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Augmented reality glasses 'translate foreign menus as you read' - Telegraph

Augmented reality glasses 'translate foreign menus as you read' - Telegraph | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it
Glasses that can automatically translate foreign menus into the wearer's own language have been unveiled in Japan.
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Metaglossia: The Translation World
News about translation, interpreting, intercultural communication, terminology and lexicography - as it happens
Curated by Charles Tiayon
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UN Careers - jobs in this network (Translators, Revisers, Editors, etc.)

UN Careers -  jobs in this network (Translators, Revisers, Editors, etc.) | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it

Vacancies in this network: Translators, Revisers, Editors, etc.

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Translator of Western novels commits suicide

Translator of Western novels commits suicide | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it
THE amateur translator who made dozens of Western literary classics, including George Orwell’s “1984” and “Animal Farm,” available to Chinese readers has committed suicide. Sun Zhongxu, 41, died on Thursday
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THE amateur translator who made dozens of Western literary classics, including George Orwell’s “1984” and “Animal Farm,” available to Chinese readers has committed suicide.

Sun Zhongxu, 41, died on Thursday in Guangzhou, capital of south China’s Guangdong Province, the Beijing Times reported yesterday.

People close to the family, as well as sources from the publishing industry said Sun took his life after suffering from depression.

His son, who was not named, confirmed his father’s death as suicide, saying he had “finally freed himself.”

Sun was perhaps best known for his translation of J D Salinger’s 1951 masterpiece “The Catcher in the Rye,” which was published in 2007 and went on to sell about 100,000 copies in China.

The Zhengzhou University graduate said in previous interviews that the story of troubled American teenager Holden Caulfield greatly influenced his life, describing it as “the book led me to the road of translation.” In his lifetime, Sun, also known as Luke Sun, published more than 30 works, including a collection of three short novels by Woody Allen, namely “Getting Even,” “Without Feathers” and “Side Effects,” and “A Writer’s People” by V S Naipaul.

Like most of China’s literary translators, Sun, was a hobbyist and made his living working at a shipping company in Guangzhou. Despite his amateur status, the announcement of his death on Sina Weibo was received with both sadness and shock by writers, translators and readers.

“Thanks to the excellent translators, we can appreciate the beauty of different cultures. May Mr Sun rest in peace in heaven,” a woman wrote on her microblog.

“Let’s choose a book translated by Mr Sun and read it tonight as we mourn his loss,” writer Zhang Yueran said on her microblog.

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The ABC's of Literacy

Broadcast date: 9/4/2014 The San Luis Obispo Literacy Council reports as many as 25 million Americans cannot read or write. There are an estimated 25,000
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The San Luis Obispo Literacy Council reports as many as 25 million Americans cannot read or write. There are an estimated 25,000 functionally illiterate adults in San Luis Obispo County alone.  In the past literacy was the ability to read and write, and understand numbers, but more recently more diverse “literacies” have emerged to include digital, financial, media and even health fields to meet the needs of our increasingly complicated world. UNESCO, the founder of International Literacy Day on September 8th, believes "literacy is a human right and the foundation of all learning.”

What are basic literacy skills in our society? Who determines which skills are important? Who is qualified to be a tutor?

Host Kris Kington-Barker is joined by guests from San Luis Obispo Literacy Council, Bernadette Bernardi, Executive Director, as well as a volunteer tutor providing training and learners receiving instruction to answer these questions and discuss the importance of developing literacy for individuals, their families and the community.

Central Coast Voices is sponsored by ACTION for Healthy Communities in collaboration with KCBX.

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L’introduction des langues nationales requiert la formation des enseignants (ministre

L’introduction des langues nationales requiert la formation des enseignants (ministre | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it

Dakar 31 août (APS) -L’introduction des langues nationales dans l’enseignement demande des prérequis importants et passe par une formation des enseignants dans ce domaine, a indiqué le ministre de l’Education nationale, Serigne Mbaye Thiam.

''L’introduction des langues nationales d’abord a un impact sur la formation des enseignants. Il faudrait donc programmer la formation des enseignants pour enseigner dans les langues nationales (qu'il faut utiliser) comme langues d’enseignement’’, a-t-il dit, samedi, lors de la cérémonie de clôture des Assises de l’éducation et de la formation.

Ouvertes jeudi à Dakar en présence du chef de l’Etat, les Assises nationales de l’éducation et de la formation ont pris fin samedi. La cérémonie de clôture a été présidée par le Premier ministre.

Une introduction des langues nationales dans le système éducatif doit aussi passer par la mise en place de ‘’manuels scolaires dans les disciplines'', ce qui ''ne peut pas se faire en une année’’, selon Serigne Mbaye Thiam.

Il a indiqué que l'introduction des langues nationales dans l'enseignement ne sera pas une ''nouveauté'' pour le ministère de l'Education nationale.

''Je dois dire que ce n’est pas une nouveauté du système éducatif parce qu'en octobre 2013, nous avons ouvert, dans le cadre d’un projet qui s’appelle ELAN (école et langues nationales) en partenariat avec l’OIF (organisation internationale de la francophonie), 30 classes bilingues expérimentales (langues nationales et langues française), a-t-il souligné.

Serigne Mbaye a Thiam a également cité les ''partenaires qui ont des classes expérimentales bilingues''. 

''Il y a trois semaines de cela, nous avons tenu un séminaire de mis à l’échelle de ces expériences de classes bilingues. Ce séminaire a pu dégager une feuille de route qui se déroule sur six ans’’, a ajouté M. Thiam.

Concernant la situation des daaras (écoles coraniques), ‘’un projet de loi est en cours’’, a fait savoir le ministre de l'Education.

''Un projet de loi portant statut des daaras qui a été adopté pour la première fois en conseil des ministres est passée en assemblée générale de la Cour suprême'', a t-il souligné. 

''Ce projet est en cours de partage dans les semaines à venir dans les familles religieuses au niveau du Sénégal avec quatre décrets d’application, un curriculum unifié entre enseignement des daaras et enseignement élémentaire a déjà été élaborée’’, a-t-il ajouté.

Avec le projet PAMOD (Projet d’amélioration et d’appui à la modernisation des daaras) élaboré avec l’appui de la BID, ''nous aurons en 2016, la construction de 64 daaras modernes (32 publics et 32non publics)’’, a annoncé Serigne Mbaye Thiam.

Charles Tiayon's insight:

Dakar 31 août (APS) -L’introduction des langues nationales dans l’enseignement demande des prérequis importants et passe par une formation des enseignants dans ce domaine, a indiqué le ministre de l’Education nationale, Serigne Mbaye Thiam.

''L’introduction des langues nationales d’abord a un impact sur la formation des enseignants. Il faudrait donc programmer la formation des enseignants pour enseigner dans les langues nationales (qu'il faut utiliser) comme langues d’enseignement’’, a-t-il dit, samedi, lors de la cérémonie de clôture des Assises de l’éducation et de la formation.

Ouvertes jeudi à Dakar en présence du chef de l’Etat, les Assises nationales de l’éducation et de la formation ont pris fin samedi. La cérémonie de clôture a été présidée par le Premier ministre.

Une introduction des langues nationales dans le système éducatif doit aussi passer par la mise en place de ‘’manuels scolaires dans les disciplines'', ce qui ''ne peut pas se faire en une année’’, selon Serigne Mbaye Thiam.

Il a indiqué que l'introduction des langues nationales dans l'enseignement ne sera pas une ''nouveauté'' pour le ministère de l'Education nationale.

''Je dois dire que ce n’est pas une nouveauté du système éducatif parce qu'en octobre 2013, nous avons ouvert, dans le cadre d’un projet qui s’appelle ELAN (école et langues nationales) en partenariat avec l’OIF (organisation internationale de la francophonie), 30 classes bilingues expérimentales (langues nationales et langues française), a-t-il souligné.

Serigne Mbaye a Thiam a également cité les ''partenaires qui ont des classes expérimentales bilingues''. 

''Il y a trois semaines de cela, nous avons tenu un séminaire de mis à l’échelle de ces expériences de classes bilingues. Ce séminaire a pu dégager une feuille de route qui se déroule sur six ans’’, a ajouté M. Thiam.

Concernant la situation des daaras (écoles coraniques), ‘’un projet de loi est en cours’’, a fait savoir le ministre de l'Education.

''Un projet de loi portant statut des daaras qui a été adopté pour la première fois en conseil des ministres est passée en assemblée générale de la Cour suprême'', a t-il souligné. 

''Ce projet est en cours de partage dans les semaines à venir dans les familles religieuses au niveau du Sénégal avec quatre décrets d’application, un curriculum unifié entre enseignement des daaras et enseignement élémentaire a déjà été élaborée’’, a-t-il ajouté.

Avec le projet PAMOD (Projet d’amélioration et d’appui à la modernisation des daaras) élaboré avec l’appui de la BID, ''nous aurons en 2016, la construction de 64 daaras modernes (32 publics et 32non publics)’’, a annoncé Serigne Mbaye Thiam.

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Una ojeada al siglo XX desde Rusia: Leyendo a Iliá Ehrenburg - Diario digital Nueva Tribuna

Una ojeada al siglo XX desde Rusia: Leyendo a Iliá Ehrenburg - Diario digital Nueva Tribuna | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it
Antes del verano la editorial El Acantilado publicó un denso volumen de memorias de Ilià Ehrenburg, con el título “Gente, años, vida (Memorias 1891 – 1967)”.
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Antes del verano la editorial El Acantilado publicó un denso volumen de memorias de Ilià Ehrenburg, con el título “Gente, años, vida (Memorias 1891 – 1967)”. En siete libros y en lo que parece ser por primera vez una versión íntegra, se ofrecen al lector, en la traducción de Marta Rebón, más de dos mil paginas de narración de una vida que comienza a finales del siglo XIX y se despliega durante el posterior a lo largo de dos guerras mundiales, la revolución y la construcción del socialismo en un solo país, la guerra fría y el movimiento por la paz. Es un libro apasionante no sólo por lo que narra, sino por la especial mirada que muestra sobre lo narrado, no habitual en las historias sobre esta parte de la historia. Ehrenburg habla desde el Este, es un ciudadano soviético que explica e interpreta el curso de las cosas desde esta posición, a lo que no está acostumbrado el lector occidental.

La gente de mi generación seguramente recuerdan dos libros de Ilià Ehrenburg que se publicaron con ocasión del boom editorial de la transición política y postrimerías. Era su recopilación de artículos sobre la España de la II República que llevaba por título, de forma sarcástica, el enunciado de la Constitucion de 1931, España, república de trabajadores, que publicó en 1976 las llamadas “Ediciones Hispanoamericanas”, y luego en 1979 la Editorial Júcar, con portadas diferentes. Hoy la obra puede comprarse en la edición de la editorial Melusina (2008) en cualquier página de libros. El tono y el estilo eran inolvidables, y es un libro que sirvió para confrontar el desarrollo democrático republicano con una realidad social de un clasismo atroz, con las fuertes presencias autoritarias de la Iglesia y el ejército, que preludiaban una polarización del conflicto en términos fundamentalmente de clase como así se comprobaría dramáticamente en 1936. El segundo libro, menos leido en la época, fue una novela, la de las aventuras de Julio Jurenito y sus discípulos, que hace un año re-editó la siempre inteligente firma editorial Capitán Swing y en la que Ehrenburg abordaba de forma sarcástica todos los dogmatismos de entre guerras, en un estilo plenamente desenfadado, en lo que entonces nosotros pensábamos que era típico del vanguardismo ruso, aunque sólo conocíamos a Maiakokovski en la antología imprescindible de Visor, y ni siquiera habíamos podido leer la traducción de Margarita y el maestro de Bulgákov. Leyendo hoy las memorias de Ehrenburg se puede comprobar que el florecimiento de tantos y tantos poetas, novelistas y autores teatrales en la Rusia revolucionaria no ha tenido prácticamente seguimiento ni repercusión en las traducciones al español. E incluso en los casos que fueron traducidos, su repercusión en términos culturales ha sido mínima.



Una debilidad literaria por el autor, por consiguiente, que era a la vez periodista, novelista y poeta, y que había vivido el cambio de época más importante después del tránsito de la modernidad a finales del siglo XVIII. El cual contempla y describe en primera persona los acontecimientos más relevantes y las personas más señaladas del siglo XX en los que participó y a las que conoció, trató y en muchas ocasiones, tuvo como amigas.

Ehrenburg nació en 1891 – le gusta repetir que él forma parte del grupo de personas “del siglo pasado” – fué compañero de estudios y de actividades clandestinas con Bujarin y es encarcelado y deportado a los 17 años a Paris, donde estaba Lenin. En las memorias desfila la vida en Paris y en la bohemia de pintores y artistas hasta el estallido de la primera guerra mundial, el desarrollo de ésta y la revolución rusa, los años 20 y 30 a lo largo de toda Europa, pero el elemento central que va caracterizando esta etapa de entreguerras es el crecimiento del fascismo y la necesidad – no lograda entonces – de enfrentarse a él y derrotarle. La guerra de España es un hito clave en esta encrucijada, pero la derrota de las fuerzas populares se acompaña de otros momentos terribles no sólo para el autor, sino para la revolución y el socialismo: la gran purga de 1938, que se lleva por delante a varios amigos del autor Meyerhold, Bábel, Chlénov, Bujarin – y el pacto germano-soviético de 1939-41.

La invasión de Rusia por las tropas nazis y la resistencia terrible por el coste en vidas y en bienes del pueblo ruso, es el momento en el que Ehrenburg despliega una actividad infatigable como periodista denunciando la acción criminal, el racismo y el genocidio de los invasores. La victoria de los aliados y la efímera unión de los mismos deja paso al inicio de la guerra fría, las últimas  purgas de Beria de 1948, la muerte de Stalin y el deshielo – título por cierto que proviene de la novela de Ehrenburg – y el gran desarrollo del movimiento por la paz en la década de los cincuenta. Las memorias acaban realmente con el inicio del gobierno de Jruschov, entre 1959 y 1962. El autor muere en Moscú en 1967.

En Gente, años, vida, se intercalan las historias sobre la historia con los retratos de los personajes históricos que se incrustan como medallones en los procesos sociales que se 

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International Literacy Day 2014 #whyiread | IBB

International Literacy Day 2014 #whyiread | IBB | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it
 The International Book Bank increases literacy and advances education by procuring and donating books and other educational materials to developing countries.
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International Literacy Day a family learning opportunity - Williams Lake Tribune

International Literacy Day a family learning opportunity  - Williams Lake Tribune | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it
Cariboo-Chilcotin Partners for Literacy asks everyone to celebrate International Literacy Day by learning something as a family.
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The Harsh, Polarizing Language of a 'Kill Switch' for Smartphones

The Harsh, Polarizing Language of a 'Kill Switch' for Smartphones | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it
Is there a better way to talk about a feature that will allow cellphones to be shut down remotely?
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Concurso UE de traducción para alumnos de secundaria celebra octava edición

Concurso UE de traducción para alumnos de secundaria celebra octava edición | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it
El concurso anual de traductores de la Unión Europea (UE), en el que podrán participar los alumnos de los 751 centros de secundaria de los Estados ...
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El concurso anual de traductores de la Unión Europea (UE), en el que podrán participar los alumnos de los 751 centros de secundaria de los Estados miembros, abre el 1 de septiembre el plazo de inscripción para su octava edición, informó hoy la Comisión Europea (CE).

Dicho plazo se extenderá hasta el 20 de octubre y el formulario de solicitud estará disponible en internet en todas las lenguas oficiales de la UE.

El concurso se celebrará el 27 de noviembre y se llevará a cabo de manera simultánea en todas las escuelas que resulten seleccionadas.

En la última edición, la ganadora en España fue Marieta Plamenova, de 17 años, que cursaba segundo de Bachillerato en el instituto Barrio Simancas de Madrid.



Plamenova compitió con estudiantes de 54 centros de toda España con una traducción del búlgaro -su lengua materna- al castellano, según informó entonces la consejería madrileña de Educación.

Cada centro podrá inscribir de dos a cinco estudiantes de cualquier nacionalidad, que deberán haber nacido en el año 1997.

La prueba consistirá en la traducción de un texto de una página de longitud que este año se tendrá como tema principal "la identidad europea".

La traducción deberá ser realizada de un idioma oficial de la UE a otro, de manera que habrá 552 combinaciones lingüísticas posibles de las 24 lenguas oficiales de la UE.

Una vez realizado el concurso, un grupo de traductores de la CE revisarán los textos y seleccionarán a los ganadores, uno por país, que serán invitados a Bruselas para recibir sus premios en abril de 2015.

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Vive l’anglais?

Vive l’anglais? | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it
La déferlante de l’anglais est une réalité. Le problème suisse n’est-il pas d’éviter qu’à cause de l’anglais, nous perdions la capacité de nous comprendre dans nos langues nationales?
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Guerre des langues: tschüss Switzerland? - rts.ch - Infrarouge - Forums

Guerre des langues: tschüss Switzerland? - rts.ch - Infrarouge - Forums | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it

La Thurgovie vient de mettre le feu à la question de l'enseignement des langues en Suisse: on n'enseignera plus le français à l'école primaire dans ce canton. Et Nidwald a pris la même option quelques jours plus tard. La seule langue étrangère que les écoliers apprendront avant d'entrer en secondaire sera l'anglais.

La guerre des langues est-elle ouverte? Qu'est-ce qui fait l'unité de ce pays? L'anglais serait-il le futur garant de la cohésion nationale? Et ne devrait-on pas d'abord mieux enseigner l'allemand en Suisse romande? Infrarouge débat, en français, avec des invités de toute la Suisse.

Si vous voulez venir assister à l'émission, réservez votre place en appelant le 079 681 70 59 ou envoyer un mail à marie.weber@rts.ch.

Pourquoi pas...sean, 2908 messagesLe 29 août 2014 à 18:51
Pourquoi on insiste tant sur l'allemand (et en Suisse-Allemande le français)? bien moins de la majorité de la population romande parle allemand, et pareil dans le cas inverse. Il vaudrait mieux que l'on mette l'accent sur l'anglais à la fois en Suisse-Romande et Suisse-Allemande, au moins plus de gens maîtriseraient une 2ème langue. Aux Pays-Bas on apprend l'anglais dès la maternelle, et le résultat est qu'une bien plus grande partie de la population maîtrise une 2ème langue.
Hors sujet: certains pays européens et les USA craignent une invasion de l'Europe par les djihadistesSuisseRomand, 922 messagesLe 30 août 2014 à 16:42
Y-a-t-il des djihadistes dans les 600'000 migrants qui attendent en Lybie pour venir en Europe … !!!.

Des murs se construisent entre la Grèce et la Bulgarie avec la Turquie afin de barrer la route aux migrants !!!.
Charles Tiayon's insight:

La Thurgovie vient de mettre le feu à la question de l'enseignement des langues en Suisse: on n'enseignera plus le français à l'école primaire dans ce canton. Et Nidwald a pris la même option quelques jours plus tard. La seule langue étrangère que les écoliers apprendront avant d'entrer en secondaire sera l'anglais.

La guerre des langues est-elle ouverte? Qu'est-ce qui fait l'unité de ce pays? L'anglais serait-il le futur garant de la cohésion nationale? Et ne devrait-on pas d'abord mieux enseigner l'allemand en Suisse romande? Infrarouge débat, en français, avec des invités de toute la Suisse.

Si vous voulez venir assister à l'émission, réservez votre place en appelant le 079 681 70 59 ou envoyer un mail à marie.weber@rts.ch.

Pourquoi pas...sean, 2908 messagesLe 29 août 2014 à 18:51
Pourquoi on insiste tant sur l'allemand (et en Suisse-Allemande le français)? bien moins de la majorité de la population romande parle allemand, et pareil dans le cas inverse. Il vaudrait mieux que l'on mette l'accent sur l'anglais à la fois en Suisse-Romande et Suisse-Allemande, au moins plus de gens maîtriseraient une 2ème langue. Aux Pays-Bas on apprend l'anglais dès la maternelle, et le résultat est qu'une bien plus grande partie de la population maîtrise une 2ème langue.
Hors sujet: certains pays européens et les USA craignent une invasion de l'Europe par les djihadistesSuisseRomand, 922 messagesLe 30 août 2014 à 16:42
Y-a-t-il des djihadistes dans les 600'000 migrants qui attendent en Lybie pour venir en Europe … !!!.

Des murs se construisent entre la Grèce et la Bulgarie avec la Turquie afin de barrer la route aux migrants !!!.
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This new technology could make watching foreign films easier

This new technology could make watching foreign films easier | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it
For movie theaters that play foreign films, subtitles are a necessity, dubbing an added bonus. That goes for downloaded movies and TV shows as well. But dubbed entertainment isn't easy to come by, and viewers usually end up with the cumbersome task of simultaneously reading subtitles while watching the scenes. Technology could change that, though. An...
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For movie theaters that play foreign films, subtitles are a necessity, dubbing an added bonus. That goes for downloaded movies and TV shows as well. But dubbed entertainment isn’t easy to come by, and viewers usually end up with the cumbersome task of simultaneously reading subtitles while watching the scenes.

Technology could change that, though.

An Israeli startup called VideoDubber, for example, says it can automatically dub films, TV shows, and other video into more than 30 languages including Arabic, Chinese, Spanish, and four dialects of English (British, American, Indian, and Australian) with a technology called TruDub. Mainly targeting broadcasters and professional content creators, the service uses synthetic voices based on professional voice talent talents—it promises the voices sound natural and will match the context of the video, according to The Next Web. And it claims it typically can dub an entire film in under five minutes. In this video, the firm demonstrated TruDub’s work on the famous 2005 commencement speech that Apple co-founder Steve Jobs delivered at Stanford University:

But the service can’t convert just any video to a different language. Because TruDub relies on text-to-speech technology, the video needs to have subtitle files. (The service also will dub or create audio files from subtitle files.) Video in .AVI and .mp4 formats can be uploaded to VideoDubber’s site, along with the corresponding subtitle files and an order form; according to the site, most orders can be turned around within one business day.

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Essential writing skills: how to make words your servants

Essential writing skills: how to make words your servants | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it
Half the battle for writers is making writing their servant - not being a servant to the words. It's a lesson novice writers usually only discover after they're about half way through the first boo...
Charles Tiayon's insight:
Half the battle for writers is making writing their servant – not being a servant to the words. It’s a lesson novice writers usually only discover after they’re about half way through the first book and are finding the words mastering them, not the other way around.

I re-pitched my history of New Zealand for its second edition, altering the tone to bring the writing up to date.

It has to be addressed. And there is, alas, only one way to do that. That’s right – practise. But that shouldn’t be a chore – writing’s fun, right?

Once you’ve made words your servant – and your friend – you can start paying attention to the equally crucial matters of content, tone and style – together, what we might call ‘voice’. This isn’t something that just happens; it can be directed and controlled, just like any other aspect of writing. Take George McDonald Fraser’s Flashman, a novel about the bully from Tom Brown’s Schooldays, grown up and turned Victorian-age military hero. Fraser presented it as a ‘found memoir’ – which it wasn’t – but buoyed the conceit with such a subtle ‘1840’ period tone to his words that at least one reviewer was taken in.

It works in non-fiction, too. Recently I re-wrote one of my earlier books, a kids’ book pitched for 8 year olds, into a young adult-and-older account pitched for the 12+ bracket. It had to be completely re-written to do so – with full attention to the language, content and tone. I also re-pitched my history of New Zealand, when it came around to the second edition, to modernise the writing.

The trick to achieving that  control – something superficially easy to do but very hard to actually master. It takes a long time for writers to be able to consciously control the tone. But it’s an essential writing skill, and one that improves with practise. My tips? Try this:

1. Pick a passage by (say) your favourite author. What defines the tone? Look through a passage for key words – terms that give flavour. Check the pacing, the ‘beats’. Look for sentence length and paragraphing. Is it present or past tense? Examine the material closely and make notes.

2. Now try writing a passage at least 750 words long, of your own, in the same style, with the same cadence, word selection and rhythms.

3. Didn’t work? Of course not, it won’t the first time. But this is an exercise…and you know what exercises mean. Yup – do it again.

4. And again.

5. And again (etc).

It’s the only way. Did I mention you then throw the exercises away? Words are not precious babies, still less numeric targets. They’re tools, and they’re disposable. You can always write more.

The point is that when you’ve mastered tone, you’re more than half way to controllingvoice, content and style. Writing will be your servant. Not the other way around. And there’s one other benefit that comes out of doing all this. With the quality comes that most precious of all skills that writers can have – speed.

Do you deliberately throw away ‘practise writing’? How do you extend yourself when writing?

Copyright © Matthew Wright 2014

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Most successful WORD festival yet

Most successful WORD festival yet | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it
Sold-out shows and thousands of attendees have made this year's Christchurch writers festival one of the most successful yet, its organiser says.
Charles Tiayon's insight:

Sold-out shows and thousands of attendees have made this year's Christchurch writers festival one of the most successful yet, its organiser says.

The four-day biennial WORD Christchurch Writers & Readers Festival ended yesterday after about 5000 people attended 57 ticketed events led by 120 speakers from New Zealand and across the world.

Festival executive director Marianne Hargreaves said 17 shows were sold out and people had to be turned away at the door of some events.

"Hopefully people will understand they have to buy tickets in advance."

One of the most popular events was at the Cardboard Cathedral where seven writers including Eleanor Catton, shared their works.

Hargreaves said many events would have been attended by more people, but they were restricted by the size of the venues.

Another sold out event was the Secrets, Spies and Free Speech public discussion featuring Dirty Politics author Nicky Hager, Guardian journalist Luke Harding and Australian journalist Richard King.

They discussed the freedom of speech in Western democracies, but the audience was especially captivated by Hager talking about his new book, which has made headlines since its release more than two weeks ago.

Dirty Politics includes information from emails hacked from blogger Cameron Slater and makes revelations about several powerful politicians and parties.

At the festival, Hager described tracking down the hacker who attacked Slater's IT system and spending weeks convincing him to share his information.

Hargreaves said Hager had been booked for the festival well before she knew he had a book coming out.

The festival has been going since 1996. It was cancelled in 2010 after it was due to start four days after the September 4 earthquake.

It was held again in 2012 but limited venues meant it had just 32 events.

Hargreaves said her aim for this year's festival was to return it to pre-quake levels and that had been well and truly achieved.

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Langues nationales: le socle de notre identité | L'Hebdo

Langues nationales: le socle de notre identité | L'Hebdo | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it

Psychrodrame confédéral * : à la suite du Roestigraben et du Polentagraben douloureusement bien connus est venu s'ajouter un Reussgraben. A l'est de la Suisse, l'obligation que se sont donnée les directeurs de l'instruction publique cantonaux d'enseigner à l'école primaire déjà une autre langue nationale en premier est de plus en plus rejetée. Le Grand Conseil thurgovien a décidé que l'anglais passerait d'abord. Emoi à l'ouest du pays. La cohésion nationale est en jeu, disent les Romands. Il est exagéré de penser qu'elle tient à cela.

Dans ces passes d'armes enflammées, peu d'allusions hélas au statu de l'italien. Les deux camps savent gré aux Tessinois d'être de meilleurs plurilingues que les autres, mais personne ne se bat pour que l'italien soit enseigné avec la même rigueur que l'allemand en Suisse romande ou le français en Suisse alémanique. Ce gros coup de canif dans le souci du respect des minorités n'augure rien de bon.

C'est dans ce contexte tendu que s'est exprimé le président de l'Ecole polytechnique fédérale de Lausanne, Patrick Aebischer, cette semaine dans la NZZ. Lui aussi plaide pour l'anglais en premier, largement pratiqué dans les cours que dispense son institution. Il s'agit d'adapter les nouvelles générations au vecteur de la globalisation. Il est la première personnalité romande de premier plan à casser le consensus autour de la nécessité d'apprendre d'abord une autre langue nationale. Il a commis une faute politique.

En Suisse, plus qu'ailleurs, la maîtrise d'une langue ne saurait être réduite à une fonction purement utilitaire. Le discours articulé depuis plusieurs années par Pascal Couchepin est beaucoup plus subtil. L'ancien président de la Confédération estime que la Suisse est une construction tripartite. Sans l'apport latin des Tessinois et des Romands, la Suisse ne serait pas la Suisse. La Confédération est l'addition de trois sensibilités au monde, de trois cultures européennes, pas la soumission de deux minorités à l'esprit de la majorité.

Au moment de quitter Berne, le radical valaisan redoutait que l'administration fédérale ne se mette à penser qu'en allemand, et n'arrive plus à concevoir, et pas seulement intégrer, les différences latines.

Si l'anglais doit devenir notre langue commune, si les autres langues nationales ne sont parlées que par des élites cosmopolites, ce sera la fin de la Suisse.L'apprentissage laborieux d'une autre langue nationale constitue la première démarche citoyenne. Je suis suisse parce que je m'efforce de comprendre mes Confédérés qui ne sont pas de ma langue maternelle. Je me prépare à ne pas être toujours d'accord avec eux, mais à supporter les tensions, à respecter et à aimer nos différences. Cet effort serein est le socle de notre identité.

Charles Tiayon's insight:

Psychrodrame confédéral * : à la suite du Roestigraben et du Polentagraben douloureusement bien connus est venu s'ajouter un Reussgraben. A l'est de la Suisse, l'obligation que se sont donnée les directeurs de l'instruction publique cantonaux d'enseigner à l'école primaire déjà une autre langue nationale en premier est de plus en plus rejetée. Le Grand Conseil thurgovien a décidé que l'anglais passerait d'abord. Emoi à l'ouest du pays. La cohésion nationale est en jeu, disent les Romands. Il est exagéré de penser qu'elle tient à cela.

Dans ces passes d'armes enflammées, peu d'allusions hélas au statu de l'italien. Les deux camps savent gré aux Tessinois d'être de meilleurs plurilingues que les autres, mais personne ne se bat pour que l'italien soit enseigné avec la même rigueur que l'allemand en Suisse romande ou le français en Suisse alémanique. Ce gros coup de canif dans le souci du respect des minorités n'augure rien de bon.

C'est dans ce contexte tendu que s'est exprimé le président de l'Ecole polytechnique fédérale de Lausanne, Patrick Aebischer, cette semaine dans la NZZ. Lui aussi plaide pour l'anglais en premier, largement pratiqué dans les cours que dispense son institution. Il s'agit d'adapter les nouvelles générations au vecteur de la globalisation. Il est la première personnalité romande de premier plan à casser le consensus autour de la nécessité d'apprendre d'abord une autre langue nationale. Il a commis une faute politique.

En Suisse, plus qu'ailleurs, la maîtrise d'une langue ne saurait être réduite à une fonction purement utilitaire. Le discours articulé depuis plusieurs années par Pascal Couchepin est beaucoup plus subtil. L'ancien président de la Confédération estime que la Suisse est une construction tripartite. Sans l'apport latin des Tessinois et des Romands, la Suisse ne serait pas la Suisse. La Confédération est l'addition de trois sensibilités au monde, de trois cultures européennes, pas la soumission de deux minorités à l'esprit de la majorité.

Au moment de quitter Berne, le radical valaisan redoutait que l'administration fédérale ne se mette à penser qu'en allemand, et n'arrive plus à concevoir, et pas seulement intégrer, les différences latines.

Si l'anglais doit devenir notre langue commune, si les autres langues nationales ne sont parlées que par des élites cosmopolites, ce sera la fin de la Suisse.L'apprentissage laborieux d'une autre langue nationale constitue la première démarche citoyenne. Je suis suisse parce que je m'efforce de comprendre mes Confédérés qui ne sont pas de ma langue maternelle. Je me prépare à ne pas être toujours d'accord avec eux, mais à supporter les tensions, à respecter et à aimer nos différences. Cet effort serein est le socle de notre identité.

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Proofreading 101: 5 Things to Watch

Proofreading 101: 5 Things to Watch | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it
You may not have been an English major, and you may find the task of revising your own written work to be frankly tedious—but proofreading is a skill that no executive, entrepreneur, or professiona…
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Mil años de poesía europea - hoyesarte.com

Mil años de poesía europea - hoyesarte.com | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it
El próximo 16 de septiembre, Crítica publicará la sexta impresión de 'Mil años de poesía europea', obra inicialmente publicada en 2009 por Francisco Rico (Barcelona, 1942). Esta antología se centra en los autores y en las obras de máxima calidad, de modo que cada uno está representado con una amplia selección de poemas, con el texto siempre en su lengua original y acompañado de la mejor traducción posible en español.
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Jiang Guangci: El joven de la vida errante

Jiang Guangci: El joven de la vida errante | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it
Traducción, prólogo y notas de Blas Piñero Martínez. Hermida Editores. Madrid, 2014. 160 páginas. 15 €
Por José Pazó Espinosa
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1200 Tutors in 12 Weeks Campaign Kicks Off on International Literacy Day

1200 Tutors in 12 Weeks Campaign  Kicks Off on International Literacy Day | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it
West CAP Literacy Program, along with Wisconsin Literacy and its 71 other member agencies across the state, are kicking off the 11th Annual 1200 Tutors in 12 Weeks campaign on International Literacy Day, Sept. 8, 2014.The campaign, supported by Alliant Energy Foundation, American Family Insurance, and...
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How technology is changing the way we communicate

How technology is changing the way we communicate | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it
Marc Brackett didn’t become the director of Yale University’s Center for Emotional Intelligence out of curiosity about emotions.
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'Abeia', 'guaiaca'? G1 tem intérprete para tradução da linguagem caipira

'Abeia', 'guaiaca'? G1 tem intérprete para tradução da linguagem caipira | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it
Vocabulário utilizado por sertanejos é repleto de metáforas e gírias.
Peões explicam expressões utilizadas dentro e fora da Arena em Barretos.
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Une loi pour défendre deux langues à l’école primaire

Une loi pour défendre deux langues à l’école primaire | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it
Deux interventions ont été déposées dans une commission fédérale pour modifier la loi sur les langues et imposer deux langues étrangères en primaire
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Le débat sur les langues sera national

Le débat sur les langues sera national | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it
Français à l'école • La polémique s'invite sous la Coupole. La Commission de l'éducation du National a décidé d'empoigner le dossier. Une modification de la loi sur les langues est à l'étude.
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Nintendo of Europe cutting more than 300 jobs

Nintendo of Europe cutting more than 300 jobs | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it
More than 320 jobs are being cut at Nintendo of Europe during its reshuffle, Nintendo confirmed today.
Charles Tiayon's insight:

Despite announcing a brand new Nintendo 3DS model today in Japan, Nintendo of Europe has confirmed that it will cut 320 jobs by August 31. When the office relocation was originally announced, only 130 jobs were expected to be cut. However, more than 190 temporary workers are being added to the list of people being laid off during this adjustment. Kotakureached out for clarification of the job cuts and this is Nintendo’s official statement:

As previously communicated in June 2014, approximately 130 permanent employees will be released by Nintendo of Europe (Germany) at the end of August 2014 as part of a set of measures to better enable the European business to adapt to the rapidly changing business environment.

As a separate measure, Nintendo of Europe is reorganizing its European Localization Development (ELD) department, where it currently uses a number of temporary agency workers in translation and testing activities, in order to increase flexibility and cost-efficiency in the long-term. It is intended that there will be an increase in outsourcing future translation and test activities to third-party companies on an as-needed basis, and very sadly this has meant having ended the contracts of 190 temporary agency workers, who were formally notified of this decision in June 2014.

From that, it seems as if the translation department that works on games to make sure FIGS (French, Italian, German, Spanish) translations are up to par with their English translations. While it sucks that these workers are being laid off, Nintendo’s representative made mention of using third-party workers in order to translate in the future. Perhaps this will result in games being translated for the European region in a much more timely manner.

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Hospitals often ignore policy on using qualified medical interpreters, patient safety is endangered

Hospitals often ignore policy on using qualified medical interpreters, patient safety is endangered | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it
As the U.S. grows increasingly more linguistically and culturally diverse, some safety experts worry that healthcare providers too often are not making professional interpreter and translator services available to patients and families, increasing the risk of adverse events.
Charles Tiayon's insight:
A Spanish-speaking male patient entered the emergency department at Anne Arundel Medical Center in Annapolis, Md., in December 2012 suffering from vomiting, abdominal pain and shortness of breath. Over two days in the hospital, he had blood drawn, underwent an abdominal CT scan, received IV fluids and had a urinary catheter inserted. But it's possible that he never fully understood that fluid was building up in his abdomen and lungs and that his condition could be fatal. 

According to a hospital inspection report, no one discussed his care plan with him in Spanish, the only language he understood, until an hour and a half before he died.

As the U.S. grows increasingly more linguistically and culturally diverse, some safety experts worry that healthcare providers too often are not making professional interpreter and translator services available to patients and families. Instead, they frequently rely on nonprofessionals, including patients' family members, who are not knowledgeable about medical terminology. This increases the risk of medication errors, wrong procedures, avoidable readmissions and other adverse events. Nearly 9% of the U.S. population is at risk for an adverse event because of language barriers, according to the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality.

Most organizations advise against the use of a patient's family or friends, who can potentially do more harm than good. Bilingual clinical staffers also are discouraged from stepping in if they have not been certified as medical interpreters. But physicians and hospital staff often ignore these policies, typically because of time pressures, lack of knowledge about the availability of professional interpreters, or procedural difficulties in arranging for interpreters. 

In a report published in May in the Journal for Healthcare Quality, hospital quality and safety leaders, nursing staff and interpreters recounted problems that arose when staffers tried to do without, often because they felt the wait for a professional interpreter would delay needed care. The report found that medication errors and lack of informed consent were more common among patients with language barriers.


MH Takeaways
Physicians and hospital staff often ignore hospital policies on using qualified interpreters, typically because of time pressures, lack of knowledge about the availability of interpreters or procedural difficulties in arranging for them.
Every expert interviewed by Modern Healthcare for this article knew of at least one case where a hospital relied on untrained hospital staff, or a patient's relative or friend, even at hospitals with established interpreter programs. “Everybody has a story about some risky situation where lack of adequate interpretive services put a patient in harm's way,” said Melanie Wasserman of Abt Associates, a research and program implementation firm based in Cambridge, Mass., who co-authored the journal article. 

In one case, a clinician communicated in French to a Haitian patient who spoke only Creole. Haitian interpreters noted that in French, “estomac” means stomach, but in Creole a similar-sounding word, “lestomak,” can refer to the chest. Such confusion could lead to a procedure on the wrong organ or other body part. “This is a potentially life-threatening error,” Wasserman said.

Many hospitals contract with companies providing interpreters, and most have discouraged the use of children as interpreters for their parents. While most hospitals have established at least phone-based interpretation services, it is not uncommon for hospitals in large urban areas such as San Francisco, Houston or Miami to have more comprehensive interpretation and translation programs. 

But researchers remain concerned about inconsistent monitoring and reporting of language-related errors. They say it's difficult to assess how well providers are addressing the issue, especially since patients with limited English proficiency are less likely than U.S.-born English speakers to call out errors when they occur.

“This is an area where you see some of the worst patient-safety problems,” said Dr. Glenn Flores, director of pediatrics at the UT Southwestern Children's Medical Center in Dallas, who studies language barriers. 

In a 2012 Annals of Emergency Medicine study analyzing audio recordings from visits at two large pediatric emergency departments in Massachusetts, Flores and his colleagues found thousands of what they deemed interpretation mistakes, even among professional interpreters. These included interpreters omitting, adding or substituting words, adding their own perspectives, or using idioms, words or phrases that didn't exist in the patient's language. Of these incidents, 18% had potential clinical consequences. Mistakes were less frequent among professional interpreters who had at least 100 hours of training.

Employment of interpreters and translators is projected to grow 46% by 2022, driven by large increases in the number of non-English-speaking people in the nation, according to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics. The number of people speaking a language other than English in U.S. homes climbed 158% in the past two decades, a 2013 census report found. 

The Joint Commission requires hospitals to provide professional interpretation services to every patient who needs it. It also requires written materials be tailored to patients' age, language and ability to understand. HHS' Office of Minority Health updated its National Standards for Culturally and Linguistically Appropriate Services last year, to help hospitals comply with Title VI of the Civil Rights Act and the Americans with Disabilities Act.


Laws on language
Click to enlarge.
In addition, every state has laws on language access in healthcare settings. Thirteen states and the District of Columbia directly reimburse providers for language services used by patients on Medicaid and the Children's Health Insurance Program. “The fact that states can pay directly for interpreters is a great opportunity to help hospitals meet federal requirements and help them offset the costs,” said Mara Youdelman, managing attorney for the National Health Law Program.

Hospitals in rural areas face particular challenges, said Dr. Elizabeth Jacobs, associate vice chair for health services research at the University of Wisconsin at Madison. The largest rate of increase of people with limited English proficiency is in rural areas because recent immigrants often seek agricultural and other manual labor jobs in rural areas and small towns, she noted. 

Some hospitals have staff or contract interpreters for languages commonly spoken in their communities, while others provide interpretation through off-site services by video or phone. Services offered in-person and via video are often preferred, as they allow interpreters to pick up on nonverbal cues that may be culture-specific. 

The Office of Management and Budget in 2002 estimated that U.S. hospitals' annual costs for providing interpreter services was $78 million for inpatient visits, $12 million for outpatient visits and $8.6 million for emergency department visits. An American Medical Association survey found that costs of $150 or more for interpreter services often exceeded a physician's payment for the visit, presenting what the AMA called a “significant hardship” for practices.

David Fetterolf, president of Stratus Video, which offers professional interpretation services via video, said his company's professional interpreter service costs about $1.50 a minute. Stratus uses an iPad, often attached to an IV pole, that can be wheeled into a patient room; within 30 seconds a certified interpreter is available online.

Such charges can quickly add up, but many say it is a necessary expense. “We have quite a demand,” said Darrin Bearden, interpretation services coordinator for Northside Hospital in Atlanta. The hospital has an average of 230 interpretation encounters daily, with about 83,000 total interactions in 2013. The hospital started using Stratus in 2012 to supplement other interpreter services it offers, including qualified medical interpreters on staff and telephone services.


MH Strategies
Getting help, giving help

Don't underestimate the interpreter's needed skill set:“There is a lack of understanding of the competency, knowledge, skill and ability needed by an interpreter to be effective. Just because someone is bilingual doesn't mean they can interpret,” said Mara Youdelman of the National Health Law Program.

Evaluate and incentivize bilingual staff: Take an assessment of bilingual staff, ensure they are fluent and offer incentives such as bonuses, says Dr. Glenn Flores of the UT Southwestern Children's Medical Center. “It should be part of diversifying your workforce.”

Assess and improve general health literacy:It's a challenge even for patients who speak English, says the Joint Commission's Dr. Ana Pujols-McKee. “Assessing a patient's ability to communicate effectively with a healthcare professional is an important part of the evaluation.” 

It's not just a big-city problem,says Dr. Elizabeth Jacobs of the University of Wisconsin at Madison. “The largest rate of increase of limited-English-proficient people in our country is in rural areas,” she said. 

Focus on high-risk situationssuch as medication reconciliation, discharge instructions, informed consent, ED visits and surgical care, says Aswita Tan-McGrory of Massachusetts General. 

Make interpreters easily accessible, such as listing them on the hospital's intranet and making them available via video technology: “If the provider has the perception that accessing the resource is hard, they are less likely to use it,” said Marcos Pesquera of Adventist Healthcare.
Lost in translation
But there is plenty of evidence that continued gaps in interpretation are leading to adverse outcomes. A study published in June in the American Journal of Managed Care found that patients whose primary language was not English were significantly more likely to have multiple 30-day readmissions at a Los Angeles hospital. Patients speaking Russian, Farsi and Spanish each represented about 5% of patients with three or more hospital stays between July 2009 and December 2010, the study found. 

A National Health Law Program study analyzing 35 claims filed in four states between January 2005 and May 2009 for one liability insurer found the insurer paid $2.3 million in damages or settlements and $2.8 million in legal fees for cases where the provider failed to offer a professional interpreter. Among the cases studied, five patients died and others suffered permanent damages, such as leg amputations and organ damage. 

Researchers urge hospitals to more closely track the number of limited English proficiency patients and the incidents of errors associated with these patients. Aswita Tan-McGrory, deputy director of the Disparities Solutions Center at Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, said hospitals should focus their attention on high-risk situations for interpretation problems, such as medication reconciliation, discharge instructions, informed consent, emergency visits and surgical care. 

Some experts say standardization of training and certification for medical interpreters would reduce clinical errors related to interpretation. The National Board of Certification for Medical Interpreters, based in Salem, Mass., and the Certification Commission for Healthcare Interpreters, based in Washington, offer programs testing interpreters' knowledge and skills, set ethics codes and provide guidelines on standard operating procedures. The certification commission said it has certified more than 1,600 interpreters since it was founded in 2009. 

Experts say hospitals also need to do a better job of informing staff that professional interpreter services are available. Even those with established interpretation programs still experience problems.

In the 2012 incident at Anne Arundel Medical Center, which has a professional interpreter program, emergency department nurses had indicated the patient was “Spanish-speaking only.” But there was no record that an interpreter was called during the admissions process. During the patient's first day, he signed a treatment consent form printed in English, and at one point his daughter acted as interpreter.


Lucia Contreras of Riverdale, Md., talks with Bertha Castrillon, cultural diversity liaison at Washington Adventist Hospital. The hospital has more than 150 employees who are qualified interpreters and has contract interpreters speaking more than 200 languages.
It cannot be determined whether the patient or his providers would have done anything differently if a professional Spanish-speaking interpreter had been used throughout his hospital stay. But one thing is clear: The patient “was not able to take part in decisions about his own treatment because his need for a translator was not identified,” the hospital inspection report concluded.

Anne Arundel Medical Center declined to comment on the case, citing federal privacy law. But Victoria Bayless, the hospital's president, said her facility uses a variety of communication mechanisms to meet the needs of limited English proficiency patients, including personal one-on-one interpretation, video conferencing and telephone services. “We remain focused on continuing to improve our care and service in this regard,” she said in a written statement.

In another reported incident, Washington Adventist Hospital in Takoma Park, Md., acknowledged that its policy was not followed in March when a Haitian patient who spoke Creole was admitted but no professional interpreter was provided during her inpatient stay. Instead, the patient's daughter provided interpretation.

Marcos Pesquera, executive director for Adventist Healthcare's Center for Health Equity and Wellness, could not say why the hospital's staff did not use professional interpreters in that case. But he noted the hospital has more than 150 employees who are qualified interpreters, and also has contract interpreters speaking more than 200 languages, including Creole, via telephone services and video technology. Adventist has since revamped efforts to educate staff about the availability of professional interpretation services. “If the provider has the perception that accessing the resource is hard, they are less likely to use it,” he said.

University of Wisconsin's Jacobs said long waits and other access issues in getting a professional interpreter are disincentives for busy clinicians and other hospital staffers. “So they go with the easiest thing to do at the moment—their own limited language skills, a family member, or whoever happens to be accessible,” she said. They “don't readily recognize the impact it can have.”
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The Read Russia Prize will be awarded in Moscow for the second time | Russia Beyond The Headlines

The Read Russia Prize will be awarded in Moscow for the second time | Russia Beyond The Headlines | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it
The second official awards ceremony for the Read Russia prize will take place on September 6
Charles Tiayon's insight:

The second official awards ceremony for the Read Russia prize will take place on September 6 in Pashkov House, Moscow. RBTH presents the short list for the 2014 nominees. inShare 14 Share by e-mail RELATED Telling Russian stories in English When literature came under state control: 80 years since the First Congress of Soviet Writers Dostoevsky’s cacophonic catastrophes: A new translation of 'Crime and Punishment' TAGS LITERATURE READ RUSSIA! TRANSLATION ARTS & LIVING HEADLINES Making a statement on the road: The world of the Russian bumper sticker From royal favorites to outcasts: The shifting fates of Russian Buddhists Pedal Power: Russian girls explore Britain and Ireland by bike Musicians and dancers from around the world converge on Red Square The awards ceremony will be one the highlights of the Third International Congress of Literary Translation. Source: Valery Levitin / RIA Novosti The organizational committee for the Read Russia Prize has announced its global shortlist of 17 translators and translations of Russian literature into other languages worldwide. The competition, which is open to works published between 2012 and 2014, received 112 nominations from 16 countries around the world, including Lebanon, Argentina and Morocco. The Read Russia Prize was established in 2011 by the Institute of Translation in Moscow, a nonprofit organization dedicated to furthering the development of the theory and practice of literary translation. The competition is held every two years with support from the Federal Agency for Press and Mass Communication and the Boris N. Yeltsin Presidential Center. The prize is awarded to a translator or group of translators for outstanding translations of prose and poetry works from Russian into a foreign language. The works must have been published by a foreign publisher during the previous two years. Russia honors foreign translators The prizewinners in each category are the translator(s) and the publishing house that released the book. Winners receive 5,000 euros for the translator(s) and 3,000 euros for the publisher, in the form of a grant to cover expenses for the translation of another work of Russian literature, to be agreed upon with the Institute of Translation. The jury is comprised of a group of ten specialists with a diverse background in Russian language and literature, from slavist professors and directors of cultural institutes to representatives of the publishing industry. The Read Russia Prize’s Trustee Council includes prominent Russian public, cultural and official figures such as Naina Yeltsin and Natalya Solzhenitsyn. The second awards ceremony will take place on September 6 in Moscow’s Pashkov House. It will be one of the highlights of the Third International Congress of Literary Translators, organized by The Moscow Institute of Translation. More than 300 people involved in publishing, translating and the media will take part in the event, alongside representatives from various Russian cultural ministries. Read Russia Prize 2014 Short List: For 19th century classic Russian literature: 1. Vera Bischitzky for her translation of Ivan Goncharov’s novel “Oblomov” (Germany); 2. Alejandro Ariel Gonzales for his translation of Fyodor Dostoevsky’s novella “The Double” (Argentina); 3. Jorge Ferrer Diaz for his translation of Alexander Herzen’s work “My Past and Thoughts” (Spain).   For 20th century Russian literature (works written before 1990): 1. Alexander Nitzberg for his translation of Mikhail Bulgakov’s novel “Master and Margarita” (Austria); Dostoevsky’s cacophonic catastrophes: A new translation of 'Crime and Punishment' 2. Daniela Rizzi for her translation of Osip Mandelstam’s prose works “The Noise of Time” (Italy); 3. Joanne Turnbull and Nikolai Formozov for their translation of Sigizmund Krzhizhanovsky’s collection “Autobiography of a Corpse” (United States); 4. Henryk Chlystowski for his translation of Mikhail Slonimsky’s book of short stories “Warsaw” (Poland); 5. Elizabeth and Robert Chandler for their translation of Vasily Grossman’s book “An Armenian Sketchbook” (United Kingdom).   For contemporary Russian literature (works written after 1990): 1. Julie Bouvard for her translation of Eduard Kochergin’s novel “Christened with Crosses” (France); 2. Ives Gauthier for his translation of Andrei Rubanov’s novel “A Successful Life” (France); 3. Nicoletta Marcialis for her translation of Zakhar Prilepin’s novel “Sin” (Italy); 4. Ljubinka Milincic for her translation of Georgy Vladimov’s novel “The General and His Army” (Serbia); 5. Ewa Rojewska-Olejarczuk for her translation of Viktor Pelevin’s novel “T” (Poland); 6. Marian Schwartz for her translation of Leonid Yuzefovich’s novel “Harlequin’s Costume” (United Kingdom).   For poetry: 1. Abderrahim Lataoui for his translation of “Selected Masterpieces of Russian Poetry by 19th- and 20th-Century Poets” (Morocco); 2. Liu Wenfei for his translation of lyrical works by Alexander Pushkin (China); 3. Martina Jakobson for her translation of Arseny Tarkovsky’s book “A Herd of Deer” (Germany).
Source: Russia Beyond the Headlines - http://rbth.com/literature/2014/08/29/the_read_russia_prize_will_be_awarded_in_moscow_for_the_second_tim_39409.html)

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