Metaglossia: The ...
Follow
Find
174.0K views | +123 today
 
Scooped by Charles Tiayon
onto Metaglossia: The Translation World
Scoop.it!

New Rules Toughen Michigan Sign Language Standards - Higher Education

LANSING, Mich. — Professional interpreters and recent graduates of sign language programs have criticized new rules taking effect in Michigan requiring more stringent education and testing requirements for sign language interpreters.

The 2007 law was prompted by miscommunication in legal and medical settings and is intended to prevent interpreter mistakes, The Detroit News reported.

Some longtime professional interpreters and graduates of college-level sign language programs described the new state licensing test is difficult. They also said it is too focused on certain English language concepts not used in everyday interpreting with deaf people.

“I feel the state’s requiring me to get a college education for something that comes naturally to me,” said Robina Anderson, an interpreter from Trenton and the daughter of two deaf parents.

Anderson has used sign language for 55 years but has twice failed a new state exam that places a heavy emphasis on antonyms, synonyms and reading comprehension. Her state certification will become invalid this year under a licensing requirement set to go into effect in June.

Sheryl Emery, director of the state Division on Deaf and Hard of Hearing, led implementation of the rules. Emery, who is deaf, said state classifications will make it easier for government institutions and medical providers to know they’re getting a qualified interpreter.

Emery said not everyone who knows sign language is cut out to be an interpreter.

“Often people mistakenly think children who have deaf parents can interpret or grow up to become excellent interpreters. Some do, some don’t,” Emery said in an email. “Just having a dad who is a master mechanic is no guarantee that the child will grow up to be a master mechanic.”

Despite an increase in the number of certified interpreters in Michigan in recent years, some hospitals and agencies that are legally required to provide interpreters are reporting shortages and longer wait times to get an interpreter in an emergency room or medical appointment.

 
more...
No comment yet.
Metaglossia: The Translation World
News about translation, interpreting, intercultural communication, terminology and lexicography - as it happens
Curated by Charles Tiayon
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Charles Tiayon
Scoop.it!

UN Careers - jobs in this network (Translators, Revisers, Editors, etc.)

UN Careers -  jobs in this network (Translators, Revisers, Editors, etc.) | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it

Vacancies in this network: Translators, Revisers, Editors, etc.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Charles Tiayon
Scoop.it!

Half The World's Languages May Be Endangered | Inside Science

Half The World's Languages May Be Endangered | Inside Science | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it
 What happens when the last person to speak a language dies?
Charles Tiayon's insight:

(Inside Science) — Sometime in the 1970s, a linguist named James Rementer, moved into the house of an elderly woman in Oklahoma. That woman, Nora Thompson Dean, was one of the last persons to speak Unami, a dialect of the Delaware (Lenni Lenape) language. When she died in 1984, the language spoken by the Native Americans who left their place names all over New Jersey, New York and Pennsylvania, and signed the famous peace treaty with William Penn in 1683, went silent.

Thousands of languages have gone extinct in the last few centuries, and an economist at Case Western Reserve University thinks the language of any people whose total population is fewer than 35,000, is possibly endangered.

That does not mean they will disappear, said David Clingingsmith.

“I think that’s what the data says on average.”

There are approximately 7,000 languages in the world, and 95 percent of the world’s population speak 300 of them. Half the world speaks the largest 16. According to the Endangered Languages Project, some 40 percent of the world's languages are threatened.

It depends on circumstances. For instance, scientists still encounter tribes in places like the Amazon that have been totally isolated from the rest of the world with their own languages. Despite having populations numbering in the hundreds, their languages only are in danger if they have too much contact with the outside world, Clingingsmith said. Without that contact, there is not much pressure to change.

There still are places in Europe, where a relatively small population speaks minority languages descended from Vulgar Latin that are mutually unintelligible from each other.  Examples include Picard and Walloon, both spoken in parts of France and Belgium. Even in Great Britain, there is a small population that still speaks Cornish, and Welsh never disappeared, he said.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Charles Tiayon
Scoop.it!

WOW! Women On Writing Blog: Proofreading: The Final Step

WOW! Women On Writing Blog: Proofreading: The Final Step | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it
We’ve all had this experience.  You’ve just posted a blog or e-mailed a manuscript to your editor and then you look down.  Staring back up at you, waving merrily, is a typo, a punctuation error or a spelling mistake. 
How is it that you can proof your work and still miss something so obvious?  Part of the problem is familiarity.  By the time you’ve been through a manuscript five or six times, your skim rather than read closely.  You need to shake things up a bit so that you can spot errors before they go out into the publishing world. 
Charles Tiayon's insight:
We’ve all had this experience.  You’ve just posted a blog or e-mailed a manuscript to your editor and then you look down.  Staring back up at you, waving merrily, is a typo, a punctuation error or a spelling mistake. 
How is it that you can proof your work and still miss something so obvious?  Part of the problem is familiarity.  By the time you’ve been through a manuscript five or six times, your skim rather than read closely.  You need to shake things up a bit so that you can spot errors before they go out into the publishing world. 
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Charles Tiayon
Scoop.it!

Google says its made over 890 improvements to search in the past year

Google says its made over 890 improvements to search in the past year | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it
While Google search may appear to some as a somewhat static service that remains generally the same year after year, the company is constantly adding updates in order to stay on top of the competition. In a recent Google+ post,…
Charles Tiayon's insight:

While Google search may appear to some as a somewhat static service that remains generally the same year after year, the company is constantly adding updates in order to stay on top of the competition. In a recent Google+ post, the company's head of search, Amit Singhal, says Google has made more than "890 improvements" to its search engine in the last year alone.

To others, these kinds of updates are expected, but the number has risen significantly over past years. In 2009 Google said it made nearly 400 changes to its search engine and as many as 500 the following year. It is widely known that Google tests out hundreds of updates and changes everyday, but very few of them actually get implemented. In the past, the company said it makes one change every single day to its core search engine.

The 890 changes Singhal is referring to are more than just core algorithm updates though. There are changes on everything from the user interface to Google Now and many other things. 

Included in his Google+ post, the head of Google search also shared some of his fondest and most memorable milestones in Google search history including adding things like directions, voice search and the introduction of predictive features like Autocomplete. You'll find the complete list on Google+ and a few others Singhal pointed out below:

Universal search: Sometimes the best answer isn’t just text—if you’re asking about JFK’s “Moon Speech,” you probably want to watch John F. Kennedy deliver his famous speech. We’ve made that possible, blending different types of results so you get the most relevant info, no matter the format.

Mobile and new screens: No matter what device or platform you may be on, whether it’s a tablet or a smartphone (or even a watch!), you need information and answers. So we’ve adapted Search to all these new devices. This includes redesigning our mobile products to help those who weren’t born with the fastest typing thumbs! 

Actions: With the Google Search app you can quickly text, email or call someone without digging and typing. Just say: “Ok Google, send an email to Jason: do you guys want to go to the beach with us for a picnic this Saturday?” You can even set sophisticated reminders like “Remind me to pick up coffee filters next time I’m at Target,” and Google will buzz your phone when you get to any Target.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Charles Tiayon
Scoop.it!

The Rich Even Google Differently

The Rich Even Google Differently | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it
It's all foam rollers and jogging strollers with them.
Charles Tiayon's insight:

The rich are different from you and me, of course. But we all use the same Google. Its empty search box is the great leveler. But it so happens, as it always does, that the rich have distinguished themselves once again. They even google differently.

The New York Times' Upshot compared common Google search terms from the most impoverished areas and the cushiest areas in America. People in poorer places are concerned about losing weight, health problems, and religion. The wealthiest are deeply concerned about the Canon Elph and jogging strollers.

A side-by-side comparison of the top-20 search terms used by people from different places on the wealth spectrum read like two very different games of Mad Libs. For example:

— The rich search for “holiday greetings” with the same frequency that the poor search for “severe itching.”

— Searches like "about hell," "the antichrist," and "dog benadryl" from the hard-scrabble communities show up with a rate similar to queries about three different camera speeds in rich areas.

— The wealthy want to know about "baby massage" as much as the destitute want to learn about “selling avon." 

— And for their respective sources of wisdom, the ranking of impoverished people's searches for "old sayings" appears directly alongside rich people’s questions about “Zoolander.” 

But don't fear that people are so different from one another that even their search queries divide Americans beyond common ground. The Upshot reports that there are certain things — namely Oprah and the Super Bowl — that captivate everyone. These are the things that connect us all in our desire to seek and search onwards. We should hold them close and type them dearly.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Charles Tiayon
Scoop.it!

The Curse of Calling and the Myth of Creativity

The Curse of Calling and the Myth of Creativity | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it

The word “calling” has the power to elicit eyerolls and sighs – a cliché of the worst kind. Though it stirs up deep desires to commit to a higher purpose and raises hopes for divine guidance, it also awakens the profound confusion within our culture and the church around personal identity and the meaning of a good life. Consider this grating email invitation to a Christian leadership retreat on calling, all too typical:

As you consider how 2013 ought to be different, start with the basics. Do you know your calling? …. Don’t let another year go by with confusion over who you were meant to be.

The church has become so confused about calling in part because it has become so highly influenced by popular, secular narratives about meaning and purpose. In contrast to a historic Christian understanding, I’ll consider two popular movements that compete with and shape how the church talks about calling, and show how they are simultaneously helpful and misleading. First, the creativity movement: think TED talks, crowdsourcing, and the current business trend of design thinking; and second, the community or craft movement: think local, slow, build-it-yourself, commit-to-a-place efforts. Though the ideologies of creativity and community fall short as ultimate systems of meaning, they do suggest some transcendent qualities inherent in a Christian understanding of calling.

The historic idea of Christian calling is best understood as a conversation, an active dialogue about creation between an individual and God. In its fullest sense, this conversation takes place among members of a community – past, present, and future – and in relation to social institutions and cultures. Knowing your calling is like knowing a friend, not like knowing what to do next. Such knowledge demands presence and intimacy, and relies on memory. Living out calling as a conversation invites dependence and deferral in rhythm with confident action, as in any healthy relationship.

Charles Tiayon's insight:

The word “calling” has the power to elicit eyerolls and sighs – a cliché of the worst kind. Though it stirs up deep desires to commit to a higher purpose and raises hopes for divine guidance, it also awakens the profound confusion within our culture and the church around personal identity and the meaning of a good life. Consider this grating email invitation to a Christian leadership retreat on calling, all too typical:

As you consider how 2013 ought to be different, start with the basics. Do you know your calling? …. Don’t let another year go by with confusion over who you were meant to be.

The church has become so confused about calling in part because it has become so highly influenced by popular, secular narratives about meaning and purpose. In contrast to a historic Christian understanding, I’ll consider two popular movements that compete with and shape how the church talks about calling, and show how they are simultaneously helpful and misleading. First, the creativity movement: think TED talks, crowdsourcing, and the current business trend of design thinking; and second, the community or craft movement: think local, slow, build-it-yourself, commit-to-a-place efforts. Though the ideologies of creativity and community fall short as ultimate systems of meaning, they do suggest some transcendent qualities inherent in a Christian understanding of calling.

The historic idea of Christian calling is best understood as a conversation, an active dialogue about creation between an individual and God. In its fullest sense, this conversation takes place among members of a community – past, present, and future – and in relation to social institutions and cultures. Knowing your calling is like knowing a friend, not like knowing what to do next. Such knowledge demands presence and intimacy, and relies on memory. Living out calling as a conversation invites dependence and deferral in rhythm with confident action, as in any healthy relationship.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Charles Tiayon
Scoop.it!

euroXpress :: ¿Partnership o Partenariado?

euroXpress :: ¿Partnership o Partenariado? | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it
Por María Barreiro
La palabra inglesa partnership, que se utiliza con frecuencia creciente en distintos ámbitos, suele plantear problemas de traducción al español (salvo en su acepción estrictamente jurídica de «sociedad de...
Charles Tiayon's insight:

La palabra inglesa partnership, que se utiliza con frecuencia creciente en distintos ámbitos, suele plantear problemas de traducción al español (salvo en su acepción estrictamente jurídica de «sociedad de personas») frente a lo que sucede en otras lenguas romances, en las que tiene equivalentes ampliamente aceptados, como partenariat, partenariato, parceria, etc. La traducción propuesta de «partenariado» parece resultar inaceptable para muchos.

José Luis Martín señalaba en un artículo sobre neologismos que el barbarismo «partenariado» podía sustituirse fácilmente por términos como «asociación» o «cooperación». Este es, de hecho, el criterio de la mayoría de los organismos internacionales, en cuyas traducciones oficiales se encuentran numerosos ejemplos de búsqueda de alternativas. Así, la FAO traduce Global Water Partnership como «Alianza Mundial en favor del Agua»; en la Comisión Europea Transatlantic economic partnership se ha traducido por «Asociación económica transatlántica» y Partnership and Cooperation Agreements por «Acuerdos de asociación y cooperación» (el Consejo, en este caso, se ha inclinado por «Acuerdos de colaboración y cooperación»); asimismo, en textos de la OMS se habla de «reforzar la colaboración mundial para el desarrollo sanitario» que es en inglés strengthen the worldwide partnership for health development.


La palabra «partenariado», sin embargo, tiene sus defensores. Se alega que el uso de palabras alternativas puede inducir a error; que en ciertos contextos el término «asociación», por ejemplo, tiene connotaciones jurídicas que no siempre están presentes en partnership, mientras que términos como «colaboración», «cooperación» o «solidaridad» pueden resultar mucho más ambiguos en español que el partnership inglés, que a menudo incorpora la idea de «compromiso» entre partes1. Se entiende, por otro lado, que los derivados partenaire o «partenario»2 pueden sustituir con ventaja a los socorridos «socio» o «participante», y «partenarial» a «asociativo» (en este punto, no obstante, hay cierto desacuerdo: en textos en los que se utiliza la palabra «partenariado» se prefiere a veces hablar de «socios», por ejemplo, para referirse a sus miembros).


Así, según han constatado fuentes de la Comisión Europea con ocasión de los trabajos realizados en el marco de la iniciativa comunitaria Europartenariat, en el campo empresarial parece haber preferencia por utilizar el término «partenariado», y no «asociación», para designar la relación de cooperación económica, a menudo transnacional, que se establece entre dos o más empresas (sin que ello implique su fusión ni el establecimiento de vínculos formales per se, ni tampoco la creación de una persona jurídica) y que puede adoptar las formas de subcontratación, desarrollo conjunto de un producto, colaboración en la comercialización de productos en distintos mercados, etc. Por otro lado, en el campo de la política social el «partenariado» se concibe a menudo como una estrategia de cohesión social3, y en su definición se pone el acento en la especificidad y distinto carácter de las partes que lo integran. Se configura así como marco de actuación en un proyecto común de, por ejemplo, entidades públicas, organizaciones voluntarias, empresas privadas, etc.


De momento, la postura más extendida, y diríamos que recomendable, parece ser la de defender un uso de la palabra «partenariado» restringido a ciertos ámbitos y contextos, cuando se considere útil para evitar ambigüedades, y seguir utilizando las alternativas usuales en los demás casos. Después de todo, «partenariado», como hemos visto, se está empleando en distintos contextos con distintos matices, pero la idea siempre presente, como común denominador, no deja de ser la de alianza o asociación en sentido amplio. «Partenariado», pues, como término nuevo de uso general, parece resultar hoy por hoy innecesario, y su uso exclusivo para traducir partnership sería en exceso limitador. Utilizarlo sin miedo, por otro lado, cuando la ocasión se preste a ello, nos evitará muchos quebraderos de cabeza.

* Este artículo es una colaboración con PuntoyComa (Boletín de los traductores españoles de las Instituciones de la Unión Europea)

Maria.Barreiro@EuroFound.ie

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Charles Tiayon
Scoop.it!

North Korean dialect as a Soviet Russian translation

North Korean dialect as a Soviet Russian translation | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it
Many of my English-language colleagues and friends complain that it is surprisingly difficult to translate North Korean language texts into English. The result, they say, often sounds highly artificial and rather comical.

The present author does not face such problems when he has to translate North Korean texts into his native Russian. There are
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Charles Tiayon
Scoop.it!

Dans les coulisses de “Fonds perdus”, le dernier roman traduit de Thomas Pynchon

Dans les coulisses de “Fonds perdus”, le dernier roman traduit de Thomas Pynchon | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it
La version française de “Bleeding Edge” paraît ce jeudi 21 août. Nicolas Richard, son traducteur, explique comment rendre les subtilités, double...
Charles Tiayon's insight:

Fonds perdus, c'est le titre français deBleeding Edge, le dernier roman deThomas Pynchon, traduit par Nicolas Richard et qui paraît en France ce jeudi 21 août 2014 aux éditions du Seuil. Plutôt bien trouvé pour dire en deux mots une histoire qui explore les eaux profondes et troubles du Deep Web et nous plonge au cœur des obscurs et faramineux transferts de capitaux qui y ont été dissimulés peu avant les attentats du 11 septembre 2001.


Thomas Pynchon nous entraîne dans le sillage de Maxine Tarnow, une experte-comptable défroquée chargée de l'enquête, qui « n’a pas manqué de développer des antennes pour ce qui est de capter l’inexprimé », dans un univers d'illusions, de faux-semblants, de traces qui s'effacent à mesure qu'elles apparaissent, dans un monde « aux multiples formes de réalité où l’unité de base est le pixel » et dans lequel « quiconque s'approche trop de la vérité disparaît ».

Des alphageeks, hackers en goguette ou guérilleros, aux capital-risqueurs en chasse à tous les étages ; des codes source ultracryptés à ceux délibérémentopen ; des balises NOINDEX aux badlands du Midwest ; de la Silicon Valley à la Silicon Alley ; de la nerdistocratie à la loi du marché ; des glaces Ben & Jerry à la coupe de cheveux de Jennifer Aniston… Sans compter des intrigues à tiroirs sans fond, des dialogues truculents, un sens de la dérision jubilatoire… Comment ne pas se perdre dans un tel roman ? « En fait il s’agit juste d’un dédale de plus, si ce n’est qu’il est invisible », nous souffle Pynchon, page 81.

On retrouve Nicolas Richard, son traducteur, que l'on avait rencontré il y a quelques mois au moment où il abordait ce texte. Son travail achevé, les épreuves rendues à l'éditeur, il promène, à la manière de Maxine, qui « cherche à cliquer sur des liens transparents avec sa baguette de sourcier », sa baguette à lui au-dessus de ses notes de travail, et nous commente quelques mots et formules qui la font vibrer. Comme autant de fragments de codes d'accès à cet exercice si subtil qu'est la traduction d'un roman de Pynchon.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Charles Tiayon
Scoop.it!

La fonction « latin » de Google traduction détournée

La fonction « latin » de Google traduction détournée | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it
Des locutions latines prenaient un drôle de sens lorsqu'elles étaient traduites par Google.
Charles Tiayon's insight:
Entrez des mots latins dans Google traduction (Google Translate), le service de traduction automatique de Google, et vous aurez peut-être la surprise de les voirtraduits par « Internet », « Chine », ou « OTAN »... Aucun rapport visiblement.

Et pourtant, a remarqué Brian Krebs, un ancien journaliste et expert en sécurité informatique, c'est ce qu'il se passait quand on tapait les termes « lorem ipsum » et ses dérivés dans Google Translate, jusqu'à il y a peu. Michael Shoukry et un autre chercheur de FireEye sont à l'origine de cette découverte.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Charles Tiayon
Scoop.it!

On-Call Translators Help English-Only Emergency Dispatchers

On-Call Translators Help English-Only Emergency Dispatchers | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it
The last thing a 911 emergency center operator wants to say when answering a caller in distress is: "I can't understand you."

But that can happen when call-center dispatchers onl...
Charles Tiayon's insight:

SALEM, OREGON—

The last thing a 911 emergency center operator wants to say when answering a caller in distress is: "I can't understand you."

But that can happen when call-center dispatchers only speak English, and in the increasingly polyglot American society, some people in distress inevitably can't communicate in English.

Calls in a foreign language are a daily - or almost daily - occurrence in urban counties across the United States, which leads many 911 centers to contract with an emergency translation service.

Veteran call-taker and training manager Andrea Tobin, at the Willamette Valley Communications Center in Salem, Oregon, admits that the wait for an interpreter to join the call can be excruciating, but dispatchers are trained not to let that tension come through in their voice.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Charles Tiayon
Scoop.it!

Translation - A Recession-Proof Industry

Translation - A Recession-Proof Industry | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it
If the great financial crisis taught us anything it is that there are very few industries that can be considered 'recession proof'. But in a global market, one that weathered the storms better than...
Charles Tiayon's insight:

If the great financial crisis taught us anything it is that there are very few industries that can be considered ‘recession proof’. But in a global market, one that weathered the storms better than others is translation services.

Reports show that the industry of translation and interpretation services has grown on average by 12 per cent each year since 2008 and with the increase of cross-border trade and business, a recent study projected a large growth between 2010 and 2020, much larger than average business growth.

The number of jobs for translators and interpreters has also doubled in the past ten years while their wages steadily grew before, during and after the recession, despite many predicting that growing technology in machine translation would cut jobs in the industry.

Free web-based translation programs such as Google Translate have not dented the market for translation services. “Machine translation can quickly summarise large paragraphs of text and it’s free, but humans will always be needed to proofread the results, at least for the foreseeable future. Even Google doesn’t use Google Translate for their business documents”, explains Kathryn Birch, founder and managing director of award winning language service, Translive Global.

Translators and interpreters should welcome new technology, says Kathryn: “Web content is booming and due to the expansion of globalisation, the industry may actually face a shortage of qualified human translators soon. Technology is part of the solution – that’s why I created Translive Global.” Technology-savvy translation companies are growing at much faster rates than those companies that are cautious when it comes to embracing technology, her research shows.

Translive Global is a highly automated website that puts expert translators around the globe in touch with those needing translation services. The website produces algorithm-based quotes to give users an upfront idea commitment to cost which means both parties know what they’re agreeing to. They also provide interpretation and transcription services. All interpreters are available via video link through the website, making it faster and easier than ever before.

Adopting technology won’t really help in the absence of fluency and experience. Individuals must not only speak and think in two languages fluently to be translators and interpreters, they must also translate meaning from one language and culture to another without inflicting harm in the process. The most successful translators and interpreters are those who are highly educated. Many hold advanced degrees have excellent training and a solid background in translation, or a specialty field they intend to concentrate on in their work.

Translive Global not only provides the customer with a speedy yet simple online service, the client can also pick the translator or interpreter of their choice by viewing their profile as well as what each one charges before submitting the work.

The estimated value of the language-service industry worldwide this year will be about £22.4 billion, according to Common Sense Advisory, a market research firm in Boston.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Charles Tiayon
Scoop.it!

Google Launchpad, Search Engine Giant’s Startup Mentorship Program, Coming To India

Google Launchpad, Search Engine Giant’s Startup Mentorship Program, Coming To India | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it
The startups will be guided by nearly 20 mentors, half of whom will be “Googlers” from California and Israel.
Charles Tiayon's insight:

Google Inc. (NASDAQ:GOOGL) will mentor startups in India as part of its successful mentorship program called “Google Launchpad.” The search engine giant has already identified more than 10 startups in the country to be part of the program, which is expected to enroll 25 companies.

Many senior executives from the company's offices in California and Israel will mentor local entrepreneurs over a period of five days starting Nov. 3 in the southern city of Bangalore, which is known as the country's technology hub. The startups will be coached by nearly 20 mentors on various subjects including technology, product strategy, user interfaces, user experiences and marketing. On the last day of the event, startups will have an opportunity to pitch venture capitalists and investors, Business Insider reported.

“Launchpad is an exhaustive mentorship program to help startups build at scale,” Sunil Rao, country head of the startup program at Google India, told Business Insider. “By next year we want to do this every quarter, and a year from then, we hope to do it every month.”

Some of the shortlisted startups are working in areas including financial services, computer graphics, online education and health care.

“We need people who can really implement the idea. We are also looking for those with a sound business plan and minimum product viability,” Rao said, adding that the startups were being identified based on the quality of the founding team.

The Google Launchpad mentorship program was first launched in Israel in December 2012, and more than a dozen such events have been held there since, including an event in Brazil.

“Google's Launchpad is a similarly innovative compressed bootcamp which will deliver access to world class experts, and knowledge to further help catalyze the Indian startup ecosystem. Launchpad resembles an accelerator on steroids and we would welcome more such programs,” Ravi Gururaj, chairman of the Nasscom Product Council, told Business Insider.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Charles Tiayon
Scoop.it!

IFRS - New Hebrew, Russian, Serbian and Spanish translations available online

The IFRS Foundation is pleased to announce the publication of the following translations:

  • Hebrew translation of Defined Benefit Plans: Employee Contributions (Amendments to IAS 19), issued by the IASB in English in November 2013.
  • Hebrew translation of IFRS 9 Financial Instruments (Hedge Accounting and amendments to IFRS 9, IFRS 7 and IAS 39), issued by the IASB in English in November 2013.
  • Hebrew translation of Annual Improvements to IFRSs 2010–2012 Cycle, issued by the IASB in English in December 2013.
  • Hebrew translation of Annual Improvements to IFRSs 2011–2013 Cycle, issued by the IASB in English in December 2013.
  • Hebrew translation of IFRS 14 Regulatory Deferral Accounts, issued by the IASB in English in January 2014.
  • Hebrew translation of Clarification of Acceptable Methods of Depreciation and Amortisation(Amendments to IAS 16 and IAS 38), issued by the IASB in English in May 2014.
  • Hebrew translation of Accounting for Acquisitions of Interests in Joint Operations(Amendments to IFRS 11), issued by the IASB in English in May 2014.
  • Russian translation of Clarification of Acceptable Methods of Depreciation and Amortisation(Amendments to IAS 16 and IAS 38), issued by the IASB in English in May 2014.
  • Russian translation of Accounting for Acquisitions of Interests in Joint Operations(Amendments to IFRS 11), issued by the IASB in English in May 2014.
  • Serbian translation of the 2013 requirements of IFRSs (without early application) (Blue Book). Official pronouncements applicable on 1 January 2013. Does not include IFRSs with an effective date after 1 January 2013.
  • Spanish translation of Agriculture: Bearer Plants (Amendments to IAS 16 and IAS 41), issued by the IASB in English in June 2014.

eIFRS/Comprehensive subscribers can access the above translations from eIFRS (you will be required to provide your login details). This section is updated throughout the year with translations of new and revised Standards as issued by the IASB, as the translations become available.

If you wish to purchase a Comprehensive or eIFRS subscription please visit our Web Shop.

To find more information about our available translations visit the Translations Status page. If you are interested in purchasing our available translated publications please visit the IFRS Web Shop.

Charles Tiayon's insight:

The IFRS Foundation is pleased to announce the publication of the following translations:

  • Hebrew translation of Defined Benefit Plans: Employee Contributions (Amendments to IAS 19), issued by the IASB in English in November 2013.
  • Hebrew translation of IFRS 9 Financial Instruments (Hedge Accounting and amendments to IFRS 9, IFRS 7 and IAS 39), issued by the IASB in English in November 2013.
  • Hebrew translation of Annual Improvements to IFRSs 2010–2012 Cycle, issued by the IASB in English in December 2013.
  • Hebrew translation of Annual Improvements to IFRSs 2011–2013 Cycle, issued by the IASB in English in December 2013.
  • Hebrew translation of IFRS 14 Regulatory Deferral Accounts, issued by the IASB in English in January 2014.
  • Hebrew translation of Clarification of Acceptable Methods of Depreciation and Amortisation(Amendments to IAS 16 and IAS 38), issued by the IASB in English in May 2014.
  • Hebrew translation of Accounting for Acquisitions of Interests in Joint Operations(Amendments to IFRS 11), issued by the IASB in English in May 2014.
  • Russian translation of Clarification of Acceptable Methods of Depreciation and Amortisation(Amendments to IAS 16 and IAS 38), issued by the IASB in English in May 2014.
  • Russian translation of Accounting for Acquisitions of Interests in Joint Operations(Amendments to IFRS 11), issued by the IASB in English in May 2014.
  • Serbian translation of the 2013 requirements of IFRSs (without early application) (Blue Book). Official pronouncements applicable on 1 January 2013. Does not include IFRSs with an effective date after 1 January 2013.
  • Spanish translation of Agriculture: Bearer Plants (Amendments to IAS 16 and IAS 41), issued by the IASB in English in June 2014.

eIFRS/Comprehensive subscribers can access the above translations from eIFRS (you will be required to provide your login details). This section is updated throughout the year with translations of new and revised Standards as issued by the IASB, as the translations become available.

If you wish to purchase a Comprehensive or eIFRS subscription please visit our Web Shop.

To find more information about our available translations visit the Translations Status page. If you are interested in purchasing our available translated publications please visit the IFRS Web Shop.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Charles Tiayon
Scoop.it!

Veja as piores traduções dos nomes de filmes de Hollywood #2 | Pretinho Básico

Veja as piores traduções dos nomes de filmes de Hollywood #2 | Pretinho Básico | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it
É incrível o potencial criativo da galera que traduz os filmes, são tantas bizarrices que rendeu até uma segunda parte, vejam mais traduções toscas dos filmes:
Charles Tiayon's insight:

É incrível o potencial criativo da galera que traduz os filmes, são tantas bizarrices que rendeu até uma segunda parte, vejam mais traduções toscas dos filmes de Hollywood:

1 – Bater ou correr em Londres:

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Charles Tiayon
Scoop.it!

Google Search Has Been Improved. A Lot.

I do a lecture for the police and intelligence community. The focus is on the techniques helpful in finding information that answers a query. If a person types a query into Google, the results are ...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Charles Tiayon
Scoop.it!

Image Search Engines: Pinterest Takes on Google (Infographic)

Image Search Engines: Pinterest Takes on Google (Infographic) | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it

Pinterest and Google are battling it out to become the ultimate image search engine. While Google remains the king of image results based on the literal intent of a search, Pinterest is doing a much …

Charles Tiayon's insight:

Pinterest and Google are battling it out to become the ultimate image search engine. While Google remains the king of image results based on the literal intent of a search, Pinterest is doing a much better job at solving the biggest problem with search engines right now, which is content discovery. By offering more intuitive image results that go beyond literal keywords or search terms, users are flocking to Pinterest to find images.

Pinterest may not be replacing Google anytime soon, but the platform is becoming a true search alternative to the giant. When you search on Pinterest, descriptive visual guides and refined search options will help you sort through the endless stream of images, and discover new, interesting content.

Here are some of the key tools that set Pinterest image search apart from Google.


more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Charles Tiayon
Scoop.it!

Exploring OER – what does the current landscape look like for less used languages?

Exploring OER – what does the current landscape look like for less used languages? | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it

This study contributes to the mapping of OER taking a specific focus on OER for less used languages, though there are several issues of interest for languages as such. In the study, which is based on surveys, interviews and the voices from experts, we present the state-of-the-art in gaps and challenges for OER and less used languages waiting to be tackled. What we found to be important were issues linked to multilingualism, the roles of teachers, policies, context, quality aspects, and accessibility. By framing an increased understanding of OER for less used languages, we can also raise awareness and contribute to sustainability.

Charles Tiayon's insight:

This study contributes to the mapping of OER taking a specific focus on OER for less used languages, though there are several issues of interest for languages as such. In the study, which is based on surveys, interviews and the voices from experts, we present the state-of-the-art in gaps and challenges for OER and less used languages waiting to be tackled. What we found to be important were issues linked to multilingualism, the roles of teachers, policies, context, quality aspects, and accessibility. By framing an increased understanding of OER for less used languages, we can also raise awareness and contribute to sustainability.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Charles Tiayon
Scoop.it!

Bringing international literature to the blind - Daily News Egypt

Bringing international literature to the blind - Daily News Egypt | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it
egypt - The nonprofit online magazine Albawtaka Review is translating and recording English audio books into Arabic for Egypt's blind
Charles Tiayon's insight:

Hala Salah Edin likens translation to a form of alchemy.

“Translating literature is much like putting two precious metals into one pot and melting them to reach a new form of rareness, which allows the reader to see the life of others from different perspectives,” she said. “Having previously been melted by the heat of prejudice, readers are being re-shaped with a bird’s eye view of the world, free of judgment.”

This idea of exposing people to new points of view is part of the reason Salah Edin, founded the Albawtaka Review, a nonprofit online magazine that features contemporary English literature translated into Arabic. It also inspired the nonprofit’s latest project, which aims to bring international literature to an even more neglected population – Egypt’s blind.

Assuming they won’t make high profits, publishing houses have long neglected producing audio versions for books and novels. Salah Edin’s project is dedicating to remedying the shortage of books available to the blind by producing about 10,000 recordings.

For this project, titled “Not Chick Lit: Stories by Ordinary Women in and Beyond Turmoil”, Salah Edin selected stories that explore contemporary humans’ socially-constructed dilemmas, she said, opening a window to women and their challenges in the 21st century, their worlds and their perspectives.

 ”As its name implies, the project is indeed about women but it doesn’t necessarily address only women,” Salah Eldin said. “I chose these stories with a human eye, rather than a feminist eye. It reflects women engaging with the plight of poverty, estrangement, prejudice, oppressive traditions, the holocaust, a child’s loss, corruption in academia, racism and the impalpable nature of music.”

The audio books will be distributed to four institutions for the blind in Cairo and three in Libya, including The Egyptian Blind Association, Taha Hussein Hall in Cairo University, Helwan University and Fagr Eltanweer Organization in Cairo, the Association for the Blind in Benghazi (ABB), the Blind Organization and Arete Foundation for Arts and Culture in Tripoli.

The project’s origin dates back to April 2006, when Salah Eldin established Albawtaka Review, hoping to deliver contemporary English literature to ordinary people in the Arab world via translation. Albawtaka Review is an Arabic independent non-profit online quarterly concerned with translating English short fiction.

Raised in Tanta where she received a Bachelor of Arts from Tanta University, Salah Eldin’s first encounter with translation was rendering the English text of An Artist of the Floating World by British novelist Kazuo Ishiguro into Arabic.

Her passion for translation arose from thinking that one of the main reasons for cultural clashes is the belief that the other is different, with unfamiliar and undecipherable behaviours, thus ominously unreachable. In her opinion, translating literature has revealed the falsehood of this conviction, exposing that what unites us is actually more than what keeps us apart.

The idea for Albawtak, an Arabic word meaning ‘the crucible’, came to her when she read a short article by Egyptian novelist Youssef Zeidan in Alahram Newspaper in 2005, which discussed the convenience of relying on the internet to deliver media contents.

“I had been translating stories for about six months [and] considerably failing to publish them in magazines due to their immense sizes,” she said. “It hits me that the internet doesn’t count words or think in numbers and I can easily publish long stories to be delivered to people’s inboxes in a matter of minutes.”

Salah Eldin opted to set up a website and design it herself, after teaching herself some basic computer coding. So far, she has published 43 issues, presented the biographies of 105 English-speaking writers, and 120 translated stories. In July 2010, Salah Eldin established Albawtaka Publishing House, which prints translations of contemporary English fiction into Arabic, in addition to anthologies of Albawtaka Review‘s short fiction.

For the first four years, Salah Eldin funded the project out of her own pocket. But, soon, the project garnered grants from The Arab Fund of Arts and Culture, the British Council in Cairo andThe International Fund for the Promotion of Culture.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Charles Tiayon
Scoop.it!

New Talking TIS newsletter available | Translating and Interpreting Service (TIS National)

New Talking TIS newsletter available | Translating and Interpreting Service (TIS National) | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it
New Talking TIS newsletter available news article
Charles Tiayon's insight:

The latest edition of the Talking TIS newsletter is now available.

Talking TIS provides a snapshot of what’s happening at TIS National including the TIS Online automated booking system, new eBilling features, our interpreter scholarship program and much more.

View the Winter 2014 edition of Talking TIS.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Charles Tiayon
Scoop.it!

Ashway: Translating SEC coachspeak

Ashway: Translating SEC coachspeak | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it
SEC Media Days? That’s a misnomer.
Charles Tiayon's insight:

Each coach arrives with his own agenda, and scrupulously avoids divulging that agenda with endless obfuscation, doubletalk and coachspeak.

But fear not! With the benefit of three weeks of analysis, probing hindsight and news leaking out of summer camps, we can now fearlessly divulge what each coach said, and what he really wanted to say.

All quotes provided by transcripts from asapsports.com.

Mark Stoops, Kentucky: “How we measure success is how we prepare.”

Translation: When you haven’t won a conference game since 2011, success is best measured anywhere but the scoreboard. We open with UT-Martin and Ohio, which should be taken as a good measure of our success.

Bret Bielema, Arkansas: “We had some transition on the coaching staff. We lost our defensive coordinator; we lost a defensive line coach, another secondary coach. It allowed me to improve our coaching staff in general.”

Translation: I wanted to bring Big Ten football to the SEC. Instead, I brought the worst defense in the league. We got ripped for 38 points a game in conference play. Big Ten football? Yeah, if you’re Indiana.

Butch Jones, Tennessee: “We’re having to replace almost half our football team. This year half our roster will be brand new. This has brought a lot of positive energy, excitement, momentum that surrounds Tennessee football.”

Translation: We’ve won four conference games in three years, two last year. We’re adding by subtracting. It’s not like we lost half of Alabama’s players.

Hugh Freeze, Ole Miss: “One good thing about Media Days is coach Spurrier isn’t talking about Ole Miss as much, wanting to play us every year. Maybe that’s a good thing.”

Translation: Of course, coach Spurrier might be mouthing off about how we can’t coach up our fine recruits had we not waxed Georgia Tech in the Music City Bowl.

Will Muschamp, Florida: “We needed to make some changes on offense. I felt like our kids had lost confidence in some things we were doing offensively.”

Translation: Here’s where the mighty Gator program sits: I had to go out and steal an offensive coordinator from Duke. Duke! Of course, the last time we stole a coach from Duke, it worked out pretty well.

Dan Mullen, Mississippi State: “We finished last year with three straight wins, which is the first time that’s happened in a long time at Mississippi State. By going to four straight bowl games, by winning four out of five Egg Bowls within the state, we’ve built a solid foundation for our future.”

Translation: We might have been the best 7-6 team in the country last year. And did you see us maul Rice in the Liberty Bowl?

Derek Mason, Vanderbilt: “It’s great to be here. First-year head coach, Vanderbilt University. It’s exciting. I’m a fresh new face, only new head coach on the block. Great thing is, I’m undefeated, so I’m feeling real good about where we’re at (smiling.)”

Translation: The other coaches told me to keep smiling. Wonder what they meant by that?

Kevin Sumlin, Texas A&M: “For us to be where we need to be, we need to be talented, but we need to increase our depth. That comes from the only two ways I know how to do it: player development.”

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Charles Tiayon
Scoop.it!

Des traductions étonnantes du latin sur Google

Des traductions étonnantes du latin sur Google | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it
Le résultat d'un petit jeu mené par quelques rigolos.
Charles Tiayon's insight:

C'est bien connu, il existe depuis déjà de nombreuses années de petits malins qui se font un plaisir de cacher des choses qui arrivent cependant à la vue de tous après une recherche souvent fortuite. En témoigne le dernier lièvre levé par Google sur son service de traduction.

 

Lorsque l'on entrait une phrase latine bien particulière, celle-ci se retrouvait traduite par « Internet », « Chine », ou encore « OTAN ». Autant dire des mots qui n'avaient rien à voir avec la phrase mise en traduction, rapporte Le Monde.

 

Pour comprendre cet habile procédé depuis corrigé par Google, il faut aller un peu plus loin. Taper les mots « lorem ipsum » dans Google Translate et l'on retrouvait un important brouillage. Mais en fait ces deux mots, dont un est d'ailleurs tronqué, sont tirés d'un texte de Cicéro : « Neque porro quisquam est qui dolorem ipsum quia dolor sit amet, consectetur, adipisci velit... ».

 

Et ces mots sont souvent utilisés par les infographistes et programmeurs pour mettre du texte dans des pages qui sont en construction pour montrer ce que cela donnera une fois l'ouvrage terminé.

 

Quand Google a des trous dans ses vastes connaissances, il fait appel au savoir des internautes en allant chercher les traductions de mots ou expressions dans les pages qu'il référence. Quelqu'un a donc réussi à leurrer ainsi Google.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Charles Tiayon
Scoop.it!

5 Quick Tips If Your Trip Is Lost in Translation

5 Quick Tips If Your Trip Is Lost in Translation | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it
Without linguistic mix-ups, I would perhaps never have tasted chicken-heart pizza in Brazil nor entered into a wager with a one-armed pool player from Italy (he beat me, if you must know). But there are times when all you want is to be understood....
Charles Tiayon's insight:

As I jumped into the back of a cab in Athens on my recent trip, I realized my predicament. I wanted to go to my hotel on Michalakopoulou Street but had no idea how to pronounce it properly. So I just let the vowels cascade out of my mouth, with all the intelligibility of a gagging codfish.

The driver just stared blankly at me in his rear view mirror for a moment, drove me to the other side of town, and marked the end of the trip with a smile and some Greek mutterings. "Your face amuses me, so I'll only rip you off by 10 euros," he seemed to say, before depositing me in front of a lamp store.

Over the years I've concluded that half the fun of traveling is embarrassing myself in foreign languages. Without linguistic mix-ups, I would perhaps never have tasted chicken-heart pizza in Brazil nor entered into a wager with a one-armed pool player from Italy (he beat me, if you must know).

But there are times when all you want is to be understood, so here are five tips and tricks that have served me well.

1. It's worth knowing some basics: English has long dominated global pop culture, but tragically, no number of international reruns of The Fresh Prince of Bel Air can teach the world to speak like Geoffrey the butler. Take it from someone who learned to order a beer in 12 languages: There are some words that you'll want to know how to say. Brush up on some basics in the plane and you'll be rewarded by better comprehension and good vibes from locals who see you making an effort.

2. Pick up airport brochures ... all of them: They may seem like marketing propaganda, but tourist brochures can be the Rosetta Stones of the modern traveler. Because they are usually printed in multiple languages you can learn how to say "commuter bus to Berlin" or "museum of poorly crafted celebrity waxworks" in the native tongue before you've even left the airport. Keep them handy throughout the trip for when you need to ask for directions to your favorite tourist trap.

3. Get an app for that: Star Trek-style universal translator ranks high on my list of fictional tech that should have been invented by now, somewhere between hoverboards and lightsabers. Sadly, scientists are too busy creating mobile apps instead. There are too many to list, but I like iTranslate, which can convert text in more than 80 languages and has a premium option for voice translation. There are downsides to the technology: excessive smartphone use can take the fun out of your vacation, cost a fortune in roaming charges, make you vulnerable to pickpockets, and leave you high and dry when the battery runs out.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Charles Tiayon
Scoop.it!

A Secret Code in Google Translate?

A Secret Code in Google Translate? | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it
A glitch in translating Latin placeholder text is sparking conspiracy theories.
Charles Tiayon's insight:

Earlier this week security reporter Brian Krebs pointed out an odd glitch in Google Translate. It had to do with the service’s treatment of “Lorem Ipsum” placeholder text—the string of Latin words that people use to block out space for text on websites and in other designs before meaningful verbiage is added.

For some reason, strings of “Lorem Ipsum” were coming back as “NATO.” In his post, Krebs works through a few examples and posits a few explanations. Perhaps someone is gaming the translate system for fun, or to get around Chinese censorship laws. 

Could it be a code hidden in plain sight?

Even before Krebs finished the post, Google had changed its translation algorithm to make reproducing these results impossible. Now, rather than “lorem” returning “China,” Google Translate simply throws “lorem” right back at you. And, for its part, Google responded cheekily with a Tweet. Garbage in, garbage out, they said. (Google turned down my request for an interview, dismissing the translation as a technical snafu.) But for some that’s not quite good enough—and the assumption that Google is hiding something rather than simply failing at translation says a lot about how we see the Internet giant.   

“I’m not a tinfoil hat kind of guy for the most part,” Krebs told me, “but it was very clear that the tinfoil hat people were going to have a field day with this.” And in some ways it's the perfect conspiracy theory, because you can't prove what's going on either way. Without Google’s help—which they haven’t yet offered—there’s no way to know why the translate algorithm connected “lorem lorem” to “China’s Internet.” 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Charles Tiayon
Scoop.it!

Microsoft Surveys Internet Explorer

Microsoft Surveys Internet Explorer | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it
Microsoft surveys longtime Internet stalwart, Internet Explorer (IE), as it has proven to be a thorn in its side instead of the smooth integrator the software giant longed for. Internet Explorer enjoyed, for many years, a lofty position in the limited landscape of the search engine world. Popularity has had a significant drop in recent years […]
Charles Tiayon's insight:

Microsoft surveys longtime Internet stalwart, Internet Explorer (IE), as it has proven to be a thorn in its side instead of the smooth integrator the software giant longed for. Internet Explorer enjoyed, for many years, a lofty position in the limited landscape of the search engine world. Popularity has had a significant drop in recent years due to competitors with better products.

Google Chrome has surpassed Internet Explorer as the most popular Internet search engine. Google Chrome currently controls 38.5 percent of the market. Firefox and Safari edge closer every day to surpassing Microsoft’s stronghold on the search engine market. Both Safari and Firefox control a fraction over 15 percent of the market, as IE holds on to a deflating 21 percent.

Microsoft has considered rebranding IE, as issues with the search engine have resulted in a negative reputation, primarily the continuous vulnerabilities that have surfaced regarding its performance. Ultimately, rebranding IE would not mean that the issues making it a search engine susceptible to hackers would disappear. The bottom line is that IE is an unsafe search engine with many vulnerabilities inherent, unfortunately, because of its integration into the rest of Microsoft’s software.

This month alone Microsoft sent out a patch addressing 37 vulnerabilities in IE. Among the vulnerabilities were two that were considered critical, one of which could allow a computer to be used for remote user execution. It was found in OneNote, a program not as widely used as others in Microsoft’s arsenal. These issues can be found in IE versions from IE6 to IE11.

Microsoft’s survey of IE led to the announcement that within the next year and a half it will support only the latest versions of IE. They will introduce Enterprise Mode for those that need to run previous versions of IE. This announcement seems a difficult task, similar to putting a band aid on a gaping wound.

In Microsoft’s struggle to fix a product that has caused so much trouble, it seems like their attempts to fix issues create even more problems. In July and August of 2014, Microsoft released patches that actually slowed down computers that are left running. Situations like this have tested the patience of even the most loyal of followers.

Perhaps Microsoft’s problems lie in the fact IE is so closely integrated to Microsoft’s other products. Other search engines are not integrated as deeply and they are not going to expose the same kind of vulnerability, something that has become an attractive option for users and obviously a definite choice as the use of third party search engines has grown significantly in the last few years.

Microsoft could continue to survey the issues at hand and not rebrand IE. Changing the name of something that does not work to another name that does not work will not help. Most of the issues that face Microsoft are to its customers with a large business enterprise as these are more vulnerable since there are many users with different levels of administrative permissions could lead to infiltration. Focus could be aimed at creating an internal third party platform that does not have access to deeper system files. This access creates paths for cyber criminals to enter and ultimately control computers.

Opinion by Steve Salazar

Sources:


Read more at http://guardianlv.com/2014/08/microsoft-surveys-internet-explorer/#KkIWxHUhL7LoxPA4.99

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Charles Tiayon
Scoop.it!

Dealer website provider Search Optics acquires DigiGo

Dealer website provider Search Optics acquires DigiGo | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it
Search Optics, a growing provider of dealer websites and digital marketing services, has purchased KPA's DigiGo division, formerly known as TK Carsites. Terms were not disclosed.
Charles Tiayon's insight:

Search Optics, a growing provider of dealer websites and digital marketing services, said today it purchased KPA’s DigiGo division, formerly known as TK Carsites.

Terms were not disclosed.

DigiGo provides websites to several hundred dealerships and has expertise in using content and links to help customers get top positions on Google and other search engines on the free portion of search pages, said Christian Fuller, chief relationship officer for Search Optics. That positioning on Google is called search engine optimization.

Those DigiGo customers will be added to Search Optics’ current customer base of about 1,000 dealerships and automakers, Fuller said.

Search Optics has been growing during the past two years on the strength of contracts with Chrysler and other automakers that have certified Search Optics as a vendor that dealers can use and be eligible for advertising reimbursement.

Search Optics provides a full line of digital marketing services, including websites, Google advertising, banner ads on online shopping sites and re-targeted ads -- ads that use cookie-tracking code to follow a shopper from a dealer website to other sites.

With the acquisition, Search Optics has about 250 employees, 15 percent of whom came from DigiGo, Fuller said. The company intends to keep the DigiGo name and maintain DigiGo’s offices in Costa Mesa, Calif.

Search Optics is based in San Diego, with a major automotive office in suburban Detroit.

You can reach David Barkholz at dbarkholz@crain.com. -- Follow David on  an

more...
No comment yet.