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Le traducteur assermenté : qui est-il ?

Le traducteur assermenté : qui est-il ? | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it

Vous êtes passionnés par les langues étrangères ? Le métier de traducteur vous attire ? Vous désirez en apprendre plus sur la façon de devenir traducteur assermenté ? Le Village de la Justice fait la lumière sur tout ce qu’il faut savoir sur ce titre de plus en plus prisé. Version imprimable Partagez cet article sur ... Dans la même rubrique : Premiers résultats de l’enquête sur les risques psychosociaux chez les juristes. Participez à la 6e Enquête Métiers du Droit du Village de la justice ! >> Tous les articles de cette rubrique >> Commenter cet article Que fait-il ? La traduction assermentée consiste à traduire de façon certifiée un certain nombre de documents comme des actes de procédure, des actes notariés, des actes d’huissier, des actes administratifs, etc. Il s’agit d’informations officielles pouvant être présentées à toutes administrations, institutions et autorités en France comme à l’étranger. Le traducteur, reconnu comme étant un officier ministériel, certifie qu’un texte est la traduction fidèle et conforme d’un document original. Pour que celle-ci soit reconnue comme étant assermentée, il est obligatoire d’y faire apposer le cachet et la signature du traducteur reconnu officiellement. Le traducteur assermenté doit connaître une ou plusieurs langues étrangères mais également maitriser l’écrit de sa langue maternelle. Il doit être capable de traduire des textes sans en modifier ni le fond ni la forme. Attention, il est important de ne pas confondre le métier de traducteur de celui d’interprète. La grande différence entre ces deux métiers est le moyen de communication employé par chacun : l’écrit pour le premier et l’oral pour le second. Ces activités sont bien distinctes dans la mesure où leurs exigences et leur finalité diffèrent. Le traducteur travaille sur la langue écrite en prenant du temps car il lui faut traduire du mieux possible et de manière fidèle alors que l’interprète doit retranscrire dans l’immédiat et sans préparation tous types de discours ou de conversation.
Read more at http://www.village-justice.com/articles/traducteur-assermente,14772.html#tYxaxLaa83IxcLxg.99

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Metaglossia: The Translation World
News about translation, interpreting, intercultural communication, terminology and lexicography - as it happens
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UN Careers - jobs in this network (Translators, Revisers, Editors, etc.)

UN Careers -  jobs in this network (Translators, Revisers, Editors, etc.) | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it

Vacancies in this network: Translators, Revisers, Editors, etc.

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Business of One: Career Development Tips for Freelance Writers

Business of One: Career Development Tips for Freelance Writers | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it
Successful career development for freelance writers is reliant on the ability to transition your previous writing skills to a business of one.
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Whether you’re an accomplished news writer or a “mom blogger,” the shift to freelancing full-time for brands can feel daunting. Luckily, the writing skills and experience you already have can translate into creating branded content. Learning how to transition those skills can lead to your successful career development as a business of one.

Prior to embarking on my journey into the world of branded content, I began my career in screenwriting. While writing lifestyle content for brands is quite different from writing dialogue for cartoon characters, with a bit of a learning curve I was able to use the knowledge I had acquired working in the film industry. I’ll admit that I did make mistakes, but my ability to adapt, take some risks, and learn from those mistakes is what has helped me succeed. Here are a few of the lessons I learned along the way.

Know Your Strengths and Weaknesses

In the film industry, writers are constantly worried about being pigeonholed in a particular style or genre. So, when I began writing branded content, I assumed that I should cover as many topics as possible. I learned the hard way that the opposite was true. I took on work from a new client because it fell into my lap, but the topic I was covering was not really in my field of expertise. It quickly became apparent to the client, and to me, that I was struggling to create content that went beyond the information I could find with a simple Google search.

Needless to say the client and I parted ways, but I learned from my mistake; moving forward, I made sure to only chase work that I was both qualified for and passionate about. When you find your niche, it will reflect in the quality of your writing, help you build your personal brand, and earn you more work.

Always Be Closing

One of the things that struck me when I met successful comedy writers was that many of them were “always on.” In other words, they were comedians by nature, constantly being funny even when they were just shooting the breeze. Their natural abilities helped sell them as talented writers even before anyone had read a single line they had written.

While you don’t have to be Robin Williams to be a successful freelance writer, the ability to sell yourself is important no matter what business you’re in. Promoting yourself can feel like stepping outside of your comfort zone, but it is an integral part of your career development. What I didn’t understand as I transitioned to brand journalism, however, is that there is a proper technique to selling your personal brand and your writing. Simply tweeting your articles into the Internet ether isn’t enough. To make an impact, you need to develop a strong social media presence across multiple platforms. You also need to grow your audience by regularly engaging followers. Block off some time every day for building and promoting your personal brand.

Don’t Get Too Comfortable

In film school, I spent a lot of time analyzing and learning about story structure and writing techniques that have been used for generations. Although the entertainment industry does evolve, changes come about very slowly and the tried-and-true methods almost always remain in some form.

When I transitioned into working as a brand journalist, I thought I’d be able to learn the ropes and be set, but I discovered that the branded content landscape is almost constantly shifting to keep up with marketing trends. Change can be difficult, but as Charles Darwin said, “It is not the strongest or the most intelligent who will survive, but those who can best manage change.” The ability to stay on the cutting edge is integral to your career development as a freelance writer. I try to take a little time each week to read up on new marketing strategies and determine how to apply those concepts to my work.

It’s Not Really a One-Man Show

Writing for film and television is a collaborative process and, although freelancing is a business of one, the same is true for branded content. When you’re writing for a brand you have to get used to the idea that you are not just speaking for yourself. You don’t have to lose your personal style, but you do have to learn to strike a balance between the brand’s voice and your own. In addition to learning to adapt your writing style to each client’s needs, it’s also important to be able to take constructive criticism from editors and to comfortably apply their notes to your work.

A successful career as a freelance writer won’t just fall into your lap, no matter what your previous experience is. As your own business, you not only have to create high-quality content, but you also have to be your own marketing and development team.

Take the leap today and start developing your own career as a full-time freelance writer by joining Skyword’s community of writers.

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A style guide for spies misses its grammatical target - FT.com

A style guide for spies misses its grammatical target - FT.com | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it
Now that the war on terror is cooling down, the war on grammar is hotting up. Last week, a 185-page style guide written by the CIA to help its agents write a respectable sentence was circulated online, proving that the agency takes the protection of
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High quality global journalism requires investment. Please share this article with others using the link below, do not cut & paste the article. See our Ts&Cs and Copyright Policy for more detail. Email ftsales.support@ft.com to buy additional rights. http://www.ft.com/cms/s/0/eedf807e-082b-11e4-acd8-00144feab7de.html#ixzz37C07dog0

This news will make pedants the world over feel very safe indeed. In an age in which people no longer fear reds under beds and mainly don’t expect to be blown up in the course of a normal day, one of the few things that still terrifies them is misuse of grammar.

Last Wednesday, I overheard colleagues discussing the most bruising football match in World Cup history and one said: “Did you hear the commentator said ‘disinterested’, when he meant ‘uninterested’?”

I turned from that conversation to see on Twitter people criticising the pop star Ariana Grande for her lyric “I got one less problem without ya”, when she should have sung one fewer.

Equally, by far the most controversial column I’ve written recently enraged readers not because I suggested the average male ego could not cope with having a higher earning wife, but because the title read “Divorce is a risk when she earns more than him”. Angry emails poured in claiming it should have been “than he does”.

The reason we get so excited about grammar is because it is one of the few means left of establishing our social superiority.

I was the victim of a groovy education in the 1960s and 1970s, and grew up not knowing a preposition from a proposition, yet because my mother once warned me against the dangling participle, I am a life-long, sworn enemy of it. Every time I catch one I feel a powerful mixture of outrage and condescension, and so am delighted to see that the CIA takes just as dim a view of this weapon of misconstruction as I do.

Yet in every other way The Style Manual & Writers Guide for Intelligence Publications is a misguided, worrying document. The very title is a giveaway that the contents are going to be a dud: it is so long that I was bored before I’d even got to the end of it and, worse, contains a grammatical howler. The guide belongs to the writer. And so there should be an apostrophe in there somewhere.

In an age in which people no longer fear reds under beds, one of the few things that still terrifies is misuse of grammar

Inside, the attention to detail is as impressive as it is pointless. There is a 13-page discussion on the use of capital letters, in which it is revealed that I really should have used a big A for Agency in paragraph two above. There is also a detailed section on how to refer to a range of numbers in which it decrees: “The march covered 10 to 15 kilometres (not 10-15 kilometres)”.

After 150 pages of rules, the agency/Agency offers some tips, or “helpful precepts” as it calls them, on how to write well. “Favour the active voice and shun streams of polysyllables and prepositional phrases,” it urges. George Orwell (“never use a long word where a short one will do” etc) would not have been impressed.

The point about language is that it changes, though it seems to be doing so slowly at the CIA. This version of the guide, updated in 2011, feels the need to explain that “email” is “a way to transmit messages electronically, or a message or messages so transmitted”.

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Global STS Translation Market 2014-2018

STS translation is a technology to convert spoken words into digital signals that can be recognized and automatically translated into the spoken commands of another language. A STS translation system or software is deployed for real-time communication between two or more individuals who speak different languages. Such systems can be employed in handheld PDAs, smartphones, desktops, and laptops, as well via landlines. A STS translation system is cost-effective compared to human translators.

The analysts forecast the Global STS Translation market will grow at a CAGR of 19.11 percent over the period 2013-2018.

The Global STS Translation market can be divided into three segments: Speech Recognition, Speech Translation, and Speech Synthesis. These segments indicate the procedure of doing STS Translation.

The report, the Global STS Translation Market 2014-2018, has been prepared based on an in-depth market analysis with inputs from industry experts. The report covers the Americas and the EMEA and APAC regions; it also covers the Global STS Translation market landscape and its growth prospects in the coming years. The report also includes a discussion of the key vendors operating in this market.

The study was conducted using an objective combination of primary and secondary information including inputs from key participants in the industry. The report contains a comprehensive market and vendor landscape in addition to a SWOT analysis of the key vendors. 

Read more: http://www.digitaljournal.com/pr/2049584#ixzz37ByzNZBT

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STS translation is a technology to convert spoken words into digital signals that can be recognized and automatically translated into the spoken commands of another language. A STS translation system or software is deployed for real-time communication between two or more individuals who speak different languages. Such systems can be employed in handheld PDAs, smartphones, desktops, and laptops, as well via landlines. A STS translation system is cost-effective compared to human translators.

The analysts forecast the Global STS Translation market will grow at a CAGR of 19.11 percent over the period 2013-2018.

The Global STS Translation market can be divided into three segments: Speech Recognition, Speech Translation, and Speech Synthesis. These segments indicate the procedure of doing STS Translation.

The report, the Global STS Translation Market 2014-2018, has been prepared based on an in-depth market analysis with inputs from industry experts. The report covers the Americas and the EMEA and APAC regions; it also covers the Global STS Translation market landscape and its growth prospects in the coming years. The report also includes a discussion of the key vendors operating in this market.

The study was conducted using an objective combination of primary and secondary information including inputs from key participants in the industry. The report contains a comprehensive market and vendor landscape in addition to a SWOT analysis of the key vendors. 

Read more: http://www.digitaljournal.com/pr/2049584#ixzz37ByzNZBT

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Appel à contributeurs Rubrique (X)HTML, êtes-vous notre prochain rédacteur, traducteur, modérateur, newser ?

Appel à contributeurs Rubrique (X)HTML, êtes-vous notre prochain rédacteur, traducteur, modérateur, newser ? | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it
Bonjour à tous, membres fidèles ou nouveaux arrivants,Le (X)HTML est aussi vieux (ou presque) que le Web. Ce format de données (on ne peut pas appeler le HTML un langage de programmation) a subit au fil des années de nombreuses évolutions, chacune le rendant plus puissant.Tout comme la technologie, notre rubrique (X)HTML existe depuis plusieurs années. Et comme vous le savez, la rubrique essaye de vous proposer un maximum d'aide dans vos développements de sites Web, quel que soit leur horizon, a...
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Le (X)HTML est aussi vieux (ou presque) que le Web. Ce format de données (on ne peut pas appeler le HTML un langage de programmation) a subit au fil des années de nombreuses évolutions, chacune le rendant plus puissant.

Tout comme la technologie, notre rubrique (X)HTML existe depuis plusieurs années. Et comme vous le savez, la rubrique essaye de vous proposer un maximum d'aide dans vos développements de sites Web, quel que soit leur horizon, aux travers des forums et des ressources telles que les articles et tutoriels, les FAQ, la traduction de la documentation et d'articles techniques, les sources, les critiques de livres, les news, les choix d'outils, les débats, etc.

Pour vous assurer un service de qualité, nous avons sans cesse besoin de nouveaux membres pour nous aider, membres qui ont suivi les évolutions du (X)HTML et qui sont les mieux placés pour en parler. Peut-être que vous, lecteur assidu et passionné, vous seriez intéressé de nous rejoindre pour améliorer la rubrique ; vous aussi, visiteur de passage, vos compétences peuvent aider à atteindre cet objectif.

Comment contribuer ?

  • Alimentation de la FAQ : elle est déjà fournie mais ne demande qu'à l'être plus ;
  • Rédaction d'articles ou de tutoriels : pourquoi ne pas devenir rédacteur sur Developpez.com ? Que vous soyez amateurs ou professionnels, débutants ou chevronnés, passionnés par le développement Web et cherchant à partager votre passion, au travers d'articles orientés vers les débutants ou les experts ;
  • Traductions de tutoriels en anglais : il existe de nombreuses ressources anglophone qui mériteraient d'avoir leur équivalent en français ;
  • Rédaction d'actualités : suivre l'actualité et faire découvrir aux autres membres toutes les nouvelles informations sur le développement Web ;
  • Correction orthographique : vérifier la correction orthotypographique des ressources proposées ;
  • Modération : aider à la bonne tenue du forum afin de présenter la meilleure base de connaissances possible (au moins dix fois plus de personnes lisent ce forum que ceux qui y écrivent) ;
  • Création de Quiz : un très bon moyen d'apprendre tout en s'amusant.
  • ...


Travailler au sein d'une communauté vous permettra de profiter du savoir de chacun. En tant que traducteur, rédacteur, modérateur ou newser pour la rubrique (X)HTML :

  • vous serez accompagné au fur à mesure de votre travail, peu importe le temps que vous prendrez pour effectuer une tâche ;
  • vous pourrez poser en direct des questions sur le forum si vous avez des doutes ou des hésitations dans la traduction ou la rédaction ;
  • vous verrez toutes vos publications relues par l'équipe et publiées à votre nom.


Il n'y a pas besoin de passer des heures par jour sur le forum : peu importe votre profil, les projets (tant en traduction que rédaction) sont divisés en tâches de relativement faible ampleur (un article, un bout d'article), qui vous permettront de vous investir plus ou moins, en fonction du temps que vous pourrez y consacrer.

Être contributeur pour notre communauté représente une véritable opportunité. Cela vous permettra d'enrichir votre savoir sur un sujet technique mais aussi d'apprendre continuellement de nouvelles choses, grâce au travail en équipe ; de plus, pour la traduction, d'augmenter considérablement vos connaissances dans une langue comme dans l'autre.

Si vous êtes motivé et souhaitez participer à l'évolution de la rubrique (X)HTML, n'hésitez pas un seul instant : Contactez-nous !

Dans tous les cas, MERCI de nous être fidèle !

Êtes-vous notre prochain rédacteur, traducteur, modérateur, newser ?
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12 Favorite World Cup Words | Wordnik

12 Favorite World Cup Words | Wordnik | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it
We wouldn’t call ourselves rabid fans of soccer (or football, depending on your side of the Atlantic), but then that guy bit that other guy (and gave us
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We wouldn’t call ourselves rabid fans of soccer (or football, depending on your side of the Atlantic), but then that guy bit that other guy (and gave us Suarezing), the Colombia team danced after every goal, and Tim Howard made 16 record-breaking saves (and while he couldn’t save the U.S. team, he did save the internet). Now we’re hooked.

And we’re celebrating the best way we know how: with words. Here are 12 of our favorites from the world of the World Cup.

corridor of uncertainty

“The Netherlands could not have gone much closer when a ball scythed along the corridor of uncertainty, somehow eluding two Dutch attackers and three Costa Rica defenders, only to fall to the feet of van Persie.”

Callum Hamilton, “Netherlands vs. Costa Rica: Final score 0-0, Dutch win on penalties after dramatic finale,” SB Nation, July 5, 2014

The corridor of uncertainty is a pass delivered into the area between the goalkeeper and the last line of defense. The phrase originates from cricket and refers to “an area where a cricket ball can pitch during a delivery” and where “a batsman struggles most to determine whether to play forward or back, or whether to leave the delivery.”

According to the Oxford English Dictionary (OED), corridor of uncertainty, which seems to have originated in the mid-1980s, is particularly associated with English cricketer and commentator Geoffrey Boycott.

dummy

“First, Thomas Muller managed to fall over as he attempted to dummy the ball, before Toni Kroos played in a shocking chip that was easily swept up by the Algerian defence.”

Hannah Duncan, “Thomas Muller ‘fall’ in German free-kick ‘fail’ was all a big ruse, reveals Benedikt Howedes,” Metro, July 1, 2014

To dummy in soccer means to deceive your opponent into thinking you’re going to pass, shoot, or receive the ball, and then do something different. The OED says this term originated in the 1950s.

The meaning comes from the sense of dummy, “an imitation of a real or original object, intended to be used as a practical substitute,” which perhaps comes from the bridge or whist term referring to “an imaginary player represented by an exposed ‘hand’, managed by and serving as partner to one of the players.”

These senses seem to ultimately come from the original meaning of dummy, a dumb or mute person. The Old English dumb means “silent, unable to speak,” and comes from the Proto-Indo-European dheubh-, “confusion, stupefaction, dizziness.” Dheubh- originates from the root dheu-, “dust, mist, vapor, smoke,” perhaps with the idea of “defective perception or wits,” according to the Online Etymology Dictionary.

flopping

“The practice of the flop is a tried-and-true method of manipulating each game’s referee to make calls go your way by aggressively exaggerating fouls or the appearance of fouls.”

Eric Levenson, “Dissecting American Soccer’s Hatred of the Flop Is a World Cup Tradition,” The Wire, June 16, 2014

Flopping, also known as diving as well as simulation, if you’re FIFA, means pretending to be fouled, and is usually evinced by exaggerated falling and howls of pain.

We couldn’t find when the term flopping originated exactly. It also applies to basketball, and in 1963 Frank Ramsey described his “deceptive” techniques to Sports Illustrated, although he never calls it flopping. He says the most reliable “eye-catcher” is the pratfall. Perhaps flopping, with the idea of flopping over, comes from the these exaggerated falls.

[Photo via The Wire]

giant-killing

“They now take on Greece, the runners up in Group C, in a round-of-16 match in the early hours of Monday morning and will be strongly fancied to continue their giant-killing run.”

Michael Lynch, “World Cup 2014: North and Central American region provides success stories of the tournament,” The Sydney Morning Herald, June 28, 2014

Giant-killing refers to, in sports, “the defeat of a team by a much weaker opponent.” The phrase may come from the story of David and Goliath, although the OED’s earliest citations refer to “Jack the giant killer” and “giant-killing Jack” of Jack and the Beanstalk.

[Illustration: "The Chronicle of the Valiant Feats"]

group of death

“Advancing out of the Group of Death is significant, but playing in the second round of the World Cup is not.”

Mike Foss, “Just escaping the group of death isn’t good enough for the U.S. at the World Cup anymore,” USA Today, June 27, 2014

group of death is “a group in a multi-stage tournament which is unusually competitive, because the number of strong competitors in the group is greater than the number of qualifying places available for the next phase of the tournament.”

This term may come from the Spanish grupo de la muerte, which was coined by Mexican journalists in 1970.

Kop

“A favourite of the Kop – the Liverpool faithful – Suarez enjoyed an ambivalent relationship with rest of the Premiership fans who slowly warmed to his goal-scoring abilities but never forgot his other escapades.”

Siddharth Saxena, “Fifa bites back: Suarez gets nine-match ban,” The Times of India, June 27, 2014

Kop, short for Spion Kop, refers to the stadium terraces “attended by hardcore fans, particularly in the United Kingdom.” The original Spion Kop, which translates from Afrikaans as “spy hill,” is a mountain in South Africa and the site of the Battle of Spion Kop, which was fought during the Second Boer War.

Sports stadium terraces may have first been referred to as Spion Kop in the early 1900s, shortly after the battle, which seems to pre-date the OED’s citation of 1924.

lost the dressing room

“Kiss’ appointment was welcomed by the players – Rory Best said getting Kiss was ‘brilliant for Ulster Rugby’ – but amid talk Anscombe lost the dressing room, Kiss will have to breathe new life into the province.”

Tom Hamilton, “Ulster’s knock-on effect on Ireland,” ESPN Scrum, July 3, 2014

The term lost the dressing room refers to when a sports team’s “manager is deemed to have lost control and support of the players” and may soon get fired. The term may come from the idea that it’s in the dressing or locker room that the manager raises his players’ spirits.

magic sponge

“Kicking a football [on Jupiter] would be like kicking a lump of concrete. More than the magic sponge would be needed to sort out that injury.”

Stuart Clark, “Across the Universe,” The Guardian, June 11, 2014

The magic sponge is a seemingly ordinary sponge that has a miraculous “reviving effect on injured players.” The OED says it originated around 1961:

Consider what is said of players and ‘the magic sponge’. Of how they are supposed to go down on the slightest pretence and, with scarcely a squeeze from the sponge, continue playing vigorously within a matter of seconds.

nutmeg

“Higuain had poked the ball through his legs to set up the shooting chance. Ouch! That’s called ‘a nutmeg in soccer.’”

Don Cuddy, “On the World Cup: Costa Rica Nearly Pulls off Historic Upset,” South Coast Today, July 6, 2014

The nutmeg is a technique used in “soccer, field hockey or basketball, in which a player rolls or throws the ball through an opponent’s legs.” The OED’s earliest citation is from 1968:

Three times I pushed the ball between the legs of the same full-back. This is the worst thing a forward can do to a defender because it makes him look foolish; and if, as I did, the forward then shouts ‘Nut Meg’ (the traditional taunt) the defender’s ego takes a sharp knock.

It’s not clear why this maneuver is called the nutmeg. Wikipedia offers a few theories: that it comes from slang meaning of nutmeg as “testicles”; that nutmeg is Cockney rhyming slang for leg; and that nutmeg at one point came to mean duping someone because nutmegs “were such a valuable commodity that unscrupulous exporters were to pull a fast one by mixing a helping of wooden replicas into the sacks being shipped to England.”

rabona

“Then, with no-one around him and time to pick out a man, he went for an unnecessary, extravagant rabona pass.”

Sam Cunningham, “Angel Di Maria played one of the worst match-winning performances in history,” The Daily Mail, July 2, 2014

rabona is “a method of kicking the football whereby the kicking leg is wrapped around the back of the standing leg.” (Not clear on what that means? This compilation might help.)

Apparently the first to perform the rabona was Argentina’s Ricardo Infante in 1948, and the Argentinian magazine, El Grafico, was the first to come up with the term. Their cover showed Infante (which means “infant” in Spanish) “dressed as a pupil with the caption ‘Infante played hooky,’” where rabona means to play hooky or skip school.

[Photo via Flickr, CC BY 2.0 by Kiernan Clarke]

tifo

Tifos are sort of a continental European thing — you’ll especially see the Italians throwing up large choreographed displays to show their support for their teams.”

Kathy Willens, “Where is Soccer City, USA?” Kens5.com, June 16, 2014

tifo is “a form of choreography displayed by supporters on the terraces of an arena or stadium, where they make a large-scale pattern or picture by holding up, or wearing, various materials.”

The tifo originated in Italy and Southern Europe, and is a shortened form of tifosi, Italian for “fans.” See also Ultras.

[Photo via Flickr, CC BY 2.0 by psmag.net]

tiki-taka

“In its six years of global supremacy, [the Spanish team] perfected an innovative way of playing the game, known as tiki-taka, which has players string together a series of rapid, short passes, many of them on first touch, denying their opponents the ball for long periods and, ultimately, wearing them down.”

John Cassidy, “Adios to the tiki-taka men,” The New Yorker, June 18, 2014

Tiki-taka is soccer style “characterised by short passing and movement, working the ball through various channels, and maintaining possession.” The word tiki-taka is imitative and may translate as “touch-touch” in Spanish.

While the term was already in colloquial use in Spanish football, perhaps originating with retired midfielder Javier Clement, Spanish broadcaster Spanish broadcaster Andrés Montes is credited with coining and popularizing the phrase.

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En ce moment - Site internet du Centre national du Livre

En ce moment - Site internet du Centre national du Livre | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it
11 traducteurs vietnamiens accueillis au CNL pour un séminaire

Du 15 au 25 juillet, 11 traducteurs vietnamiens, encadrés par 2 traducteurs expérimentés, participeront à des ateliers de traduction au CNL et rencontreront des professionnels français du monde de l’édition.

Les matinées de travail rythmeront le voyage des jeunes traducteurs à Paris qui se concentreront sur les ouvrages de JMG Le Clézio, Tempête (Éditions Gallimard, 2014) et de Trinh Xuan Thuan, Le destin de l’Univers : le Big-Bang et après (Éditions Gallimard, 2008). Les après-midi seront consacrées aux rencontres avec des professionnels français (éditeurs, libraire, bibliothécaire, critique littéraire, traducteur…).

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11 traducteurs vietnamiens accueillis au CNL pour un séminaire

Du 15 au 25 juillet, 11 traducteurs vietnamiens, encadrés par 2 traducteurs expérimentés, participeront à des ateliers de traduction au CNL et rencontreront des professionnels français du monde de l’édition.

Les matinées de travail rythmeront le voyage des jeunes traducteurs à Paris qui se concentreront sur les ouvrages de JMG Le Clézio, Tempête (Éditions Gallimard, 2014) et de Trinh Xuan Thuan, Le destin de l’Univers : le Big-Bang et après (Éditions Gallimard, 2008). Les après-midi seront consacrées aux rencontres avec des professionnels français (éditeurs, libraire, bibliothécaire, critique littéraire, traducteur…).

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'No, I Said' Command Lets Google Correct Itself

'No, I Said' Command Lets Google Correct Itself | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it
Google has announced a new innovation to its Google Now search allowing any correction if it has been misinterpreted the spoken words. This feature has been revealed to both Android and iOS versions of the Google search application.
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When the "OK Google" feature is used, the accuracy of the words seems to a challenge. According to Droid Life, it depends on many factors, such as quietness of the surroundings and clarity of speech. Therefore, the results can be inaccurate sometimes.

Google acknowledges the problem and introduced the "No, I Said" command which makes the Google voice search more natural and conversational. This is easier compared with performing the search over again either by typing or stressing certain words to make sure the voice assistant gets it right.

Google announced the feature by posting a brief video demo in Google+. The video clearly shows how the command "No, I Said" works instantly and easily corrects a misheard word.

In the video, the user asks to search for "baroque artists" which Google misinterprets as "broke artists" and shows plenty of witty results. Immediately, with the help of the voice command the user says "No, I Said baroque" which ultimately clears the misunderstood word and provides the actual desired results.

Techradar further reports Google does not mention of such a unique feature being added in the latest notes which were released for the Google Search apps and had only the usual "bug fixes and performance improvements" on Google Play.

Google Now and Apple's Siri are constantly updating their voice assistant apps in order to make them more human and easier to use. However, according to Techradar, with the addition of "No, I said" command, the voice-activated, Google Now-powered assistant becomes much more powerful than Apple's Siri, which does not have the feature of recovering when words are misunderstood.

Another update is Google's addition of offline support for its Google Now cards. Users can now view the cards even without an Internet connection. Also, Google added support for Indian dialect to its Voice Search improving the search experience for Indian users.

To contact the editor, e-mail: editor@ibtimes.com

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L’ »homoparentalité » impensable au regard de la langue chinoise ou coréenne

L’ »homoparentalité » impensable au regard de la langue chinoise ou coréenne | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it
Un auteur du blog britannique Englishmanif.blog écrit que la langue chinoise ne connait ni les mots de “couple” ni ceux de “parents”.

Le terme
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Un auteur du blog britannique Englishmanif.blog écrit que la langue chinoise ne connait ni les mots de “couple” ni ceux de “parents”.

Le terme chinois utilisé se traduit en anglais par husbandwife ; en français par “marifemme”. Les enfants pour parler de leurs parents utilisent fathermother traduisible par “papamaman”.

Cela est vrai non seulement du Chinois, mais aussi du Coréen: 

부모()=parents (se prononce « poumo ») = littéralement: « père-mère »

=père (voir 성부와 = Saint Père Dieu) ( se prononce « pou »: même racine que papa)

=mère (voir 성모 = Sainte Mère = Marie) ( se prononce « mo »: même racine que maman)

 

Je ne connais pas le japonais, mais je ne serais pas surpris que ce soit aussi vrai dans cette langue, qui fait partie de la même grande famille des langues asiatiques. 

Dans ces langues, l’idée même de « parents » homosexuels est « impensable, inexprimable, inouïe ». On ne peut pas l’entendre (inouïe=inaudible) parce qu’on ne peut pas le dire ; on ne peut pas le dire parce que l’idée même de parent est « père-mère » : on ne peut pas le « penser » autrement. 

Il faut dire qu’avec la moindre connaissance d’étymologie, l’idée même de « parents homosexuels » est aussi impensable dans les langues latines, car « parent » vient de « parens – celui/celle qui ENGENDRE » ; or il est bien évident que tout « couple » homosexuel est absolument incapable d’engendrer, et donc d’être parents !

En union de prières en Jésus et Marie, 


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FRA - Glossaire juridique - Anaxagora

FRA - Glossaire juridique - Anaxagora | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it
Valérie Ladegaillerie, docteur en droit, met à notre disposition un glossaire de terminologie juridique, certes forcément incomplet (vu l'ampleur de la terminologie du domaine) malgré ses 170 pages...
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6 Invisible Secrets to Fostering Your Creativity

6 Invisible Secrets to Fostering Your Creativity | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it
When IBM recently polled 1,500 CEOs across 60 countries, they rated creativity as the most import...
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Eighty percent of the CEOs said the business environment is growing so complex that it literally demands new ways of thinking. Less than 50 percent said they believed their organizations were equipped to deal effectively with this rising complexity. Fortunately, even if our work environments are not as accommodating as they could be, we as individuals have the power to train our own creativity, the same way we would any muscle.

Here are the six fundamental moves you can make to fuel your own creativity:

1. Meet Your Needs. Recognize that questioning orthodoxy and convention -- the key to creativity -- begins with questioning the way you're working. The more we are preoccupied by unmet needs, the less energy and engagement we bring to our work. Take The Energy Audit to find out how you're doing. You can't change what you don't notice.

2. Train Creativity Systematically. It isn't magical and it can be developed. There are five well-defined, widely accepted stages of creative thinking: first insight, saturation, incubation, illumination and verification. They don't always unfold predictably, but they do provide a roadmap for enlisting the whole brain, moving back and forth between analytic, deductive, left-hemisphere thinking, and more pattern-seeking, big-picture, right-hemisphere thinking. The best description of the stages I've come across is in Betty Edward's book Drawing on the Artist Within. The best understanding of the role of the right hemisphere, and how to cultivate it, is in Edwards' first book, Drawing on the Right Side of the Brain.

3. Nurture Your Passion. It is often difficult to feel creative when we are in roles that don't excite our imagination. Think of the aspects of your job that you find most challenging, enjoyable and meaningful. What specific steps could you take to spend more time engaged in these activities?

4. Make Your Work Matter. Human beings are meaning-making animals. Money pays the bills but it's a thin source of meaning. We feel better about ourselves when we're making a positive contribution to something beyond ourselves. It's a source of fuel not just for higher performance, but also for thinking more creatively about how to overcome obstacles and generate new solutions. How can you focus more of your energy at work on contributing to others?

5. Make the Time. Creative thinking requires relatively open-ended, uninterrupted time, free of pressure for immediate answers and instant solutions. Ironically, the best way to nurture creativity is to schedule sacrosanct time for it. The first step is to set aside least an hour a week for reflection, uninterrupted by the ping of your email or the ring of your phone. Often our most creative breakthroughs occur when we step away from a problem we're trying to solve and let our unconscious work on it. Try taking a walk, or listening to music, or quieting the mind by meditating.

6. Value Renewal. Human beings are not meant to operate continuously the way computers do. We're designed to expend energy for relatively short periods of time -- no more than 90 minutes -- and then recover. Movement -- especially exercise that raises the heart rate -- is another powerful way to induce the sort of shift in consciousness in which creative breakthroughs spontaneously arise.



Read more: http://theenergyproject.com/blog/6-invisible-secrets-fostering-your-creativity#ixzz37B3FB9hT

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Bauso: How do children learn to read the Montessori way?

Bauso: How do children learn to read the Montessori way? | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it
"The child is the future man, the foundation must be firm; the building blocks must be chosen with care." — Dr. Maria Montessori
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"The child is the future man, the foundation must be firm; the building blocks must be chosen with care." — Dr. Maria Montessori

I try to pass my love of reading to my students. I managed to snag a few of them when I read “Julie of the Wolves” aloud. Sometimes I let a child borrow one of my personal books from home, and I have also made a habit of giving our children books as gifts throughout the year. But still some of them weren't interested. There are many obstacles that block our children from experiencing the joy of a good book — video games, lack of books at home, television, VIDEO GAMES! It can be difficult enough to get them to read during the school year, but the summer is a killer! So exactly what is the Montessori approach to reading?

At Creative Minds Montessori we begin by placing our youngest students in classes in which the older students are already reading as a natural lure for the young child. What younger child doesn't want to do exactly what the older children are doing?

Some of the first exercises our young students encounter when learning to read are the sandpaper letters, metal insets and the moveable alphabet.

Sandpaper letters are cut out of sandpaper and glued onto a wooden tablet. Consonants are mounted on a red background, the vowels are on blue. Only lower-case letters are used in the beginning. The sandpaper letters offer three distinctive experiences: Learning to recognize the shape of each letter, experiencing the tactile feel of the sandpaper letter by tracing its outline just as if writing it with a pencil, and finally learning to pronounce and recognize the spoken sound that the letter represents.

Maria Montessori designed the metal insets to provide an opportunity for young children to practice the basic strokes of letters. Children often make booklet after booklet of ovals, pentagons, quatrefoils and trapezoids by tracing the frame of the shape. This helps them gain fine motor control.

But how do children put these skills and concepts together to form words? At Creative Minds Montessori, the teacher/directress will present two or three letters at a time, showing the child how to trace and pronounce each letter. She follows a “three period lesson” — a lesson made up of three steps. First, she shows the child the letter, traces its shape just as it would be written, and pronounces its basic phonetic sound. As a second step, she asks the child to show her each letter in turn, giving the child the prompt for asking for a specific letter — "please show me the 'tuh'" (t). In the third step, she points to each letter and asks the child to identify it without any prompts. As the child masters the first group of letters, new ones are added until they know the entire alphabet.

Next, our children begin to compose words with the movable alphabet, a set of letters cut out of wood that follow the same color scheme as the sandpaper letters. Our teachers assemble a basket of objects that represent simple three-letter phonetic words. The child selects an object, says its name aloud, and then selects the letter that matches the first sound in its name. They continue this for the second and third sounds, and then finally they read the entire word out loud. Gradually, our children are introduced to consonant blends (sl, tr, cr), digraphs (th, sh, ch), vowel teams (ea, ou, ui), and then words containing more than one syllable.

While using their growing knowledge of the phonetic sounds of the alphabet, our children learn to read and write increasingly complex words and sentences. The mastery of basic reading skills normally develops so smoothly that we often refer to our students as suddenly "exploding into reading," which leaves them (and their families) beaming with joy.

Once our young students have made that initial leap into reading, they tend to progress rapidly from reading and writing single words to sentences and stories. At this point, we begin a sequential study of the English language: vocabulary, spelling rules, functions of grammar and sentence structure.

As Maria Montessori said, "The only language men ever speak perfectly is the one they learn in babyhood, when no one can teach them anything!" Reading is different. It must be actively taught and consciously learned. It's important as educators and parents that we understand the mechanics behind the skill of reading. The more we understand, the better able we are to help when there are problems that need to be addressed.

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Mormon Church essay says one of its scriptures may not be a literal translation

Mormon Church essay says one of its scriptures may not be a literal translation | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it
A new online essay by the LDS Church says its Book of Abraham is inspired scripture but perhaps not a literal word-for-word translation of ancient Egyptian papyrus scrolls by the faith’s founder, Joseph Smith.
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A new online essay by the LDS Church says its Book of Abraham is inspired scripture but perhaps not a literal word-for-word translation of ancient Egyptian papyrus scrolls by the faith’s founder, Joseph Smith.

The article says it is possible that the papyri merely served as a catalyst for revelation by Smith that led to his expanding on the biblical account of Abraham. The book is included in a church volume of scripture called The Pearl of Great Price.

The essay concedes that is impossible to prove or disprove the translation since most of the papyri used have long since vanished and are presumed destroyed.

“This (essay) now allows Latter-day Saints to adopt the view that the Book of Abraham was not on the papyri that Joseph Smith possessed as an acceptable orthodox option,” said David Bokovoy, a University of Utah religious-studies instructor who wrote a book about the Book of Abraham.

The “Translation and Historicity of the Book of Abraham” essay comes on the heels of other recent postings designed to help Latter-day Saints and others better understand sometimes-sticky theological or historical issues in Mormonism.

Other essays include explorations of the faith’s former ban on blacks from entering its all-male priesthood, its long-discarded practice of plural marriage and its teachings about the nature of God and mankind’s eternal potential.

Smith said he translated the Book of Abraham after obtaining mummies and papyri from an entrepreneur named Michael Chandler after they were uncovered in Egypt by Antonio Lebolo, a former cavalryman in the Italian army.

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iTranslate maintenant disponible sur Mac - Apple Mind

iTranslate maintenant disponible sur Mac - Apple Mind | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it
Le logiciel de traduction iTranslate est maintenant disponible sur Mac.
Charles Tiayon's insight:

Le logiciel de traduction iTranslate, populaire sur iOS, est maintenant disponible sur Mac. L'application prend en charge jusqu'à 80 langages et peut prononcer à voix haute du texte afin d'apprendre la prononciation. iTranslate intègre également des dictionnaires pour qu'on puisse choisir la meilleure traduction en fonction du contexte.

iTranslate est disponible sur le Mac App Store pour 4.49€. L'app vient se loger dans la barre d'état afin d'être facilement accessible.

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Légal de recevoir un avis de paiement dans une langue étrangère ?

Légal de recevoir un avis de paiement dans une langue étrangère ? | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it
Un avis de paiement reçu dans une langue qu’on ne maîtrise pas est-il légal? Le SPF Finances et la CPCL ont des opinions divergentes à ce propos.
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Un avis de paiement reçu dans une langue qu’on ne maîtrise pas est-il légal? Le SPF Finances et la CPCL ont des opinions divergentes à ce propos.

Le document avait un caractère officiel: il émanait du Service Public Fédéral (SPF) des Finances. L’adresse de sa destination était étrangement rédigée: «5000 Namen», au lieu de «5000 Namur». Car l’avis de paiement était libellé entièrement en néerlandais, une langue que sa destinataire ne maîtrise pas. Le montant à régler, lui, était par contre particulièrement clair: 797,58 euros, à payer dans les quinze jours. En application d’un jugement rendu le 14 décembre 2011 par le tribunal correctionnel de Courtrai, sur des faits commis le 1er août 2010, apprendra-t-elle, après avoir obtenu l’aide d’une personne pratiquant lamoedertaal.

Une «faculté»? Voire…

L’avis, on le saura plus tard – voir ci-contre – ne lui était pas destiné. Mais devait-elle s’y conformer? L’erreur d’adressage lui permettait-elle de le refuser? Le document n’aurait-il pas dû être rédigé en français? Ou à tout le moins une phrase, en français, n’aurait-elle pas dû lui indiquer comment en obtenir une copie dans sa langue?

«La langue d’avis dépend du lieu d’émission de la condamnation», explique le SPF Finances. Et «la loi ne fait aucune obligation de mentionner dans la langue du destinataire la possibilité d’obtenir une copie dans cette langue. Il s’agit d’une simple faculté». Quant aux adresses, «elles sont issues directement de notre base de données qui les reprend à partir des sources authentiques»: le registre national, et les banques carrefours des entreprises et de la sécurité sociale.«L’habitude de traduire le nom des villes en Belgique n’est pas une particularité du SPF Finances. Refuser un avis de paiement sur ce motif ne semble pas judicieux».

À la Commission Permanente de Contrôle Linguistique (CPCL), en charge du«contrôle de la loi sur l’emploi des langues dans les administrations et dans leurs relations avec le public et les particuliers», on juge les choses différemment. Même si l’emploi des langues en matière judiciaire répond à une logique propre.

«Ici, l’avis émanait d’une autorité administrative, qui s’adressait à une particulière», y précise-t-on. Le SPF devait s’exprimer dans la langue utilisée par la personne. Et faute de la connaître, «utiliser sa langue présumée, en fonction de son domicile». En l’occurrence, donc, le français, «comme la CPCL en a jugé à plus d’une reprise», rappelle son porte-parole…

Et par surcroît, il y avait confusion !

L’avis de paiement en néerlandais envoyé à cette habitante de Namur posait problème linguistique. Mais, vérification opérée, une autre anomalie s’est révélée: l’amende avait été infligée par le tribunal correctionnel de Courtrai à… une homonyme de la destinataire.

Si cette dernière s’était acquittée du montant exigé, aurait-elle pu le récupérer? Et si elle ne l’avait pas fait, le SPF Finances ne l’aurait-il pas ajouté à ses impôts?

«Effectivement, tous les dossiers d’amendes pénales sont introduits dans la balance fiscale, et les dettes peuvent être payées par prélèvement sur les éventuels remboursements d’impôts» confirme le SPF Finances. Et si, par prudence, l’intéressée «avait payé avec la communication structurée qui lui avait été communiquée, il n’y aurait eu aucune intervention manuelle de la part du bureau de Recouvrement non fiscal. Et l’erreur n’aurait pas été relevée».

La destinataire pouvait toujours «écrire au bureau où l’argent aurait été versé erronément», en justifiant «sur base de sa carte d’identité (qu’elle) n’était pas la personne condamnée» pour en ob

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Two Koreas make strides to talk the same language

Two Koreas make strides to talk the same language | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it
The Korean People's Comprehensive Dictionary will iron out the differences between the North and South
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Joo Yeon-ah did not realise how hard it would be to settle in South Korea. The 45-year-old defector says she was prepared for the dangerous journey out of North Korea, and the unfamiliarity of everyday devices such as mobile phones and cash machines.

But what she wasn't expecting was a communication barrier with people who spoke the same language.

"I didn't understand [what people were saying]," said Joo, who has lived in Seoul since 2009. "Everything is so different in South Korea, but I thought at least our language would be the same."

What she discovered is that after more than 60 years of division, different forms of the Korean language have evolved, with the South incorporating many words from English.

For example, North Koreans express anxiety by saying in Korean, "My head hurts", while South Koreans use the English word stress, which they pronounce "suh-tu-reh-suh".

Now scholars from both sides of the peninsula are collaborating on a project funded by the South Korean government to create a unified Korean language dictionary. Known as Gyeoremal-kunsajeon (the Korean People's Comprehensive Dictionary), the initiative is intended to bridge the linguistic divide in a future where the two Koreas are reunified.

"Time has passed and the language has evolved," said project director Han Yong-un in an interview at his office in Seoul. "Those changes will continue, but when reunification happens, we need to be ready."

After the 1950-53 Korean war, South Korea opened its economy and society to outside influences while the North resisted any foreign incursions, particularly from the English language which the Pyongyang regime associates with American imperialism.

Rather than borrowing new words from English, North Korea has come up with homegrown substitutes. For example, when watching or playing football, South Koreans simply use the English expression "penalty kick", while in the North they use a Korean term that translates as "11-metre punishment". South Koreans use the English word "juice", North Koreans a term that means "sweet fruit water" in translation.

Han says that in daily life, the languages are "about two-thirds" the same. But in business or professional settings these differences become more pronounced. "We could end up with a situation where doctors are in an operating room performing surgery and aren't able to understand each other," said Han.

The project's hope is that in a reunified Korea, people will be able to consult the dictionary when there is confusion over unfamiliar words, and to solve the misunderstandings that may arise.

But the work, which began in 1989, has been stalled in the peninsula's political turmoil. It was supposed to completed by 2012, but lost time due to political holdups. Almost all inter-Korean exchange has been halted since 2010, when the previous South Korean administration put sanctions in place to punish North Korea for sinking of South Korea's Cheonan warship.

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New search engine goes for simple | Russia Beyond The Headlines

New search engine goes for simple  | Russia Beyond The Headlines | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it
Sputnik hopes to appeal to those who see the Internet as a tool to make life easier
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The search engine Sputnik (sputnik.ru), which was officially launched in May at the St. Petersburg International Economic Forum, is the third public search engine created by Russian programmers. Developed by KM Media, a subsidiary of state-owned telecommunications firm Rostelecom, Sputnik has been called an attempt to create a state-controlled search engine to compete with dominant web search firm Yandex, whose influence on the Russian media landscape has been monitored by the government since 2008. Yandex, which dominates search on the Russian segment of the Internet, sees itself as a web company competing with Google and not a media holding. It has argued that it should not be subject to government monitoring since only its homepage, Yandex.ru, has any media influence and that the stories that link from the page are only news stories, not analytical or opinion texts. However, given the influence Russian government officials believe that firms such as Yandex have over Russian citizens, it should come as no surprise that the government wants control over a search engine. Rostelekom launches state-owned search engine Sputnik Dmitry Medvedev was the first advocate of a national search engine. Medvedev, who was known for his Internet-savvy and use of Twitter, made the suggestion in 2011, while he was still president. Medvedev, who is now prime minister, considered the creation of a search engine a point of pride for the government and a sign that it was interested in developing IT in Russia. Today the creators of Sputnik.ru are trying to distance themselves from the state, but they still emphasize that an important part of their project is to help citizens interact with government institutions as well as private in taking care of such matters as receiving government documents, paying utilities, registering cars and real estate and purchasing train and airline tickets. According to one of Sputnik’s creators, Alexei Basov, the project is aimed at those who have only recently gotten access to the Internet, or who use it very rarely. Basov notes that Rostelecom can help in this process because it is one of Russia’s biggest developers of Internet infrastructure. When Sputnik’s creators talk about their audience, they are not referring to Moscow hipsters who check in on Facebook and update their Instagram accounts. They are not interested in reaching those who live their lives online, but in those who are interested in using the Internet to make their lives easier. Older people may not want to send their friends pictures of their dacha gardens on Snapchat, but they may be interested in using the web to learn more about growing techniques, what kind of plants are best for the local climate, as well as weather predictions. They might also welcome the ability to use the Internet to pay their electric bills or register their vehicles. Because of Sputnik’s association with the government, users who want to take advantage of these services can be assured that the site is up-to-date on the latest regulations and all the instructions are in accordance with the most recent legislation. These potential users do not need to be attracted with the latest technology out there. They are not looking for a search engine with a “wow effect.” They use the Internet not to kill time, but to conduct business that can be done offline more efficiently.
Source: Russia Beyond the Headlines - http://rbth.com/opinion/2014/07/11/new_search_engine_goes_for_simple_38147.html)

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IATE Can Now Be Downloaded

IATE Can Now Be Downloaded | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it
IATE, the EU's living terminology database, can now be downloaded for specific needs. Some of the data contained in IATE will be easily accessible following a short download. The file contains about 8 million terms in all the 24 official EU languages, and will be provided in TermBase eXchange (TBX) format.
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IATE, the EU’s living terminology database, can now be downloaded for specific needs. Some of the data contained in IATE will be easily accessible following a short download. The file contains about 8 million terms in all the 24 official EU languages, and will be provided in TermBase eXchange (TBX) format.

For further details and to download your copy, clickhere.

Inter-Active Terminology for Europe (IATE) recently celebrated its 10 year anniversary as a vibrant and living termbank after having been used by the language services of the EU institutions and agencies since 2004.

It is a living database in that it is constantly updated with new content. Indeed, it is estimated that in 2013, almost 97 000 new terms were added to the database, and even more were revised and modified.

To read more about IATE, click here.


Compiled by Oscar Larsson
Student at University of Glasgow, School of Social & Political Sciences
Communication Trainee at TermCoord


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Euro-Méditerranée: La traduction dans l’EuroMed : la Fondation Anna Lindh organise un atelier à Madrid

Euro-Méditerranée: La traduction dans l’EuroMed : la Fondation Anna Lindh organise un atelier à Madrid | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it
La Fondation Anna Lindh, en partenariat avec Transeuropéennes, la Fondation du Roi Abdul Aziz à Casablanca, et Casa Arabe à Madrid, organise un atelier sur le « Projet de collaboration pour la traduction des sciences humaines et sociales » qui a lieu les 24 et 25 Juin au siège de Casa Arabe à Madrid, en Espagne.
 
Cette initiative pilote lancée à Amman en 2012 dans le cadre de la cartographie de la traduction dans la région Euro-Méditerranéenne, est consolidée par des ateliers collectifs de traduction à Madrid, réunissant des traducteurs français, italiens et espagnols. Le projet vise à créer un forum permanent et indépendant pour la consultation, la discussion et la coopération à travers des groupes d’ateliers et une plate-forme numérique de traduction, avec la perspective de l’élaboration de projets de traduction dans les domaines des sciences humaines et sociales au niveau Euro-Méditerranéen.
 
L’atelier va  collecter des textes écrits par des intellectuels et des jeunes chercheurs arabes, concernant les dynamiques culturelles, sociales et politiques en Syrie, au Yémen, à Bahreïn, en Egypte, en Tunisie et en Libye et les manifestations qui se sont produites en Algérie, au Maroc, en Jordanie et dans la Péninsule Arabique. A terme, ces données seront compilées dans un livre intitulé les Sociétés Arabes, Visions de l’Intérieur, inspiré par le travail de l’anthropologue Franck Mermier.
 
En 2012, la Fondation Anna Lindh et Transeuropéennes ont lancé la première étude de cartographie sur l’état actuel et les enjeux de la traduction dans la région Méditerranéenne. La publication de la cartographie, disponible en arabe, en anglais et en français, a été le résultat d’un processus qui a duré 2 ans.
 
La Fondation Anna Lindh pour le dialogue interculturel favorise la connaissance, le respect mutuel et le dialogue interculturel entre les peuples de la région euro-méditerranéenne, à travers un réseau de plus de 3000 organisations de la société civile dans 43 pays. Son budget est co-financé par l'Union européenne (7 millions d’euros) et les États membres de l'UE (6 millions d’euros). 
 
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Charles Tiayon's insight:
La Fondation Anna Lindh, en partenariat avec Transeuropéennes, la Fondation du Roi Abdul Aziz à Casablanca, et Casa Arabe à Madrid, organise un atelier sur le « Projet de collaboration pour la traduction des sciences humaines et sociales » qui a lieu les 24 et 25 Juin au siège de Casa Arabe à Madrid, en Espagne.
 
Cette initiative pilote lancée à Amman en 2012 dans le cadre de la cartographie de la traduction dans la région Euro-Méditerranéenne, est consolidée par des ateliers collectifs de traduction à Madrid, réunissant des traducteurs français, italiens et espagnols. Le projet vise à créer un forum permanent et indépendant pour la consultation, la discussion et la coopération à travers des groupes d’ateliers et une plate-forme numérique de traduction, avec la perspective de l’élaboration de projets de traduction dans les domaines des sciences humaines et sociales au niveau Euro-Méditerranéen.
 
L’atelier va  collecter des textes écrits par des intellectuels et des jeunes chercheurs arabes, concernant les dynamiques culturelles, sociales et politiques en Syrie, au Yémen, à Bahreïn, en Egypte, en Tunisie et en Libye et les manifestations qui se sont produites en Algérie, au Maroc, en Jordanie et dans la Péninsule Arabique. A terme, ces données seront compilées dans un livre intitulé les Sociétés Arabes, Visions de l’Intérieur, inspiré par le travail de l’anthropologue Franck Mermier.
 
En 2012, la Fondation Anna Lindh et Transeuropéennes ont lancé la première étude de cartographie sur l’état actuel et les enjeux de la traduction dans la région Méditerranéenne. La publication de la cartographie, disponible en arabe, en anglais et en français, a été le résultat d’un processus qui a duré 2 ans.
 
La Fondation Anna Lindh pour le dialogue interculturel favorise la connaissance, le respect mutuel et le dialogue interculturel entre les peuples de la région euro-méditerranéenne, à travers un réseau de plus de 3000 organisations de la société civile dans 43 pays. Son budget est co-financé par l'Union européenne (7 millions d’euros) et les États membres de l'UE (6 millions d’euros). 
 
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iTranslate - traducteur & dictionnaire maintenant disponible sur Mac

iTranslate - traducteur & dictionnaire maintenant disponible sur Mac | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it
Après avoir connu un fort succès sur iOS iTranslate - traducteur & dictionnaire débarque sur Mac au prix de 4,49€.
Charles Tiayon's insight:

Après avoir connu un fort succès sur iOS [gratuit] iTranslate – traducteur & dictionnaire débarque sur Mac au prix de 4,49€. iTranslate pour Mac est conçu comme une application qui réside sur la barre d’état, permettant un accès rapide en un seul clic ou avec une touche personnalisée.

L’application vous permet de traduire facilement les mots et expressions dans plus de 80 langues, avec le soutien d’une voix de d’homme ou femme. L’application dispose également de plusieurs dictionnaires sensibles au contexte.

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Coleção Clássica traz coletânea sobre a perspectiva latina da mitológica Medeia

Coleção Clássica traz coletânea sobre a perspectiva latina da mitológica Medeia | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it
A narrativa sobre Medeia foi abordada por quase todos os autores romanos. Agora, as mais expressivas estão reunidas na coletânea Medeias latinas, Medeae romae, lançamento da Autêntica Editora.
A obra traz a personagem mitológica Medeia pela perspectiva dos autores Ênio, Pacúvio, Lúcio Ácio, Varrão de Átax, Higino, Ovídio, Sêneca, Valério Flaco, Hosídio Geta, Ausônio e Dracôncio, em edição bilíngue português-latim espelhada. A tradução e a organização são de Márcio Meirelles Gouvêa Júnior, que assina a apresentação da obra e revela ao leitor quem foi Medeia, a quem ela serviu e por que se falou de Medeia em Roma.

A caracterização latina de Medeia consolida a imagem da estrangeira desterrada, daquela espécie de belas feiticeiras errantes, exiladas, poderosas e misteriosas detentoras da habilidade de constranger os deuses à sua vontade. Ela foi construída como uma mulher que, ferida na alma pelo brutal sentimento do amor, tornou-se, após seus atos funestos, errante e expatriada.
Em Roma, o cenário cultural construía-se sob a ênfase em temas morais e de virtude, reunindo valores helenísticos e romanos. Nesse sentido, dada a origem da protagonista e a natureza do gênero trágico, como espelho social de Roma e de seus costumes, Medeia discute e reflete sobre a marginalização do estrangeiro, forçado ao isolamento cultural.

Das princesas estrangeiras existentes nas narrativas mitológicas herdadas do helenismo, Medeia é a única descrita como inuicta, como definiu Horácio. De todas, apenas Medeia jamais foi vencida ou contida, tornando-se o modelo da fronteira de tudo quanto não fosse romano.

Medeias latinas, Medeae romae é o terceiro volume da Coleção Clássica, que reúne textos de literatura – em prosa e verso – e ensaios que, pela qualidade da escrita, aliada à importância do conteúdo, tornaram-se referência para determinado tema ou época. Também fazem parte da coleção: Dicionário do latim essencial, organizado por Antônio Martinez de Rezende e Sandra Braga Bianchet, e uma versão bilíngue português-latim do Diálogo dos oradores, uma das grandes obras do pensador romano Tácito, com tradução e notas de Martinez Rezende e Júlia Batista Castilho de Avellar.

Sobre o organizador e tradutor – Márcio Meirelles Gouvêa Júnior é formado em Direito pelas Faculdades Milton Campos (2000), possui mestrado em Estudos Clássicos pela Universidade de Coimbra (2009), mestrado em Letras pela Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (2007) e doutorado em Letras: Estudos Literários pela Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (2013). Atualmente é professor da Faculdade de Letras da Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG).

Título: Medeias latinas, Medeae romae
Autores: Vários
Organização e tradução: Márcio Meirelles Gouvêa Júnior
Número de páginas: 312
Formato: 14 x 21 cm
Preço: R$ 54,00
ISBN: 978-85-8217-384-8
Mais informações sobre os livros da Autêntica Editora estão disponíveis em
www.grupoautentica.com.br ou pelo telefone 0800 28 31 322
________________________________________
Assessoria de Imprensa do Grupo Autêntica:
Pluricom Comunicação Integrada®
Katia Saisi | katiasaisi@pluricom.com.br
Gabriel Capucho | capucho@pluricom.com.br
Murillo Chamusca | murillo@pluricom.com.br
Fone (11) 3774-6463 | pluricom@pluricom.com.br | www.pluricom.com.br | www.twitter.com/pluricom
Charles Tiayon's insight:

Un auteur du blog britannique Englishmanif.blog écrit que la langue chinoise ne connait ni les mots de “couple” ni ceux de “parents”.

Le terme chinois utilisé se traduit en anglais par husbandwife ; en français par “marifemme”. Les enfants pour parler de leurs parents utilisent fathermother traduisible par “papamaman”.

Cela est vrai non seulement du Chinois, mais aussi du Coréen: 

부모()=parents (se prononce « poumo ») = littéralement: « père-mère »

=père (voir 성부와 = Saint Père Dieu) ( se prononce « pou »: même racine que papa)

=mère (voir 성모 = Sainte Mère = Marie) ( se prononce « mo »: même racine que maman)

 

Je ne connais pas le japonais, mais je ne serais pas surpris que ce soit aussi vrai dans cette langue, qui fait partie de la même grande famille des langues asiatiques. 

Dans ces langues, l’idée même de « parents » homosexuels est « impensable, inexprimable, inouïe ». On ne peut pas l’entendre (inouïe=inaudible) parce qu’on ne peut pas le dire ; on ne peut pas le dire parce que l’idée même de parent est « père-mère » : on ne peut pas le « penser » autrement. 

Il faut dire qu’avec la moindre connaissance d’étymologie, l’idée même de « parents homosexuels » est aussi impensable dans les langues latines, car « parent » vient de « parens – celui/celle qui ENGENDRE » ; or il est bien évident que tout « couple » homosexuel est absolument incapable d’engendrer, et donc d’être parents !

En union de prières en Jésus et Marie, 


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Saving Endangered Languages | Alpha Omega Translations

Saving Endangered Languages | Alpha Omega Translations | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it

Estimates may vary, but it is commonly accepted that between 50% and 90% of the world’s ~7,000 languages will disappear by the end of the 21st century without substantial preservation efforts. Many of these languages do not have a written form. On average, a language dies or goes extinct every two weeks when its last speaker dies. The death of a language means the death of a culture. Thousands of years of history, stories and heritage would be lost to all future generations and major pieces of the human portrait would be wiped from the face of the Earth, never to be seen again.

Minority languages are being increasingly replaced by various politically, economically, or socio-culturally dominant ones. Every two weeks, the last fluent speaker of a language passes on and along with him/her hundreds of generations of traditional knowledge encoded in these ancestral tongues. Nearly half of the world’s languages are likely to vanish in the next 100 years. Out of the all languages that exist on the planet, half of them are at risk of disappearing during this century. And out of the 7,000 languages that could disappear, the majority does not have written documents or dictionaries that would allow us to preserve these languages and to safeguard their memory. As a consequence, when the last speaker dies, we lose their language and its knowledge forever.

 Co-occurrence of linguistic diversity and biological diversity

Maintaining indigenous languages and conserving biodiversity go hand in hand. While it is widely acknowledged that the degradation of the natural environment, in particular traditional habitats, entails a loss of cultural and linguistic diversity, new studies suggest that language loss has, in turn, a negative impact on biodiversity conservation.

There is however a glimmer of hope for some of these languages. Several organizations are dedicated to the documentation and potential revitalization of endangered languages.

The Enduring Voices project is a collaborative effort between National Geographic and the Living Tongues Institute for Endangered Languages. This project seeks to preserve these languages through awareness, preservation and the renewal of interest among the younger groups within the communities most at risk.The mission of the Living Tongues Institute for Endangered Languages is to promote the documentation, maintenance, preservation, and revitalization of endangered languages worldwide through linguist-aided, community-driven multi-media language documentation projects.

Projects begin with expeditions to communities to dialogue with the last speakers of endangered languages worldwide. After they obtain the permission of the community to work with them, they discuss various courses of action to help them meet their own goals of maintenance, revitalization, program. Storybooks, basic literacy materials as well as grammatical and lexical materials in electronic and print form may be produced. They publish their scientific work in leading journals and in books and archive their video for the use of future generations.

The Digital Encyclopedia of Languages

Sorosoro has the ambition to progressively set up the Digital language Encyclopedia  - the first facet of the program.

The researchers, linguists and anthropologists are doing tremendous work and have succeeded in the safeguard of many languages that would have disappeared form the human memory if this detailed literary work had not been done. Sorosoro’s objective is to complement their work with filmed data.

Academic initiatives

Variety within variety: The linguistic landscape of Corfu

Maria Giakoumelou and Dimitris Papazachariou of the Freie Universität Berlin started investigating the dialectal situation and geographical variation in the island of Corfu (Greece) within the framework of Perceptual Dialectology. More specifically, their aim is twofold a) to report on the perceptions of the Corfiots about the linguistic situation in the island and about the number of different varieties they recognize within this specific region, identifying the criteria they employ for their categorization, and b) to describe the effect of the attitudes towards the social identity of speakers of a different variety on their understanding of the difference among varieties.

The linguistic landscape of Corfu is almost completely unexplored, since the dialect spoken in the island has never been systematically investigated. A few amateur and sporadic studies (see, for example, Salvanos 1918, Laskari 1998), mainly concerning the history and the society of the island, imply that the dialect is divided into two major varieties; the variety spoken in the city of Corfu, which was heavily influenced by the Italian variety of Veneto because of the longtime occupation of the island by the Venetians, and the variety spoken in the rural areas, which remained “pure” and unaffected by foreign influences due to geographic and socio-political facts.

In order to check if the above distinction reflects the locals’ beliefs and attitudes about their own and others’ dialect areas of a region, they follow three techniques, which are of both of a qualitative and a quantitative nature: a) conversational evidence, b) questionnaires about attitudes, c) a «Draw-a-map» task (see Preston 1999: xxxiv, Niedzielski & Preston 2003).

The results confirm the lack of homogeneity inside the dialect; however, they present a greater variability than it has been presented by the previously mentioned studies, as, according to Corfiots’ judgments, there are four different varieties spoken in the island: the variety spoken in the villages of North Corfu, the variety of the villages of Middle Corfu, the Corfiot of the city, and the variety spoken in the villages of South Corfu. The differences of the varieties that lead to this categorization are identified on the phonological level (and more specifically on intonation) and on the vocabulary (the Corfiots claim that they can immediately detect a speaker’s exact origin, based on his different “singing talk”). Furthermore, it is shown that the South Corfiot is perceived by the speakers of the other varieties as more different, reflecting their general attitude towards the people of the South, who are characterized as “autonomists”, “people with a different culture, lifestyle, idiosyncrasy, even different looks”.

For more information on endangered languages see:

http://www.endangeredlanguages.com

http://www.livingtongues.org/

http://www.sorosoro.org/en

Charles Tiayon's insight:

Estimates may vary, but it is commonly accepted that between 50% and 90% of the world’s ~7,000 languages will disappear by the end of the 21st century without substantial preservation efforts. Many of these languages do not have a written form. On average, a language dies or goes extinct every two weeks when its last speaker dies. The death of a language means the death of a culture. Thousands of years of history, stories and heritage would be lost to all future generations and major pieces of the human portrait would be wiped from the face of the Earth, never to be seen again.

Minority languages are being increasingly replaced by various politically, economically, or socio-culturally dominant ones. Every two weeks, the last fluent speaker of a language passes on and along with him/her hundreds of generations of traditional knowledge encoded in these ancestral tongues. Nearly half of the world’s languages are likely to vanish in the next 100 years. Out of the all languages that exist on the planet, half of them are at risk of disappearing during this century. And out of the 7,000 languages that could disappear, the majority does not have written documents or dictionaries that would allow us to preserve these languages and to safeguard their memory. As a consequence, when the last speaker dies, we lose their language and its knowledge forever.

 Co-occurrence of linguistic diversity and biological diversity

Maintaining indigenous languages and conserving biodiversity go hand in hand. While it is widely acknowledged that the degradation of the natural environment, in particular traditional habitats, entails a loss of cultural and linguistic diversity, new studies suggest that language loss has, in turn, a negative impact on biodiversity conservation.

There is however a glimmer of hope for some of these languages. Several organizations are dedicated to the documentation and potential revitalization of endangered languages.

The Enduring Voices project is a collaborative effort between National Geographic and the Living Tongues Institute for Endangered Languages. This project seeks to preserve these languages through awareness, preservation and the renewal of interest among the younger groups within the communities most at risk.The mission of the Living Tongues Institute for Endangered Languages is to promote the documentation, maintenance, preservation, and revitalization of endangered languages worldwide through linguist-aided, community-driven multi-media language documentation projects.

Projects begin with expeditions to communities to dialogue with the last speakers of endangered languages worldwide. After they obtain the permission of the community to work with them, they discuss various courses of action to help them meet their own goals of maintenance, revitalization, program. Storybooks, basic literacy materials as well as grammatical and lexical materials in electronic and print form may be produced. They publish their scientific work in leading journals and in books and archive their video for the use of future generations.

The Digital Encyclopedia of Languages

Sorosoro has the ambition to progressively set up the Digital language Encyclopedia  - the first facet of the program.

The researchers, linguists and anthropologists are doing tremendous work and have succeeded in the safeguard of many languages that would have disappeared form the human memory if this detailed literary work had not been done. Sorosoro’s objective is to complement their work with filmed data.

Academic initiatives

Variety within variety: The linguistic landscape of Corfu

Maria Giakoumelou and Dimitris Papazachariou of the Freie Universität Berlin started investigating the dialectal situation and geographical variation in the island of Corfu (Greece) within the framework of Perceptual Dialectology. More specifically, their aim is twofold a) to report on the perceptions of the Corfiots about the linguistic situation in the island and about the number of different varieties they recognize within this specific region, identifying the criteria they employ for their categorization, and b) to describe the effect of the attitudes towards the social identity of speakers of a different variety on their understanding of the difference among varieties.

The linguistic landscape of Corfu is almost completely unexplored, since the dialect spoken in the island has never been systematically investigated. A few amateur and sporadic studies (see, for example, Salvanos 1918, Laskari 1998), mainly concerning the history and the society of the island, imply that the dialect is divided into two major varieties; the variety spoken in the city of Corfu, which was heavily influenced by the Italian variety of Veneto because of the longtime occupation of the island by the Venetians, and the variety spoken in the rural areas, which remained “pure” and unaffected by foreign influences due to geographic and socio-political facts.

In order to check if the above distinction reflects the locals’ beliefs and attitudes about their own and others’ dialect areas of a region, they follow three techniques, which are of both of a qualitative and a quantitative nature: a) conversational evidence, b) questionnaires about attitudes, c) a «Draw-a-map» task (see Preston 1999: xxxiv, Niedzielski & Preston 2003).

The results confirm the lack of homogeneity inside the dialect; however, they present a greater variability than it has been presented by the previously mentioned studies, as, according to Corfiots’ judgments, there are four different varieties spoken in the island: the variety spoken in the villages of North Corfu, the variety of the villages of Middle Corfu, the Corfiot of the city, and the variety spoken in the villages of South Corfu. The differences of the varieties that lead to this categorization are identified on the phonological level (and more specifically on intonation) and on the vocabulary (the Corfiots claim that they can immediately detect a speaker’s exact origin, based on his different “singing talk”). Furthermore, it is shown that the South Corfiot is perceived by the speakers of the other varieties as more different, reflecting their general attitude towards the people of the South, who are characterized as “autonomists”, “people with a different culture, lifestyle, idiosyncrasy, even different looks”.

For more information on endangered languages see:

http://www.endangeredlanguages.com

http://www.livingtongues.org/

http://www.sorosoro.org/en

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Google : une meilleure intégration de Translate dans Search | Fredzone

Google : une meilleure intégration de Translate dans Search | Fredzone | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it
Google a mis à jour sa carte de traduction dans Search, pour une utilisation plus complète et puissante.
Charles Tiayon's insight:

Google Search intègre un bon nombre de fonctionnalités un peu cachées qui ne s’activent que lorsque l’on exécute certaines requêtes bien particulières. Ainsi, il est possible de lui faire afficher une véritable calculatrice complète ou un convertisseur de devises, mais ce n’est pas tout, car il est également possible d’afficher une petite section de traduction dans Google Search.

Malheureusement, cette fonctionnalité ne semble pour le moment disponible que dans la version anglophone du service, mais quoiqu’il en soit elle reste bien pratique pour éviter d’ouvrir Google Translate chaque fois qu’on veut traduire un mot ou deux. En effet, pour traduire un court texte de quelques mots, il suffit de lancer la requête « translate [mots à traduire] to [langue de destination] » et le tour est joué : Google Search vous affichera une petite carte contenant le texte de départ et la traduction.

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Education Research Report: Decreasing font size enhances reading comprehension among children who have already developed proficient reading skills

Education Research Report: Decreasing font size enhances reading comprehension among children who have already developed proficient reading skills | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it
A new study performed by Haifa University shows that decreasing the font size helps to improve reading comprehension among fifth graders who have mastered the technical skills of reading. "Adding cognitive perpetual load in reading actually seems to improve comprehension," said Prof. Tami Katzir, Head of the Department of Learning Disabilities at Haifa University and a researcher at the Edmond J. Safra Brain Research Center for the Study of Learning Disabilities at the university, who led the study.
There is a psychological-cognitive approach that claims that imposing difficulties that form cognitive load -- such as deleting letters from words, may enhance performance on subsequent performance such as recall. In the domain of reading, the hypothesis was that creating a "desirable" difficulty by decreasing the font size, reducing line spacing and increasing line length -- may actually enhances the ability to learn. Few studies have been performed in this area, and these focused specifically on adults, yielding contradictory results.
In this study, performed by Prof. Katzir with Shirley Hershko and Dr. Vered Halamish, the researchers sought to determine whether introducing difficulties in text presentation may improves comprehension in second as well as fifth graders. According to Prof. Katzir, it is important to test these two age groups because second graders are still acquiring the technical skills of reading, whereas fifth graders can already read fluently.
Each group consisted of forty-five children. The children were asked to read texts, and they were later asked related reading comprehension questions. Font size, line spacing and line length were manipulated.
The findings showed the decreasing font size and line length parameters impaired comprehension of second graders who are still learning to read and thus not fluent readers in standard form (the change in spacing had no effect) -- whereas comprehension among fifth graders actually improved when the font size was significantly decreased (changes to line length and line spacing had no effect). According to the researchers, a possible explanation is that the difficulty, which requires the reader to concentrate and read slowly -- even to reread the same line several times -- is what ultimately improves their reading comprehension.
"This study demonstrates the difference between children at different stages of reading proficiency, and it is important to understand that difficulty impairs comprehension at one stage, while at another it actually facilitates comprehension. After mastering reading skills, an effective way to improve comprehension could be to decrease the text's font size. In the age of digital media this findings have important applied applications," Prof.. Katzir concluded.
Charles Tiayon's insight:
A new study performed by Haifa University shows that decreasing the font size helps to improve reading comprehension among fifth graders who have mastered the technical skills of reading. "Adding cognitive perpetual load in reading actually seems to improve comprehension," said Prof. Tami Katzir, Head of the Department of Learning Disabilities at Haifa University and a researcher at the Edmond J. Safra Brain Research Center for the Study of Learning Disabilities at the university, who led the study.
There is a psychological-cognitive approach that claims that imposing difficulties that form cognitive load -- such as deleting letters from words, may enhance performance on subsequent performance such as recall. In the domain of reading, the hypothesis was that creating a "desirable" difficulty by decreasing the font size, reducing line spacing and increasing line length -- may actually enhances the ability to learn. Few studies have been performed in this area, and these focused specifically on adults, yielding contradictory results.
In this study, performed by Prof. Katzir with Shirley Hershko and Dr. Vered Halamish, the researchers sought to determine whether introducing difficulties in text presentation may improves comprehension in second as well as fifth graders. According to Prof. Katzir, it is important to test these two age groups because second graders are still acquiring the technical skills of reading, whereas fifth graders can already read fluently.
Each group consisted of forty-five children. The children were asked to read texts, and they were later asked related reading comprehension questions. Font size, line spacing and line length were manipulated.
The findings showed the decreasing font size and line length parameters impaired comprehension of second graders who are still learning to read and thus not fluent readers in standard form (the change in spacing had no effect) -- whereas comprehension among fifth graders actually improved when the font size was significantly decreased (changes to line length and line spacing had no effect). According to the researchers, a possible explanation is that the difficulty, which requires the reader to concentrate and read slowly -- even to reread the same line several times -- is what ultimately improves their reading comprehension.
"This study demonstrates the difference between children at different stages of reading proficiency, and it is important to understand that difficulty impairs comprehension at one stage, while at another it actually facilitates comprehension. After mastering reading skills, an effective way to improve comprehension could be to decrease the text's font size. In the age of digital media this findings have important applied applications," Prof.. Katzir concluded.
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Arabic Translation of Malayalam ‘Goat Days’ Reportedly Banned in Saudi, UAE

Arabic Translation of Malayalam ‘Goat Days’ Reportedly Banned in Saudi, UAE | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it
Arabic Translation of Malayalam ‘Goat Days’ Reportedly Banned in Saudi,  UAE
Charles Tiayon's insight:
Oye! BooksArabic Translation of Malayalam ‘Goat Days’ Reportedly Banned in Saudi, UAE
Category: Books
Published on Thursday, 10 July 2014 12:55
Written by Mlynxqualey

t is perhaps less of a surprise that the Arabic translation of the best-selling and acclaimed Malayalam novel ആടുജീവിതം, or Goat Days, has been banned in Saudi Arabia and the UAE, and more of a surprise that the Bahrain-based Gulf News Daily is reporting on it:

Benyamin’s novel — winner of the 2009 Kerala Literary Academy Award, longlisted for the 2012 Man Asian Literary Prize, and shortlisted for the 2013 DSC Prize for South Asian Literature — is based on the real life story of an Indian emigrant going missing in Saudi Arabia.

The Arabic translation was apparently available at this year’s Riyadh International Book Fair.

According to its English-language publisher, Penguin India, the novel’s protagonist is an Indian man, Najeeb, and:

Najeeb’s dearest wish is to work in the Gulf and earn enough money to send back home. He achieves his dream only to be propelled by a series of incidents, grim and absurd, into a slave-like existence herding goats in the middle of the Saudi desert.

The Gulf News Daily article, written by Bahraini poet Laala Kashef Alghata, notes that the Arabic translation, published by “Aafaq Bookstore in Kuwait, has not gone down well with the region’s censors.”


“I was told by my translator Suhail Wafy that the book had been banned in the UAE and Saudi,” Benyamin told the Gulf News Daily (GND). “I don’t know why it is banned because it has nothing in it that is against a country or religion. It is all about human suffering. … I’m sad that they have chosen to ban it.”


Benyamin also told the GND, hopefully, “Bahrain is more open and has freedom of speech, so I hope that the book will be available there in the future.”

Benyamin told the GND he was hoping “media will come forward and speak about it in order to let the higher authorities rethink this stance.”

Benyamin himself lived in Bahrain for 21 years and wrote Goat Days in that nation, before moving to Kerala.

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LinkedIn groups for translators and interpreters - Languages & Translation

LinkedIn groups for translators and interpreters - Languages & Translation | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it
As one of the largest professional networking websites, LinkedIn is a great place to network with other translators and interpreters from around the world. Here is a list of open and closed groups targeted at translators and interpreters (you have to be a member of LinkedIn to join these groups): Professional associations European Legal Interpreters …
Charles Tiayon's insight:

As one of the largest professional networking websites, LinkedIn is a great place to network with other translators and interpreters from around the world. Here is a list of open and closed groups targeted at translators and interpreters (you have to be a member of LinkedIn to join these groups):

Professional associations

European Legal Interpreters and Translators Association
International Association of Professional Translators and Interpreters
American Translators Associations
National Association of Judiciary Interpreters and Association
International Medical Interpreters Association
California Healthcare Interpreting Association
Members of the Institute of Translation and Interpreting
Japan Association of Translators
OTTIAQ – Ordre des traducteurs, terminologues et interprètes du Québec
Asociación Española de Traductores, Correctores e Intérpretes
Netherlands Society of Interpreters and Translators
Australian Institute of Interpreters and Translators Incorporated
Association Internationale des Interprètes de Conférence

Legal translation and interpreting

Legal Translation Network Group
Legal Translations and Interpretation Network
FR<>EN Legal Translation
TransLegal
Interpreti Giudiziari
Traduttori Giurati

Medical translation and interpreting

National Certification for Medical Interpreters
Medical Interpreters Professional Development Group
Medical Translators and Editors
Medical Translation

Interpreting

Professional Interpreters, all languages
Interpreters worldwide
Conference/Meeting Simultaneous Interpreters
Sign Language Interpreters Network
Legal Interpreting Services Forum

Language-specific groups

English Spanish Translator Org
Dutch Translator
Chinese Translators Group
Chinese/English Translation
Japanese-English Translation
Japanese-English Interpreters
Arabic Translation
English Arabic Translation professionals
Arabic – English Translation Issues
English – Portuguese Translation

Networking & job opportunities

Freelance Translators Lounge
N.de.T
Selling Translations
Translation and Localization Services – Issues and Trends
Translation, Interpretation, Desktop Publishing
Translator Training
Translators – Interpreters network
Translators and Interpreters: Continuing Professional Development and Education
Translation work opportunities
Professional Translators and Interpreters (ProZ.com)
Trad Online – traduction, translation, traducción, traduzione
Interpreter and Translator’s professionals International forum
Translator group
Translators Without Borders
Worldwide Lexicon: Freelance Translators Network
Translation & Interpretation RFPs, Bids, Tenders, Projects
Localization and Translation Canada
News & Translation Jobs
Globalization, Localization & Translation Job Board
Translation agencies business practices
GlobalJobZ – (GLIT) Localization, Interpretation and Translation
Translation & Localization Professionals Worldwide
Lingua
Translation agencies business practices
SDL Trados Localisation
Localization Professional
Video Game Localization / Translation
Groupe des Traducteurs et Agences de Traduction
Traductores
Translators Worldwide
Translation Management
Translation World
Indian Localization & Translation Professionals
Translation Sweden
Vertalers Platform
Ik zoek een vertaler / Looking for a translator
Marktplatz für Übersetzungen und Dolmetschen

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