Metaglossia: The ...
Follow
Find
175.5K views | +102 today
 
Scooped by Charles Tiayon
onto Metaglossia: The Translation World
Scoop.it!

New Bible translation has screenplay format

New Bible translation has screenplay format | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it
A new Bible translation tackles the challenge of turning ancient Greek and Hebrew texts into modern American English and then adds a twist: It's written like a screenplay.

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) - A new Bible translation tackles the challenge of turning ancient Greek and Hebrew texts into modern American English and then adds a twist: It's written like a screenplay.

Take the passage from Genesis in which God gets angry at Adam for eating the forbidden fruit from the tree of knowledge of good and evil:

"Adam (pointing at the woman): It was she! The woman You gave me as a companion put the fruit in my hands, and I ate it.

"God (to the woman): What have you done?

"Eve: It was the serpent! He tricked me, and I ate."

Later, Eve bears her first son, Cain.

"Eve (excited): Look, I have created a new human, a male child, with the help of the Eternal."

Even people who have never read the Bible could probably guess that other translations don't say Adam pointed his finger at Eve when he blamed her for his disobedience. Neither do other Bibles describe Eve as "excited" about her newborn son.

more...
No comment yet.
Metaglossia: The Translation World
News about translation, interpreting, intercultural communication, terminology and lexicography - as it happens
Curated by Charles Tiayon
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Charles Tiayon
Scoop.it!

UN Careers - jobs in this network (Translators, Revisers, Editors, etc.)

UN Careers -  jobs in this network (Translators, Revisers, Editors, etc.) | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it

Vacancies in this network: Translators, Revisers, Editors, etc.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Charles Tiayon
Scoop.it!

Translating Shakespeare

Translating Shakespeare | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it
What happens when Shakespeare’s work is translated into foreign languages? Is it still Shakespeare? Or does something fundamental to the original evaporate in the process? "Bless Thee! Thou Art Tra...
Charles Tiayon's insight:

What happens when Shakespeare’s work is translated into foreign languages? Is it still Shakespeare? Or does something fundamental to the original evaporate in the process?

“Bless Thee! Thou Art Translated,” a podcast in the Folger Shakespeare Library’s Shakespeare Unlimited series, raises these thought-provoking questions.

A translator can retain the story, characters, and ideas of a play, but the intricate wordplay proves much more difficult. For one thing, it’s impossible to translate Shakespeare’s iambic pentameter into a language like Korean, in which poetry is based on syllable counts, not stresses. And what is to be done with those well-crafted puns?

However, translation also opens up possibilities for new depths of meaning, as the familiar recedes and a different perspective takes over.

Sound interesting? Go ahead – take a short break from back-to-school prep and listen to this delightful podcast.

Do you have any of your own stories to share about encountering Shakespeare in a different language or culture? Tell us in the comments.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Charles Tiayon
Scoop.it!

Push for protecting languages whose speakers a minority

Push for protecting languages whose speakers a minority | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it
The Constitution accords as much primacy to linguistic minorities as it does to religious minorities.
Charles Tiayon's insight:

At a time when the NDA and the PM have shown their preference for Hindi, and when the UPSC aptitude test CSAT has seen protests over the perceived advantages it grants English-medium students over those of Hindi medium, the Commissioner for Linguistic Minorities in its 50th report has made a case for safeguarding linguistic minorities in various states. It has, in 27 recommendations, reaffirmed the status of the mother tongue, even if spoken by a minority in a state, and called for its inclusion in education up to the primary level, recruitment and state-level exams.

The Constitution accords as much primacy to linguistic minorities as it does to religious minorities. Articles 29 and 30 speak of safeguarding that diversity. The Commissioner for Linguistic Minorities, set up in 1957, has in its latest report made a recommendation that could have far-reaching implications if followed — a call to states for “identification and declaration of Linguistic Minority Concentrated Areas”. The commission says states and UTs should declare/notify areas populated with linguistic minorities who constitute more than 15 per cent of the local population at the local level (district, municipal, taluk).

Taking note of erosion across states of languages spoken by a minority, the commission has observed that in almost all states, learning the state official language has been made compulsory in the curriculum. It argues that instead, representation for redress of grievances in states should be allowed and encouraged in languages that may not be the main language of the state, but are spoken.

The commission says it has been told by states that state services recruitment examinations do not allow the use of languages other than the regional language for answering questions. This, it has recommended, must change and “knowledge of state official language need not be insisted upon as a prerequisite at the time of entry into state services”.

During enrolment of children in school, the commission has said, it is of the view that registering the child’s mother tongue should be made compulsory, along with asking the parents their preferences for first language and optional language. This, writes the commission, would be well within the three-language formula. It has emphasised a meaningful application for the three-language formula in schools and called for providing a “level playing field for linguistic minorities” and “facilities for instruction in their mother tongue at the primary stage of education within their territory.”

The report has also called for encouraging the teaching of minority languages in schools by filling in teacher vacancies, improving the teacher-student ratio for languages in a minority, and enabling the availability of textbooks in those languages at the start of the academic session.

“Our centuries-old multilingual, multicultural ethos has held the country together like the thread in a rosary of beads and this diversity is more emphatically presented in the multiplicity of languages spoken by people in different parts of the country,” said commissioner for linguistic minorities Prof Akhtar ul Wasey. “The point of zabaans is to foster samvaad, not vivaad.”

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Charles Tiayon
Scoop.it!

Les cadres de l'administration soumis à des tests de langue

Les cadres de l'administration soumis à des tests de langue | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it
Le Conseil fédéral veut améliorer la diversité linguistique dans l'administration. Cadres et directeurs seront soumis prochainement à un examen de langues obligatoire.
Charles Tiayon's insight:

L'administration fédérale parle allemand et francophones ou italophones doivent s'y plier. Du coup, ces derniers sont nettement moins présents dans les services de la Confédération, contrairement aux souhaits du Conseil fédéral.

Comme l'explique vendredi 29 août le Tages-Anzeiger, les derniers chiffres du personnel montrent que les collaborateurs alémaniques représentent 71,5% des effectifs, soit plus que les 68,5 à 70,5% visés.

Des cadres peu polyglottes

Les chiffres varient fortement par département, comme le montre le graphique ci-dessus. Ce n'est peut-être pas une surprise mais c'est ainsi le Département fédéral de la défense de la protection de la population et des sports (DDPS) d'Ueli Maurer qui emploie le plus de germanophones avec un taux de 76,9%.

Le Conseil fédéral soupçonne également que ses fonctionnaires ne sont donc pas aussi polyglottes qu'ils devraient l'être, et plus spécialement les cadres. «Il est possible que des collaborateurs très qualifiés n'affichent pas (encore) à leur embauche les compétences linguistiques nécessaires», souligne le gouvernement.

Pas de cours obligatoires

Le Conseil fédéral entend donc y remédier. Tout d'abord, les chefs de service ne pourront plus invoquer leur ignorance linguistique. «Pour les cadres supérieurs et intermédiaires avec fonction de direction, un test de langues sera obligatoire», explique Nicoletta Mariolini, déléguée au plurilinguisme au sein de l'administration. Cette mesure entrera en vigueur en 2015.

Selon Nicoletta Mariolini, il s'agit de se faire une idée sur les connaissances dans les langues de travail que sont l'allemand, le français et l'italien. En cas de résultats insuffisants, des progrès de la part des fonctionnaires sont attendus, même s'il n'est pas encore prévu de rendre obligatoire les cours de langues déjà offerts par l'administration.

Les employés sans responsabilité de direction n'auront pas l'obligation de passer ce test mais ils devront estimer leur niveau dans une déclaration.

Rôle croissant dans le recrutement

Le Conseil fédéral veut avoir une idée plus précise de ce qui se parle dans l'administration. Si les données existent par département, celles-ci seront affinées dès 2015 puisque chaque office fédéral sera également scanné.

Ces objectifs ne sont pour le moment pas contraignants et les fonctionnaires monolingues ne risquent aucune sanction. Mais sur le long terme, la question linguistique jouera un rôle croissant dans le recrutement, avec de nouvelles règles pour les ressources humaines des départements, ajoute Nicoletta Mariolini.

Ces aménagements interviennent en plein débat sur la place des langues à l'école primaire, avec tous les risques que cela comporte. «Sur le long terme, il sera impossible de renforcer le plurilinguisme de l'administration si les enfants ne reçoivent à l'école pas suffisamment d'enseignement des langues nationales», prévient la déléguée.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Charles Tiayon
Scoop.it!

Un clásico colombiano moderno está finalmente disponible traducido al inglés

Un clásico colombiano moderno está finalmente disponible traducido al inglés | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it

Es como una coup de grâce literaria: corta y veloz, con un imaginario agudo, la amenaza y la sensualidad se anidan juntas en un lujoso escenario caribeño.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Charles Tiayon
Scoop.it!

Epidemic vs. Pandemic vs. Endemic

Epidemic vs. Pandemic vs. Endemic | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it
The dreadful outbreak of the Ebola virus in West Africa has made headlines like these a daily sight in newspapers and on news sites all over the world.
Charles Tiayon's insight:

The dreadful outbreak of the Ebola virus in West Africa has made headlines like these a daily sight in newspapers and on news sites all over the world:

Ebola Epidemic Ravages West Africa

Leave endemic Ebola zones – Germany tells nationals

Americans fear pandemic as Ebola patients evacuate to Atlanta

The element dem in epidemicendemic, and pandemic comes from the ancient Greek word demos, which meant people or district:

epi (among) + demos = epidemic
en (in) + demos = endemic
pan (all) + demos = pandemic

An epidemic is a widespread occurrence of an infectious disease in a community at a particular time:

Annual influenza epidemics follow a winter seasonal pattern in the United States with typical activity peaking during late December to early February. 

An intense flu epidemic spreading across the nation has already taken a tragic toll in Michigan. 

H1N1 Flu Epidemic Fills Up Texas Hospital Beds And ERs

Endemic is an adjective that refers to a disease or condition regularly found among particular people or in a certain area.

In many malaria-endemic countries, malaria transmission does not occur in all parts of the country. 

Polio remains endemic in three countries – Afghanistan, Nigeria and Pakistan.

Pertussis is endemic worldwide, even in areas with high vaccination rates.

A disease becomes pandemic when it spreads beyond a region to infect large numbers of people worldwide:

The Black Death was one of the worst pandemics in human history, killing at least 75 million people on three continents 

The Franco-Prussian War triggered a smallpox pandemic of 1870–1875 that claimed 500,000 lives.

The 1918 Spanish influenza pandemic [is] estimated as being responsible for the deaths of approximately 50 million people or more.

The word epidemic is also used to refer to an occurrence of any undesirable phenomenon:

Teen Prescription Drug Abuse: A National Epidemic

Don’t panic, the teenage pregnancy epidemic is over!

Factors Contributing to the Youth Violence Epidemic 

An Epidemic of Stupidity is Sweeping America

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Charles Tiayon
Scoop.it!

Google strips content authorship from search engine results

Google strips content authorship from search engine results | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it
As of now, you’ll no longer see the author and a link to their Google+ account alongside a relevant search result.
Charles Tiayon's insight:

Google has made the decision to stop authorship markup when it comes to search results.

In other words, previously when you searched and saw a relevant article pop up, you'd also see the author and a link to his or her Google+ account. However, those details have been stripped away as of now.

Why? According to The Next Web, John Mueller, Webmaster Trends Analyst at Google, said that the company had found that information wasn't as useful to searchers as was hoped – and indeed at times it detracted from the overall search results.

Mueller noted: "With this in mind, we've made the difficult decision to stop showing authorship in search results."

This follows a move earlier this summer, in June, when Google stripped author photos from its search results. At the time, one of the reasons given was mobile, with photos not fitting well in terms of smartphone surfing and bandwidth – but clearly, it was part of a bigger picture move, the fruition of which has come this week.

Related: Google+ stops forcing people to use their real name



Mueller also stated that in testing, it was found that removing authorship doesn't affect traffic to websites. This is purely a change to improve the user's search experience, he asserted.

He also clarified: "It's also worth mentioning that Search users will still see Google+ posts from friends and pages when they're relevant to the query – both in the main results, and on the right-hand side. Today's authorship change doesn't impact these social features."

Needless to say, there are some unhappy folks there, and webmasters who feel that Google's authorship program wasn't so much an experiment as an excuse to drive folks to join Google+ and link through on a large scale.




Read more: http://www.itproportal.com/2014/08/29/google-strips-content-authorship-from-search-engine-results/#ixzz3Bm9SKbZp

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Charles Tiayon
Scoop.it!

« On apprend en s’amusant ! »

« On apprend en s’amusant ! » | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it
Les langues constituent des atouts indéniables dans le monde du travail. Dans ce cadre, le Centre Européen des Langues Parlées propose, dès le plus jeune âge, des cours tout au long de l’année et des stages réguliers.
Charles Tiayon's insight:

Les langues constituent des atouts indéniables dans le monde du travail. Dans ce cadre, le Centre Européen des Langues Parlées propose, dès le plus jeune âge, des cours tout au long de l’année et des stages réguliers.

Depuis ce lundi 25 août et jusqu’à ce vendredi, l’un de ces stages se déroule dans les locaux du Canonnier. Meggy De Berdt et Élodie Cremers, professeurs de langues germaniques, expliquent le déroulement de cette semaine: «Nous accueillons une vingtaine d’élèves, dès 4 ans. Pour les enfants en immersion, c’est l’occasion de se remettre dans le bain. En ce qui concerne l’anglais, ils sont là pour apprendre, tout simplement.

Certains en ont déjà pratiqué, d’autres non. Nous nous organisons donc en fonction de l’âge mais aussi du niveau des enfants. Si un enfant est trop avancé par rapport au reste de sa classe, il passe à un niveau supérieur pour continuer à apprendre. »

Cinq enfants par groupe

Évidemment, le Centre Européen de Langues Parlées (ASBL créée en 1996 à l’initiative de la Ville de Mouscron) met en avant la compétence de l’oral, qui est généralement plus difficile à acquérir dans un cadre scolaire.

Pour Meggy et Élodie, «l’apprentissage est optimal par rapport à l’école». Elles en précisent les principales raisons: «Nous n’utilisons que la langue cible pour parler aux enfants. D’autre part, les groupes ne sont constitués que de cinq enfants durant les cours au long de l’année.»

Et les bienfaits de cet apprentissage sont confirmés par les enfants eux-mêmes:«Ici, on n’a pas de points alors on n’est pas stressés. On est plus à l’aise qu’en classe et c’est très différent de l’école, on apprend en s’amusant!»

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Charles Tiayon
Scoop.it!

Burundi: l'anglais officialisé aux côtés du français et du kirundi - Afrique - RFI

Burundi: l'anglais officialisé aux côtés du français et du kirundi - Afrique - RFI | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it
Au Burundi, quatre langues (kirundi, swahili, français et anglais) étaient utilisées jusqu’ici, sans aucune réglementation. Cela a été corrigé hier, jeudi 28 août. L’Assemblée...
Charles Tiayon's insight:

Au Burundi, quatre langues (kirundi, swahili, français et anglais) étaient utilisées jusqu’ici, sans aucune réglementation. Cela a été corrigé hier, jeudi 28 août. L’Assemblée nationale a adopté à l’unanimité un projet de loi portant sur le statut des langues et qui vise à mettre de l’ordre dans le paysage linguistique burundais. Une nouvelle réglementation qui fait la part belle notamment à l’anglais, langue nouvellement introduite dans ce pays francophone des Grands Lacs africains. Mais les autorités se veulent rassurantes sur la place du français.

Sur papier, le kirundi, langue nationale de ce pays, était la seule langue officielle du Burundi. Mais dans les faits, le français, héritage de la tutelle belge est depuis longtemps langue de l’administration, de législation et de l’éducation. Et, depuis l’entrée du Burundi dans l’East African Community (Communauté d’Afrique de l’Est), l’anglais et le swahili sont obligatoires dès la première année du primaire.

Cette fois, les choses vont changer, la nouvelle loi va mettre sur un pied d’égalité le kirundi, le français et l’anglais, toutes trois appelées à être langues officielles de ce pays. De quoi faire perdre à la langue de Molière sa place prépondérante au Burundi. Mais le ministre burundais de l’Enseignement supérieur, qui a défendu ce projet devant l’Assemblée nationale, s’est voulu rassurant.

« Diplomatie linguistique »

« Au contraire, nous faisons une diplomatie linguistique, explique Joseph Butore. On adopte l’anglais pour être en ordre avec les autres pays membres de la Communauté est-africaine, mais on n’adopte pas l’anglais pour exclure le français. Nous ne voulons pas fermer les portes, nous voulons que les francophones se sentent à l’aise, [et que] les anglophones se sentent à l’aise également. »

Le gouvernement burundais rappelle qu’il fait plutôt la promotion de la francophonie. Dans cette région tournée vers l’anglais, il a demandé officiellement à ses partenaires de l’EAC de donner au français un statut de langue officielle de la communauté, aux côtés de l’anglais. « On veut accepter l’anglais, pour qu’au contraire on nous ouvre les portes pour véhiculer le français dans les pays de la Communauté est-africaine », justifie le ministre.

Mais ce combat s’annonce très dur car l’anglais est archi-dominant dans la région et a gagné du terrain, notamment au Rwanda voisin, devenu aujourd’hui quasiment anglophone.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Charles Tiayon
Scoop.it!

What does your body language say?

What does your body language say? | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it
If you're not making headway in your life, you might need to look at your non-verbal cues.
Charles Tiayon's insight:

It's not just first impressions that count. Your everyday body language can be what determines whether people like or trust you – and ultimately whether they want to do business with you.

If someone has already made up his or her mind about you it can be very difficult to change, so making sure your body language is working for, rather than against, you is crucial. This applies whether you are asking for a raise, meeting a potential new client, and especially when applying for a new job or role.

A failure to look someone directly in the eye makes you come across as shifty and untrustworthy. 

Judy Sahay, director with digital media agency Crowd Media HQ says there are plenty of do's and don'ts around body language when it comes to securing new business. “Conducting yourself in a business meeting can be nerve-racking in ordinary circumstances, but is particularly daunting when attempting to make a positive first impression and secure a new client or a raise,” she says.

Kyla Tustin: don't make too much eye contact.

Here are six do's and don'ts of ensuring your body language works in your favour.

Advertisement 

1. Do have a firm handshake. Sahay says a firm handshake makes a great first impression. “It doesn't need to be bruising,” she says. “But by going straight for a stable grip you display confidence and subtle dominance and immediately establish yourself as someone to take seriously.”

2. Do meet someone's eyes. A failure to look someone directly in the eye makes you come across as shifty and untrustworthy. But corporate coach Kyla Tustin says making too much eye contact, early on can scare some people. “It's important to remain aware of the body language of others so that you can gauge how they are responding to you,” she says.

3. Do incorporate subtle hand gestures into your conversation. “Treat a meeting with



Read more: http://www.theage.com.au/small-business/trends/what-does-your-body-language-say-20140825-3ea41.html#ixzz3Bm6T5IGu

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Charles Tiayon
Scoop.it!

Now You're Speaking My Language - County Line Magazine - September/October 2014

Now You're Speaking My Language - County Line Magazine - September/October 2014 | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it

Members of the Tyler Metro Association of the Deaf enjoy group outings like this recent one at the Lindale Whataburger. (l-4) Shanna Staring, Kelly Drumm, Susie Grona, Rylee Drumm, Eugene Alaniz, Martha Alaniz, Daphne Smith, Margaret Berzas, Elizabeth Crook, Patrick Grona, and Glenn Woolsey.

Growing up in communities with a language and culture they can’t understand, many deaf people learn to live with isolation and frustrating social situations. Attempts to communicate with the hearing world often find it is the “hearies” that turn a deaf ear to their audible-challenged neighbors with such humiliating tactics as shouting, or speaking slowly as if they were stupid, or asking if they know another deaf person in China as if all deaf people know each other.

With an estimated 98,000 deaf and hard-of-hearing people living in East Texas, some felt it was time for a place where people understand their culture and speak their language. 

Currently looking for an actual building, the Tyler Deaf and Hard of Hearing Center doesn’t let a little obstacle like that stop them from providing the deaf community with essential services including social activities, after school children’s programs, adult literacy classes, caseworker services, and basic sign language classes. Until they get a one-stop-shop location, they meet in a variety of places where they can interact and communicate freely with others.

Deaf herself, Susie Grona, is president of the center’s community advisory committee, a retired teacher and the inspiration behind creating a “home” for the East Texas deaf community. She recognized the need for a center after moving to Tyler from Corpus Christi where they had an active center for the deaf.

“The purpose of having the deaf center — a ‘one-stop shop’ — is accessibility and a deaf-friendly environment where everyone can communicate in sign or ASL,” Grona said.

ASL stands for American Sign Language and is the predominant language of deaf communities in the United States. Beautifully expressed with fingers and hands, touch and body language, it allows deaf people to connect and interact meaningfully with other human beings.

Referencing A Journey into the Deaf World, Grona estimates that 90 percent of deaf children are born to hearing parents so they learn the values of the deaf community and sign language in residential schools, such as the Texas School for the Deaf. Children are also welcomed into the community through interaction with local deaf adults. This acculturation process encourages a close community and deaf people usually call each other by first name, foregoing the use of titles.

According to Grona, “The deaf community does not focus on the inability to hear, but the ability to thrive in a visual-spatial environment communicating bilingually in a bi-cultural environment (American Sign Language and English).”

In order to best serve the community, the center has a board of directors and a community advisory committee. Board members manage the center’s business and financial aspects, and community advisory committee members work within the deaf community, becoming familiar with its needs. Dr. Lonny McKinzie serves as the president of the board of directors.

The center gained the status of a non-profit organization in 2012 and now provides access to qualified interpreters, but still lacks the land and funding for a building. Their goal is to provide a central location for communication, a place where deaf people can come, chat, and feel at home. Eventually, the center will offer after school and summer recreational programs that focus on tutoring, leadership, and social activities. Literacy services are available to deaf and hard-of-hearing adults who want to improve their English reading and writing skills.


Charles Tiayon's insight:

Members of the Tyler Metro Association of the Deaf enjoy group outings like this recent one at the Lindale Whataburger. (l-4) Shanna Staring, Kelly Drumm, Susie Grona, Rylee Drumm, Eugene Alaniz, Martha Alaniz, Daphne Smith, Margaret Berzas, Elizabeth Crook, Patrick Grona, and Glenn Woolsey.

Growing up in communities with a language and culture they can’t understand, many deaf people learn to live with isolation and frustrating social situations. Attempts to communicate with the hearing world often find it is the “hearies” that turn a deaf ear to their audible-challenged neighbors with such humiliating tactics as shouting, or speaking slowly as if they were stupid, or asking if they know another deaf person in China as if all deaf people know each other.

With an estimated 98,000 deaf and hard-of-hearing people living in East Texas, some felt it was time for a place where people understand their culture and speak their language. 

Currently looking for an actual building, the Tyler Deaf and Hard of Hearing Center doesn’t let a little obstacle like that stop them from providing the deaf community with essential services including social activities, after school children’s programs, adult literacy classes, caseworker services, and basic sign language classes. Until they get a one-stop-shop location, they meet in a variety of places where they can interact and communicate freely with others.

Deaf herself, Susie Grona, is president of the center’s community advisory committee, a retired teacher and the inspiration behind creating a “home” for the East Texas deaf community. She recognized the need for a center after moving to Tyler from Corpus Christi where they had an active center for the deaf.

“The purpose of having the deaf center — a ‘one-stop shop’ — is accessibility and a deaf-friendly environment where everyone can communicate in sign or ASL,” Grona said.

ASL stands for American Sign Language and is the predominant language of deaf communities in the United States. Beautifully expressed with fingers and hands, touch and body language, it allows deaf people to connect and interact meaningfully with other human beings.

Referencing A Journey into the Deaf World, Grona estimates that 90 percent of deaf children are born to hearing parents so they learn the values of the deaf community and sign language in residential schools, such as the Texas School for the Deaf. Children are also welcomed into the community through interaction with local deaf adults. This acculturation process encourages a close community and deaf people usually call each other by first name, foregoing the use of titles.

According to Grona, “The deaf community does not focus on the inability to hear, but the ability to thrive in a visual-spatial environment communicating bilingually in a bi-cultural environment (American Sign Language and English).”

In order to best serve the community, the center has a board of directors and a community advisory committee. Board members manage the center’s business and financial aspects, and community advisory committee members work within the deaf community, becoming familiar with its needs. Dr. Lonny McKinzie serves as the president of the board of directors.

The center gained the status of a non-profit organization in 2012 and now provides access to qualified interpreters, but still lacks the land and funding for a building. Their goal is to provide a central location for communication, a place where deaf people can come, chat, and feel at home. Eventually, the center will offer after school and summer recreational programs that focus on tutoring, leadership, and social activities. Literacy services are available to deaf and hard-of-hearing adults who want to improve their English reading and writing skills.


more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Charles Tiayon
Scoop.it!

It's Over: The Rise & Fall Of Google Authorship For Search Results

It's Over: The Rise & Fall Of Google Authorship For Search Results | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it
Anyone who follows Google knows that nothing it creates is immune from elimination. Like so many efforts before it, Authorship is fading into the sunset.
Charles Tiayon's insight:

The cessation of the Authorship program comes after two major reductions of Authorship rich snippets over the past eight months. In December 2013 Google reduced the amount of author photo snippets shown per query, as Google’s webspam head Matt Cutts hadpromised would happen in his keynote at Pubcon that October. Starting in December, only some Authorship results were accompanied by an author photo, while all others had just a byline.

Then at the end of June 2014 Google removed all author photos from global search, leaving just bylines for any qualified authorship results.

At that time, John Mueller in a Google+ post stated that the photos were removed because Google was moving toward unifying the user experience between desktop and mobile search, and author photos did not work well with the limited screen space and bandwidth of mobile. He also remarked that Google was seeing no significant difference in “click behavior” between search pages with or without author photos.

A Brief History of Google Authorship

The roots of the Authorship project go back to Google’s Agent Rank patent of 2007. As explained by Bill Slawski, an expert on Google’s patents, the Agent Rank patentdescribed a system for connecting multiple pieces of content with a digital signature representing one or more “agents” (authors).

Such identification could then be used to score the agent based on various trust and authority signals pointing at the agent’s content, and that score could be used to influence search rankings.

Agent Rank remained a theoretical idea without a practical means of application, until the adoption by Google of the schema.org standards for structured markup. In a blog post in June 2011, Google announced that it would begin to support authorship markup. The company encouraged webmasters to begin marking up content on their sites with the rel=”author” and rel=”me” tags, connecting each piece of content to an author profile.

The final puzzle piece for Authorship to be truly useful to Google fell into place with the unveiling of Google+ at the end of June 2011. Google+ profiles could now serve as Google’s universal identity platform for connecting authors with their content.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Charles Tiayon
Scoop.it!

Tips on how to maintain focus when writing

Tips on how to maintain focus when writing | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it
Sometimes the motivation to write is lacking. You have a deadline to beat but you just can’t seem to be able to concentrate and come up with anything. Some people will call it writer’s block others...
Charles Tiayon's insight:

Sometimes the motivation to write is lacking. You have a deadline to beat but you just can’t seem to be able to concentrate and come up with anything. Some people will call it writer’s block others will call it being lazy. Giving it a name only matters if you can get out of that mind funk and write.

Here a few tips on how to write when it seems impossible.

Listen to music

Music can help you block out conversation around you and concentrate on your work. Plug in your headphones, put on some music that relaxes yiu and let it inspire you to travel into your writing zone. You will be surprised to find yourself writing a lot when you listen to music. Try noise-canceling headphones to eliminate even more outside interference.

Turn off your phone

Yes, you need to shut down your phone. I know it seems hard and like a harsh thing to do for mmost people who happen to be phone addicts but it’s worth it. You need to concentrate and all those texts, whatsapp messages and phonecalls will not help you do it. If you must produce an article, shut off your phone for a while.

Close all doors and windows

It doesn’t matter if you work at home or the office, shutting doors and windows can be helpful. It will help you keep out distractions and keep them out of your head. You get to ignore movement outside and concentrate on what’s in front of you. Most people will also avoid coming into the room if there’s a locked door meaning you can work uninterrupted.

Turn off the internet

In this day and age where most people are addicted to social media, social media can be a distraction from working. The only solution to this is turning off the internet. Ignore the funny conversations and memes and work on your writing. The only thing that should be on when you’re working on your computer is Microsoft Word (or any software you use to write). Once the article is done, you can reward yourself with a long internet session for working so hard.

Work at your desk

It’s always a good idea to make yourself work at a desk when writing. Getting your computer and working from the couch or bed can make you too relaxed to work through everything. Being at a desk will force you to maintain good posture (if you have the right chair that is) and in most cases you only have walls around you and won’t get distracted. Being at a desk also motivates you to work faster so you can get away and go relax much faster.

Work in chunks of time

Writing for long periods of time can be hard and part of the problem. Time out your writing sessions into small chunks of time. It will help you keep track of time and tackle the most important part of your writing as you go along. The chunks of time could be a way to beat deadlines and you concentrate on one article at a time. You can set aside 1hour for each work that needs to be done.

Hopefully these tips will make writing so much easier for you. Try them out and see yourself produce more content even when you feel a little uninspired.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Charles Tiayon
Scoop.it!

Friday Reviews: On Writing by Stephen King

On WritingStephen KingNear the end of the 1990's, Stephen King decided to write a book about writing. Reluctant to be one of those writers who talks out his ass about what he does, King opted to ke...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Charles Tiayon
Scoop.it!

Cultural innovation: Languages live at Royal B.C. Museum

Cultural innovation: Languages live at Royal B.C. Museum | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it
Our Living Languages: First Peoples’ Voices in B.C. Through June 2017 | Royal B.C. Museum, Victoria
Charles Tiayon's insight:

Our Living Languages: First Peoples’ Voices in B.C.

Through June 2017 | Royal B.C. Museum, Victoria

When the Royal B.C. Museum decided to explore the First Nations languages of B.C., they did something radical, at least by museum standards, CEO Jack Lohman says. The museum teamed with the First Peoples Culture Council to create the exhibit.

“We did not ask for those we were engaging to hand over their content for us to interpret,” he says. “Nor did we stand back and say, ‘Here’s a gallery, do your own thing.’ Instead we offered ourselves as a space and resource.”

The result is an exhibit, called Our Living Languages: First Peoples’ Voices in B.C., that has been inspiring visitors and other museum operators since opening in Victoria earlier this summer.

“I’ve had great interest from America where they have been looking to do something similar at the Smithsonian,” Lohman says. The exhibit also played host to the annual general meeting of the Canadian commission for the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization.

Displays include a language forest where visitors are greeted in all 34 of B.C.’s indigenous languages. There’s an intimate theatre where people can listen to lullabies in various languages. Another exhibit explains the use and meaning of symbols in the written versions of First Nations languages: for instance the number 7, when inserted in a word, is used to indicate a glottal stop.

Lohman wants this new partnership to be a template for future exhibits — and reimagining current ones.

“We’re going to work together on our permanent First Nations displays,” he says. “This is a partnership that I hope will grow into a really enabling partnership that will help to transform the museum.”

Lorna Williams, chair of the First Peoples Culture Council, also hopes this is the beginning of a beautiful friendship.

“I think that there are many other stories to be told,” she says. “For example, something that’s really rich and unique to First Nations across this land are our songs. And again, our songs are intangible, but they also speak the language about our relationships and I’m hoping that we’ll be able to work with the museum to do an exhibit on music from a First Nations perspective and point of view.”




Read more: http://www.vancouversun.com/business/2035/Cultural+innovation+Languages+live+Royal+Museum/10157876/story.html#ixzz3BmZixDHp

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Charles Tiayon
Scoop.it!

As People Shun Pollsters, Researchers Put Online Surveys to the Test

As People Shun Pollsters, Researchers Put Online Surveys to the Test | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it
Traditional polls, chasing nonrespondents, have grown too expensive. But online surveys run the awful "President Landon" risk.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Charles Tiayon
Scoop.it!

Vikram Chandra Is A Novelist Who’s Obsessed With Writing Computer Code

Vikram Chandra Is A Novelist Who’s Obsessed With Writing Computer Code | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it
Acclaimed novelist Vikram Chandra is equally obsessed with the tech world of computer coding and the realm of imagination. He talks about the two realities.
Charles Tiayon's insight:
Acclaimed novelist Vikram Chandra is equally obsessed with the tech world of computer coding and the realm of imagination. He talks about the two realities.


When Vikram Chandra mentioned he was working on a nonfiction book about computer coding at a literary party in San Francisco last fall, I was startled. Chandra is a gifted and original novelist, author most recently of Sacred Games(2006), a sprawling, densely layered noirish detective story set in Mumbai. His first novel, Red Earth and Pouring Rain (1995), won the Commonwealth Writers Prize for best first book.  Love and Longing in Bombay (1997) was shortlisted for the Guardian fiction award, and he also has written for Bollywood  (he cowroteMission Kashmir [2000]). Chandra is a writer, not a geek. What does he know about coding?


more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Charles Tiayon
Scoop.it!

Bible translation changes and grows - Mission Network News

Bible translation changes and grows - Mission Network News | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it
Bible translation is changing. Bob Creson, President and CEO of Wycliffe USA, shares why and how it is changing in this report.
Charles Tiayon's insight:

International (MNN) — Bible translation is changing. It’s not just about translating the written Word anymore, but that’s not a bad thing.

Bob Creson, President and CEO of Wycliffe Bible Translators USA,also known as Wycliffe USA, shares why in this report.

“In the past, we would start translating maybe the Gospel of Mark, or the Gospel of Luke. Now, communities are saying, ‘We learn orally. Would you help us translate a set of stories that would start a project?’” Creson states.

Previously, Wycliffe would assign a team to translate the entire New Testament for a group of people who didn’t have God’s Word in their native tongue.

“It often took up to 20 years-25 years to translate a New Testament,” explains Creson.

Today, translation needs are driven by the local community. People groups are taking more ownership of translating Scripture into their own language. And, they’re working together to make it happen.

Creson says, “You might find five or six language communities working together to produce the materials that they want.”

Why does it matter?

(Photo credit Wycliffe USA)

“We really believe within the next 10 or 15 years every community will have some opportunity to hear this Good News of the Gospel in a language and a form they understand,” says Creson.

Some people hear that and think, “Well, good! The needs are all taken care of,” Creson notes. But, he adds, that’s not really true. There are still 1,800 communities who have no Bible translation projects started in their language.

Will you join Wycliffe USA and be part of the “push” that gets the final translation projects started? Find ways to get involved here.

It’s not just translators that are needed, Creson adds.

“We need teachers, we need administrators, we need IT people, we still need pilots,” he says.

Find a complete list here.

“People can pray, and they can also give if they can’t go.”

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Charles Tiayon
Scoop.it!

Google Tests New Site Search Box

Google Tests New Site Search Box | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it

For navigational searches like [amazon], [white house] or [stanford], Google displays a search box that lets you search the top search result. Google now tests a completely new site search box. The updated search box is bigger, it's placed below the top search result and Google shows a list of suggestions when you type the query.

Charles Tiayon's insight:

For navigational searches like [amazon], [white house] or [stanford], Google displays a search box that lets you search the top search result. Google now tests a completely new site search box. The updated search box is bigger, it's placed below the top search result and Google shows a list of suggestions when you type the query.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Charles Tiayon
Scoop.it!

Le forum des langues revient

Le forum des langues  revient | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it
L'association À livre ouvert travaille d'arrache-pied et remet en place le forum de langues 2014 à Najac. Il aura lieu samedi 20 septembre, de 10 heures à 18 heures, sous les arcades. Cette date coïncide avec le festival Jazz in Najac, qui se ...
Charles Tiayon's insight:

L'association À livre ouvert travaille d'arrache-pied et remet en place le forum de langues 2014 àNajac. Il aura lieu samedi 20 septembre, de 10 heures à 18 heures, sous les arcades.

Cette date coïncide avec le festival Jazz in Najac, qui se déroule les 20 et 21 septembre, à 21 heures, à Val-Vac (Les Hauts-de-Najac).

«Nous allons faire connaître l'ensemble des langues parlées, écrites, gestuelles dans la région», rappelle la présidente France Lambaere.

Cette journée sera une fête de connaissance et de reconnaissance, avec comme support, outre les rencontres, les livres, les documents, les musiques, les récitals vers une construction culturelle de partage et d'échanges.

Une animation musicale est déjà prévue le samedi après-midi avec le groupe Pulcinella qui donnera ensuite un concert jazz, en soirée, aux Hauts-de-Najac. Afin de préparer ces deux temps forts de l'association, une réunion de travail est programmée pour le mardi 9 septembre, à partir de 18 heures, dans les locaux de la maison de la communauté des communes, au 31, place du Faubourg, 12270 Najac. Tél. 05 65 81 47 68.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Charles Tiayon
Scoop.it!

The Modern English Version, a new translation | CP White Media

The Modern English Version, a new translation | CP White Media | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it

This is the Word I know and love rendered both more poetic and clearer.

I have to admit to a little cynicism about the MEV being yet another new translation and whether or not it was just going to be about revenue. But Passio and the translators have clearly worked hard on this, and they are clearly worth their wage. I don’t begrudge them their hard-won revenue.

Far beyond all that, though, is this Work. Much like Harry Connick Jr. said about his favorite kinds of Steinways, I enjoy a book that’s unafraid to “fight me” a little. The MEVtranslation, in the short time I have spent with it, reached out and slapped me around. Romans, in particular, was unlike I’d ever read it. Paul is infamous among followers of Christ for his tangled rhetoric at times, and I’ve heard it said by more than one Christian that they understood Paul’s intent not because of his writing but rather in spite of it and with heavy empowerment by the Holy Spirit. I’m telling you, if you’re looking for a new way to understand what Paul meant, you need to read the MEV. It’s staggeringly good.

This is a translation wherein words are on full display for their deep meanings, without apology, and the translators haven’t shied away from the rich ones. I had mistakenly assumed their use of the word “Modern” was going to mean we would be burdened with yet another NIV: tepid stale milquetoast. The MEV is nothing like it. It’s punchy. It will wake you up and make you pay attention, especially in those certain favorite passages where you think you know what’s coming.

And it’s not just the translators’ word choices that set the MEV apart. It’s how those words come together at the sentence, even at the paragraph level. All in all, the effect is provocative because it makes one stop and consider everything anew.

I highly recommend to you this translation, this approach, to the Word of God. And I look forward very much indeed to spending more time with it, more time in it, soaking in the richness, the goodness, the meaning. This is, as pastor Trevor says, “good grazing.”

Charles Tiayon's insight:

This is the Word I know and love rendered both more poetic and clearer.

I have to admit to a little cynicism about the MEV being yet another new translation and whether or not it was just going to be about revenue. But Passio and the translators have clearly worked hard on this, and they are clearly worth their wage. I don’t begrudge them their hard-won revenue.

Far beyond all that, though, is this Work. Much like Harry Connick Jr. said about his favorite kinds of Steinways, I enjoy a book that’s unafraid to “fight me” a little. The MEVtranslation, in the short time I have spent with it, reached out and slapped me around. Romans, in particular, was unlike I’d ever read it. Paul is infamous among followers of Christ for his tangled rhetoric at times, and I’ve heard it said by more than one Christian that they understood Paul’s intent not because of his writing but rather in spite of it and with heavy empowerment by the Holy Spirit. I’m telling you, if you’re looking for a new way to understand what Paul meant, you need to read the MEV. It’s staggeringly good.

This is a translation wherein words are on full display for their deep meanings, without apology, and the translators haven’t shied away from the rich ones. I had mistakenly assumed their use of the word “Modern” was going to mean we would be burdened with yet another NIV: tepid stale milquetoast. The MEV is nothing like it. It’s punchy. It will wake you up and make you pay attention, especially in those certain favorite passages where you think you know what’s coming.

And it’s not just the translators’ word choices that set the MEV apart. It’s how those words come together at the sentence, even at the paragraph level. All in all, the effect is provocative because it makes one stop and consider everything anew.

I highly recommend to you this translation, this approach, to the Word of God. And I look forward very much indeed to spending more time with it, more time in it, soaking in the richness, the goodness, the meaning. This is, as pastor Trevor says, “good grazing.”

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Charles Tiayon
Scoop.it!

Why ‘LOL’ and ‘JK’ are totally OK on your social media profiles | ASU News | The State Press | Arizona State University

Why ‘LOL’ and ‘JK’ are totally OK on your social media profiles | ASU News | The State Press | Arizona State University | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it
Today, the way we write, the way we speak and the way we communicate is doing what it has always done: change. Where is this change happening? The Internet.
Charles Tiayon's insight:

Every week, the editorial board sits together in the editor-in-chief’s office and pitches “boos” or “bravos” for local, national and international news items that happened the previous week. As we wrap up, the editor-in-chief assigns each of us a boo or bravo to write.

Last semester, I happened to be running late to one such editorial meeting because I was coming from an internship out at South Mountain High School in Phoenix — I plan to teach English after I graduate — and when I arrived in the newsroom, the opinion editor came to give me a special boo that the editorial board, in my absence, agreed I would want to write.

“We want to boo the AP for making ‘more than’ and ‘over’ interchangeable in the stylebook,” he said.

The change was news to me, and I found it a surprising one. “More than” is specifically used when referring to a quantity, while “over” is used in spatial relationships. I think my response, however, caught him off guard.

“Why would we boo that?” I asked.

I don’t think many people would have expected the editorial board’s copy chief — the person responsible for fixing style inconsistencies and less-than-stellar grammar in stories before they’re published — to show indifference to such a controversial grammar-related style change.

“I don’t think it’s that big of a deal,” I added with a shrug.

We didn’t end up booing the AP’s decision.

I love language. I wouldn’t be working for The State Press if I didn’t love working with words, nor would I be working toward a degree in English education if I didn’t want to share my passion for it with students. One of my favorite aspects of language, however, is that it is always changing.

Pick up a copy of “Beowulf,” and you will find the English we use now is not the same English we used more than a thousand years ago. Definitions evolve; spellings change; grammatical standards and structures become obsolete. In fact, to say we are “users” of language is a misnomer. We are creators; after all, “gossip” and “luggage” weren’t words until Shakespeare made them up. Language belongs to us, and we adapt it to our needs.

Today, the way we write, the way we speak and the way we communicate is doing what it has always done: change. Where is this change happening? The Internet.

Social media has catalyzed the evolution of language, and it has empowered us as creators. Who doesn’t know what the terms “LOL,” “JK,” “OMG,” and “TBH” mean, even though they weren’t in common practice 20 years ago? “Like” can be used as a noun. “Tweeting” is no longer something only birds do. Want to know what the 2013 Word of the Year was? Google it: The American Dialect Society voted it as “because,” because change.

Some, including my co-worker who recently wrote a column on this very subject, believe that the use of “LOL” and “JK” as well as “sentence fragments, improper grammar and the misspelling of simple words” on our social media profiles are “sending English into a steady decline,” that somehow these alleged crimes against the language are childish and a poor reflection on users’ intelligence. I don’t.

When I don’t capitalize my sentences, forgo punctuation or use “b” instead of “be,” it doesn’t mean I’m not smart or that I don’t have an ability to articulate myself. I’m fully cognizant of what I’m doing, and so are many other Internet users. There are nuanced meanings that can be conveyed when everything is in ALL CAPS or when I use “2” instead of “to” or when I write a long run-on sentence that leaves its reader breathless, just like I would have been had I said it aloud.

Context matters, too. Is such liberal use of language acceptable in a research paper or hard-hitting news article? No, probably not. What about a personal blog or a website meant for communicating with our friends and family? LOL away.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Charles Tiayon
Scoop.it!

La Chine change : c'est le dictionnaire qui le dit

La Chine change : c'est le dictionnaire qui le dit | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it
Le "Dictionnaire standard du chinois moderne", approuvé par les autorités inclut cette année de nouveaux mots qualifiant les comportements des nouveaux riches
Charles Tiayon's insight:

Les rapides évolutions de la Chine trouvent une illustration dans la dernière édition d'un dictionnaire approuvé par les autorités, qui inclut parmi ses entrées des mots concernant les nouveaux riches ou la pollution atmosphérique. Parmi ces références entrant dans le "Dictionnaire standard du chinois moderne" figure le mot "tuhao", un terme qualifiant les comportements ostentatoires des nouveaux riches manquant de culture et de sens du goût. Des souliers sertis de diamants ou un imposant 4X4 repeint en doré sont ainsi volontiers qualifiés de "tuhao".

L'expression, qui désignait à l'origine les tyrans locaux fortunés des campagnes chinoises, a récemment fait florès sur internet, où se façonne le langage moderne des jeunes Chinois. A noter également l'inclusion dans le dictionnaire de l'expression "particules fines", ces microparticules suspendues dans l'air pollué des grandes villes chinoises, un sujet qui s'est imposé comme l'une des principales inquiétudes de la population.

Publié pour la première fois en 2004, le "Dictionnaire standard du chinois moderne" a pour mission d'"énoncer les normes nationales pour la langue et les idéogrammes chinois en guidant les enseignants et les étudiants", rappelle le journal China Daily. 

Autres nouvelles entrées dans cette édition 2014, les mots "commerce en ligne" ou encore "Weixin", le nom chinois de l'application de messagerie instantanée WeChat, très populaire en Chine.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Charles Tiayon
Scoop.it!

English Writing Center provides help to students

English Writing Center provides help to students | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it
Mr. Frazier helps student on an essay in room D101

English teachers are on deck to help run Pattonville’s English Writing Center which is located in D101.

They
Charles Tiayon's insight:

English teachers are on deck to help run Pattonville’s English Writing Center which is located in D101.

They are there to help students with all of their English needs. English teachers are in the help center every hour of the day to help tutor students as well as provide a location for students to make up tests and write essays.

“The English Writing Center is known for always being wild and crazy,” Ms. Sarah Gulifoyle said.

However, realistically the environment for the students who work in the English Writing Center can best be described in two words: “Calm and academic.”

Writing tips and opportunities for learning can also be found inside the Writing Center.

Two teachers help run the Writing Center every hour and strive to have both a helpful and productive session for students.

Most English teachers, at some point during the day, run the center. The teacher on duty rotates responsibilities with another teacher at the end of each hour.

The only time the center is not open is during second lunch; however, there is a lot of availability and students are encouraged to take advantage of the time.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Charles Tiayon
Scoop.it!

Official language policy needed to unite Washington residents | GUEST OP - Kent Reporter

Official language policy needed to unite Washington residents | GUEST OP - Kent Reporter | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it
When it comes to cultivating a welcoming environment for immigrants, policymakers in Washington are lacking.
Charles Tiayon's insight:

When it comes to cultivating a welcoming environment for immigrants, policymakers in Washington are lacking.

Yes, the Evergreen State is home to a diverse group of residents. Washingtonians speak 167 different languages, according to the United States Census Bureau, and nearly 60 languages are spoken by more than 1,000 residents. But as one of just 19 states without an official language policy, Washington's immigrants are met with little assistance to help them assimilate.

More than 8 percent of Washington residents are considered limited English proficient, meaning they would struggle to carry on more than a basic conversation in English.

Currently, in an effort to include these residents, the state offers driver's license examinations in six languages other than English. Countless state documents and services are offered in foreign languages for the same reason. Unfortunately, as well intentioned as these translations may seem, they are misguided when it comes to creating a unified environment for all residents.

As an immigrant myself, I know that to succeed in the United States, English proficiency is key. As someone who came to the United States before the government provided the crutch of native language translations, I also know that delaying English acquisition does immigrants no favors.

Without an official language policy, immigrants receive the message that English is optional, not essential. Without English proficiency, immigrants are often held back from better, higher paying jobs, health insurance and more. They are likely to encounter language barriers on a daily basis at the grocery store, the doctor's office or a child's school.

Conversely, if Washington's state government agencies offered services in English, rather than an abundance of foreign languages, immigrants would face an added incentive to learn English sooner. With the money saved on translations, the state government could even designate funding to create additional English language learning classes or invest in education, infrastructure or other areas in need.

In other words, declaring English the official language of Washington is a win-win situation for all parties involved. With an Official English policy, residents are still free to speak the language of their choosing, but will also benefit from an added incentive to learn English. That English proficiency can lead to a 30 percent increase in income, contributing to a better life for the immigrant population and an improved economic outlook for the state.

Best of all, declaring English the official language is a measure that is widely supported by citizens of all backgrounds. A Rasmussen Reports poll conducted on Aug. 9-10 found that 83 percent of Americans support the policy, and an even more overwhelming 94 percent believe English proficiency is important to succeed in the United States.

While policymakers may believe they are benefiting Washington's immigrant population by providing native language translations, reality could not be farther from the truth. Diversity is an asset, and we should respect the linguistic and cultural differences among residents of the United States. But without a common factor to unite us in our diversity, we remain divided.

I encourage the Washington State Legislature to take action this year and send a message to all residents that we are united through a common, shared language, English.

Mauro E. Mujica is the chairman of U.S. English, Inc., one of the nation's oldest and largest nonpartisan citizens' action groups dedicated to preserving the unifying role of the English language in the United States. Founded in 1983 by the late Sen. S.I. Hayakawa of California, U.S. English, Inc. (www.usenglish.org) has more than 1.8 million members.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Charles Tiayon
Scoop.it!

6 Secrets to Writing a Concise Resume Recruiters Will Read | The Savvy Intern by YouTern

6 Secrets to Writing a Concise Resume Recruiters Will Read | The Savvy Intern by YouTern | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it
According to a CareerBuilder survey, one in six hiring managers spend 30 seconds or less reviewing resumes. So when we write our resumes, there is...
Charles Tiayon's insight:

According to a CareerBuilder survey, one in six hiring managers spend 30 seconds or less reviewing resumes. So when we write our resumes, there is intense pressure to “sound good.”

We use big or fancy words that will make their resume sound professional and well-written. We fill the resume with buzzwords and cliches. And we use way too many words to say what only a few will do. Unfortunately, this approach can alienate the recruiter we are trying so hard to impress!

As employers sift through resumes, they don’t have time for wordy and fluffy applications. The want to get down to the core of your qualifications so they can determine whether or not they should call you for an interview.

A recruiter wants one thing: they want you to be concise.

To help you write a clear and concise resume that will get read by recruiters, here are some helpful tips to follow:

Include Relevant Experience Only

When you apply for a job, employers want to know why you are qualified for the position. Hiring managers want to read about your experience and skills that are relevant to the position you’re applying for and how those qualifications make you the best fit for the organization.

To make sure your resume is up to par for your job application, spend some time customizing your resume to the job description. Even if you have a variety of experience with different jobs and employers, only include the best experience you have that relates to the job you’re applying for. By tailoring your resume to each job application, you will catch the employer’s attention.

Use the Best Words for a Resume

When writing a stellar resume, there are certain words and phrases hiring managers like to read. If you want to stand out to employers as they quickly scan your resume, consider using some of the following terms:

  • Achieved
  • Improved
  • Trained
  • Managed
  • Volunteered
  • Ideas
  • Launched
  • Under budget
Avoid the Worst Words for a Resume

There are also some words you should definitely avoid at all cost when writing your resume. The last thing hiring managers want to read is a resume filled with fluff and cliches. To make sure you’re heading down the right track with your resume, here are some resume buzzwords to avoid:

  • Go-getter
  • Think outside of the box
  • Team player
  • Go-to person
  • Bottom-line
  • Hard worker
  • Dynamic
  • Self-motivated
Remove Redundancy

It can be challenging to think of creative ways to write boring job descriptions for your past experience. Many job seekers often fall into the trap of using redundant phrases and words when writing their resume because they are focused on spicing up their boring jobs rather than illustrating their accomplishments.

To remove redundancy from your resume, be aware of the phrases, adjectives, and verbs you use. For example, don’t say “I’m seeking job” in your resume because the employer already knows you’re looking for a job, hence your job application.

Remove Articles and Helping Verbs

To tighten up your resume, watch for helping verbs such as “have,” “had,” “may,” and “to be” and articles such as “a,” “an,” and “the.” Believe it or not, these words can add a great amount of fluff to your resume and slow down the reader.

For example, the use of helping verbs makes this phrase too wordy: “Managed a team of sales associates in order to help them achieve quarterly goals.” Instead, you can tighten up the phrase like this: “Managed sales team to help accomplish quarterly goals.” (If you can include the specific goal numbers, even better!)

Watch for Vagueness

Although it’s difficult to write about your experience, you must be very precise when explaining what your accomplished during each job or internship.

For example, if you’re writing a description for a clerical position and said something like “I assisted with paperwork,” this doesn’t tell the hiring manager anything about what you did or accomplished at that job. Instead, you could write “Assisted with clerical duties including database entry, paperwork filing, and answering phones.” This gives the hiring manager a more detailed description of what you performed during your last job.

Read Your Resume Out Loud

The best way to ensure your resume is clear and concise? Proofread it aloud.

This will help you catch and grammar or spelling errors, as well as pay attention to phrasing. Your resume should flow together and be easily read. If you find yourself stumbling over a part of your resume, go back and figure out how you can reword it to make it more concise.

Writing a concise resume takes a lot of practice and patience. However, if you master these tips and you’re diligent during the editing process, you’ll write a resume that will definitely get read!

 

more...
No comment yet.