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Concours de recrutement direct de traducteurs à la Fonction publique camerounaise

Concours de recrutement direct de traducteurs à la Fonction publique camerounaise | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it
Le ministre de la Fonction publique du Cameroun annonce l’ouverture d’un concours pour le recrutement direct de soixante (60) traducteurs principaux, catégorie « A » deuxième grade de la Fonction publique, dans le corps des fonctionnaires des Services de Traduction et d’Interprétation.

Ledit concours se déroulera les 13 et 14 octobre 2012 au centre unique de Yaoundé.

Entre autres conditions à remplir pour faire acte de canditure, chaque candidat(e) doit être titulaire à la fois d’une licence d’enseignement supérieur ou d’un diplôme reconnu équivalent et d’un diplôme de Traducteur délivré par un établissement national de formation ou par une école étrangère ou internationale figurant sur une liste fixée par arrêté du Premier Ministre.

Pour tous renseignements complémentaires, bien vouloir télécharger l’arrêté du ministre

....

http://metaglossia.wordpress.com/2012/08/24/concours-de-recrutement-direct-de-traducteurs-a-la-fonction-publique-camerounaise/

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News about translation, interpreting, intercultural communication, terminology and lexicography - as it happens
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UN Careers - jobs in this network (Translators, Revisers, Editors, etc.)

UN Careers -  jobs in this network (Translators, Revisers, Editors, etc.) | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it

Vacancies in this network: Translators, Revisers, Editors, etc.

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10 tips on writing a successful CV | BusinessDay

When it comes to applying for a new job, your CV could be just the ticket to get you that initial foot in the door and secure an interview – but how do you ensure your CV is added to the interview pile rather than thrown straight in the bin?

Putting together a successful CV is easy once you know how. It’s a case of taking all your skills and experience and tailoring them to the job you’re applying for. But what if you don’t meet the right criteria? Well, I’ve put together the following tips to help you get started in creating a successful CV and securing your first (or next) arts job.

Get the basics right

There is no right or wrong way to write a CV but there are some common sections you should cover. These include: personal and contact information; education and qualifications; work history and/or experience; relevant skills to the job in question; own interests, achievements or hobbies; and some references.

Presentation is key

A successful CV is always carefully and clearly presented, and printed on clean, crisp white paper. The layout should always be clean and well structured and CVs should never be crumpled or folded, so use an A4 envelope to post your applications.

Always remember the CV hotspot – the upper middle area of the first page is where the recruiter’s eye will naturally fall, so make sure you include your most important information there.

Stick to no more than two pages of A4

A good CV is clear, concise and makes every point necessary without waffling. You don’t need pages and pages of paper – you just keep things short and sweet. A CV is a reassurance to a potential employer, it’s a chance to tick the right boxes. And if everything is satisfied, there’s a better chance of a job interview. Also, employers receive dozens of CVs all the time so it’s unlikely they’ll read each one cover to cover. Most will make a judgment about a CV within sections, so stick to a maximum of two pages of A4 paper.

Understand the job description

The clues are in the job application, so read the details from start to finish. Take notes and create bullet points, highlighting everything you can satisfy and all the bits you can’t. With the areas where you’re lacking, fill in the blanks by adapting the skills you do have. For example, if the job in question requires someone with sales experience, there’s nothing stopping you from using any retail work you’ve undertaken – even if it was something to help pay the bills through university. It will demonstrate the skills you do have and show how they’re transferable.

Tailor the CV to the role

When you’ve established what the job entails and how you can match each requirement, create a CV specifically for that role. Remember, there is no such thing as a generic CV. Every CV you send to a potential employee should be tailored to that role so don’t be lazy and hope that a general CV will work because it won’t.

Create a unique CV for every job you apply for. You don’t have to re-write the whole thing, just adapt the details so they’re relevant.

Making the most of skills

Under the skills section of your CV don’t forget to mention key skills that can help you to stand out from the crowd. These could include: communication skills; computer skills; team working; problem solving or even speaking a foreign language. Skills can come out of the most unlikely places, so really think about what you’ve done to grow your own skills, even if you take examples from being in a local sports team or joining a voluntary group – it’s all relevant.

Making the most of interests

Under interests, highlight the things that show off skills you’ve gained and employers look for. Describe any examples of positions of responsibility, working in a team or anything that shows you can use your own initiative. For example, if you ran your university’s newspaper or if you started a weekend league football team that became a success.

Include anything that shows how diverse, interested and skilled you are. Don’t include passive interests like watching TV, solitary hobbies that can be perceived as you lacking in people skills. Make yourself sound really interesting.

Making the most of experience

Use assertive and positive language under the work history and experience sections, such as “developed”, “organised” or “achieved”. Try to relate the skills you have learned to the job role you’re applying for. For example: “The work experience involved working in a team,” or “This position involved planning, organisation and leadership as I was responsible for a team of people”.

Really get to grips with the valuable skills and experience you have gained from past work positions, even if it was just working in a restaurant – every little helps.

Including references

References should be from someone who has employed you in the past and can vouch for your skills and experience. If you’ve never worked before you’re OK to use a teacher or tutor as a referee. Try to include two if you can.

Keep your CV updated

It’s crucial to review your CV on a regular basis and add any new skills or experience that’s missing. For example, if you’ve just done some volunteering or worked on a new project, make sure they’re on there – potential employers are always impressed with candidates who go the extra mile to boost their own skills and experience.

Source: The Guardia Professional.

Katy Cowan runs the Creative Boom website voluntarily – she is a trained journalist, writer and PR professional. Follow her and Creative Boom on Twitter @Creative_Boom

Charles Tiayon's insight:

When it comes to applying for a new job, your CV could be just the ticket to get you that initial foot in the door and secure an interview – but how do you ensure your CV is added to the interview pile rather than thrown straight in the bin?

Putting together a successful CV is easy once you know how. It’s a case of taking all your skills and experience and tailoring them to the job you’re applying for. But what if you don’t meet the right criteria? Well, I’ve put together the following tips to help you get started in creating a successful CV and securing your first (or next) arts job.

Get the basics right

There is no right or wrong way to write a CV but there are some common sections you should cover. These include: personal and contact information; education and qualifications; work history and/or experience; relevant skills to the job in question; own interests, achievements or hobbies; and some references.

Presentation is key

A successful CV is always carefully and clearly presented, and printed on clean, crisp white paper. The layout should always be clean and well structured and CVs should never be crumpled or folded, so use an A4 envelope to post your applications.

Always remember the CV hotspot – the upper middle area of the first page is where the recruiter’s eye will naturally fall, so make sure you include your most important information there.

Stick to no more than two pages of A4

A good CV is clear, concise and makes every point necessary without waffling. You don’t need pages and pages of paper – you just keep things short and sweet. A CV is a reassurance to a potential employer, it’s a chance to tick the right boxes. And if everything is satisfied, there’s a better chance of a job interview. Also, employers receive dozens of CVs all the time so it’s unlikely they’ll read each one cover to cover. Most will make a judgment about a CV within sections, so stick to a maximum of two pages of A4 paper.

Understand the job description

The clues are in the job application, so read the details from start to finish. Take notes and create bullet points, highlighting everything you can satisfy and all the bits you can’t. With the areas where you’re lacking, fill in the blanks by adapting the skills you do have. For example, if the job in question requires someone with sales experience, there’s nothing stopping you from using any retail work you’ve undertaken – even if it was something to help pay the bills through university. It will demonstrate the skills you do have and show how they’re transferable.

Tailor the CV to the role

When you’ve established what the job entails and how you can match each requirement, create a CV specifically for that role. Remember, there is no such thing as a generic CV. Every CV you send to a potential employee should be tailored to that role so don’t be lazy and hope that a general CV will work because it won’t.

Create a unique CV for every job you apply for. You don’t have to re-write the whole thing, just adapt the details so they’re relevant.

Making the most of skills

Under the skills section of your CV don’t forget to mention key skills that can help you to stand out from the crowd. These could include: communication skills; computer skills; team working; problem solving or even speaking a foreign language. Skills can come out of the most unlikely places, so really think about what you’ve done to grow your own skills, even if you take examples from being in a local sports team or joining a voluntary group – it’s all relevant.

Making the most of interests

Under interests, highlight the things that show off skills you’ve gained and employers look for. Describe any examples of positions of responsibility, working in a team or anything that shows you can use your own initiative. For example, if you ran your university’s newspaper or if you started a weekend league football team that became a success.

Include anything that shows how diverse, interested and skilled you are. Don’t include passive interests like watching TV, solitary hobbies that can be perceived as you lacking in people skills. Make yourself sound really interesting.

Making the most of experience

Use assertive and positive language under the work history and experience sections, such as “developed”, “organised” or “achieved”. Try to relate the skills you have learned to the job role you’re applying for. For example: “The work experience involved working in a team,” or “This position involved planning, organisation and leadership as I was responsible for a team of people”.

Really get to grips with the valuable skills and experience you have gained from past work positions, even if it was just working in a restaurant – every little helps.

Including references

References should be from someone who has employed you in the past and can vouch for your skills and experience. If you’ve never worked before you’re OK to use a teacher or tutor as a referee. Try to include two if you can.

Keep your CV updated

It’s crucial to review your CV on a regular basis and add any new skills or experience that’s missing. For example, if you’ve just done some volunteering or worked on a new project, make sure they’re on there – potential employers are always impressed with candidates who go the extra mile to boost their own skills and experience.

Source: The Guardia Professional.

Katy Cowan runs the Creative Boom website voluntarily – she is a trained journalist, writer and PR professional. Follow her and Creative Boom on Twitter @Creative_Boom

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6 Steps to Becoming a Best-Selling Author - Mediabistro

6 Steps to Becoming a Best-Selling Author - Mediabistro | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it
The success of a book depends on a lot more than just good writing.
Charles Tiayon's insight:

There are plenty of authors who write for love of the craft -- you know, the people who claim they would keep churning out books even if they only sold copies to their mother and first grade English teacher, and never earned a dime for their efforts. Most of us, though, desire for our carefully crafted words to be read by the masses as we rake in millions.

When it comes to literary validation, hitting the best-seller lists is one of the most universally recognized achievements. Even the most humble scribes don't hesitate to add "New York Times best-selling author" to their titles once they've reached that coveted status. But the reality is that landing on high-powered rankings takes more than just talent and a killer plot. Indeed, becoming a best-selling author is just as much about marketing and promotion as the actual writing. That's a scary notion for us introverted folks who would much rather hide behind our bylines than scream from the mountaintops for readers to "buy my book -- now!"


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The Fix guide to understanding all the great political cliches

The Fix guide to understanding all the great political cliches | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it


The election is little more than a month away, which means reporters are filing campaign stories at a sprint-like clip, and spokespeople and politicians are finally settling into the phrases they had prepared in the hopes that they'd scare or bore reporters away. More and more analysis to read; less and less to learn.

In order to make sure you make the most of your quest for midterm enlightenment, here is a quick guide to some of the things you will hear ad nauseam over the next month-plus. (And yes, I/we have probably used all these cliches before too -- and more often than we care to admit -- so save yourself the trouble. The Fix is still selling like hot cakes. So don't cry over spilt milk. The rest is history.)

The list is by no means unabridged. If you type "election cliches" into Google -- or watch any election analysis on TV -- you will find many more.


A poll worker rips "I Voted" stickers from a roll at a polling place in Oklahoma City, Tuesday, June 24, 2014. (AP Photo/Sue Ogrocki)

Blue state

Definition: A state that often votes for Democratic presidential candidates. Contrary to popular belief, there are often many Republicans in blue states. In rural blue state areas, there are often local governments comprised entirely of Republican officials. There are even Chik-fil-A's and pick-up trucks.

Ex. 1: "But even in the shadow of defeat, blue states have reason to be proud. In a country where cultural identities can be claustrophobic, blue states are home to great cities where people find freedom in the streets of Boston or New York or Chicago to transcend conventional expectations and become most fully themselves."

Gaffe

Definition: An embarrassing mistake made by a political campaign or candidate -- often involving an inadvertent telling of the truth -- that will likely be forgotten tomorrow.

Ex. 1: "Udall gaffes, apologizes, nothing viral, yet"

Ex. 2: "The only saving grace for Snyder is that this happened in August, not October. The memory of his gaffe may recede in time, just like Detroit's flood waters."

Game changer

Definition: When the polls move by a percentage point or two, or a gaffe prompts second-day analysis (when you account for Internet inflation, this is similar to writing about an event a week later in 1992). It will likely be lost to history by next week.

Ex. 1: "That debate may very well have been the winning margin in that closest of races. You never know when a debate will become a game-changer."

Grassroots

Definition: The real Americans who help politicians win elections. They are often secret weapons. To better understand a story or cable news panel, say "real America" or "AMERICA!" instead of grassroots.

Ex. 1: "Today, the tightly-knit group of about 20 organizers is one of a handful of Obama-inspired outfits like it across Iowa, an uplifting legacy point for a president who tapped the power of grassroots organizing to win the White House but now struggles with dismal approval ratings and a stalled agenda in Washington."

Ex. 2: “'Joni is the grassroots candidate with the farm girl work ethic to outwork Congressman Braley in taking her message to Iowans,' Ernst spokeswoman Gretchen Hamel said in a statement."

Ground game

Definition: When you put grassroots organizers in a state that is neither a red state nor a blue state in order to try to win said state, you have a ground game. A ground game is a magnet for horse races (see next).

Ex. 1: "If Johnson can raise enough money to compete in the TV air war, state GOP Chairman Downey said, the party is prepared to wage the 'ground game' he needs to get his supporters to the polls."

Horse race

Definition: In theory, campaigning so exciting and so close that Laura Hillenbrand could write a book and make millions about it. In practice, it is when reporters and pundits carefully document the minutiae of elections, carefully plotting the passage of time in gaffes and game changers, in the hopes of ascertaining the election's outcome. Polls are the primary weapon of the horse-race journalist, although strategists are also invaluable (seestrategists).  The most reliable example of modern horse race coverage is Twitter, which is being saved for posterity by the Library of Congress.

Ex. 1: "When he avoided the press, he got punished by a cranky and access-starved press corps. When he held a rare press conference to push a policy idea, his comments were drowned out by a cacophony of horse-race questions or some Twitter-driven 'controversy' unfolding hundreds of miles away."

Ex. 2: "With the media increasingly fixated on the 'horse race' aspects of electoral politics, polls have taken center stage in virtually every race from the courthouse to the White House. Who's up and who's down sells more newspapers than analysis of the policy positions that will affect the lives of citizens who buy those papers.

"It's all going to come down to turnout"

Definition: When you hear this phrase it means there is an election coming. It means nothing else. It is the "um" or "uh" of people interviewed for their political analysis. People use it to convey that the election being discussed is a close one, and that "get out the vote" efforts or apathy could change the outcome. In reality, however, it means nothing.

Ex. 1: "This was always going to be a base-versus-base election. It's going to come down to turnout. So it's obviously in their interest to peddle this notion that things are slipping away."

Ex. 2: "I think it's all going to come down to turnout." said the state Democratic chairman, John A. Marino. "I don't see any great vote-pulling operation by anybody. It's really going to be a question of who comes out."

Low turnout

Definition: This is a reminder that it is a midterm election. Not only will basically no one vote, but no one will be reading the news coverage mentioning that no one voted.

Ex. 1: “I hate the negative ads,” said voter Rita Sokolowski. “It makes you want the election to be over like now.”

Ex. 2: "Both McCormick, a founding partner in the venture capital firm Saturn Partners, and Falchuk, an executive with Best Doctors Inc., pointed to the low turnout Tuesday as evidence of uninspiring major party candidates and dissatisfaction with the two parties that have long dominated the political landscape. An estimated 16.5 percent of registered voters showed up at the polls."

Mud-slinging

Definition: There is an inverse relationship between the number of days before the election and the number of articles and news segments quoting voters who hate all the negative campaign ads they have to watch. Although voters haven't been paying attention for quite as long, political observers and strategists appreciate knowing that other people are sick of the election cycle too.

Ex. 1: "Yes, people complain the whole campaign, I hate the negative ads, I hate the negative ads, I hate the negative ads, and you ask them as they leave the polling place, why did you vote for X, and they repeat Y's negative ads or X's negative ads back and forth. That's just the way the process works."

New blood

Definition: At a time when government dysfunction is seen as one of the most pressing problems in the United States, the voters chased down by reporters at polling places will inevitably want someone who is not a politician to represent them. The next time the new blood is up for election, the voters will likely want another transfusion, given that they are once again represented by a politician.

Ex. 1: “We need people who are not veterans in politics to inject new blood in our politics."

Ex. 2“I want to see change, and I don’t like the way either party is bifurcated. And I don’t like the negative ads Tierney has run against Moulton. It’s time for new blood.”

Political observers say

Definition: A sage stored in an undisclosed office space at all news organizations who happens to agree with all a reporters' opinions about the subject they are covering. In order to substantiate any opinions the reporter has, they consult with the political observer, who nods when briefed on the possibility that a game is about to be changed, and allows the writer or pundit to insert their beliefs in a story without fear of being reproached. The political observer usually dabbles in conventional wisdom, and offers little insight -- having been stored in an undisclosed office space for so long. The general rule should be, if you can't say anything without a political observer, it is better to say nothing at all.

Ex. 1: "McDonnell verdict tarnishes Virginia's image, political observers say"

Ex. 2: "The candidate that prevails, political observers say, will be the one who finds a balance with voters while addressing key issues such as city management, finances and infrastructure."

Red state

Definition: A state that often votes for Republican presidential candidates. Contrary to popular belief, there are often many Democrats in red states. In urban red state areas, there are often local governments comprised of Democratic officials. There are even Starbucks locations in red states -- and they haven't taken lattes off the menu.

Ex.1: "But let me ask you a program question -- is there a single red state Democratic senator up for reelection who could embrace soy latte liberalism without getting defeated?"

State nicknames

Definition: Journalists in fear of repeating the same word too much in one story -- or eager to imbue their piece on polling with a bit of whimsy -- sometimes refer to states by their nickname. However, this practice fails to acknowledge the fact that most Americans do not know their own state's nickname -- and especially not the states that border them, or those halfway across the country. Although readers are probably smart enough to figure out the state by context clues, the Associated Press' election style guide encourages reporters to "avoid them."

Ex. 1: Unlike cities, states are almost never referred to by name. It’s not Pennsylvania, it’s “the Keystone State.” It’s not South Carolina, it’s “the Palmetto State,” and so on. Senator Harry Reid is “the Nevadan.”

Strategist

Definition: Someone who has at least one political campaign on their LinkedIn page and always picks up the phone when reporters call. Synonymous with "expert," except with substantial syllable inflation.

Ex. 1: "Political strategists across the nation are watching this operation."

Ex. 2: “Clintonism was about winning,” says Susan Estrich, the longtime Democratic strategist and pundit. “It was about grabbing victory from the jaws of defeat."


Jaime Fuller reports on national politics for "The Fix" and Post Politics. She worked previously as an associate editor at the American Prospect, a political magazine based in Washington, D.C.
Charles Tiayon's insight:


The election is little more than a month away, which means reporters are filing campaign stories at a sprint-like clip, and spokespeople and politicians are finally settling into the phrases they had prepared in the hopes that they'd scare or bore reporters away. More and more analysis to read; less and less to learn.

In order to make sure you make the most of your quest for midterm enlightenment, here is a quick guide to some of the things you will hear ad nauseam over the next month-plus. (And yes, I/we have probably used all these cliches before too -- and more often than we care to admit -- so save yourself the trouble. The Fix is still selling like hot cakes. So don't cry over spilt milk. The rest is history.)

The list is by no means unabridged. If you type "election cliches" into Google -- or watch any election analysis on TV -- you will find many more.


A poll worker rips "I Voted" stickers from a roll at a polling place in Oklahoma City, Tuesday, June 24, 2014. (AP Photo/Sue Ogrocki)

Blue state

Definition: A state that often votes for Democratic presidential candidates. Contrary to popular belief, there are often many Republicans in blue states. In rural blue state areas, there are often local governments comprised entirely of Republican officials. There are even Chik-fil-A's and pick-up trucks.

Ex. 1: "But even in the shadow of defeat, blue states have reason to be proud. In a country where cultural identities can be claustrophobic, blue states are home to great cities where people find freedom in the streets of Boston or New York or Chicago to transcend conventional expectations and become most fully themselves."

Gaffe

Definition: An embarrassing mistake made by a political campaign or candidate -- often involving an inadvertent telling of the truth -- that will likely be forgotten tomorrow.

Ex. 1: "Udall gaffes, apologizes, nothing viral, yet"

Ex. 2: "The only saving grace for Snyder is that this happened in August, not October. The memory of his gaffe may recede in time, just like Detroit's flood waters."

Game changer

Definition: When the polls move by a percentage point or two, or a gaffe prompts second-day analysis (when you account for Internet inflation, this is similar to writing about an event a week later in 1992). It will likely be lost to history by next week.

Ex. 1: "That debate may very well have been the winning margin in that closest of races. You never know when a debate will become a game-changer."

Grassroots

Definition: The real Americans who help politicians win elections. They are often secret weapons. To better understand a story or cable news panel, say "real America" or "AMERICA!" instead of grassroots.

Ex. 1: "Today, the tightly-knit group of about 20 organizers is one of a handful of Obama-inspired outfits like it across Iowa, an uplifting legacy point for a president who tapped the power of grassroots organizing to win the White House but now struggles with dismal approval ratings and a stalled agenda in Washington."

Ex. 2: “'Joni is the grassroots candidate with the farm girl work ethic to outwork Congressman Braley in taking her message to Iowans,' Ernst spokeswoman Gretchen Hamel said in a statement."

Ground game

Definition: When you put grassroots organizers in a state that is neither a red state nor a blue state in order to try to win said state, you have a ground game. A ground game is a magnet for horse races (see next).

Ex. 1: "If Johnson can raise enough money to compete in the TV air war, state GOP Chairman Downey said, the party is prepared to wage the 'ground game' he needs to get his supporters to the polls."

Horse race

Definition: In theory, campaigning so exciting and so close that Laura Hillenbrand could write a book and make millions about it. In practice, it is when reporters and pundits carefully document the minutiae of elections, carefully plotting the passage of time in gaffes and game changers, in the hopes of ascertaining the election's outcome. Polls are the primary weapon of the horse-race journalist, although strategists are also invaluable (seestrategists).  The most reliable example of modern horse race coverage is Twitter, which is being saved for posterity by the Library of Congress.

Ex. 1: "When he avoided the press, he got punished by a cranky and access-starved press corps. When he held a rare press conference to push a policy idea, his comments were drowned out by a cacophony of horse-race questions or some Twitter-driven 'controversy' unfolding hundreds of miles away."

Ex. 2: "With the media increasingly fixated on the 'horse race' aspects of electoral politics, polls have taken center stage in virtually every race from the courthouse to the White House. Who's up and who's down sells more newspapers than analysis of the policy positions that will affect the lives of citizens who buy those papers.

"It's all going to come down to turnout"

Definition: When you hear this phrase it means there is an election coming. It means nothing else. It is the "um" or "uh" of people interviewed for their political analysis. People use it to convey that the election being discussed is a close one, and that "get out the vote" efforts or apathy could change the outcome. In reality, however, it means nothing.

Ex. 1: "This was always going to be a base-versus-base election. It's going to come down to turnout. So it's obviously in their interest to peddle this notion that things are slipping away."

Ex. 2: "I think it's all going to come down to turnout." said the state Democratic chairman, John A. Marino. "I don't see any great vote-pulling operation by anybody. It's really going to be a question of who comes out."

Low turnout

Definition: This is a reminder that it is a midterm election. Not only will basically no one vote, but no one will be reading the news coverage mentioning that no one voted.

Ex. 1: “I hate the negative ads,” said voter Rita Sokolowski. “It makes you want the election to be over like now.”

Ex. 2: "Both McCormick, a founding partner in the venture capital firm Saturn Partners, and Falchuk, an executive with Best Doctors Inc., pointed to the low turnout Tuesday as evidence of uninspiring major party candidates and dissatisfaction with the two parties that have long dominated the political landscape. An estimated 16.5 percent of registered voters showed up at the polls."

Mud-slinging

Definition: There is an inverse relationship between the number of days before the election and the number of articles and news segments quoting voters who hate all the negative campaign ads they have to watch. Although voters haven't been paying attention for quite as long, political observers and strategists appreciate knowing that other people are sick of the election cycle too.

Ex. 1: "Yes, people complain the whole campaign, I hate the negative ads, I hate the negative ads, I hate the negative ads, and you ask them as they leave the polling place, why did you vote for X, and they repeat Y's negative ads or X's negative ads back and forth. That's just the way the process works."

New blood

Definition: At a time when government dysfunction is seen as one of the most pressing problems in the United States, the voters chased down by reporters at polling places will inevitably want someone who is not a politician to represent them. The next time the new blood is up for election, the voters will likely want another transfusion, given that they are once again represented by a politician.

Ex. 1: “We need people who are not veterans in politics to inject new blood in our politics."

Ex. 2“I want to see change, and I don’t like the way either party is bifurcated. And I don’t like the negative ads Tierney has run against Moulton. It’s time for new blood.”

Political observers say

Definition: A sage stored in an undisclosed office space at all news organizations who happens to agree with all a reporters' opinions about the subject they are covering. In order to substantiate any opinions the reporter has, they consult with the political observer, who nods when briefed on the possibility that a game is about to be changed, and allows the writer or pundit to insert their beliefs in a story without fear of being reproached. The political observer usually dabbles in conventional wisdom, and offers little insight -- having been stored in an undisclosed office space for so long. The general rule should be, if you can't say anything without a political observer, it is better to say nothing at all.

Ex. 1: "McDonnell verdict tarnishes Virginia's image, political observers say"

Ex. 2: "The candidate that prevails, political observers say, will be the one who finds a balance with voters while addressing key issues such as city management, finances and infrastructure."

Red state

Definition: A state that often votes for Republican presidential candidates. Contrary to popular belief, there are often many Democrats in red states. In urban red state areas, there are often local governments comprised of Democratic officials. There are even Starbucks locations in red states -- and they haven't taken lattes off the menu.

Ex.1: "But let me ask you a program question -- is there a single red state Democratic senator up for reelection who could embrace soy latte liberalism without getting defeated?"

State nicknames

Definition: Journalists in fear of repeating the same word too much in one story -- or eager to imbue their piece on polling with a bit of whimsy -- sometimes refer to states by their nickname. However, this practice fails to acknowledge the fact that most Americans do not know their own state's nickname -- and especially not the states that border them, or those halfway across the country. Although readers are probably smart enough to figure out the state by context clues, the Associated Press' election style guide encourages reporters to "avoid them."

Ex. 1: Unlike cities, states are almost never referred to by name. It’s not Pennsylvania, it’s “the Keystone State.” It’s not South Carolina, it’s “the Palmetto State,” and so on. Senator Harry Reid is “the Nevadan.”

Strategist

Definition: Someone who has at least one political campaign on their LinkedIn page and always picks up the phone when reporters call. Synonymous with "expert," except with substantial syllable inflation.

Ex. 1: "Political strategists across the nation are watching this operation."

Ex. 2: “Clintonism was about winning,” says Susan Estrich, the longtime Democratic strategist and pundit. “It was about grabbing victory from the jaws of defeat."


Jaime Fuller reports on national politics for "The Fix" and Post Politics. She worked previously as an associate editor at the American Prospect, a political magazine based in Washington, D.C.
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UN News - FEATURE: Juggling a cacophony of tongues, UN interpreters avert linguistic disaster

UN News - FEATURE: Juggling a cacophony of tongues, UN interpreters avert linguistic disaster | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it
Out of potential linguistic chaos, a corps of over 100 United Nations interpreters brings order and comprehension as speaker after speaker from around the world takes the podium of the General Assembly to give their annual speeches at the General Debate, discusses war and peace in the Security Council, or delves into arcane details of administrative and budgetary affairs in one of the Assemblys six specialized committees.
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Highly skilled interpreters perform a vital service at UN meetings, where delegates come together to present their views in one of the six official languages or in their own tongue. A UN Interpreter, at work in a booth over looking a meeting room. (1965) UN Photo

22 September 2014 – Out of potential linguistic chaos, a corps of over 100 United Nations interpreters brings order and comprehension as speaker after speaker from around the world takes the podium of the General Assembly to give their annual speeches at the General Debate, discusses war and peace in the Security Council, or delves into arcane details of administrative and budgetary affairs in one of the Assemblys six specialized committees.



Were only interpreters but its our contribution to what the UN is doing, Laurence Viguie, a French interpreter with the Organization, told the UN News Centre in an interview. I love the job, and I never have the feeling that Im going to work.



Back in 19We’ve never caused a problem, a slip of the tongue here, a slip of the tongue there, perhaps.64, when Anthony Mango became an interpreter, the job was a very prestigious one. People used to consider that as something that was magical your ability to come out in one language while simultaneously listening to a statement in another language, said the now retired UN staffer.



UN interpreters have even inspired Hollywood: the linguistic specialists were featured in a 2005 political thriller starring Nicole Kidman and Sean Penn. The Interpreter, the first movie to be shot inside UN Headquarters in New York, was directed by the late Sydney Pollack, who said at the time: You have tons and tons of visitors but most of the people...don't know what the UN looks like and don't understand how the UN works and don't know what its day-to-day business is.



Despite all the possibilities for lost in translation moments, the UN Interpretation Service runs remarkably smoothly. Weve never caused a problem, a slip of the tongue here, a slip of the tongue there, perhaps, said Interpretation Service Chief Hossam Fahr.



But this does not mean the team has not at times found itself inadvertently embroiled in burning disputes, compounded by the speed at which some delegates speak, such as the issue of the name of the former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia (FYROM).



A UN-brokered accord in 1995 between FYROM and Greece committed the two countries to negotiate on the name issue under UN auspices, with the republic to be referred to provisionally as the former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, pending a final solution.









United Nations interpreters at work during the opening of the general debate of the General Assembly's sixty-seventh session. (2012) UN Photo/JC McIlwaine














Thats where a pitfall opened up for one interpreter, exacerbated by the speakers warp speed delivery.



As Mr. Fahr took up the story: Once, I think in the General Assembly, somebody was speaking at an incredible speed and one of the things he said was the former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia and the interpreter, pressed for time, just said Macedonia.



Greece was up in arms, very, very angry, and I just literally ran to the General Assembly Hall and I sat behind the representative of Greece and I apologized profusely on behalf of the interpretation service for this terrible and unforgivable mistake.



And, [I told the representative] you know, it has to be taken into account that the person was speaking at a very high speed and he tried to use the shortest possible version. This was an error of judgment on the part of the interpreter but he did not mean any disrespect to the nomenclature, to the rules of the General Assembly, and I apologize. And that was it.



Mr. Fahr, an Egyptian who has worked for over 30 years as an Arabic interpreter with the UN, oversees a corps that numbers about 100 but swells at times of the UN rush hour, particularly during the General Debate, which brings scores of presidents, prime ministers and monarchs to UN Headquarters at the start of each annual General Assembly session in September.



UN rules of procedure have simplified the potential linguistic morass by having six official languages for all Security Council and Assembly activities, and into which all UN documents are translated Arabic, Chinese, English, French, Russian and Spanish. It is only on very rare occasions that an interpreter will have the written text of a speech in front of him, though this may occur in the case of non-official languages.



Any Member State has the sovereign right to speak in any language it chooses as long as it provides an interpreter into one of the official languages, or a written translation and a pointer somebody who sits behind the interpreter to point out where the speaker is at any given moment.



This led to a potential nightmare a couple of years ago when Iranian President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad addressed the Assembly. The English booth got the written version but the Farsi interpreter never showed up, Mr. Fahr said. There was a problem with security or something, and she didnt appear.



Our colleague in the English booth had an impossible choice to make either to leave the President of a Member State speaking without an interpretation coming out of the booth or to take the plunge and start reading when she doesnt understand a word of what hes saying, and try to keep some kind of rhythm with him.



So she made the very courageous choice to start reading from the translated text and try to keep pace with him. Half way through the speech, the Farsi interpreter barged in, panting and sweating bullets, sat down and took over helping with the interpretation of the speech.



For Mr. Fahr, the worst nightmare is if you hear a word that you dont understand or if somebody is speaking in a very, very thick accent and you cant make out what theyre saying. It is then a question of what to do, he said. Do you attribute to them something they did not say or do you keep a dignified silence? Most of the time, its a dignified silence, if you cant understand a word of what is being said because of the accent. But you cant keep silent all the time.



For Russian interpreter Vitaly Shevlak, a nightmare scenario is actually what we are living through every day. Its very fast delivery, the delegates dont have much time basically theyre given three, four, five minutes to deliver their speeches so the tempo is very hot and you have to resort to all kinds of tricks just to be in sync with them and then to remember whatever they are saying because its a must.



So basically we are working under extraordinarily difficult conditions these days because of the limited time that is given to the delegates.



This is what Mr. Fahr calls the speakers traffic lights. There are green, yellow and red lights on the rostrum for a five-minute speech. The green light means that you go very fast, the yellow light means go extremely fast, and the red means go supersonic, he said. They have the green light until the fourth minute, and at the beginning of the fifth minute they get the yellow light and after the fifth minute they get the red light.



Mr. Shevlak always wanted to be a UN interpreter ever since he was a language student back in Moscow in the 80s. It was a kind of dream of mine but it didnt happen immediately, he said. But he recalled the pitfalls that can lie in wait for an interpreter under pressure.



It was during my first or second year here on the job, I misheard what the speaker was saying and instead of mentioning Sweden for some reason I said South Africa, which was very wrong, a faux pas as they say in French. But I managed somehow to catch a glimpse of the reaction of the Russian delegate the debate was about apartheid, and I managed somehow to correct myself.



But for a real blooper by a greenhorn, its hard to beat what happened to Mr. Fahr. It was on my very first day back in 1983, and it was an Arabic-speaking representative making a statement, and I misheard something. There are two words in Arabic that are very similar so that what came out of my mouth was that the exploitation of small nations is one of the lofty goals of the United Nations Charter.



And then I said, but oh my God, the independence of small nations is one of the lofty goals of the United Nations. And then of course I was behind the speaker for a whole sentence for the duration of the speech, and then he finished and he turned to the chairman and he started picking up his papers, and I was still going on.



On the other hand, one of Mr. Fahrs proudest moments was interpreting the first statement delivered in the Assembly by Nelson Mandela after he became President of South Africa.



It was a very emotional moment for all those who have, like myself, followed the struggle of South Africa against apartheid until the moment when he came as President of South AfricaAnd I was thinking that the whole Arabic-speaking world is listening to Nelson Mandela through my voice.



News Tracker: past stories on this issue

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Need a dual language contract? Here's how

Need a dual language contract? Here's how | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it
By Pablo Cilotta[1]. International Senior Legal Counsel & Head of Contract Management (HR - EMEA & Latin America). Publicado en revista de la IACCM (International Association for Commercial...
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Textos legales franceses traducidos al español | El Gascón Jurado

Habitualmente y por razones obvias suele estar más puesto en el idioma de Kant y de los diferentes recursos que existen en alemán. Sospecho que es un claro
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Habitualmente y por razones obvias suele estar más puesto en el idioma de Kant y de los diferentes recursos que existen en alemán. Sospecho que es un claro ejemplo y caso de deformación profesional. Sin embargo, hoy toca hablar de otro idioma precioso y que es el de nuestros vecinos franceses y de las traducciones de textos legales franceses al español.Indagando un poco acerca de los recursosque nos ofrece la República Francesa en Internet destaca el sitio Legifrance. Legifrance es el servicio público francés para la difusión del Derecho por Internet. Un sitio de parada obligatoria para aquellos que se dedican a la traducción e interpretación juridica y jurada en lengua francesa. Aquí podremos encontrar diferentes apartados con información jurídica del país galo y uno que nos debería interesar en especial: «Traductions». Es una auténtica joya porque podemos consultar y descargar las traducciones de los siguientes textos legales franceses:

Código Civil francés

Código de Comercio francés

Código del consumo francés

Código de medio ambiente francés

Código de proceso civil francés

Código de proceso penal francés

Código de los seguros francés

Códigos de la propiedad intelectual francés

Código penal francés

Ley relativa a la subcontratación francés

Adicionalmente, existe un apartado de «Traducciones accesibles en otros sitios institucionales franceses» que nos remite, como bien indica el título, a las páginas web de otros sitios institucionales nacionales franceses como, por ejemplo, laAssemblée nationale o la CNIL y donde nos ofrecen una traducción del francés al español de la Constitución o de la Ley de 6 de enero de 1978 relativa a la informática, los ficheros y las libertades. Bon appétit.

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Online Course: Proofreading and Copyediting 101 - CEU Certificate

Online Course: Proofreading and Copyediting 101 - CEU Certificate | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it
If you are looking for a new career path or if you are a writer who wants to improve your writing skills, learning how to proofread and copyedit with our easy to follow, in-depth course, may be just what you need.
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Become a Skilled Proofreader or Copyeditor
 
If you're looking for a new career path or if you're a writer who wants to improve your writing skills, learning how to proofread and copyedit with our easy to follow, in-depth course, may be just what you need.  Learning these specialized skills will help improve your overall writing ability and may provide a career path that is both lucrative and in high demand.  In today's world, proofreaders and copyeditors are sought after not only in the corporate environment and Internet-related ventures, but also by start-up companies, small businesses, and entrepreneurs. Freelance proofreading jobs are bountiful, and many companies offer work-from-home opportunities as an additional benefit.
 
This online course will cover:
  • Exactly what proofreading and copyediting will entail.
  • The tools you need to be an efficient proofreader or copyeditor.
  • The basic skills you need to learn, taught to you in an easy-to-understand manner.
  • Step-by-step instruction on how to proofread or copyedit.
  • How to apply your newly learned skills. 
  • Tips to make you a professional proofreader or copyeditor with just a little practice.
  • How to proofread and copyedit different kinds of writing such as fiction, blogs and articles.
  • How to proofread and copyedit your own work.
  • How to secure employment as a proofreader or copyeditor.
  • How to start your own proofreading or copyediting business upon completion of the course.
  • Current salary information.
  • Practice exercises to implement your new skills.

This course is designed for everyone, regardless of education, experience, or background.  No matter who you are or what you want to achieve in life, gaining proofreading and copyediting skills will improve your written communications, help you think more clearly, and perhaps start you on the road to a brand new career. 

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English In All The World's Classrooms? Just Say 'Non!'

English In All The World's Classrooms? Just Say 'Non!' | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it

ZURICH — The ongoing debate about the heavy influence of the English language in our education system is mostly focused on primary and high schools. But within many Swiss universities — in economics, finance and management — the utter domination of English has in fact become the norm in master's degree and PhD courses. The same goes for ...



Read the full article: English In All The World's Classrooms? Just Say 'Non!' 
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ZURICH — The ongoing debate about the heavy influence of the English language in our education system is mostly focused on primary and high schools. But within many Swiss universities — in economics, finance and management — the utter domination of English has in fact become the norm in master's degree and PhD courses. The same goes for ...



Read the full article: English In All The World's Classrooms? Just Say 'Non!' 
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Courts told to break down language barriers

Courts told to break down language barriers | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it
TAMPA — In Hillsborough County, 26 percent of adults speak a language other than English at home.
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TAMPA — In Hillsborough County, 26 percent of adults speak a language other than English at home.



But in many state court proceedings, people with limited or no ability to understand English are on their own.



That means someone who is being evicted or foreclosed on may not understand what is happening. The same goes for people whose pets or money may be seized in a civil dispute, and people getting a divorce.



The U.S. Justice Department says that’s not fair. Failing to provide translators for all court proceedings, the department says, can be a violation of civil rights or discrimination on the basis of national origin.



The department wrote states, including Florida, in 2003 and 2010, about the need to furnish translators for people whose English language abilities are limited. “Dispensing justice fairly, efficiently, and accurately is a cornerstone of the judiciary,” the department said in 2010. “Policies and practices that deny (limited English speakers) meaningful access to the courts undermine that cornerstone.”



Court officials say they understand the problem but that solving it wouldn’t be easy.



“It’s a delicate issue,” said Gregory J. Youchock, chief of court services for Florida. “It’s an evolving issue. It is a budgetary issue. In order to expand (court translations), we’ll need more funding.”



Census figures show that 27 percent of adult Floridians speak a language other than English at home.



The state funds translators for all criminal courts and for civil court proceedings in which the state has determined a “fundamental interest” is at stake, such as domestic violence hearings or when parental rights could be terminated.



But in many other proceedings, including divorce and landlord-tenant hearings, the parties are responsible for providing their own translators. With certified translators costing upward of $75 an hour, litigants often bring relatives or friends to translate, officials say. This can cause problems because these amateur translators frequently don’t understand court terminology and don’t know the standards for official translation.



Two years ago, the Justice Department released the results of an investigation into practices in North Carolina, which it found was failing to provide translators in all kinds of proceedings, both civil and criminal. While acknowledging budgetary issues, the department wrote that, “Fiscal pressures are not a blanket exemption from civil rights requirements.”



The Justice Department pointed out in a letter to North Carolina officials that there are financial implications to not adequately providing interpreters.



“It costs money and time to handle appeals and reversals based on the failure to ensure proper interpretation and effective communication,” the department wrote. “Similarly, delays in providing interpreters often result in multiple continuances, which needlessly waste the time and resources of the court staff. And ineffective communication deprives judges and juries of the ability to make reliable decisions.”



Hillsborough Chief Judge Manuel Menendez said the Justice Department “made some very good points” in its letter to North Carolina.



He said the courts here have “made do with what we had.” Years ago, Menendez said, he presided over a trial involving a car crash where an attorney communicated with his client through her daughter. When it came time for the woman to testify, the lawyer hired an interpreter to translate her testimony.



That worked just fine, Menendez said. “In other cases,” he added, “It’s probably essential that we do something.”



Hillsborough County Judge Frances Perrone hears domestic violence cases, where translators are provided, as well as general civil cases, such as evictions, where they are not. Every day, she said, someone appears in her courtroom who doesn’t speak English. In addition to Spanish, she sees people who speak other languages, such as Vietnamese and French.



“There’s even a shortage of interpreters for the cases where they are approved,” Perrone said. “On cases where they are not approved, we have to rely on an individual that the party brought with them to court.” When that’s not possible, she said, bilingual bailiffs and judicial assistants will pitch in to help.



“It’s very unfortunate because I hate to send people out without being confident they understand what has taken place,” Perrone said.



Perrone said she doesn’t think significant numbers of people have been wrongly evicted because of the language problem in court. They most likely would have had extensive communications with their landlords before landing in court, she noted.



But is it possible, that on occasion, people have been wrongly evicted because of the translator issue? “I don’t know,” she said.



Some judges are looking for creative solutions, enlisting volunteers to help.



Circuit Judge Catherine Catlin, who sits in family court, said parties who come to court without benefit of a lawyer are given forms that instruct them that if they need an interpreter, it’s their responsibility to bring one.



“A lot of that docket can be Spanish speaking and there’s no funding in the court system to provide translators in the civil side of the courthouse,” Catlin said. She said people bring friends and neighbors to translate, and sometimes these translators speak broken English.



Catlin said she approached the Tampa Hispanic Bar Association, and the group’s president, Victoria Cruz-Garcia, agreed to help. Cruz-Garcia enlisted translators to volunteer their services. So once a month, people representing themselves are provided professional translators at no cost to the courts or the litigants, This happens for the initial court hearings. The litigants are informed that for subsequent hearings, however, they need to bring their own translators.



Cruz-Garcia said she’s seen litigants’ friends and family members in court providing bad translations. “There have been moments where I just wanted to leap up and do something, but I can’t,” she said. Sometimes, she said, “I will tell the judge something’s going on here, but it wasn’t interpreted correctly.”



One time, she said, she was in court when an issue arose when the litigant was being sworn in. The woman was refusing to take the oath, and no one understood why. Cruz-Garcia had overheard a conversation in the hallway, and so she stepped in and explained that the woman was a Jehovah Witness. Instead of saying the word “swear,” all the court had to do was use the word “affirm” or “promise,” and the oath could be given.



Circuit Judge Nick Nazaretian, also working with Cruz-Garcia, has enlisted bilingual students from Cooley Law School to volunteer their services to translate in his courtroom. Nazaretian, who is an adjunct professor at the school, said the parties benefit from the help from students, and the students get real-world exposure to family courts.



“I just wish we had done this years ago,” he said.



The program is now only used in family court but could be helpful in other courts as well, Nazaretian said.



One of the students who participates, Marisol Perez, said the experience is rewarding. Perez said she grew up in Cuba. “My husband doesn’t speak fluent English. For some reason, if he has any issue at all trying to go to court and be heard, he can’t be understood.”



People who don’t speak English can be lost in court, she said. They’re also embarrassed that they can’t communicate.



She said her father once sued someone. In court, she said, “The other party was saying horrific things about him, which all were lies. He couldn’t understand.” Fortunately, she said, her father had a lawyer, who was able to help him.



Patricia Cruz, a professional translator, volunteers her services once a month in Catlin’s courtroom.



“I want to help people,” she said. “I see how lost they are when they get into the system. They already have the trauma of appearing before a judge. I just want to give back a little bit.”



She said litigants are profusely grateful for her help. And her presence “takes a load off the judge, mainly,” saving her from having to postpone hearings.



The state is experimenting with using technology to reduce the cost of translation services where they are provided. Youchock said a pilot program is being conducted in several courts, including Orlando, Daytona Beach and Panama City. Using video and audio hookups, interpreters are able to work in a central location and serve distant courtrooms.



It’s possible the technology could enable the state to provide interpreters in more hearings, Youchock said. “We’re in an evaluation period where we’re studying this pilot and we’re trying to determine whether or not it’s going to work and meet our needs and what would the costs for expansion be.”



Senior Court Operations Consultant Maggie Evans said officials are collecting data about the pilot program and can’t provide a firm evaluation yet. “Anecdotally, it sounds like it’s working fairly well,” she said.



Youchock said Florida is not the only state grappling with providing translators in courts. “There are states all around the country that are dealing with the same issues,” he said, including California and Texas. “This is an evolving issue. It has not been resolved at all. We’re working hard on it every day.”




esilvestrini@tampatrib.com



(813) 259-7837



Twitter: @ElaineTBO

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Learning in Two Languages

Learning in Two Languages | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it
Gooding Elementary School launches new dual-immersion kindergarten class.
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Gooding Elementary School launches new dual-immersion kindergarten class.

GOODING • Surrounded by six kindergartners, Magda Campos held up a flash card with the letter “A” and a picture of an airplane.

During a lesson Wednesday, the paraprofessional asked Gooding Elementary School students to repeat the word and its sounds in Spanish.

“Avi”n, avi”n, ah, ah, ah,” students recited.

They moved on to another word: “Oso,” Spanish for “bear.”

“Oso, oso, o, o, o,” they chanted.

After they got through the alphabet, students got high-fives from Campos and switched to speaking in English.

“Three more minutes, and then you switch groups, OK?”

Gooding Elementary launched its dual-immersion kindergarten class this fall, with instructions in English and Spanish.

The class has 24 students — 12 with English as their native language and 12 for whom Spanish is their first language.

Lessons are conducted in English two days a week and Spanish the other two days.

Being able to speak, read and write in both languages opens many opportunities for students, said teacher Jeny Pavkov.

“This is an opportunity for them to keep their home language and build a second language.”

A Rare Program

Only six Idaho school districts and one pubic charter school have a dual-immersion program.

St. Mary’s Catholic School in Boise is launching a kindergarten section in 2015.

Schools don’t need state approval for a dual-immersion class, said Christina Nava, who coordinates limited English proficiency programs for the Idaho Department of Education.

But such a program does need school board approval. “It’s a lot of legwork, from what I’ve seen,” Nava said.

Brad Henson, principal of a dual-immersion magnet school in Hailey, said he’s excited to see Gooding join the ranks.

“It’s nice to see that school districts are recognizing the importance of cultural awareness,” said Henson, of Alturas Elementary.

The Blaine County School District has a robust dual-immersion program, with 826 students enrolled — 25 percent of the district’s students.

Such programs have been running nationwide for decades, but they are few. Only 271 programs were operating in 2003, according to the University of Minnesota’s Center for Advanced Research on Language Acquisition.

Henson hopes more programs are launched in Idaho.

“These kids are so immersed in the language that they come out of it being able to read, write, speak and listen naturally,” he said.

“It just opens their world to potential jobs, awareness and cultural understanding.”

How Dual Immersion Works in Gooding

The dual-immersion class in Gooding sprang from a collective conversation among school employees, said Principal Kali Connell.

One reason for the change is that English language learners weren’t making the needed academic gains.

But the pilot class includes English and Spanish speakers; it’s not targeting high or low achievers, Connell said.

“No one has a complete advantage,” she said, and students depend on each other when they’re learning in their non-native language.

“We want to move it (the program) up through the grade levels until at least through middle school,” Connell said. “The benefits in that area are huge.”

Children learn languages far more easily when they’re young, research shows.

If the dual-immersion students are struggling, they’re enrolled in extended day kindergarten. That means they attend the dual immersion class in the morning and a regular class in the afternoon.

Students were tested on the Idaho Reading Indicator at the beginning of the year so teachers have baseline data to see how they progress.

Wednesday, groups of six students sat around tables for different lessons in Pavkov’s classroom.

“Can you find the oso?” Pavkov asked during a vocabulary lesson.

“What’s an oso?” one boy asked, and his classmates helped him find the bear.

Gooding High School seniors Jodene Trent, 17, and Savannah Fleming, 17, helped another student group draw numbers on small whiteboards.

They rolled two foam dice and asked students to add the numbers and write the answer.

“Do you guys all remember how to do 8s?” Jodene asked. She drew the number on her whiteboard to show them.

Another group worked on iPads.

Once kindergartners finished the lesson, they returned to their normal seats.

“Hands on your head,” Pavkov said to get their attention. “Eyes on me.”

“Kindergarten, that was one of the best days we’ve had yet.”

What do Parents Think?

Ana Navarro arrived just before morning kindergarten ended at 11:20 a.m. Wednesday to pick up her daughter.

Why did she choose the language class? “Because it’s a big opportunity to speak and write in both languages,” she said.

It’s not easy for her daughter Perla Cortez, 5, since it’s practically double the work, Navarro said. “It’s a challenge for her.”

But the opportunity to learn in two languages appeals to many parents, she said. “I know a lot of people who want to do it.”

Navarro, who has three children, helps her kindergartner with letters and sounds at home.

And she’d like to see Perla continue in a dual-immersion program for years to come.

Lorena Solis said her kindergartner was bilingual before starting school.

“I didn’t want him to lose his Spanish,” she said, and she wants him to be able to read and write it.

It’s a great opportunity for Erik, 5, she said, and she’s glad the district launched the class. “He actually likes it.”

The class has a waiting list, but Connell didn’t have the exact count.

“We actually got a lot more interest from English-speaking parents,” she said.

Expansion in Blaine County

Until this year, the Blaine County School District had the only dual-immersion program in south-central Idaho.

Now that 10-year-old program is expanding.

The dual-immersion magnet, Alturas Elementary, opened this fall after several years of work, Henson said.

The school was previously Woodside Elementary, but officials decided to change the name.

English-speaking students who attended Woodside now go to Hailey or Bellevue elementary schools.

One dual-immersion class per grade level remains at Ernest Hemingway Elementary in Ketchum.

After doing research and visiting programs around the nation, the district asked families whether they’d support a magnet school.

“We wanted to make sure that everyone would be vested,” Henson said.

Blaine County school trustees voted in January 2013 to create the school.

School leaders say they’ve seen how dual-immersion classes affect students.

“There are many cognitive benefits of becoming bilingual at an early age,” said Molly Lansing, dual-immersion coordinator for the Blaine County School District.

Also, students gain problem-solving skills, better job opportunities once they graduate, and experience different cultures, she said.

“I think there’s potential for dual immersion to connect different people within our community.”

Copyright 2014 Twin Falls Times-News. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

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Summit School District increases outreach to Spanish-speaking families | SummitDaily.com

Summit School District increases outreach to Spanish-speaking families | SummitDaily.com | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it
Giovanna Voge was tired of being the bad guy.
For the last 14 years, she worked in Summit County in accounting and property management. The native Columbian said she didn’t
Charles Tiayon's insight:

For the last 14 years, she worked in Summit County in accounting and property management. The native Columbian said she didn’t like having to be a bearer of bad news when non-English speaking families faced financial and other troubles often stemming from or exacerbated by language barriers or cultural misunderstandings.

Now Voge, 37, works to help immigrants, Spanish speakers and others understand the school system and how to support their children. Voge started last month as the full-time interpreter, translator and family liaison for the Summit School District.

In her new role, she coordinates interpreters for parent-teacher conferences at every school, translates the district’s communications into Spanish and acts as a resource for families who might be lost or confused.

At an interpreter training session she helped organized on Wednesday, Sept. 17, she said she loves using her native language again and learning all about the school district.

This year, the district restructured its communications department and is expanding efforts to more effectively reach students’ families, especially those who might face language barrier challenges and are not well represented on school PTAs.

Voge reports to Julie McCluskie, the district spokeswoman who was promoted to a full-time position now called director of communications and community engagement.

At the training day at the district’s central office, McCluskie pointed to the roughly 15 people learning more about interpreting guidelines and said she was happy the district could bring together its interpreting personnel with a handful of Family and Intercultural Resource Center staff members and a couple Mind Springs Health employees.

In larger communities, outside companies provide language services for schools, she said, which makes it more important for those working in interpreting and translating for different organizations around the county to meet and share best practices.

McCluskie said the district now has a full-time interpreter/translator/family liaison in four schools and is trying to increase its number of on-call experienced interpreters to 12 to 15 people.

This fall, the district hired a part-time district-wide bilingual family liaison, Moraima Kelley, who will talk to families about their needs, reach out to all the local faith-based organizations and connect with parents at community events.

Moraima Kelley said she’s been involved with the schools as a parent for almost 25 years and has worked with the school district for the last five years. Now in her new role as family liaison, she attended an event called Dialogue Over Dinner at Upper Blue Elementary last week.

About 12 families participated, and a school literacy specialist talked to them about how to read to their children and get more involved with reading. Kelley said she was happy with the number of families who attended, and the topic was especially helpful for foreign-born parents who may have stopped their education to work when they were elementary- or middle-school aged.

Dialogue Over Dinner is a monthly parenting discussion that the Family and Intercultural Resource Center took over from Summit Prevention Alliance two years ago. This fall the series added a night specifically for parents of elementary kids.

Tamara Drangstveit, FIRC executive director, said she applauds the school district for making family engagement a priority and following through with the commitment.

When parents are engaged in their children’s education, she said, students are more likely to graduate high school and go to college and less likely to abuse substances or inflict harm on themselves.

“Large bureaucracies like the school district can often be overwhelming,” she added, and parents who didn’t grow up with the American school system might be unfamiliar or intimidated by talking to school staff.

Another resource the district offers families is called El Grupo, a monthly meeting at school that gives Spanish-speaking parents an opportunity to talk to teachers and administrators. McCluskie said the district is trying to start one at every school.

At Upper Blue Elementary, Kelley said, meetings have involved English and computer lessons. She has taught some parents, who likely don’t have access to computers or Internet at home, how to check their children’s grades online and told them the schools give people free access to computers before and after school hours.

Not all non-English speaking families are Hispanic, she said. She has visited with families who speak French and Russian as well as one from former Yugoslavia.

This Thursday, Sept. 25, Kelley will meet parents at Frisco Elementary at 6 p.m. for an El Grupo potluck and to chat about how to better meet their needs. She will also explain the role parents play in their children’s education.

In other countries, she said, people believe that it’s the teacher’s fault if a child isn’t excelling in school. Without the interpreters and liaisons, that cultural misunderstanding could lead to conflict.

Part of the district’s increase outreach has involved the Summit Middle School principal, Joel Rivera, visiting the homes of incoming sixth-graders before school starts in the fall.

The idea was to help kids feel more attached to their school from the beginning, McCluskie said.

“Connectedness is a driver for good outcomes for kids,” she said, explaining that the home visits have led to improved attendance, better grades and fewer discipline issues. “The impact that it’s had in the school has been just tremendous.”

The week before school started in August, Rivera and interpreters targeted and visited 40 Spanish-speaking families.

“The fact that we have a principal who’s willing to take time out of his summer, go into homes and talk to the kids about their hopes and dreams” Drangs said. “I give him huge kudos for that effort.”

Kelley said the visits benefit the schools as well as the families when educators learn more about their students’ backgrounds.

For example, during a recent home visit, Kelley learned that a family was concerned that the father might be deported soon. Kids can’t concentrate 

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Google Traduction : « Translate » devient « Captions » pour les Google Glass

Google Traduction : « Translate » devient « Captions » pour les Google Glass | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it
La traduction en ligne prend de plus en plus d’ampleur depuis quelques années. Google traduction tente actuellement d’élargir sa plate-forme de traduction,
Charles Tiayon's insight:

La traduction en ligne prend de plus en plus d’ampleur depuis quelques années. Googletraduction tente actuellement d’élargir sa plate-forme de traduction, Google Traduction, afin que celui-ci soit utilisable sur tous les appareils, des PC aux smartphones en passant pas les tablettes et bien sûr le Google Glass. Récemment, trois étudiants ont de développé « Captions », une application de traduction de la parole qui s’avère être très efficace.

Captions, uniquement sur Google Glass

Cette nouvelle application peut s’avérer particulièrement utile puisque la traduction se fait directement, de la parole au texte. Captions permettra donc de surpasser les barrières de langues puisqu’elle propose plus de 60 combinaisons de traductions. Pour le moment l’application n’est pas encore téléchargeable et sera disponible uniquement sur les Google Glass.

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Palabras intraducibles convertidas en GIFs

Palabras intraducibles convertidas en GIFs | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it
El sitio Wordstuck colecciona palabras de todos los idiomas que no tienen una traducción directa al inglés o español y las convierte en GIF para evocar mejor su significado. Cada una de ellas engloba un sentimiento entero y complicado de explicar en otros términos.
Charles Tiayon's insight:

Palabras intraducibles convertidas en GIFsEL SITIO WORDSTUCK COLECCIONA PALABRAS DE TODOS LOS IDIOMAS QUE NO TIENEN UNA TRADUCCIÓN DIRECTA AL INGLÉS O ESPAÑOL Y LAS CONVIERTE EN GIF PARA EVOCAR MEJOR SU SIGNIFICADO. CADA UNA DE ELLAS ENGLOBA UN SENTIMIENTO ENTERO Y COMPLICADO DE EXPLICAR EN OTROS TÉRMINOS.POR: PIJAMASURF - 22/09/2014 A LAS 21:09:26
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Descubrir que en algunos idiomas hay palabras que engloban toda una emoción compleja, y que a veces incluso contienen su propia paradoja, da un poco de envidia. Quisiéramos tenerlas en la punta de la lengua porque a veces ni siquiera en una oración podemos expresar lo que ellas expresan por sí solas. Todos los idiomas tienen algunas, pero nada tan rico como el alemán, el japonés o el ruso. Wordstuck es una colección de distintas palabras interesantes en distintos idiomas, y casi todas carecen de una directa traducción al inglés o al español.

Mark Cuyos, de 20 años, es el coleccionista de estas palabras. Los siguientes son algunos GIFs que realizó para complementar la traducción de las palabras y acercarse más a evocar su significado. Cada pieza es un poema digital compuesto de una sola palabra.

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    Statement by the chairperson of the african union commission (auc)

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    Linguists receive $260,000 grant to study endangered Irish language

    Linguists receive $260,000 grant to study endangered Irish language | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it
    UC Santa Cruz researchers are working hard to document the Irish language. Even though it is an official language of Ireland, only 1.5% to 3% of the population regularly use it in their community, and its future is in doubt.
    Charles Tiayon's insight:

    “Although we all have tongues, we are surprisingly bad at knowing precisely what they're doing or conveying that to others,” says UC Santa Cruz professor of linguistics Jaye Padgett.

    Tongue motion, it turns out, is crucial to the documentation of endangered languages.

    Who knew?

    And we haven’t even got to the ultrasound part yet.

    Let me explain.

    UC Santa Cruz researchers are working hard to document the Irish language. Even though it is an official language of Ireland and has considerable government support, it is highly endangered. Only 1.5%  to 3% of the population regularly use it in their community, and its future is in doubt.

    But one unusual feature of the Irish language is that every consonant comes in two varieties--one where the tongue is raised and pushed forward, and one where it is raised and retracted. So, one important goal of the researchers is to document this contrast--using real-time tongue imaging.

    “We do this using a portable ultrasound machine which allows us to non-invasively capture video of the tongue's surface while it moves during speech,” says Padgett. “Analysis of this ultrasound data will also allow us to answer more general questions about speech production.”

    The use of ultrasound in speech research is still in its early stages. Other ways of capturing tongue motion can be dangerous (x-ray video), or more expensive and less portable (MRI). To date, there are very few ultrasound studies of languages outside of English and other dominant languages, and there are none of Irish. 

    UC Santa Cruz, however, has just been awarded a $261,255 grant from the National Science Foundation to undertake a new project titled "Collaborative Research: An Ultrasound Investigation of Irish Palatalization.” 

    The principal investigators for the project are Padgett and assistant professor Grant McGuire from the UC Santa Cruz Linguistics Department. They will work in collaboration with Ryan Bennett of Yale, a former student of the linguistics program at UC Santa Cruz and Máire Ní Chiosián of University College, Dublin. 

    Padgett and Bennett have both published research on the sound system of Irish. McGuire and Bennett have developed the ultrasound infrastructure at UC Santa Cruz. Ní Chiosáin's primary research area is Irish language phonology, and she is a native speaker of Irish.

    “The funding from the NSF is crucial as it will allow us to take the machine to Ireland, record native speakers of Irish, and analyze the data we collect with the help of graduate and undergraduate students at UCSC and Yale,” said Padgett. 

    “Analyzing ultrasound data is pretty labor-intensive,” he added. “There are three major dialect regions of Irish, isolated from each other, and we are investigating all three.”

    Apart from documentation and research, the researchers also plan to use their ultrasound data to create materials that will be useful to those who want to learn Irish, both within Ireland and around the world. 

    WATCH a short video of an Irish tongue movin

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    Workshop on Manipuri Terminology Building commences : 23rd sep14 ~ E-Pao! Headlines

    Workshop on Manipuri Terminology Building commences 
    Source: Hueiyen News Service

    Imphal, September 22 2014: A 10-day long workshop on Manipur Terminology Building being organized by Directorate of Language Planning & Implementation began today at the conference hall of the directorate at Old Lambulane, Imphal West.

    Interacting with media persons, Dr L Mahabir Singh, Director of Directorate of Language Planning & Implementation said that a total of 35 university and college teachers are participating in the workshop during which books of various subjects including economics, political science, history, sociology, anthropology, philosophy, home science and commerce of Class XI up to graduate level will be translated into Manipuri language.

    He conceded that Manipuri language is the official language of the State which is included in the 8th Schedule of the Constitution and underlined on the need for effective implementation of Manipur Language Act 1979 to develop the language.

    Charles Tiayon's insight:

    Workshop on Manipuri Terminology Building commences 
    Source: Hueiyen News Service

    Imphal, September 22 2014: A 10-day long workshop on Manipur Terminology Building being organized by Directorate of Language Planning & Implementation began today at the conference hall of the directorate at Old Lambulane, Imphal West.

    Interacting with media persons, Dr L Mahabir Singh, Director of Directorate of Language Planning & Implementation said that a total of 35 university and college teachers are participating in the workshop during which books of various subjects including economics, political science, history, sociology, anthropology, philosophy, home science and commerce of Class XI up to graduate level will be translated into Manipuri language.

    He conceded that Manipuri language is the official language of the State which is included in the 8th Schedule of the Constitution and underlined on the need for effective implementation of Manipur Language Act 1979 to develop the language.

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    How Conversations Around Campfire Might Have Shaped Human Cognition And Culture

    How Conversations Around Campfire Might Have Shaped Human Cognition And Culture | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it
    We can perhaps thank campfire story time for getting us where we are today
    Charles Tiayon's insight:

    Most adults today spend the daylight hours at work; nighttime is for cutting loose over drinks and food and sharing stories and strengthening relationships. Our ancient ancestors probably weren’t so different.

    According to new research published in Nature Communications, ending the day around the campfire, where songs, stories and relationships blossomed, ultimately shaped cultures and perhaps even helped develop some of our ability to understand one another, cooperate and internalize culture.

    Anthropologist Polly Wiessner arrived at these conclusions after spending 174 days living with the Ju/’hoan (!Kung) Bushmen of Botswana and Namibia. Weissner recorded conversations during the day and at night, and then compared the content of those exchanges. Three-quarters of daytime conversation, Weissner found, centered around work-related talk or gossip. At night, however, more than 80 percent of conversations centered around singing, dancing, spirituality or “enthralling stories, often about known people,” including tales about “the exploits of distant kin, adventures in towns, local politics, truck stories, elephant stories, or experiences in trance.”

    Weissner describes that fireside setting today, as experienced with the Ju/’hoan and likely representative of previous generations:


    Fireside gatherings are often, although not always, composed of people of mixed sexes and ages. The moon and starlit skies awaken imagination of the supernatural, as well as a sense of vulnerability to malevolent spirits, predators, and antagonists countered by security in numbers.  Body language is dimmed by firelight and awareness of self and others is reduced. Facial expressions—flickering with the flames—are either softened, or in the case of fear or anguish, accentuated. Agendas of the day are dropped while small children fall asleep in the laps of kin. Whereas time structures interactions by day because of economic exigencies, by night social interactions structure time and often continue until relationships are right. Foragers make use of daytime efficiently and nighttime effectively.


    Such regular interactions, Weissner continues, date back at least 400,000 years. It could be that these repeated interactions shaped entire cultures and gave us our aptitude for stories and song. The significance of the time our ancestors’ spent by the fire manifests in a more obvious way as well. As Weissner writes, “Appetites for firelit settings for intimate conversations and for evening stories remain with us today.” 




    Read more: http://www.smithsonianmag.com/smart-news/late-night-conversations-around-fire-might-have-shaped-early-human-cognition-and-culture-180952790/#MsYr4kvGCpJVRrQq.99
    Give the gift of Smithsonian magazine for only $12! http://bit.ly/1cGUiGv
    Follow us: @SmithsonianMag on Twitter

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    Glossary of general legal terms

    Glossary of general legal terms | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it
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    Gambia: Journalists Trained On Communication Rights

    Gambia: Journalists Trained On Communication Rights | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it
    The Gambia Press Union (GPU) Thursday held a three-day training workshop on communication rights for media practitioners at the GTMI school hall.
    Charles Tiayon's insight:

    The Gambia Press Union (GPU) Thursday held a three-day training workshop on communication rights for media practitioners at the GTMI school hall.

    The training course that brought together media practitioners from both the print and electronic media, and was aimed at improving the ability of the journalists to report on complex issues relating to communication rights and the core values of democracy in a professional, ethical and constructive manner.

    Gibairu Janneh, GPU Secretary General, said this was one of the training sessions the GPU is organizing for the journalists to enable them do their job effectively, and equipped them with requisite skills.

    He said that the training courses would expose journalists to communication rights and skills relating to the inflow and outflow of communication.

    "Every human being has a right to be heard in this 21st century, since the media speaks to the people and also gives a voice to the voiceless," he said.

    Media communication is vital and nobody is perfect, but with training one's capacity could be improved, he continued, adding that as long as the GPU is alive they would continue to train journalists, and he urged the participants to make best use of the training courses and the knowledge gained.

    Sang Mendy, speaking on the ethics of the profession, said as a journalist you need to know how to report, you need to know the language and the reporting skills and you need to seek the truth.

    He said as a journalist you don't lie and you should be able to defend your story, adding that journalists need to respect people's privacy and to be fair and they should not entertain intimidation when reporting.

    He also emphasized the need to give a voice to the voiceless, and t hold the powerful accountable, adding that the truth is what they are looking for because at the end when the story is out, they should stand up to defend it.

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    Le discours d'Emma Watson à l'ONU

    Le discours d'Emma Watson à l'ONU | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it
    "Messieurs - je voudrais saisir cette occasion pour vous envoyer une invitation officielle. L'égalité des sexes vous concerne aussi."

    Discours d'Emma Watson, ambassadrice de bonne volonté d'ONU Femmes, pour le lancement de la campagne 'HeForShe', au quartier général des Nations Unies, New York, le 20 septembre 2014. 
    (Traduction par Les Nouvelles NEWS. Voir la vidéo en bas de page.)
    Lire aussi : Emma Watson : le féminisme est aussi une affaire d'hommes

     

    Aujourd'hui, nous lançons une campagne intitulée "HeForShe" ("Lui pour elle")

    Je vous tends la main parce que j'ai besoin de votre aide. Nous voulons mettre fin aux inégalités entre les sexes et pour cela nous avons besoin de la participation de tout le monde.

    Il s'agit de la première campagne du genre à l'ONU : nous voulons essayer de galvaniser autant d'hommes et de garçons que possible pour qu'ils soient les défenseurs de l'égalité des sexes. Et nous ne voulons pas seulement en parler, mais obtenir des résultats.

    J'ai été nommée il y a six mois et plus je parle de féminisme, plus je me rends compte que la lutte pour les droits des femmes passe trop souvent pour un synonyme de haine des hommes. S'il y a une chose dont je suis certaine, c'est que cela doit cesser.

    Pour la petite histoire, le féminisme, par définition, est « La croyance que les hommes et les femmes doivent avoir les mêmes droits et chances. C'est la théorie de l'égalité politique, économique et sociale des sexes ».

    J'ai commencé à remettre en question les préjugés fondés sur le sexe quand à 8 ans, je ne comprenais pas d'être appelé "bossy" ("autoritaire") parce que je voulais diriger les pièces que nous mettions en scène pour nos parents, alors que ce n'était pas le cas des garçons.

    Quand à 14 ans j'ai commencé à être sexualisée par certains titres de presse.

    Quand à 15 ans mes amies ont commencé à quitter leurs équipes sportives parce qu'elles ne voulaient pas paraître « musclées ».

    Quand à 18 ans mes amis de sexe masculin étaient incapables d'exprimer leurs sentiments.

    J'ai décidé que j'étais féministe et cela ne me semblait pas compliqué. Mais ce que j'ai vu récemment m'a montré que le féminisme est devenu un mot impopulaire.

    Apparemment, je fais partie de ces femmes dont les expressions sont considérées comme trop fortes, trop agressives, excluantes, anti-hommes et désagréables.

    Pourquoi le mot met-il si mal à l'aise?

    Je suis originaire de Grande-Bretagne et je pense qu'il est juste, en tant que femme, d'être payée comme mes homologues masculins. Je pense qu'il est juste de pouvoir prendre des décisions au sujet de mon propre corps. Je pense qu'il est juste que les femmes participent en mon nom à la politique et aux prises de décision de mon pays. Je pense qu'il est juste que socialement je bénéficie du même respect que les hommes. Mais malheureusement, je peux dire qu'il n'y a pas un pays au monde où toutes les femmes peuvent espérer bénéficier de ces droits.

    Aucun pays au monde ne peut encore dire qu'il a atteint l'égalité des sexes.

    Ces droits, je les considère comme des droits humains, et je sais que je suis chanceuse. Je suis une grande privilégiée, car mes parents ne m'ont pas moins aimée parce que je suis née fille. Mon école ne m'a pas limitée parce que j'étais une fille. Mes mentors n'ont pas estimé que j'irais moins loin parce que je pourrais donner naissance à un enfant un jour. Ces influenceurs sont les ambassadeurs de l'égalité des sexes qui ont fait ce que je suis aujourd'hui. Ils ne le savent peut-être pas, mais ils sont des féministes naturels, qui changent le monde aujourd'hui. Et nous avons besoin de plus de personnes comme cela. Et si vous détestez toujours le mot, dites-vous que ce n'est pas le mot qui est important, mais l'idée et l'ambition derrière lui. Parce que toutes les femmes n'ont pas les mêmes droits que moi. En fait, statistiquement, très peu les ont.

    En 1995, Hilary Clinton a prononcé un discours célèbre à Pékin sur les droits des femmes. Malheureusement beaucoup de choses qu'elle voulait changer sont encore une réalité aujourd'hui.

    Mais ce que je remarque le plus, c'est que seulement 30 % de son public était de sexe masculin. Comment pouvons-nous changer les choses dans le monde si seulement la moitié de celui-ci est invité ou se sent autorisé à participer à la conversation ?

    Messieurs - je voudrais saisir cette occasion pour vous envoyer une invitation officielle. L'égalité des sexes vous concerne aussi.

    Car je constate que le rôle de mon père en tant que parent est moins valorisé par la société, bien que j'aie besoin de sa présence autant que de celle de ma mère. Je vois des jeunes hommes souffrir de problèmes psychologiques et qui ne demandent pas d'aide, par crainte d'avoir l'air moins 'macho' - c'est un fait, le suicide au Royaume-Uni est la principale cause de décès des hommes entre 20 et 49 ans, devant les accidents de la route, le cancer et les maladies coronariennes. Je vois des hommes fragilisés et insécurisés par la vision trompeuse de ce qui constitue le succès masculin. Les hommes subissent aussi le déficit d'égalité.

    Nous ne parlons pas souvent du fait que les hommes sont emprisonnés dans des stéréotypes de genre, mais je peux voir que c'est le cas, et s'ils en sont libérés les choses changeront naturellement pour les femmes.

    Si les hommes ne se sentent pas obligés d'être agressifs, les femmes n'auront pas à se sentir soumises. Si les hommes n'ont pas à contrôler, les femmes n'auront pas à être contrôlées.

    Les hommes et les femmes doivent se sentir libres d'être sensibles. Les hommes et les femmes doivent se sentir libres d'être forts ... Il est temps que nous percevions le genre sur un spectre, et non pas comme une opposition d'idéaux.

    Si nous cessons de nous définir par ce que nous ne sommes pas et commençons à nous définir par ce que nous sommes, nous serons tous plus libres – et c'est là le sens de la campagne HeForShe. Il s'agit de liberté.

    Je veux que les hommes prennent leurs responsabilités. Afin que leurs filles, sœurs et mères puissent être libres de tout préjugé, mais aussi pour que leurs fils aient le droit d'être vulnérables et humains aussi, retrouvent cette partie d'eux-mêmes qu'ils ont abandonnée et, ce faisant, puissent être eux-mêmes... dans une version plus vraie et complète.

    Vous vous dites peut-être : mais qui est cette fille de Harry Potter ? Et que fait-elle à la tribune de l'ONU ? C'est une bonne question et croyez-moi, je me la suis posée. Je ne sais pas si je suis qualifiée pour être ici. Tout ce que je sais, c'est que je me sens concernée par cette question. Et je veux des progrès.

    Et pour avoir vu ce que j'ai vu - et connaissant ma chance - je pense qu'il est de mon devoir de m'exprimer. L'homme d'État anglais Edmund Burke a dit: "Les forces du mal n'ont besoin que d'une chose pour triompher : que suffisamment de femmes et d'hommes de bien n'agissent pas."

    Dans mon état de nervosité pour écrire ce discours et dans mes moments de doute, je me suis dit fermement : si je ne le fais pas, qui ? Et si je ne le fais pas maintenant, quand ? Si vous avez des doutes similaires lorsque des occasions se présentent à vous, j'espère que mes mots pourront vous être utiles.

    Parce que la réalité est que si nous ne faisons rien, il faudra 75 ans – je serai presque centenaire - avant que les femmes soient payées autant que les hommes pour le même travail. Dans les 16 prochaines années 15,5 millions de filles seront mariées avant l'âge adulte. Et au rythme actuel, ce n'est pas avant 2086 que toutes les filles des régions rurales d'Afrique seront en mesure de recevoir une éducation secondaire.

    Si vous croyez en l'égalité, vous pouvez être l'un de ces féministes naturels dont j'ai parlé tout à l'heure.

    Et pour cela, je vous félicite.

    Nous luttons pour un monde plus uni, et la bonne nouvelle est que nous avons un mouvement d'union. Il s'appelle HeForShe. Je vous invite à aller de l'avant, de vous exprimer, d'être 'lui pour elle'. Et de vous demander : si je ne le fais pas, qui ? Et si je ne le fais pas maintenant, quand ?

    Je vous remercie.

     
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    Ask Emily: What if you can’t translate your coverage notices?

    Ask Emily: What if you can’t translate your coverage notices? | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it
    Covered California has taken a lot of heat for its communication — or lack thereof — to consumers who don’t speak or understand English well.

    To its credit, the agency has improved in the past year, especially in its Spanish-language enrollment-related materials. Unfortunately, the news isn’t so great when it comes to important notices sent after enrollment.

    Consumers complain they can’t understand some of the letters they receive about their insurance, whether from Covered California, Medi-Cal (the state’s Medicaid program) or directly from their health plans.

    The stakes are high. Covered California, for instance, recently contacted nearly 100,000 families to inform them they have until the end of September to submit documents verifying their immigration status. If they don’t comply, they risk losing their coverage. But it’s not always that clear ...

    Q: I received a letter about my health insurance that I don’t understand because it’s not in my language. What should I do?

    A: Qiuhua Wu, an energetic and athletic Chinese immigrant, owns USA International WuShu Kung Fu Academy in Sacramento.

    Wu speaks Mandarin Chinese and a little English. She enrolled in a Covered California plan through Anthem Blue Cross but didn’t pay her premiums for several months, thinking auto-pay had her covered. It didn’t.

    She received several warning letters from Anthem — but all in English, so she didn’t understand them. She was able to make out a phone number included in the letters offering language assistance in Spanish, Chinese, Korean, Vietnamese and Tagalog.

    The person who answered told Wu she could not provide help in Mandarin, so Wu contacted Evette Tsang, the Sacramento insurance agent who first enrolled her. It was too late. Wu’s plan had been canceled, leaving her uninsured until she signs up for a new plan for next year.



    Wu certainly bears responsibility for not paying her premiums, but Tsang — who says 95 percent of her clients speak Chinese as their primary language — and others say that critical communications need to be translated. If not, they argue, they should at least include a tagline in other languages that says something like, “Failure to respond may result in the loss of your coverage.”

    “It would have made a difference,” says Wu in her native Chinese. “I would have taken more action.”

    There’s a spot in the Covered California application that asks consumers in what language they prefer to be contacted. Tsang checks Chinese for most of her clients, but she says, “Our clients still receive letters in English.”

    Federal and state laws prohibit discrimination based on language, but they govern Medi-Cal, Covered California and health plans differently.

    Not every document is required to be translated, says Claudia Menjivar, an attorney at the Western Center on Law and Poverty who specializes in language access.

    Instead, she says, translation is required for “vital documents,” meaning those carrying information that may impact or reduce a person’s benefits. Even then, they are only required in certain languages, based on the demographics of the affected population.

    Health plans and government agencies often try to meet this requirement by including telephone numbers for interpretation services, such as the one Wu tried to call. “The result is that people are falling through the cracks and potentially losing their coverage,” Menjivar says.

    Menjivar notes the laws govern oral interpretation services as well, actually giving consumers even more rights than for written translations.

    Cary Sanders, director of policy analysis for the California Pan-Ethnic Health Network, says key documents routinely aren’t translated. She heard from Covered California, for instance, that upcoming annual renewal notices will only go out in English and Spanish.

    But Covered California spokesman Dana Howard says a final decision has not been made on the translation of the renewal forms, noting that while the recent mailings on immigration documents went out in Spanish and English, a follow-up email was sent in English, Spanish, Korean, Chinese and Vietnamese.

    “This is a new organization,” Howard says. “We do communicate in both English and Spanish. We are building on the Asian languages. We hope to include all languages as we grow.”

    Here are some tips on what to do if you — or someone you know — receives a letter or email about health coverage that isn’t in the recipient’s primary language:

    • Don’t ignore it. If a certified insurance agent or enrollment counselor who helped you enroll in your plan speaks your language, ask him or her for translation help.

    • Click on the “find help near you” link on Covered California’s homepage to access free resources.

    • If you believe a health program that receives federal money (including Covered California and Medi-Cal) engaged in language discrimination, file a complaint with the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services at www.hhs.gov/ocr. In general, the complaint must be filed within 180 days from the time of the alleged discrimination.

    • If language-access issues contributed to a loss of or change in benefits, consider filing an appeal with Covered California.

    • Call the state Department of Managed Health Care’s Help Center at 888-466-2219 if you believe your plan violated language-access laws.

    To see an index of past questions, read Bazar’s column at www.centerforhealthreporting.org
    Charles Tiayon's insight:

    Covered California has taken a lot of heat for its communication — or lack thereof — to consumers who don’t speak or understand English well.

    To its credit, the agency has improved in the past year, especially in its Spanish-language enrollment-related materials. Unfortunately, the news isn’t so great when it comes to important notices sent after enrollment.

    Consumers complain they can’t understand some of the letters they receive about their insurance, whether from Covered California, Medi-Cal (the state’s Medicaid program) or directly from their health plans.



    The stakes are high. Covered California, for instance, recently contacted nearly 100,000 families to inform them they have until the end of September to submit documents verifying their immigration status. If they don’t comply, they risk losing their coverage. But it’s not always that clear ...

    Q: I received a letter about my health insurance that I don’t understand because it’s not in my language. What should I do?

    A: Qiuhua Wu, an energetic and athletic Chinese immigrant, owns USA International WuShu Kung Fu Academy in Sacramento.



    Wu speaks Mandarin Chinese and a little English. She enrolled in a Covered California plan through Anthem Blue Cross but didn’t pay her premiums for several months, thinking auto-pay had her covered. It didn’t.

    She received several warning letters from Anthem — but all in English, so she didn’t understand them. She was able to make out a phone number included in the letters offering language assistance in Spanish, Chinese, Korean, Vietnamese and Tagalog.

    The person who answered told Wu she could not provide help in Mandarin, so Wu contacted Evette Tsang, the Sacramento insurance agent who first enrolled her. It was too late. Wu’s plan had been canceled, leaving her uninsured until she signs up for a new plan for next year.



    Wu certainly bears responsibility for not paying her premiums, but Tsang — who says 95 percent of her clients speak Chinese as their primary language — and others say that critical communications need to be translated. If not, they argue, they should at least include a tagline in other languages that says something like, “Failure to respond may result in the loss of your coverage.”

    “It would have made a difference,” says Wu in her native Chinese. “I would have taken more action.”

    There’s a spot in the Covered California application that asks consumers in what language they prefer to be contacted. Tsang checks Chinese for most of her clients, but she says, “Our clients still receive letters in English.”



    Federal and state laws prohibit discrimination based on language, but they govern Medi-Cal, Covered California and health plans differently.

    Not every document is required to be translated, says Claudia Menjivar, an attorney at the Western Center on Law and Poverty who specializes in language access.

    Instead, she says, translation is required for “vital documents,” meaning those carrying information that may impact or reduce a person’s benefits. Even then, they are only required in certain languages, based on the demographics of the affected population.



    Health plans and government agencies often try to meet this requirement by including telephone numbers for interpretation services, such as the one Wu tried to call. “The result is that people are falling through the cracks and potentially losing their coverage,” Menjivar says.

    Menjivar notes the laws govern oral interpretation services as well, actually giving consumers even more rights than for written translations.

    Cary Sanders, director of policy analysis for the California Pan-Ethnic Health Network, says key documents routinely aren’t translated. She heard from Covered California, for instance, that upcoming annual renewal notices will only go out in English and Spanish.



    But Covered California spokesman Dana Howard says a final decision has not been made on the translation of the renewal forms, noting that while the recent mailings on immigration documents went out in Spanish and English, a follow-up email was sent in English, Spanish, Korean, Chinese and Vietnamese.

    “This is a new organization,” Howard says. “We do communicate in both English and Spanish. We are building on the Asian languages. We hope to include all languages as we grow.”

    Here are some tips on what to do if you — or someone you know — receives a letter or email about health coverage that isn’t in the recipient’s primary language:



    • Don’t ignore it. If a certified insurance agent or enrollment counselor who helped you enroll in your plan speaks your language, ask him or her for translation help.

    • Click on the “find help near you” link on Covered California’s homepage to access free resources.

    • If you believe a health program that receives federal money (including Covered California and Medi-Cal) engaged in language discrimination, file a complaint with the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services at www.hhs.gov/ocr. In general, the complaint must be filed within 180 days from the time of the alleged discrimination.



    • If language-access issues contributed to a loss of or change in benefits, consider filing an appeal with Covered California.

    • Call the state Department of Managed Health Care’s Help Center at 888-466-2219 if you believe your plan violated language-access laws.

    To see an index of past questions, read Bazar’s column at www.centerforhealthreporting.org

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    Which translation is best for Bible study?

    Which translation is best for Bible study? | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it

    As a pastor I am often asked what translation of the Bible I think is best. The short answer is "the best Bible translation for you to use is the one that makes the most sense to you.

    Charles Tiayon's insight:

    As a pastor I am often asked what translation of the Bible I think is best. The short answer is "the best Bible translation for you to use is the one that makes the most sense to you."

    But how do you find the right one? Begin by recognizing they are all translations. The Bible was originally written in Hebrew, Greek and Aramaic—so unless you are reading it in one of these languages, you are reading a translation. God did not send down the King James Red Letter Authorized Edition and say, "This is the best one"--though certainly some kings and churches have tried to say so.

    Here are a few commonly used translations and what makes them so appealing.

    New International Version (NIV): a simple translation of the Bible requiring about an 8th grade reading level. The NIV is available in a vast variety of study Bibles with excellent notes. Two I particularly like are the CS Lewis and Archeology Study Bibles. More popular than these however are the Men & Women's Devotional versions. With so many to choose from it's easy to see why this is the bestselling translation in the United States.

    King James Version (KJV): Number two on the best seller list for Bibles the KJV is nevertheless the most read translation according to studies. Appreciated primarily for its poetry and influence upon the English language it requires a 12th grade reading level. According to a Christianity Today poll 55 percent of Christians who read the Bible re

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    Intellectual Property News Agency(AG-IP-News) | WIPO Pearl Launched, a Free Multilingual Terminology Database

    Intellectual Property News Agency(AG-IP-News) | WIPO Pearl Launched, a Free Multilingual Terminology Database | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it
    GENEVA - The World Intellectual Property Organization (WIPO) launched a new database providing free access to a wealth of multilingual scientific and technical terminology, a press release by the Corporation stated.

    Through its web-based interface, WIPO Pearl promotes accurate and consistent use of terms across different languages, and makes it easier to search and share scientific and technical knowledge.

    The database initially includes terms found in applications filed via WIPO’s Patent Cooperation Treaty (PCT) and will eventually include collections from other areas of WIPO, such as trademarks, industrial designs, and terminology found in other treaties administered by WIPO.

    The 90,000+ terms and 15,000 concepts in 10 languages have all been entered and validated by WIPO-PCT language experts and terminologists, who have experience working with technical documents in multiple languages. Regular additions to the data are planned.

    WIPO Pearl offers powerful search features, including the ability to select source and target languages, search by subject field as well as with abbreviations, and “fuzzy,” “exact” and Boolean search functions.
    Users can obtain a quick list of results, which can be expanded, while browsing via “concept maps” that show linkages among related concepts by language and subject field - for example, showing concepts that are broader or narrower in scope than other concepts.

    Key features

    Ten languages: Arabic, Chinese, English, French, German, Japanese, Korean, Portuguese, Russian and Spanish
    Classification of concepts by 29 subject fields
    Fully validated content with reliability scores
    “Concept maps” that give an innovative graphical display of related concepts by language and subject field
    Context provided for all terms
    Term labelling (e.g. “recommended”, “standardized” or “avoid”)
    Integrated with PATENTSCOPE and CLIR (Cross-Lingual Information Retrieval)  
    Users can rate the quality of results
    WIPO Pearl can be accessed from the Reference page, along with WIPO’s PATENTSCOPE technology database - which now contains nearly 40 million patent records – and WIPO’s other searchable data collections.
    WIPO is the global forum for the promotion of intellectual property (IP) policy, services, information and cooperation. A specialized agency of the United Nations, WIPO assists its 187 member states in developing a balanced international IP legal framework to meet society’s evolving needs. It provides business services for obtaining IP rights in multiple countries and resolving disputes. It delivers capacity-building programs to help developing countries benefit from using IP. And it provides free access to unique knowledge banks of IP information.
    Charles Tiayon's insight:
    GENEVA - The World Intellectual Property Organization (WIPO) launched a new database providing free access to a wealth of multilingual scientific and technical terminology, a press release by the Corporation stated.

    Through its web-based interface, WIPO Pearl promotes accurate and consistent use of terms across different languages, and makes it easier to search and share scientific and technical knowledge.

    The database initially includes terms found in applications filed via WIPO’s Patent Cooperation Treaty (PCT) and will eventually include collections from other areas of WIPO, such as trademarks, industrial designs, and terminology found in other treaties administered by WIPO.

    The 90,000+ terms and 15,000 concepts in 10 languages have all been entered and validated by WIPO-PCT language experts and terminologists, who have experience working with technical documents in multiple languages. Regular additions to the data are planned.

    WIPO Pearl offers powerful search features, including the ability to select source and target languages, search by subject field as well as with abbreviations, and “fuzzy,” “exact” and Boolean search functions.
    Users can obtain a quick list of results, which can be expanded, while browsing via “concept maps” that show linkages among related concepts by language and subject field - for example, showing concepts that are broader or narrower in scope than other concepts.

    Key features

    Ten languages: Arabic, Chinese, English, French, German, Japanese, Korean, Portuguese, Russian and Spanish
    Classification of concepts by 29 subject fields
    Fully validated content with reliability scores
    “Concept maps” that give an innovative graphical display of related concepts by language and subject field
    Context provided for all terms
    Term labelling (e.g. “recommended”, “standardized” or “avoid”)
    Integrated with PATENTSCOPE and CLIR (Cross-Lingual Information Retrieval)  
    Users can rate the quality of results
    WIPO Pearl can be accessed from the Reference page, along with WIPO’s PATENTSCOPE technology database - which now contains nearly 40 million patent records – and WIPO’s other searchable data collections.
    WIPO is the global forum for the promotion of intellectual property (IP) policy, services, information and cooperation. A specialized agency of the United Nations, WIPO assists its 187 member states in developing a balanced international IP legal framework to meet society’s evolving needs. It provides business services for obtaining IP rights in multiple countries and resolving disputes. It delivers capacity-building programs to help developing countries benefit from using IP. And it provides free access to unique knowledge banks of IP information.
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    «J’aime prendre le lecteur à rebrousse-poil»

    «J’aime prendre le lecteur à rebrousse-poil» | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it
    Depuis six ans Markus Haller édite et traduit de l’anglais des essais du monde entier. Sa maison d’édition, qui porte son nom et est basée à Genève, s’est fait une réputation en terre francophone. Coup de projecteur sur une micro-entreprise qui défie le mercantilisme
    Charles Tiayon's insight:

    «Editeur genevois? Je me vois plutôt éditeur de la francophonie.» Depuis son tout petit bureau genevois niché au cœur des Eaux-Vives, Markus Haller rayonne; sa maison d’édition, qui porte son nom, vient de publier son vingtième livre à l’occasion de ses six ans d’existence. Sa spécialité? Faire traduire et publier en français des essais de langue anglaise. Une spécialité unique dans l’édition en Suisse romande, et qui souffre de peu de concurrence. «En Allemagne ou en Suisse alémanique, je n’aurais jamais pu monter un tel modèle, car là-bas les essais en anglais sont beaucoup plus vite traduits qu’en France ou en Suisse romande», raconte ce Zurichois d’origine, établi à Genève depuis 1979.

    «La France est riche en essayistes et s’intéresse avant tout à sa production, poursuit Markus Haller. Pensez qu’un essayiste majeur comme John Rawls et sa Théorie de la justice a mis dix-sept ans à être traduit! Peut-être les éditeurs français craignent-ils trop souvent de présenter des idées minoritaires dans les universités ou dans les sociétés.»

    Vingt livres en six ans, disions-nous: c’est modeste. Mais à y regarder de près, c’est une prouesse. Markus Haller travaille seul, il fait tout, depuis la sélection de livres éligibles jusqu’au service de presse. Seules la traduction et la correction sont déléguées à des spécialistes. Au résultat, des ouvrages impeccables, cousus au fil, à la maquette soignée, pour un contenu de haute tenue intellectuelle. «Au fil des ans, je me suis fait une réputation parmi la petite frange de personnes qui s’intéressent aux essais écrits par des non-Parisiens, sourit-il. J’ai de bons relais à la radio et dans la presse, notamment le magazine Books, qui suit l’actualité à travers les essais anglo-saxons.» Quant à son marché, il est davantage tourné vers la France que la Suisse.

    Et qui sont ses auteurs de prédilection? Markus Haller puise dans une vaste communauté d’universitaires de langue anglaise (mais pas forcément anglo-saxons), qui ont le don de vulgariser des thèmes extrêmement pointus pour un public cultivé et curieux des sciences humaines: l’économiste Paul Seabright (La Société des inconnus), l’expert en développement William Easterly (Le Fardeau de l’homme blanc), le philosophe Stuart Hampshire (La Justice est conflit), l’historien Peter Baldwin (Le Narcissisme des petites différences), le psychologue Gerd Gigerenzer (Penser le risque) ou encore le criminologue Diego Gambetta (La Pègre déchiffrée)…

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    Criticism and Language Barrier | Life | Daily Sabah

    Criticism and Language Barrier | Life | Daily Sabah | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it
    When you are writing in a language other than your native tongue you are out of your element. No matter how much you know of the non-native language, mistakes will be there. In most cases the amount of mistakes usually depends on your level of knowledge,... | Daily Sabah
    Charles Tiayon's insight:

    When you are writing in a language other than your native tongue you are out of your element. No matter how much you know of the non-native language, mistakes will be there. In most cases the amount of mistakes usually depends on your level of knowledge, but when your profession is journalism it becomes very important to convey your meaning to the readers flawlessly. Actually, I already wrote about this issue on June , 2014, in a story titled, "A Slope in Journalism: Translation." 

    As the ombudsman for Daily Sabah, aside from preparing this page every week and writing about the state of journalism at the paper we also review letters from readers as well as surf Internet platforms to spot possible criticisms about our newspaper and act accordingly. One of the most frequent criticisms I encounter usually concerns our use of the English language in the paper. Many critics have said that news articles published in the Daily Sabah were poorly written, grammatically wrong and used incorrect words. Furthermore, nearly every one of these critics neglected to give examples of the aforementioned flaws and thus we could not take measures to correct the mistakes or inform the authors of their mistakes. 

    Last week, a letter with similar content was sent to our Chief Copy Editor Gönül Taban. The correspondence read exactly as such:

    "Hello,

    I want you to say that, there is something wrong with your newpapers' [sic] language. It is so clear, your authors use google translate or something like this type of dictionary. Cause [sic], sentences are so much 'chicken translate' [sic]. Please solve this huge problem to perfection.

    Ece TEZCAN

    Hacettepe University"

    Our chief copy editor requested some examples from the reader and she provided us with some. We thank Ms. Tezcan for taking the time to provide us with a structured critique. Below are the cited mistakes and Gönül Taban's responses:

    ET: Sure, I need to give 'a couple' of examples. But u [sic] can be sure, there are so many mistakes in whole, but i [sic] have no time to correct all. 

    1) Sept. 10, 2014, page: 2
    [...] Social Circus Festival, organized by the Art Anywhere Association (Her Yerde Sanat Dernegi)..." if somebody wants to explain "her yerde sanat" that always [sic] be "art is everywhere" 

    GT: We cannot change the name of an association. This is how the "Her Yerde Sanat Derneği" refers to itself in English on its own official website. Please click on the link to see for yourself:

    http://artanywhere.weebly.com/

    ET: 2) Same day, page: 3 
    "Miners return to work at Soma mine" mine means always elements [sic] not the area or region. Author has to write "Miners back to work at Soma mine region"

    GT: A brief Google search will show that even The New York Times (only because you referred to it as a reference) this is not an error and they too have simply written "Soma mine…" in reference to the area.

    ET: 3) Same day, page: 10
    Author translated ISID (Turkish version) as ISIS. But New York Times translated that organization as ISIL - Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant-.

    GT: In our earlier prints we used ISIL, but later made an executive decision to use ISIS. They are both correct. There are different translations for the name. The name in the original is the Islamic State of Iraq and "al-Sham" (an Arabic word that refers to Greater Syria or the Levant). So it is alternately referred to as the Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant, or ISIL; or the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria, or ISIS; or other versions of "al-Sham."

    The exchange was considerably longer but these will do for now. I chose not to edit the mistakes of the correspondence to give you a better picture. It is important when engaging in criticism to have sufficient knowledge of the subject before criticizing, otherwise what is thought to be a mistake could in fact be the correct usage. Nevertheless, as I said before, we thank our reader and release both the examples and our copy editor's answers in order to address such topics in case anyone else had similar thoughts about the issues mentioned above.

    At Daily Sabah, every word is checked by our team of native-English-speaking copy editors before the paper goes to print. However, we are only human, so minor typos and even grammatical mistakes can slip through the cracks as it happens with even some of the biggest papers around the world. As long as the errors don't change the meaning and are rare enough to be nearly nonexistent, how a newspaper choses to conduct journalism should be more significant.

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