted to turn it into a positive experience.” She said it also assured her that she wasn’t the sole person affected by negative thoughts.

“That’s what I really wanted to show people. Everyone has to have these thoughts at least once in their life and how you deal with it is incredibly important,” Bolduc said. Bolduc plans to attend this year’s Boston Zinefest the weekend of Oct. 11 to display “New Beginnings.”

The second issue, entitled “Feelings and Other Sappy Bulls***,” is promised to arrive in November and circles around the theme of social relationships.

Bolduc said her goal is to change the theme with every new edition, creeping away from personal entanglement and towards more common topics.  An electronic copy of “LIZ: the zine” can be found on the website Tumblr at Lizthezine.tumblr.com.

“I was tired of succumbing to the negative thoughts,” Bolduc said.

 

Allie Baker can be contacted at abaker@keene-equinox.com

Charles Tiayon's insight:

One Keene State College student decided to face her darkest thoughts and then publish them. 

“This summer I was a sad lady,” KSC senior Liz Bolduc said, “I knew I had to do something.”

That August, Bolduc said she sat down and began to dispel her negative thoughts on paper. Bolduc’s final product, “LIZ: the zine,” is a 16-page miniature magazine that displays Bolduc’s personal thoughts and illustrations as well as contributions from close friends.

She titled her first edition “New Beginnings.” The issue skipped across her bout with emotional pressure. A zine is a small, non-commercial or homemade magazine.

Zines typically run under 20 pages and focus their content on a theme or personal interest of the creator.

Matt Allen / Equinox Staff

Bolduc said she first thought of producing a zine of her own after seeing another girl’s take it on.

“Last year a girl—she has a band—brought a zine to the show she played at my house,” Bolduc said.

“I felt like I wanted to do something like that. I’ve always been interested in the outlet of zines,” Bolduc said.

She said she hoped to make a zine that her friend group and peers could relate to. Her friends contributed drawings, personal poetry and self-made graphics.

Contributor and KSC alumnus Tim Gagnon said he helped Bolduc take the first step.

“She was thinking about it and I told her, ‘No, you have to do it,’” Gagnon said.

He offered a two-leaf long faux letter, or as Gagnon described it “rambling,” at the end of the zine describing muddled childhood memories and the emotional angst that accompanied it.

“I think it’s awesome that she assembled all of these friends with very different styles,” Gagnon said.

Justyna Dabrowski, UHart student, contributed a personal graphic to “LIZ: the zine.”

The collage includes images of meaningful things, according to Dabrowski.

“Liz is one of my best friends so I wanted to help her zine,” Dabrowski said, “There was a lot of thought and process that went into it.”

Bolduc decided to distribute her first edition free through social media. She said she mostly promoted the issue through personal Instagram and Facebook accounts and mailed copies to out-of-state friends reaching as far as Washington and Canada.

“I’m still in the process of figuring out how I want to do this for the future,” Bolduc said.

“Printing thankfully is free here [at Keene State College] so I abuse the hell out of that,” Bolduc said.

She is unsure how printing costs will affect the continuation of her zine once unlimited printing is inaccessible.

Gagnon said he is “really proud of [Bolduc]” and the final product. Dabrowski also expressed pride for “LIZ: the zine.”

“I think she portrayed her thoughts precisely the way she wanted to,” Dabrowski said. Bolduc said that the zine served more than one purpose to her.

It began as a personal art project to last over the course of her senior year, but it also presented a way of pushing depressive thoughts out of her head.

“I thought this could be something beneficial for my brain,” Bolduc said, “I wanted to turn it into a positive experience.” She said it also assured her that she wasn’t the sole person affected by negative thoughts.

“That’s what I really wanted to show people. Everyone has to have these thoughts at least once in their life and how you deal with it is incredibly important,” Bolduc said. Bolduc plans to attend this year’s Boston Zinefest the weekend of Oct. 11 to display “New Beginnings.”

The second issue, entitled “Feelings and Other Sappy Bulls***,” is promised to arrive in November and circles around the theme of social relationships.

Bolduc said her goal is to change the theme with every new edition, creeping away from personal entanglement and towards more common topics.  An electronic copy of “LIZ: the zine” can be found on the website Tumblr at Lizthezine.tumblr.com.

“I was tired of succumbing to the negative thoughts,” Bolduc said.

 

Allie Baker can be contacted at abaker@keene-equinox.com

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El último diccionario de español en papel se fabrica en Cataluña

El último diccionario de español en papel se fabrica en Cataluña | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it
Una imprenta catalana se encarga de la nueva edición del Diccionario de la RAE, que verá la luz el 16 de octubre
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New Modern Persian Bible Launched in UK and Turkey

New Modern Persian Bible Launched in UK and Turkey | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it
A major new translation of the whole Bible into modern Persian was launched in London and Istanbul last week (September 22- 24). The project was especially significant as some of its’ earliest contributors were martyred for their faith.
Charles Tiayon's insight:

A major new translation of the whole Bible into modern Persian was launched in London and Istanbul last week (September 22- 24). The project was especially significant as some of its' earliest contributors were martyred for their faith.

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Its publishers are Elam Ministries and Wycliffe Bible Translators. Elam was founded in 1990 by senior Iranian church leaders with a vision to serve the growing church in the Iran.

Elam says this event was made all the more remarkable because of the recent transformation of the church in Iran. At the time of the Islamic revolution in 1979, there were no more than 500 Christians from a Muslim background in the country. Now Iran is thought to have one of the fastest growing churches in the world.

The Coordinator and Chief Editor of the new Bible translation Rev. Dr Mehrdad Fatehi said: 'This project is like raising a child. It has been 18 years of hard work but worth it for such an exciting day.'

'Though the event was joyful, we are sad it had to take place outside Iran,' said Sam Yeghnazar, founder and director of Elam. 'This event proves the worldwide church will always bring the Scriptures to people, however "closed" a country is meant to be.'

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Bonne fête à tous les traducteurs littéraires !

Bonne fête à tous les traducteurs littéraires ! | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it
Aujourd'hui, pour la Saint Jérôme, fête des traducteurs et journée mondiale de la traduction, le CEATL propose d'envoyer cette carte postale
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Medical transcriptionist (Bilingual Health Records Transcriptionist) - Saint John, NB - Job Posting - Job Bank

Languages

Bilingual

Education

Completion of high school; Completion of college/CEGEP/vocational or technical training

Credentials (certificates, licences, memberships, courses, etc.)

Certified Medical Transcriptionist (CMT)

Experience

No experience

Typing (Words Per Minute)

41 - 60 wpm

Shorthand (Words Per Minute)

Not required

Technical Terminology

Medical

Medical Transcriptionist Specific Skills

Transcribe medical notes, records, statistics and related information

Security and Safety

Criminal record check

Work Conditions and Physical Capabilities

Fast-paced environment; Attention to detail

Other Information

While we appreciate the interest of all applicants, only those selected for interview will be contacted.

Charles Tiayon's insight:
Languages

Bilingual

Education

Completion of high school; Completion of college/CEGEP/vocational or technical training

Credentials (certificates, licences, memberships, courses, etc.)

Certified Medical Transcriptionist (CMT)

Experience

No experience

Typing (Words Per Minute)

41 - 60 wpm

Shorthand (Words Per Minute)

Not required

Technical Terminology

Medical

Medical Transcriptionist Specific Skills

Transcribe medical notes, records, statistics and related information

Security and Safety

Criminal record check

Work Conditions and Physical Capabilities

Fast-paced environment; Attention to detail

Other Information

While we appreciate the interest of all applicants, only those selected for interview will be contacted.

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Paris Review – Translation and Virginity, Damion Searls

Paris Review – Translation and Virginity, Damion Searls | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it
Raise a glass, say a prayer in a language other than Hebrew and Greek, or wear a donkey’s ear in your buttonhole: it’s International Translation Day, aka the Feast of Saint Jerome, the patron saint of librarians and libraries, schoolchildren, students, Bible scholars, and translators. Jerome translated the Bible into Latin and died in Bethlehem on this day in 419 or 420 A.D.; he single-handedly (so to speak) created the Vulgate, a translation read as the sacred original for some thousand years.

He famously said that you should translate the meaning of the original text, not the words themselves, but translators must have always known this intuitively—even Jerome cites half a dozen predecessors. Because he was one of the early ones, though, he gets the credit, along with Horace, who said the same thing. Jerome made a partial exception for the Bible, whose very word order was a sacred mystery; his balance between the competing demands is what made his translation so good.

He was born in 331 or 347 in the town of Stridon, possibly in what’s now northwest Croatia; its only mention in history is Jerome’s comment that he was born “in the town of Stridon, now destroyed by the Goths.” He was also by far the crabbiest of the Church Fathers, as befits a man who earned sainthood by scholarship and rigorous asceticism, not working with people. As important a theological polemicist as he was a translator, he fired off letter after letter, volume after volume, from his library in Palestine, written in elegant classical Latin studded with choice insults. To someone who questioned his translations, he countered: “What men like you call fidelity in transcription, the learnèd term pestilent minuteness”; a heretic, Pelagius, was “a very stupid dolt weighed down with Scottish porridge.”
Yet strangely, Jerome is also one of the most admired saints, even most loved. Maybe it’s not so strange, given the overlap between antisocial scholars and reputation-makers. Three early fourteenth-century forgeries purporting to be by Jerome’s disciples and colleagues, describing his last hours, death, and numerous miracles, were runaway hits in the original Latin and, appropriately, in Tuscan, Sicilian, German, Dutch, French, Spanish, Catalan, Danish, and English translation. (Some four hundred manuscripts and thirty-six printed editions are known before 1501.) By the early Renaissance, Jerome was the object of widespread popular devotion, speeches every September 30 giving thanks for miracles, and the adoration of his brother and sister scholars.

In art, St. Jerome became the most popular theme in Renaissance Christian painting after the Annunciation. He was usually shown with a book or two, his red cardinal’s hat, and a lion, because when a lion limped into his monastery courtyard and the other monks fled, Jerome welcomed the beast and called back his brothers to wash and treat its injured paw. They took out the thorns and tamed the lion. (This is an old story, one of Aesop’s fables and probably mis-assigned to Jerome—in Latin: Hieronymus—from the life of the similar-sounding St. Gerasimus.)


Caravaggio, Saint Jerome Writing, 1605–1606.
Italian artists invented another, even more popular motif around 1400: Jerome penitent in the wilderness, beating his ascetic breast with a stone. This allowed Christian painters to glorify the male near-nude, as they often did with St. Sebastian; and the wilderness setting, along with Jerome’s passing mention of “having nothing but scorpions and wild animals for company” in the desert, let painters indulge in naturalistic portrayals of animals: not just lion, but badger, cheetah, otter, squirrel, goldfinch, heron (three kinds), partridge, snake, snail … One zoologist/art historian has identified sixty-five kinds of animal in Renaissance paintings of Jerome, not counting the imaginary dragon, harpy, and unicorn, and the humdrum, “plot point” animals: camel, donkey, sheep.

Finally, Jerome was the Christian Father who did the most to make virginity and the Virgin Birth a central part of Christian doctrine. In his eyes, sexuality was irredeemable: while Augustine said that marriage was good and continence better, Jerome said marriage was bad and fornication worse. That Scottish porridge Pelagius’s problem was denying that sex was “defilement” and bodily urges a sin.

The combination could mean nothing—maybe Jerome was a guy with two unrelated interests—but something tells me translation and the Virgin Birth do go together. Translations are creative acts that don’t come from the self, at least not in the usual sense: In the translator’s creativity, the generative seed isn’t planted in quite the same way. There’s a third party involved, a God or Gabriel, an author who’s both the originator and totally absent from the actual formation of the translated work, or at least invisible in it. The translator is in a sense barren, ungenerative, but surely Mary is in some sense the mother of God, not just the vessel or bearer, and the translator is not just an empty conduit through which the original passes.

I say “surely,” but that glosses over centuries of Catholic controversy. Aside from the early debates over whether Mary was a virgin at conception, and whether she remained a virgin after Jesus’s birth (scriptural mention of Jesus’s “brothers” explained away as a mistranslation of “cousins”), there were even more extreme debates about whether Mary’s virginity remained intact during Christ's birth. In one radical second-century Syrian text, the eventually noncanonical Protoevangelium of James, a skeptical friend of Mary’s midwife puts her hand up Mary afterward to check and gets it fried in a blaze of holy fire. (She repents and her hand is unwithered.)

Even most early Christian ascetics shrank back from that position, but not Jerome. And ever since the second century, this last and most mystical virginity has been a metaphor for holy writing: “The Lord’s scriptures bring forth the truth and yet remain virgins, hiding within them the mysteries of the truth. ‘She has brought forth and has not brought forth,’ says the Scripture.” Writing that is and isn’t what it is: as good a definition for translation as any.

Damion Searls is a translator from German, French, Norwegian, and Dutch.
Charles Tiayon's insight:

Raise a glass, say a prayer in a language other than Hebrew and Greek, or wear a donkey’s ear in your buttonhole: it’s International Translation Day, aka the Feast of Saint Jerome, the patron saint of librarians and libraries, schoolchildren, students, Bible scholars, and translators. Jerome translated the Bible into Latin and died in Bethlehem on this day in 419 or 420 A.D.; he single-handedly (so to speak) created the Vulgate, a translation read as the sacred original for some thousand years.

He famously said that you should translate the meaning of the original text, not the words themselves, but translators must have always known this intuitively—even Jerome cites half a dozen predecessors. Because he was one of the early ones, though, he gets the credit, along with Horace, who said the same thing. Jerome made a partial exception for the Bible, whose very word order was a sacred mystery; his balance between the competing demands is what made his translation so good.

He was born in 331 or 347 in the town of Stridon, possibly in what’s now northwest Croatia; its only mention in history is Jerome’s comment that he was born “in the town of Stridon, now destroyed by the Goths.” He was also by far the crabbiest of the Church Fathers, as befits a man who earned sainthood by scholarship and rigorous asceticism, not working with people. As important a theological polemicist as he was a translator, he fired off letter after letter, volume after volume, from his library in Palestine, written in elegant classical Latin studded with choice insults. To someone who questioned his translations, he countered: “What men like you call fidelity in transcription, the learnèd term pestilent minuteness”; a heretic, Pelagius, was “a very stupid dolt weighed down with Scottish porridge.”

Yet strangely, Jerome is also one of the most admired saints, even most loved. Maybe it’s not so strange, given the overlap between antisocial scholars and reputation-makers. Three early fourteenth-century forgeries purporting to be by Jerome’s disciples and colleagues, describing his last hours, death, and numerous miracles, were runaway hits in the original Latin and, appropriately, in Tuscan, Sicilian, German, Dutch, French, Spanish, Catalan, Danish, and English translation. (Some four hundred manuscripts and thirty-six printed editions are known before 1501.) By the early Renaissance, Jerome was the object of widespread popular devotion, speeches every September 30 giving thanks for miracles, and the adoration of his brother and sister scholars.

In art, St. Jerome became the most popular theme in Renaissance Christian painting after the Annunciation. He was usually shown with a book or two, his red cardinal’s hat, and a lion, because when a lion limped into his monastery courtyard and the other monks fled, Jerome welcomed the beast and called back his brothers to wash and treat its injured paw. They took out the thorns and tamed the lion. (This is an old story, one of Aesop’s fables and probably mis-assigned to Jerome—in Latin: Hieronymus—from the life of the similar-sounding St. Gerasimus.)

Caravaggio, Saint Jerome Writing, 1605–1606.

Italian artists invented another, even more popular motif around 1400: Jerome penitent in the wilderness, beating his ascetic breast with a stone. This allowed Christian painters to glorify the male near-nude, as they often did with St. Sebastian; and the wilderness setting, along with Jerome’s passing mention of “having nothing but scorpions and wild animals for company” in the desert, let painters indulge in naturalistic portrayals of animals: not just lion, but badger, cheetah, otter, squirrel, goldfinch, heron (three kinds), partridge, snake, snail … One zoologist/art historian has identified sixty-five kinds of animal in Renaissance paintings of Jerome, not counting the imaginary dragon, harpy, and unicorn, and the humdrum, “plot point” animals: camel, donkey, sheep.

Finally, Jerome was the Christian Father who did the most to make virginity and the Virgin Birth a central part of Christian doctrine. In his eyes, sexuality was irredeemable: while Augustine said that marriage was good and continence better, Jerome said marriage was bad and fornication worse. That Scottish porridge Pelagius’s problem was denying that sex was “defilement” and bodily urges a sin.

The combination could mean nothing—maybe Jerome was a guy with two unrelated interests—but something tells me translation and the Virgin Birth do go together. Translations are creative acts that don’t come from the self, at least not in the usual sense: In the translator’s creativity, the generative seed isn’t planted in quite the same way. There’s a third party involved, a God or Gabriel, an author who’s both the originator and totally absent from the actual formation of the translated work, or at least invisible in it. The translator is in a sense barren, ungenerative, but surely Mary is in some sense the mother of God, not just the vessel or bearer, and the translator is not just an empty conduit through which the original passes.

I say “surely,” but that glosses over centuries of Catholic controversy. Aside from the early debates over whether Mary was a virgin at conception, and whether she remained a virgin after Jesus’s birth (scriptural mention of Jesus’s “brothers” explained away as a mistranslation of “cousins”), there were even more extreme debates about whether Mary’s virginity remained intact during Christ's birth. In one radical second-century Syrian text, the eventually noncanonical Protoevangelium of Jamesa skeptical friend of Mary’s midwife puts her hand up Mary afterward to check and gets it fried in a blaze of holy fire. (She repents and her hand is unwithered.)

Even most early Christian ascetics shrank back from that position, but not Jerome. And ever since the second century, this last and most mystical virginity has been a metaphor for holy writing: “The Lord’s scriptures bring forth the truth and yet remain virgins, hiding within them the mysteries of the truth. ‘She has brought forth and has not brought forth,’ says the Scripture.” Writing that is and isn’t what it is: as good a definition for translation as any.

Damion Searls is a translator from German, French, Norwegian, and Dutch.


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'The Book of Three' Marks 50 Years

'The Book of Three' Marks 50 Years | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it
Two of author Lloyd Alexander's biggest fans are key contributors to the new 50th-anniversary editions of Chronicles of Prydain series-starter 'The Book of Three,' which was originally published in 1964.
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Voice Recognition Software: The Next Big Security Threat?

Voice Recognition Software: The Next Big Security Threat? | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it
A recent Forbes article warns that voice recognition software could be the next big security threat. Technology savvy smart phone users are likely familiar with the likes of Apple’s speech recognizing virtual assistant, Siri or Google’s answer to Siri, Google Now. Most, however, probably will not take too kindly to AVG’s Yuval Ben-Itzhak’s dire warning about the security risk posed by voice recognition software.

According to Ben-Itzhak, the risk is so great that users are urged to cease using speech recognition programs immediately. He was quoted in an interview with Forbes as saying,

Microphones should be disabled immediately and our current recommendation is that the user switch off features [involving voice commands].
Some people may be complacent about being able to ask your phone to send a text message or having a list of gluten-free recipes pop up at the sound of your voice. Others might be excited and wish for the days when making a call will mean talking to someone face-to-face on your smart phone screen. Some are likely to be disheartened about being told that voice recognition software is the next big security threat. Most people might find the actual history of voice recognition software pretty interesting.

It started as early as the 1950s when the “Audrey” System, was designed by Bell laboratories. Audrey could understand a single voice reciting digits but in 1962, IBM introduced a machine called the “Shoebox” which could understand 16 English words. In the 1970’s, the U.S. Department of Defense got involved and speech recognition developments began to move rapidly. It was then that “Harpy,” a system that could recognize over 1000 words, was developed.The 1980’s saw speech recognition efforts focused more on prediction.

Tech Hive writer, Melanie Pinola, writes about…”A new statistical method known as the hidden Markov model (HMM). Rather than simply using templates for words and looking for sound patterns, HMM considered the probability of unknown sounds being words.”  Dragon speaks was introduced in the 1990’s but with a $9000 price tag, making it somewhat unobtainable for many. In fact, advances in speech recognition technology stalled for a period until Google introduced a voice search application for the iPhone in 2008.

The next big thing was 2010’s introduction of the voice search feature for Android by Google, of course, and then came Siri. Designed to incorporate what she knows about you, Siri is at once playful as well as entertaining. In answer, Google launched Google Now and Microsoft has jumped into the ring with Cortana which promises the ability to integrate your home based technology, temperature controls and motion sensors, etc., with the voice controls on your smart phone.

With all the cool advances in speech recognition some will likely be devastated by Ben-Itzhak’s warning. He and his team, however, performed experiments to test just how far a person of nefarious intent could go by using his or her voice to activate someone else’s speech recognition software. It turns out that voice recognition software does not necessarily recognize just one voice.

According to Ben-Itzhak, “…There is something very basic here that everyone seems to have forgotten: authentication. If you have a smart TV at home, for instance, it will respond to a synthesized voice as well as yours.” He warns that voice recognition software will soon be embedded in everything from smart watches to refrigerators.

He likens leaving it as it is today to walking away from your computer, “Without a password and just allowing anyone to walk by, click and take an action.” Notwithstanding all the excitement generated by the newest technological advances, people everywhere should beware; voice recognition software could be the next big security threat.
Charles Tiayon's insight:

A recent Forbes article warns that voice recognition software could be the next big security threat. Technology savvy smart phone users are likely familiar with the likes of Apple’s speech recognizing virtual assistant, Siri or Google’s answer to Siri, Google Now. Most, however, probably will not take too kindly to AVG’s Yuval Ben-Itzhak’s dire warning about the security risk posed by voice recognition software.

According to Ben-Itzhak, the risk is so great that users are urged to cease using speech recognition programs immediately. He was quoted in an interview withForbes as saying,

Microphones should be disabled immediately and our current recommendation is that the user switch off features [involving voice commands].

Some people may be complacent about being able to ask your phone to send a text message or having a list of gluten-free recipes pop up at the sound of your voice. Others might be excited and wish for the days when making a call will mean talking to someone face-to-face on your smart phone screen. Some are likely to be disheartened about being told that voice recognition software is the next big security threat. Most people might find the actual history of voice recognition software pretty interesting.

It started as early as the 1950s when the “Audrey” System, was designed by Bell laboratories. Audrey could understand a single voice reciting digits but in 1962, IBM introduced a machine called the “Shoebox” which could understand 16 English words. In the 1970’s, the U.S. Department of Defense got involved and speech recognition developments began to move rapidly. It was then that “Harpy,” a system that could recognize over 1000 words, was developed.The 1980’s saw speech recognition efforts focused more on prediction.

Tech Hive writer, Melanie Pinola, writes about…”A new statistical method known as the hidden Markov model (HMM). Rather than simply using templates for words and looking for sound patterns, HMM considered the probability of unknown sounds being words.”  Dragon speaks was introduced in the 1990’s but with a $9000 price tag, making it somewhat unobtainable for many. In fact, advances in speech recognition technology stalled for a period until Google introduced a voice search application for the iPhone in 2008.

The next big thing was 2010’s introduction of the voice search feature for Android by Google, of course, and then came Siri. Designed to incorporate what she knows about you, Siri is at once playful as well as entertaining. In answer, Google launched Google Now and Microsoft has jumped into the ring with Cortana which promises the ability to integrate your home based technology, temperature controls and motion sensors, etc., with the voice controls on your smart phone.

With all the cool advances in speech recognition some will likely be devastated by Ben-Itzhak’s warning. He and his team, however, performed experiments to test just how far a person of nefarious intent could go by using his or her voice to activate someone else’s speech recognition software. It turns out that voice recognition software does not necessarily recognize just one voice.

According to Ben-Itzhak, “…There is something very basic here that everyone seems to have forgotten: authentication. If you have a smart TV at home, for instance, it will respond to a synthesized voice as well as yours.” He warns that voice recognition software will soon be embedded in everything from smart watches to refrigerators.

He likens leaving it as it is today to walking away from your computer, “Without a password and just allowing anyone to walk by, click and take an action.” Notwithstanding all the excitement generated by the newest technological advances, people everywhere should beware; voice recognition software could be the next big security threat.

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Neuchâtel tient aux deux langues nationales à l'école primaire - RTN votre radio régionale

Neuchâtel tient aux deux langues nationales à l'école primaire - RTN votre radio régionale | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it
Il faut maintenir l'enseignement de deux langues nationales à l'école primaire, les autorités neuchâteloises en sont convaincues. Le Grand Conseil a adopté mardi par 108 voix et deux abstentions une résolution qui demande au Conseil d'Etat de s'adresser au Conseil fédéral et à la Conférence des directeurs cantonaux de l'instruction publique (CDIP) afin qu'ils veillent au bon apprentissage d'une deuxième langue nationale à l'école primaire.
Charles Tiayon's insight:

Il faut maintenir l'enseignement de deux langues nationales à l'école primaire, les autorités neuchâteloises en sont convaincues. Le Grand Conseil a adopté mardi par 108 voix et deux abstentions une résolution qui demande au Conseil d'Etat de s'adresser au Conseil fédéral et à la Conférence des directeurs cantonaux de l'instruction publique (CDIP) afin qu'ils veillent au bon apprentissage d'une deuxième langue nationale à l'école primaire.

Cette résolution déposée par le groupe libéral-radical est une réaction à la volonté de plusieurs cantons suisses alémaniques de supprimer l'enseignement du français à l'école primaire. Les députés neuchâtelois ont souligné l'importance d'être cohérent au plan national et de pouvoir se comprendre au sein d'un même pays.

Les parlements vaudois et fribourgeois viennent également d'accepter de telles résolutions à une large majorité. Les cantons romands pourront donc parler d'une même voix lors de la prochaine réunion de la CDIP fin octobre.

Mardi, le Grand Conseil neuchâtelois a aussi accepté à une large majorité de modifier la Loi d'organisation judiciaire neuchâteloise pour alléger le travail des procureurs. Le statut de greffier-rédacteur sera remplacé par celui de procureur assistant. /mvr

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Overcoming the Fear by Writing

Overcoming the Fear by Writing | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it
of Halloween. The scary store displays, and the anticipation of dressing up like a witch to get candy from neighbors kept a smile on my face the whole month. Now, along with the scary items in the store in October has come the pinking of the stores for the benefit of breast cancer awareness. That pink, however, reminds me of my time as a breast cancer patient. Don’t get me wrong, I adore the level of commitment by so many companies to help fund much needed research. Plus, there are many stories
Charles Tiayon's insight:

The scary store displays, and the anticipation of dressing up like a witch to get candy from neighbors kept a smile on my face the whole month. Now, along with the scary items in the store in October has come the pinking of the stores for the benefit of breast cancer awareness. That pink, however, reminds me of my time as a breast cancer patient. Don’t get me wrong, I adore the level of commitment by so many companies to help fund much needed research. Plus, there are many stories of women who get a mammogram because of something they saw in the news during this time. But, each October since my diagnosis, I’m faced with reclaiming my former self.

This year I will be hosting a Horror Writing Workshop for the public with the help of The Creative Writing Club of UTPA. The workshop will take place in the Arts and Humanities Building at UTPA in room 244 on October 7 from 4:30-6:30 pm. For more information on the workshop, please contact me at marafaust5@gmail.com.

The reason for the Horror Writing Workshop is simple. Before my identification as a cancer patient and now cancer survivor, my descriptor was a former DNA analyst for the state crime laboratory and writer. As a result of my time in the crime laboratory, I developed a passion learn about people who commit horrific crimes. The need to know why these behaviors exist prompted my writing and reading.

When I faced my diagnosis, Stage I, HER-2 positive breast cancer, I faced the abyss left behind those criminals I read about. HER-2 positive breast cancer is particularly aggressive with a higher recurrence rate and a lower survival rate than the others. The difference between getting murdered in the dark by a man with a knife or this was that in this case, the horror grew in me. No shield or blade could hold it off. It festered, it lingered, it grew and I fed it.

I fed it literally and psychologically. I disappeared in my room under my bed covers. I watched the walls, the floor and lost the pleasure of watching thrillers because thrillers always had a time limit—now, so did I. I lost the ability to write my memoirs, because every time I picked up a pen I felt as if I were writing my own obituary.

I spoke to couple of fellow survivors, I spoke to my priests, I prayed and asked God to take me quickly because I’d read too many stories of people who lingered in pain then still passed away. I read Nancy Brinker’s story about her sister, Susan G. Komen, faced in her last days and I wanted to be spared if my fate was unavoidable. Of all the horrific tales I’d read before Komen’s biography, none ever kept me awake for weeks after reading it like this one.

By hosting this workshop we take the greatest parts of the month and meld into an act of defiance of the ills in the world. We have to remember that Horror takes many forms. In today’s culture we equate gore to horror, it is the goal of the workshop to delve into the darkest recesses of the mind to create a world where the writers unleash their demons, but at the same time control them based on their storytelling.

The writers who participate in this workshop will be invited to read their work in a reading planned by The Creative Writing Club on October 30 at The Cordoba Café located at 2000 South McColl in McAllen Texas starting at 7:30pm. The public is also welcomed to join this event to hear the authors read their work or join in if they wish.

Katherine Hoerth will be hosting another celebration of words, and the empowerment of women taking place this in October. Hoerth will host a reading to celebrate the release of her second poetry collection called Goddess Wears Cowboy Books. Hoerth will be hosting the event at Schneider’s Gasthaus and Beer Garden located at 5507 N. Ware Rd. in McAllen on October 11 starting at 7:00 pm.

Escamilla earned a BS in Biology, an MA in Literature at the University of Texas Pan American.  Recently, her creative nonfiction has been published in the Along the River III Anthology.


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Malijet Tribune : la francophonie se porterait plutôt bien Mali Bamako

Malijet Tribune : la francophonie se porterait plutôt bien Mali Bamako | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it

Le 19 mai 2014, l’émission d’Yvan Amar, la danse des mots, avait comme invité, Monsieur Hervé Bourges, qu’on ne présente pas. C’est une icône du paysage médiatique français, un amoureux invétéré et utilisateur raffiné de la langue française, mais aussi un avocat, engagé, éloquent, et infatigable de la francophonie.

A la danse des mots, il était venu parler de son livre « Pardon my french », qu’il vient de publier chez Karthala. Ce titre « Pardonnez mon français », est la transcription d’une expression largement utilisée par les américains quand ils veulent ironiser, ou se moquer des français. 

Au cours de l’émission, Monsieur Bourges n’a pas été seulement rassurant sur la situation actuelle de la langue française, mais aussi, grandement optimiste pour l’avenir de la francophonie, pour le rayonnement de laquelle il formule un certain nombre de propositions à mettre en œuvre. Pour ce qui est du français, il dit qu’il se porte très bien, en minimisant la menace des anglicismes qui, selon lui, ne dépasseraient pas les 700 mots, au moment où la langue de sa majesté en compterait dix-sept mille. 

Au même moment, il trouve inadmissible qu’on ne puisse pas trouver des mots français, qui expriment fidèlement ce que certains tiennent à formuler en un anglais pas toujours bon, rien que pour ‘’faire moderne’’. 

Il s’insurge contre le fait que certains conseils d’administration, sans raison valable, se déroulent à Paris, mais en anglais. Dans ce cadre, il pense qu’il est du devoir de l’Etat français d’intervenir, son rôle étant de protéger cette langue que la constitution de la République consacre comme la langue des français. Il se défend, toutefois, d’être contre la langue anglaise. Il faut, dit-il, apprendre toutes les langues, mais l’opinion dominante que l’anglais va supplanter toutes les langues n’est pas fondée. Le français est, par exemple, au même titre que l’anglais, la langue de secrétariat des nations unies. 

Au contraire, il pense que l’anglais sera dépassé, dans un avenir pas lointain,  par le mandarin, que l’espagnol reprend de la place surtout en Amérique, au moment où le français passerait de plus de 250 ou 300 millions de locuteurs actuellement, à un milliard de francophones à l’horizon 2050. L’essentiel de ce dernier nombre (9 sur 10) se situerait en Afrique, ‘’favorisé’’ par la croissance démographique galopante.  

Il ajoute que, contrairement à une idée répandue dans le passé, la langue française n’est plus considérée par les élites comme une langue de colonisation, mais plutôt un butin de guerre que les anciens colonisés devraient capitaliser.  

Selon lui, les spécialistes prévoient, dans un avenir proche, la disparition de plus de 3000 langues. Particulièrement celles qui véhiculent des civilisations et des cultures. A ceux qui prétendent que le français est une langue vieillissante ou morte, il répond, avec argumentation, qu’ils se trompent largement. 

Pour l’auteur, si l’Académie française a accompli des signes positifs louables par l’entrée de femmes à l’Académie, ainsi que d’écrivains  non français comme le haïtien Dany Laferrière, il reste encore des efforts conséquents à faire. Dans ce cadre, il propose la création d’une académie de la francophonie qui prendrait en compte les apports des francophones, et qui lui semblent de nature à enrichir la langue française. 

Il propose, entre autres, l’organisation de festivités annuelles et périodiques dans tous les Etats de la francophonie, et l’instauration d’un visa de la francophonie. 

Dans ce même ordre d’idées, M. Bourges considère que Monsieur Abdou Diouf, actuel Secrétaire Général de l’OIF (organisation internationale de la francophonie), a formulé de bonnes propositions dans ce sens. Comme M. Diouf, après trois mandats successifs, a décidé de ne pas se représenter, M. Bourges souhaite qu’il soit relayé à la tête de l’OIF par quelqu’un qui a la même maturité politique, et la vision ambitieuse pour la francophonie, que celles qui caractérisent le Secrétaire Général sortant. 

Mohamed Debellahi ABDELJELLIL (Mauritanie), Auteur du blog : Bouillon d’humeurs et d’opinions

SourceLe Flambeau

Charles Tiayon's insight:

Le 19 mai 2014, l’émission d’Yvan Amar, la danse des mots, avait comme invité, Monsieur Hervé Bourges, qu’on ne présente pas. C’est une icône du paysage médiatique français, un amoureux invétéré et utilisateur raffiné de la langue française, mais aussi un avocat, engagé, éloquent, et infatigable de la francophonie.

A la danse des mots, il était venu parler de son livre « Pardon my french », qu’il vient de publier chez Karthala. Ce titre « Pardonnez mon français », est la transcription d’une expression largement utilisée par les américains quand ils veulent ironiser, ou se moquer des français. 

Au cours de l’émission, Monsieur Bourges n’a pas été seulement rassurant sur la situation actuelle de la langue française, mais aussi, grandement optimiste pour l’avenir de la francophonie, pour le rayonnement de laquelle il formule un certain nombre de propositions à mettre en œuvre. Pour ce qui est du français, il dit qu’il se porte très bien, en minimisant la menace des anglicismes qui, selon lui, ne dépasseraient pas les 700 mots, au moment où la langue de sa majesté en compterait dix-sept mille. 

Au même moment, il trouve inadmissible qu’on ne puisse pas trouver des mots français, qui expriment fidèlement ce que certains tiennent à formuler en un anglais pas toujours bon, rien que pour ‘’faire moderne’’. 

Il s’insurge contre le fait que certains conseils d’administration, sans raison valable, se déroulent à Paris, mais en anglais. Dans ce cadre, il pense qu’il est du devoir de l’Etat français d’intervenir, son rôle étant de protéger cette langue que la constitution de la République consacre comme la langue des français. Il se défend, toutefois, d’être contre la langue anglaise. Il faut, dit-il, apprendre toutes les langues, mais l’opinion dominante que l’anglais va supplanter toutes les langues n’est pas fondée. Le français est, par exemple, au même titre que l’anglais, la langue de secrétariat des nations unies. 

Au contraire, il pense que l’anglais sera dépassé, dans un avenir pas lointain,  par le mandarin, que l’espagnol reprend de la place surtout en Amérique, au moment où le français passerait de plus de 250 ou 300 millions de locuteurs actuellement, à un milliard de francophones à l’horizon 2050. L’essentiel de ce dernier nombre (9 sur 10) se situerait en Afrique, ‘’favorisé’’ par la croissance démographique galopante.  

Il ajoute que, contrairement à une idée répandue dans le passé, la langue française n’est plus considérée par les élites comme une langue de colonisation, mais plutôt un butin de guerre que les anciens colonisés devraient capitaliser.  

Selon lui, les spécialistes prévoient, dans un avenir proche, la disparition de plus de 3000 langues. Particulièrement celles qui véhiculent des civilisations et des cultures. A ceux qui prétendent que le français est une langue vieillissante ou morte, il répond, avec argumentation, qu’ils se trompent largement. 

Pour l’auteur, si l’Académie française a accompli des signes positifs louables par l’entrée de femmes à l’Académie, ainsi que d’écrivains  non français comme le haïtien Dany Laferrière, il reste encore des efforts conséquents à faire. Dans ce cadre, il propose la création d’une académie de la francophonie qui prendrait en compte les apports des francophones, et qui lui semblent de nature à enrichir la langue française. 

Il propose, entre autres, l’organisation de festivités annuelles et périodiques dans tous les Etats de la francophonie, et l’instauration d’un visa de la francophonie. 

Dans ce même ordre d’idées, M. Bourges considère que Monsieur Abdou Diouf, actuel Secrétaire Général de l’OIF (organisation internationale de la francophonie), a formulé de bonnes propositions dans ce sens. Comme M. Diouf, après trois mandats successifs, a décidé de ne pas se représenter, M. Bourges souhaite qu’il soit relayé à la tête de l’OIF par quelqu’un qui a la même maturité politique, et la vision ambitieuse pour la francophonie, que celles qui caractérisent le Secrétaire Général sortant. 

Mohamed Debellahi ABDELJELLIL (Mauritanie), Auteur du blog : Bouillon d’humeurs et d’opinions

SourceLe Flambeau

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Don't follow these rules?

Don't follow these rules? | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it
When staff members here turn their attention to the topics of grammar, word usage and newspaper style, it’s usually about some rule or guideline that we need to follow — or do a better job of following.
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gulftoday.ae | Award longlists for criticism, translation categories announced

gulftoday.ae | Award longlists for criticism, translation categories announced | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it

ABU DHABI: The Sheikh Zayed Book Award has announced its long-list of entries contesting its “Literary and Art Criticism” and “Translation” categories. Fifteen books have been filtered under both categories after the Award’s Reading Panels concluded their work. 

The “Literary and Art Criticism” longlist includes seven books with diverse topics, ranging from studies in poetry to scholarly research reports in literature, narration and Arabic discourse. The works came mostly from Morocco with the other two from Iraq and Egypt.

The books in the “Translation” category included eight works, of which six are translations to Arabic from English, French and Spanish; the other two are works in Italian and Japanese translated from Arabic works. Last year, Mohammad Al Mansouri from Tunisia was named winner of Translation Award for translating “Housing the Stranger in the Mediterranean and the Middle Ages” (by Olivia Remie Constable, Cambridge University Press, 2003). 

The award comprises nine categories where the total monetary prize stands at Dhs7 million. Each prize consists of a gold medal bearing the SZBA logo, a certificate of merit and Dhs750,000. The Cultural Personality of the Year winner receives a prize of Dhs1 million.

WAM
Charles Tiayon's insight:

ABU DHABI: The Sheikh Zayed Book Award has announced its long-list of entries contesting its “Literary and Art Criticism” and “Translation” categories. Fifteen books have been filtered under both categories after the Award’s Reading Panels concluded their work. 

The “Literary and Art Criticism” longlist includes seven books with diverse topics, ranging from studies in poetry to scholarly research reports in literature, narration and Arabic discourse. The works came mostly from Morocco with the other two from Iraq and Egypt.

The books in the “Translation” category included eight works, of which six are translations to Arabic from English, French and Spanish; the other two are works in Italian and Japanese translated from Arabic works. Last year, Mohammad Al Mansouri from Tunisia was named winner of Translation Award for translating “Housing the Stranger in the Mediterranean and the Middle Ages” (by Olivia Remie Constable, Cambridge University Press, 2003). 

The award comprises nine categories where the total monetary prize stands at Dhs7 million. Each prize consists of a gold medal bearing the SZBA logo, a certificate of merit and Dhs750,000. The Cultural Personality of the Year winner receives a prize of Dhs1 million.

WAM
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Nuclear Attribution and Hot Cognition

Nuclear Attribution and Hot Cognition | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it
The challenges of identifying the perpetrators of a nuclear attack on the United States and communicating that information to senior leadership were considered in a 2009 workshop sponsored by the Office of the Director of National Intelligence. A declassified report on the workshop was released last week in heavily redacted form. See “Transforming Nuclear Attribution: Culture, Community, and Change (SHARP 2009)” (redacted), Office of the Director of National Intelligence, July 2009. One of the c
Charles Tiayon's insight:

The challenges of identifying the perpetrators of a nuclear attack on the United States and communicating that information to senior leadership were considered in a 2009 workshop sponsored by the Office of the Director of National Intelligence. A declassified report on the workshop was released last week in heavily redacted form. See “Transforming Nuclear Attribution: Culture, Community, and Change (SHARP 2009)”(redacted), Office of the Director of National Intelligence, July 2009.

One of the challenges is that the task may be impossible. “The outcome from the assessment of all the evidence and sources may be that a definitive answer is not achievable.”

In the best of cases, “There will almost certainly be a disconnect between the speed at which the national leadership must respond to the policy/political environment and the slower pace at which forensic evidence, technical analysis, and law enforcement investigations can proceed. This gives rise to an anchoring problem (i.e. a tendency to anchor on the usual suspects in attributing responsibility for an event).”

“Given the magnitude of the likely national response to any substantial WMD event, those involved in the attribution process need to be cautious of leaping to conclusions ahead of the evidence.”

The report considers the problem of “hot cognition,” referring to analysis that is performed under conditions of emotional agitation or distress.

“Hot cognition has an immense potential for distorting our perceptions of the environment and how we interpret information. It leads us to more extreme judgments of information, perhaps far beyond what they warrant. And it may lead us to fill in the gaps of missing or ambiguous information with emotional filler that could seriously distort our assessments.”

The workshop was conducted as part of the ODNI Summer Hard Problem (SHARP) program. In the roughly 50% of the resulting report that was not redacted by ODNI and the Department of Energy, there are a number of passages of interest concerning the psychology of intelligence analysis, and other topics. For example:

*  “Resolving an information need is not just about finding a ‘nugget.’ Information must be actively incorporated into the mind. New information has to be assimilated into a person’s preexisting context or state of information about the world. ‘Meaning construction’ takes place when this new information can connect with what is already understood. Our ability to absorb new information is limited. People selectively attend to new information that connects, and may be oblivious to the rest.”

*  Assembling an “all-star” team of outstanding intelligence analysts to tackle the attribution problem may not be the right approach. “It has been observed in a number of professional level sporting events that all-star teams — that is, teams created by joining the most exceptional players from across the league — rarely produce the best team overall. While their members have exceptional skills and are tremendous atheletes individually, these all-star teams typically do not perform as well as expected, nor do individual all-stars perform as well as they performed on their originating team.”

*  “In the case of a nuclear event, it is likely that individual private citizens will have images stored on cell phones or digital cameras that could help [resolve] the attribution question. [Word deleted - AFTAC?] should make arrangements in advance of any actual emergency that would give the public a way to send information to government servers for analysis.”

*  “For every one casualty actually caused by a [WMD] event, as many as fifty other individuals may descend upon local medical facilities presenting with psychosomatic symptoms.”

*  “Current limits to information sharing exist for good reasons, including the need to protect sources, the need to avoid tainting legal prosecution, and the need to protect rights to privacy. These reasons will remain important in a nuclear emergency, but cannot be allowed to impede the higher priority of protecting thousands or millions of human lives…. We must prepare IT tools and approaches now, that when activated for a nuclear emergency, allow relevant players to share knowledge at the speed of technology, not the speed of bureaucracy.”

*  “Having examined the range of capabilities that the US Government will bring to the issue of nuclear attribution, we conclude that IC, LE, and TNF [intelligence community, law enforcement, and technical nuclear forensics] capabilities, as currently configured, are likely to result in eventual success. By this we mean that we are confident that these efforts would eventually result in identification of those who mounted and sponsored any nuclear-related attack on the US or engaged in related activities. We are far less confident that as currently configured these agencies will be able to deliver meaningful, rapid success.”

 

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De la Real Academia Española, que cumple tres siglitos

De la Real Academia Española, que cumple tres siglitos | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it

Celebración doble, porque la propia Academia se hace su regalo de cumpleaños, y de paso nos lo hace a todos, ya que presenta la 23ª edición del Diccionario, fruto de la colaboración de las veintidós corporaciones integradas en la Asociación de Academias de la Lengua Española (ASALE). El nuevo diccionario tendrá 2.400 páginas, con un número de palabras que ascenderá a unas 93.000 y unas 200.000 acepciones, 19.000 de ellas americanismos. Todo lo cual representa cinco mil vocablos más que los incluidos en la edición anterior, la del año 2001, y más del doble de los del primer diccionario, publicado en 1780.
 
            Pues bien, para ser exactos, lo que mañana celebramos es la real cédula del reyFelipe V emitida un 3 de octubre como mañana pero del año 1714, mediante la cual crea en Madrid la Real Academia Española a imagen y semejanza de la Academia Francesa fundada por el Cardenal Richelieu en 1635. Es su promotor Juan Manuel Fernández Pacheco, VIII Marqués de Villena, a la sazón mayordomo mayor y jefe de la Casa Real, quien será también primer director de la institución y a quien dedicamos mañana nuestra diaria entrada en esta columna.
 
            Lógicamente, para cuando ocurre lo que mañana celebramos son ya algunos los movimientos que se han producido hacia su fundación, entre los cuales vale la pena resaltar la primera junta, realizada el 6 de julio del año 1713, con los ocho primeros académicos fundadores. El 3 de agosto de 1713 se celebra la primera sesión académica que recoge el libro de actas de la corporación, celebrada como todas las primeras en la casa delMarqués de Villena, en la actual Plaza de las Descalzas Reales, en Madrid.
 
            El 24 de enero la Academia aprueba sus primeros estatutos y se elige su emblema, un crisol al fuego bajo la famosa leyenda “limpia, fija y da esplendor”. El 19 de septiembre de 1715, con el ingreso de Pedro Scotti de Agoiz en la silla Z, quedan cubiertas las veinticuatro plazas, tantas como letras, aprobadas en los estatutos.
 
            El 29 de junio de 1725 ocurre el fallecimiento de su director, y pasa a ocupar el cargo su hijo, Mercurio Antonio López Pacheco, a quien a su muerte, acontecida el 10 de junio 1738, sucede en el mismo su hijo Andrés Fernández Pacheco, a quien a su vez, sucederá a su muerte ocurrida el 19 de julio de 1746 Juan López Pacheco, su hermano. La elección el 13 de mayo de 1751 de José de Carvajal y Lancáster pone fin a la vinculación existente hasta la fecha de la dirección de la institución con el marquesado de Villena.
 
            El 27 de febrero de 1755 se celebra la primera junta en la nueva sede de la corporación, la Real Casa del Tesoro, dependencia aneja al Palacio Real cedida por el Rey Fernando VI. 1793. El 20 de agosto de 1793, Carlos IV le cede para su nueva sede el antiguo edificio del Estanco del Aguardiente, en la calle Valverde. La actual sede en la madrileña calle de Felipe IV data de 1894.
 
            La primera gran obra de la institución va a ser el llamado Diccionario de autoridades, editado en seis volúmenes publicados entre 1726 y 1739, que junto a una sucinta historia de la institución, recoge la utilización de las distintas palabras por las grandes plumas de la literatura española. A él seguirán la Orthographía en 1741, laGramática en 1771, y en 1780, por fin, el primer Diccionario de la lengua castellana que, publicado en un único volumen, inicia la serie de diccionarios usuales que, como decimos al principio, llega hasta hoy con su vigésimo tercera edición.
 
            En 1951 se funda en Méjico la Asociación de Academias de la Lengua Española (ASALE), de la que forman parte las otras veintiuna corporaciones que en los distintos países de habla hispana velan por la correcta evolución de ese gran patrimonio común que es la lengua española.
 
            A lo largo de sus trescientos años de historia, un total de veintinueve directores han regido los destinos de la RAE.
 
            Y sin más por hoy sino reiterar a la Real Academia Española nuestra felicitación En Cuerpo y Alma, me despido de Vds. hasta mañana, deseándoles, como siempre, que hagan Vds. mucho bien y que no reciban menos.
 
 

Charles Tiayon's insight:

Celebración doble, porque la propia Academia se hace su regalo de cumpleaños, y de paso nos lo hace a todos, ya que presenta la 23ª edición del Diccionario, fruto de la colaboración de las veintidós corporaciones integradas en la Asociación de Academias de la Lengua Española (ASALE). El nuevo diccionario tendrá 2.400 páginas, con un número de palabras que ascenderá a unas 93.000 y unas 200.000 acepciones, 19.000 de ellas americanismos. Todo lo cual representa cinco mil vocablos más que los incluidos en la edición anterior, la del año 2001, y más del doble de los del primer diccionario, publicado en 1780.
 
            Pues bien, para ser exactos, lo que mañana celebramos es la real cédula del reyFelipe V emitida un 3 de octubre como mañana pero del año 1714, mediante la cual crea en Madrid la Real Academia Española a imagen y semejanza de la Academia Francesa fundada por el Cardenal Richelieu en 1635. Es su promotor Juan Manuel Fernández Pacheco, VIII Marqués de Villena, a la sazón mayordomo mayor y jefe de la Casa Real, quien será también primer director de la institución y a quien dedicamos mañana nuestra diaria entrada en esta columna.
 
            Lógicamente, para cuando ocurre lo que mañana celebramos son ya algunos los movimientos que se han producido hacia su fundación, entre los cuales vale la pena resaltar la primera junta, realizada el 6 de julio del año 1713, con los ocho primeros académicos fundadores. El 3 de agosto de 1713 se celebra la primera sesión académica que recoge el libro de actas de la corporación, celebrada como todas las primeras en la casa delMarqués de Villena, en la actual Plaza de las Descalzas Reales, en Madrid.
 
            El 24 de enero la Academia aprueba sus primeros estatutos y se elige su emblema, un crisol al fuego bajo la famosa leyenda “limpia, fija y da esplendor”. El 19 de septiembre de 1715, con el ingreso de Pedro Scotti de Agoiz en la silla Z, quedan cubiertas las veinticuatro plazas, tantas como letras, aprobadas en los estatutos.
 
            El 29 de junio de 1725 ocurre el fallecimiento de su director, y pasa a ocupar el cargo su hijo, Mercurio Antonio López Pacheco, a quien a su muerte, acontecida el 10 de junio 1738, sucede en el mismo su hijo Andrés Fernández Pacheco, a quien a su vez, sucederá a su muerte ocurrida el 19 de julio de 1746 Juan López Pacheco, su hermano. La elección el 13 de mayo de 1751 de José de Carvajal y Lancáster pone fin a la vinculación existente hasta la fecha de la dirección de la institución con el marquesado de Villena.
 
            El 27 de febrero de 1755 se celebra la primera junta en la nueva sede de la corporación, la Real Casa del Tesoro, dependencia aneja al Palacio Real cedida por el Rey Fernando VI. 1793. El 20 de agosto de 1793, Carlos IV le cede para su nueva sede el antiguo edificio del Estanco del Aguardiente, en la calle Valverde. La actual sede en la madrileña calle de Felipe IV data de 1894.
 
            La primera gran obra de la institución va a ser el llamado Diccionario de autoridades, editado en seis volúmenes publicados entre 1726 y 1739, que junto a una sucinta historia de la institución, recoge la utilización de las distintas palabras por las grandes plumas de la literatura española. A él seguirán la Orthographía en 1741, laGramática en 1771, y en 1780, por fin, el primer Diccionario de la lengua castellana que, publicado en un único volumen, inicia la serie de diccionarios usuales que, como decimos al principio, llega hasta hoy con su vigésimo tercera edición.
 
            En 1951 se funda en Méjico la Asociación de Academias de la Lengua Española (ASALE), de la que forman parte las otras veintiuna corporaciones que en los distintos países de habla hispana velan por la correcta evolución de ese gran patrimonio común que es la lengua española.
 
            A lo largo de sus trescientos años de historia, un total de veintinueve directores han regido los destinos de la RAE.
 
            Y sin más por hoy sino reiterar a la Real Academia Española nuestra felicitación En Cuerpo y Alma, me despido de Vds. hasta mañana, deseándoles, como siempre, que hagan Vds. mucho bien y que no reciban menos.
 
 

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Translating the Deaf Self: understanding the impact of mediation | The University of Manchester

Translating the Deaf Self: understanding the impact of mediation | The University of Manchester | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it

Interpreters and translators form a large part of everyday life for Deaf people in interaction with hearing communities. The effects of this on how they are perceived by others and in turn how Deaf people see themselves, is to be investigated by a team of researchers in Edinburgh and Manchester.

The BSL/English bilingual team has been awarded £200,000 for a unique project to investigate the cultural and social impact of translation on Deaf people who rely on sign language interpreters to be understood and participate in hearing society.

The award from the Arts and Humanities Research Council (AHRC) will assist two deaf and two hearing researchers to take a novel approach in combining Translation and Interpreting Studies, Deaf Studies and Social Research.

They will look at how translation shapes and projects Deaf culture and what impact it has on Deaf people’s own identity, achievement and well-being.

Professor Jemina Napier, from the Centre for Translation & Interpreting Studies Scotland (CTISS) at Heriot-Watt University, explained, “The majority of people rarely, if ever, have the experience of being interpreted or translated. If they do it is usually confined to occasional social, business or official situations, not a permanent, everyday experience.

“However, for Deaf British Sign Language (BSL) users, interpretation is normally a part of everyday life. They understand people’s perceptions of who they are through their sign language interpreter. Other people’s experience of Deaf people is also largely formed indirectly through the use of interpreters.

“To date analyses of translation and identity have focussed on the identity of the translator, but not on the user, and particularly not on the user who is in a permanent state of being translated.”

The project is one of only eight Research Innovation Grants funded by the Arts and Humanities Research Council under the Translating Cultures Theme. It is being jointly led by Professor Jemina Napier at Heriot-Watt University and Professor Alys Young, alongside Co-Investigator Rosemary Oram, at The University of Manchester, in collaboration with the Deaf community organisation Action Deafness, and the Deaf-led video production company AC2.Com.

Professor Alys Young, from the Social Research with Deaf People (SORD) programme at The University of Manchester, said, “The results of this unique study will inform theories on translation, identity and well-being, and will trial a new methodology for conducting research with visual languages. The results will benefit  parents of deaf children, sign language interpreters, and hearing people who work with Deaf sign language users, as well as Deaf people themselves.”

Craig Crowley, Chief Executive Officer at Action Deafness, added, “Action Deafness is proud to be among the community partners assisting with the 'Translating the Deaf Self' project. We are delighted with this funding from AHRC as this will help pave the way forward for recognising the cultural identity of Deaf people through sign language."

Notes for editors

This project is specifically about people who are Deaf and use British Sign Language (BSL). Deaf with a capital ‘D’ usually refers to that group of people who use BSL, while deaf with a lower-case ‘d’ is used to refer to the many people who experience a deterioration in their hearing as they become older.

British Sign Language provides Deaf people with a way of fully communicating, receiving information and participating in all aspects of life. About 50-60,000 people use BSL as their preferred or only way of communicating. BSL is not a set of gestures or a visual way to represent English. It is an independent language, developed in the Deaf community centuries ago, that is unrelated to English.

There is a strong community of Deaf people united by a common language and way of life – this is usually called Deaf culture. Deaf people access information through sign language interpreters in education, at work, to see the doctor, and to attend conferences. Interpreters are typically paid for by the Government’s Access to Work scheme, or through disability student support or healthcare or legal interpreting provisions.

For further information contact

Giselle Dye or Barbara Fraser
Pagoda PR for Heriot-Watt University

Tel: 0131 556 0770
Mob (out of hours only): 07739 085023
Email: Giselle.dye@pagodapr.com or Barbara.fraser@pagodapr.com

or

Aeron Haworth
Senior Media Relations Officer
The University of Manchester

Tel: 0161 275 8387
Mob: 07717 881563
Email: aeron.haworth@manchester.ac.uk

Contact us

Charles Tiayon's insight:

Interpreters and translators form a large part of everyday life for Deaf people in interaction with hearing communities. The effects of this on how they are perceived by others and in turn how Deaf people see themselves, is to be investigated by a team of researchers in Edinburgh and Manchester.

The BSL/English bilingual team has been awarded £200,000 for a unique project to investigate the cultural and social impact of translation on Deaf people who rely on sign language interpreters to be understood and participate in hearing society.

The award from the Arts and Humanities Research Council (AHRC) will assist two deaf and two hearing researchers to take a novel approach in combining Translation and Interpreting Studies, Deaf Studies and Social Research.

They will look at how translation shapes and projects Deaf culture and what impact it has on Deaf people’s own identity, achievement and well-being.

Professor Jemina Napier, from the Centre for Translation & Interpreting Studies Scotland (CTISS) at Heriot-Watt University, explained, “The majority of people rarely, if ever, have the experience of being interpreted or translated. If they do it is usually confined to occasional social, business or official situations, not a permanent, everyday experience.

“However, for Deaf British Sign Language (BSL) users, interpretation is normally a part of everyday life. They understand people’s perceptions of who they are through their sign language interpreter. Other people’s experience of Deaf people is also largely formed indirectly through the use of interpreters.

“To date analyses of translation and identity have focussed on the identity of the translator, but not on the user, and particularly not on the user who is in a permanent state of being translated.”

The project is one of only eight Research Innovation Grants funded by the Arts and Humanities Research Council under the Translating Cultures Theme. It is being jointly led by Professor Jemina Napier at Heriot-Watt University and Professor Alys Young, alongside Co-Investigator Rosemary Oram, at The University of Manchester, in collaboration with the Deaf community organisation Action Deafness, and the Deaf-led video production company AC2.Com.

Professor Alys Young, from the Social Research with Deaf People (SORD) programme at The University of Manchester, said, “The results of this unique study will inform theories on translation, identity and well-being, and will trial a new methodology for conducting research with visual languages. The results will benefit  parents of deaf children, sign language interpreters, and hearing people who work with Deaf sign language users, as well as Deaf people themselves.”

Craig Crowley, Chief Executive Officer at Action Deafness, added, “Action Deafness is proud to be among the community partners assisting with the 'Translating the Deaf Self' project. We are delighted with this funding from AHRC as this will help pave the way forward for recognising the cultural identity of Deaf people through sign language."

Notes for editors

This project is specifically about people who are Deaf and use British Sign Language (BSL). Deaf with a capital ‘D’ usually refers to that group of people who use BSL, while deaf with a lower-case ‘d’ is used to refer to the many people who experience a deterioration in their hearing as they become older.

British Sign Language provides Deaf people with a way of fully communicating, receiving information and participating in all aspects of life. About 50-60,000 people use BSL as their preferred or only way of communicating. BSL is not a set of gestures or a visual way to represent English. It is an independent language, developed in the Deaf community centuries ago, that is unrelated to English.

There is a strong community of Deaf people united by a common language and way of life – this is usually called Deaf culture. Deaf people access information through sign language interpreters in education, at work, to see the doctor, and to attend conferences. Interpreters are typically paid for by the Government’s Access to Work scheme, or through disability student support or healthcare or legal interpreting provisions.

For further information contact

Giselle Dye or Barbara Fraser
Pagoda PR for Heriot-Watt University

Tel: 0131 556 0770
Mob (out of hours only): 07739 085023
Email: Giselle.dye@pagodapr.com or Barbara.fraser@pagodapr.com

or

Aeron Haworth
Senior Media Relations Officer
The University of Manchester

Tel: 0161 275 8387
Mob: 07717 881563
Email: aeron.haworth@manchester.ac.uk

Contact us

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Elgolfo.info -

Elgolfo.info - | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it

Nueva York.- Eliot Weinberger es considerado uno de los principales traductores al inglés de la obra de Octavio Paz y todavía se sorprende de que a la edad de 18 años el Premio Nobel mexicano le confiara algunos poemas, hecho que con los años permitió el surgimiento de una gran amistad.
 
“Yo era un muchacho hippie y nunca pensé tener en mis manos tal responsabilidad”, afirmó Eliot Weinberger, quien los próximos 6 y 7 de octubre participará en Nueva York con María Baranda y Coral Bracho en una mesa redonda y una lectura de poesía organizadas por el Consulado General de México en Nueva York y el Instituto Cultural Mexicano de Nueva York.
 
Las actividades tendrán lugar en la sede de la Americas Society en el 680 de Park Avenue (6 de octubre) y posteriormente en la célebre Poets House en el 10 de River Terrace (7 de octubre).
 
Sobre la aventura de traducir a Octavio Paz, Eliot Weinberger, quien a su vez es poeta y escritor, afirmó que nunca aprendió el español de manera formal y en realidad comenzó a adquirir experiencia en nuestra lengua leyendo muchos libros.
 
“Yo quería ser arqueólogo, pero fue a los 15 años que me encontré con un poema de Octavio Paz y recuerdo que me cambió la vida. En la secundaria comencé a traducir varios poemas para aprender del lenguaje y sus secretos, principalmente a Paz, pero también a Neruda y Vallejo”.
 
Eliot Weinberger recuerda que fue a través de un amigo cercano que tenía cierto contacto con Octavio Paz, quien ese entonces era Embajador en la India, que a los 18 años pudo hacerle llegar algunas de las traducciones de sus poemas.
 
Para su sorpresa el escritor mexicano quedó gratamente sorprendido por su trabajo y le encargo que tradujera más de su obra. Poco después tuvo la oportunidad de conocerlo, tras la renuncia de Octavio Paz a su cargo de Embajador luego de la masacre de estudiantes el 2 de octubre de 1968 en Tlatelolco.
 
“Fue en la ciudad de Pittsburg donde tuvo lugar ese encuentro, y yo creo que Octavio Paz estaba completamente sorprendido de que alguien tan joven estuviera traduciendo su obra al inglés”.
 
Afirma que en ocasiones vuelve a leer las traducciones de esos años y trata de retroceder en el tiempo para sentir y recuperar lo que cruzaba en su cabeza por ese tiempo y lo que representaba en su juventud el leer una obra de la trascendencia de Octavio Paz.
 
Eliot Weiberger confiesa que uno de los poemas de Paz que más ha disfrutado traducir al inglés es Ejercicio de tiro (Target Practice).
 
La marea se cubre, se descubre, se recubre y siempre anda desnuda./ La marea se teje y se desteje, se abraza y se divide, nunca es la misma y nunca es otra./ La marea escultora de formas que duran lo que dura su oleaje./ La marea pule conchas, rompe rocas./ La marea siempre al asalto de sí misma./ La marea, oleaje de sílabas de la palabra interminable, sin fin y sin principio, que le dicta la luna./ La marea es rencorosa y ciertas noches, al golpear el peñasco, anuncia el fin del mundo […] (fragmento)
 
“No tenía idea lo que significaba el título Ejercicio de tiro, incluso recuerdo que le pregunté a varios mexicanos para saber si había algún significado oculto en esas palabras, pero no, al final el título quedó literal en inglés: Target Practice”.
 
El traductor nacido en Nueva York en 1949 comentó que siempre le ha sorprendido cómo reaccionan los autores de otras lenguas al leer sus traducciones al inglés, porque en cierta forma hay un fenómeno mágico, se convierten en lectores de

Charles Tiayon's insight:

Nueva York.- Eliot Weinberger es considerado uno de los principales traductores al inglés de la obra de Octavio Paz y todavía se sorprende de que a la edad de 18 años el Premio Nobel mexicano le confiara algunos poemas, hecho que con los años permitió el surgimiento de una gran amistad.
 
“Yo era un muchacho hippie y nunca pensé tener en mis manos tal responsabilidad”, afirmó Eliot Weinberger, quien los próximos 6 y 7 de octubre participará en Nueva York con María Baranda y Coral Bracho en una mesa redonda y una lectura de poesía organizadas por el Consulado General de México en Nueva York y el Instituto Cultural Mexicano de Nueva York.
 
Las actividades tendrán lugar en la sede de la Americas Society en el 680 de Park Avenue (6 de octubre) y posteriormente en la célebre Poets House en el 10 de River Terrace (7 de octubre).
 
Sobre la aventura de traducir a Octavio Paz, Eliot Weinberger, quien a su vez es poeta y escritor, afirmó que nunca aprendió el español de manera formal y en realidad comenzó a adquirir experiencia en nuestra lengua leyendo muchos libros.
 
“Yo quería ser arqueólogo, pero fue a los 15 años que me encontré con un poema de Octavio Paz y recuerdo que me cambió la vida. En la secundaria comencé a traducir varios poemas para aprender del lenguaje y sus secretos, principalmente a Paz, pero también a Neruda y Vallejo”.
 
Eliot Weinberger recuerda que fue a través de un amigo cercano que tenía cierto contacto con Octavio Paz, quien ese entonces era Embajador en la India, que a los 18 años pudo hacerle llegar algunas de las traducciones de sus poemas.
 
Para su sorpresa el escritor mexicano quedó gratamente sorprendido por su trabajo y le encargo que tradujera más de su obra. Poco después tuvo la oportunidad de conocerlo, tras la renuncia de Octavio Paz a su cargo de Embajador luego de la masacre de estudiantes el 2 de octubre de 1968 en Tlatelolco.
 
“Fue en la ciudad de Pittsburg donde tuvo lugar ese encuentro, y yo creo que Octavio Paz estaba completamente sorprendido de que alguien tan joven estuviera traduciendo su obra al inglés”.
 
Afirma que en ocasiones vuelve a leer las traducciones de esos años y trata de retroceder en el tiempo para sentir y recuperar lo que cruzaba en su cabeza por ese tiempo y lo que representaba en su juventud el leer una obra de la trascendencia de Octavio Paz.
 
Eliot Weiberger confiesa que uno de los poemas de Paz que más ha disfrutado traducir al inglés es Ejercicio de tiro (Target Practice).
 
La marea se cubre, se descubre, se recubre y siempre anda desnuda./ La marea se teje y se desteje, se abraza y se divide, nunca es la misma y nunca es otra./ La marea escultora de formas que duran lo que dura su oleaje./ La marea pule conchas, rompe rocas./ La marea siempre al asalto de sí misma./ La marea, oleaje de sílabas de la palabra interminable, sin fin y sin principio, que le dicta la luna./ La marea es rencorosa y ciertas noches, al golpear el peñasco, anuncia el fin del mundo […] (fragmento)
 
“No tenía idea lo que significaba el título Ejercicio de tiro, incluso recuerdo que le pregunté a varios mexicanos para saber si había algún significado oculto en esas palabras, pero no, al final el título quedó literal en inglés: Target Practice”.
 
El traductor nacido en Nueva York en 1949 comentó que siempre le ha sorprendido cómo reaccionan los autores de otras lenguas al leer sus traducciones al inglés, porque en cierta forma hay un fenómeno mágico, se convierten en lectores de

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Yeshiva University Launches New Speech-Language Masters

Yeshiva University Launches New Speech-Language Masters | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it

Yeshiva University announced that it will introduce a new Master of Science degree program in Speech-Language Pathology (SLP) in Fall 2015. Students enrolled in the new program will have the opportunity to learn from the experienced clinicians and faculty of the Montefiore Health System and the Albert Einstein College of Medicine, and will have access to resources at both institutions.

The five-semester graduate program is designed to prepare students to become speech-language pathologists capable of working in hospitals, rehabilitative centers, university or college clinics, specialized clinical settings or private practice. The program was developed by Linda Carroll, Ph.D., speech pathologist in the Department of Otolaryngology at Montefiore Medical Center, who will serve as director. Dr. Carroll is also an experienced voice therapist and was recently named a Fellow of the American Speech, Language and Hearing Association (ASHA).

“This master’s program is not only responsive to the needs of YU students who are interested in the health sciences, but also critical to the community as it seeks to hire accomplished speech-language therapists,” said Dr. Selma Botman, provost and vice president for academic affairs at YU. “We are fortunate to have Dr. Carroll, a nationally recognized expert in the field, lead this initiative.”

The program is dedicated to providing a first-rate academic experience, outstanding clinical education opportunities and collaborative management of disorders across the life span that affect speech, language, cognition, voice and swallow function. The graduate program establishes a strong base for normal and abnormal speech/language development, voice and swallow function in the first year of study, expanding to upper level communication/cognitive function in the second year of study. Students will also have the opportunity to specialize through didactics and a final capstone project.


“YU’s tradition of scholarship and professional excellence coupled with the clinical and research experience at Montefiore and Einstein is a perfect match for a dynamic graduate program in speech-language pathology,” said Dr. Carroll. “We are thrilled that our institutions are coming together for the benefit of our students and those affected by communicative disorders."

Integrating academic training and collaborative teaching by speech-language and medical professionals, the program offers students the unique opportunity to learn and gain clinical experience in the world class facilities of the Montefiore Medical Arts Pavilion, the Children’s Hospital at Montefiore, Montefiore’s Wakefield Hospital, as well as numerous other externship sites throughout the New York City region.

“Our role in the new Speech-Language Pathology Program is a natural extension of the clinical rehabilitation services we already provide to a broad number of patients,” said Matthew N. Bartels, M.D., M.P.H., chairman of the Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation at Montefiore and Einstein. “Our current department boasts more than 25 speech-language pathologists who will be able to provide teaching and mentoring to the graduate students in a comprehensive rehabilitation program in one of the largest medical centers in the country.”

“This is a natural marriage between the undergraduate speech pathology and audiology program, the Albert Einstein College of Medicine and Montefiore,” said Dr. Joseph Danto, professor and cross-campus chair of the undergraduate speech and hearing sciences program at YU.  “It’s rare for graduate programs in Speech-Language Pathology to be connected to a medical institution. Our students will be able to employ hands-on, state-of-the-art learning in virtual operating rooms, major voice clinics and medical school anatomical laboratories.”

The collaborative effort between YU, Einstein and Montefiore will also strengthen the comprehensive care available to patients. YU students will acquire knowledge and skills that will prepare them to serve a diverse group of patients in a full complement of settings. 

“The program is a significant step in developing a premier academic voice and swallowing service, enhancing the natural synergy of three world-class institutions: Yeshiva, Montefiore and Einstein,” said Marvin Fried, M.D., University Chairman of the Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery at Montefiore and Einstein. “This has long been a vision that I hoped we could achieve, and it will soon be a reality.”

The program is approved by the State of New York Department of Higher Education and is seeking Accreditation Candidacy with the Council on Academic Accreditation (CAA) of ASHA. Potential applicants can visit the YU website for more details.

Charles Tiayon's insight:

Yeshiva University announced that it will introduce a new Master of Science degree program in Speech-Language Pathology (SLP) in Fall 2015. Students enrolled in the new program will have the opportunity to learn from the experienced clinicians and faculty of the Montefiore Health System and the Albert Einstein College of Medicine, and will have access to resources at both institutions.

The five-semester graduate program is designed to prepare students to become speech-language pathologists capable of working in hospitals, rehabilitative centers, university or college clinics, specialized clinical settings or private practice. The program was developed by Linda Carroll, Ph.D., speech pathologist in the Department of Otolaryngology at Montefiore Medical Center, who will serve as director. Dr. Carroll is also an experienced voice therapist and was recently named a Fellow of the American Speech, Language and Hearing Association (ASHA).

“This master’s program is not only responsive to the needs of YU students who are interested in the health sciences, but also critical to the community as it seeks to hire accomplished speech-language therapists,” said Dr. Selma Botman, provost and vice president for academic affairs at YU. “We are fortunate to have Dr. Carroll, a nationally recognized expert in the field, lead this initiative.”

The program is dedicated to providing a first-rate academic experience, outstanding clinical education opportunities and collaborative management of disorders across the life span that affect speech, language, cognition, voice and swallow function. The graduate program establishes a strong base for normal and abnormal speech/language development, voice and swallow function in the first year of study, expanding to upper level communication/cognitive function in the second year of study. Students will also have the opportunity to specialize through didactics and a final capstone project.


“YU’s tradition of scholarship and professional excellence coupled with the clinical and research experience at Montefiore and Einstein is a perfect match for a dynamic graduate program in speech-language pathology,” said Dr. Carroll. “We are thrilled that our institutions are coming together for the benefit of our students and those affected by communicative disorders."

Integrating academic training and collaborative teaching by speech-language and medical professionals, the program offers students the unique opportunity to learn and gain clinical experience in the world class facilities of the Montefiore Medical Arts Pavilion, the Children’s Hospital at Montefiore, Montefiore’s Wakefield Hospital, as well as numerous other externship sites throughout the New York City region.

“Our role in the new Speech-Language Pathology Program is a natural extension of the clinical rehabilitation services we already provide to a broad number of patients,” said Matthew N. Bartels, M.D., M.P.H., chairman of the Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation at Montefiore and Einstein. “Our current department boasts more than 25 speech-language pathologists who will be able to provide teaching and mentoring to the graduate students in a comprehensive rehabilitation program in one of the largest medical centers in the country.”

“This is a natural marriage between the undergraduate speech pathology and audiology program, the Albert Einstein College of Medicine and Montefiore,” said Dr. Joseph Danto, professor and cross-campus chair of the undergraduate speech and hearing sciences program at YU.  “It’s rare for graduate programs in Speech-Language Pathology to be connected to a medical institution. Our students will be able to employ hands-on, state-of-the-art learning in virtual operating rooms, major voice clinics and medical school anatomical laboratories.”

The collaborative effort between YU, Einstein and Montefiore will also strengthen the comprehensive care available to patients. YU students will acquire knowledge and skills that will prepare them to serve a diverse group of patients in a full complement of settings. 

“The program is a significant step in developing a premier academic voice and swallowing service, enhancing the natural synergy of three world-class institutions: Yeshiva, Montefiore and Einstein,” said Marvin Fried, M.D., University Chairman of the Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery at Montefiore and Einstein. “This has long been a vision that I hoped we could achieve, and it will soon be a reality.”

The program is approved by the State of New York Department of Higher Education and is seeking Accreditation Candidacy with the Council on Academic Accreditation (CAA) of ASHA. Potential applicants can visit the YU website for more details.

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Talk to explore 'Poetry Translation and the Russian Radical Left' | Penn State University

Talk to explore 'Poetry Translation and the Russian Radical Left' | Penn State University | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it
At 12:30 p.m. Oct. 6, Brian Baer, professor of Russian and translation studies at Kent State University, will present “Solidarity and Sacrifice: Poetry Translation and the Russian Radical Left” in Room 102 of the Kern Building.
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UNIVERSITY PARK, Pa. -- At 12:30 p.m. Oct. 6, Brian Baer, professor of Russian and translation studies at Kent State University, will present “Solidarity and Sacrifice: Poetry Translation and the Russian Radical Left” in Room 102 of the Kern Building.

This event is a part of the Comparative Literature Luncheon lecture series, a weekly, informal lunchtime gathering of students, faculty and other members of the University community. Each week the event begins at 12:15 p.m. – lunch, coffee and tea are provided. At 12:30 p.m. there will be a 20-minute presentation, by a visitor or a local speaker, on a topic related to any humanities discipline. All students, faculty, colleagues and friends are welcome. Jon Abel (jea17@psu.edu) and Shuang Shen (sxs1075@psu.edu) are coordinators for the series. For a full list of Comparative Literature lunches, visit http://complit.la.psu.edu/news-luncheon.shtml.

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¿Y si los títulos de película en inglés fuesen traducciones literales? (FOTOS)

¿Y si los títulos de película en inglés fuesen traducciones literales? (FOTOS) | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it
Los traductores están de fiesta. ¿Han subido las tarifas de traducción? ¿Ha bajado el precio de la matrícula en las Escuelas Oficiales de Idiomas? ¿Ha aumentado la cuantía de las becas Erasmus?

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