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Google Closes in on Antitrust Agreement with EU: Report - Mobile and Wireless - News & Reviews

Google Closes in on Antitrust Agreement with EU: Report - Mobile and Wireless - News & Reviews | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it
After months of ongoing negotiations, Google is apparently getting close to a settlement deal with the European Union to resolve antitrust issues that would avoid formal charges against the search company, according to a published report.
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Metaglossia: The Translation World
News about translation, interpreting, intercultural communication, terminology and lexicography - as it happens
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UN Careers - jobs in this network (Translators, Revisers, Editors, etc.)

UN Careers -  jobs in this network (Translators, Revisers, Editors, etc.) | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it

Vacancies in this network: Translators, Revisers, Editors, etc.

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How to Write a Law Review Note Worthy of Publication: Writing the Note | The Girl's Guide to Law School®

How to Write a Law Review Note Worthy of Publication: Writing the Note | The Girl's Guide to Law School® | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it
Today, we're thrilled to welcome back Jonathan Burns for more advice on writing a law review Note that's worth of publication. He's here to discuss a critical topic -- actually writing the Note!
Charles Tiayon's insight:

Today, we’re thrilled to welcome back Jonathan Burns to The Girl’s Guide for more advice on writing a law review Note that’s worth of publication. He’s here to discuss a critical topic — actually writing the Note!

Welcome, Jonathan!

While the theme of your Note is of utmost foundational importance in the publication decision process, the substance of your Note must adequately address the theme with a thorough (yet concise), clear, and relevant objective background as well as a thoughtful, well-reasoned, and in-depth subjective analysis.

But first, let’s take a moment to discuss what a law review Note is.


A law review Note is an original recommendation of policy for the legal community to consider based on the research and observations of an expert, and that expert is you (so, as previously mentioned, remember to choose a theme that is extremely interesting to you, since you will spend countless hours reading endless pages of research materials with the goal of becoming an expert).

After you become an expert, you will write your Note for the purpose of offering an original recommendation of policy for the legal community.

Next, keeping in mind the purpose of a law review Note, the following subsections will discuss the basic breakdown of the components that a Note should contain as a baseline for publication.

There are four essential elements to include:

  1. the introduction
  2. the objective portion
  3. the subjective portion
  4. the conclusion
A. Writing the Introduction

The introduction to your Note is arguably the most important section as it relates to the Selection Committee. This is your first chance to make a striking impression on the individual judging your Note and, unfortunately, many candidates fail to capitalize on this opportunity by writing a weak, vague, and confusing introduction.

In contrast, a good introduction will clearly present the theme of your Note.

Then, it will conspicuously and succinctly disclose the conclusion, which should be articulated in your subjective recommendation of policy. Finally, the introduction will pull out the main arguments supporting your subjective recommendation and both summarize and briefly discuss them.

Essentially, the reader should be able to skim the rest of your Note after reading the introduction and have a good understanding of its structure and arguments. This is not Creative Writing 101 or a literature course; thus, do not engage in foreshadowing and do not attempt to leave the reader in suspense after she reads the introduction. Mainly, the introduction should represent about five percent of your whole Note.

B. Writing the Objective Portion

After preparing the introduction, you should include a wholly objective, “just-the-facts” analysis of your Note’s theme. Unfortunately, this is where many candidates tend to go off the rails.

When writing the objective and subjective portions of your Note, keep in mind the aforementioned purpose of a law review Note: an original recommendation of policy for the legal community.

Your objective research is only the preparation that is required to adequately articulate your subjective opinion. And, frankly, your objective research is essentially somebody else’s hard work that you are reproducing in preparation for the true purpose of a law review Note: your subjective recommendation of policy.

Thus, do not, as many candidates do, give the reader a “history lesson” based on an accumulation of material that the reader could have looked up herself. Rather, you should keep the objective portion of your Note to the bare minimum relevant facts that are required to support your subjective recommendation of policy for the legal community. This should represent about 30 percent of your Note.

C. Writing the Subjective Portion

The subjective portion of your Note, in contrast, is the bulk and the heart of your Note.

Here, you are virtually creating pure gold.

You are offering some kind of novel opinion, framework, or viewpoint that the legal community has thus far never considered and, thereby, contributing to the creation of knowledge and the progress of society. Compare this purpose to the purpose of the objective portion, where you are just copying somebody else’s creation.

Obviously, since this portion of the Note is your creation, it will require less footnote citations than the objective portion of your Note. However, remember to tie in the objective material with your subjective analysis by extracting all of the relevant facts, thoroughly probing them, and utilizing them to support your argument. This section should represent about 60 percent of your Note.

D. Writing the Conclusion

Finally, the conclusion is admittedly the least important part of your Note because, frankly, by the time the Selection Committee has reached the conclusion, it has probably already decided whether or not your Note belongs in the “Publish” or “No Publish” pile. Nonetheless,a strong conclusion is still necessary for a good Note.

Remember the grade school formula for writing papers and giving presentations? While I’m sure variations exist, my recollection is this:

“First, tell the audience what you are going to tell them. Then, tell them. Lastly, tell them what you told them.”

The basic rule applies even in the sophisticated realm of law review. Your introduction clearly announced the theme as well as your subjective opinion and the reasoning supporting it. The objective and subjective portions thoroughly probed and analyzed your recommendation of policy and the facts supporting it. And the conclusion will offer a recap of the Note by essentially rewording your introduction. Thus, like the introduction, your conclusion should represent about five percent of your Note.

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El campus de Vigo amplía su oferta con el nuevo grado de Ciencias del Lenguaje

El campus de Vigo amplía su oferta con el nuevo grado de Ciencias del Lenguaje | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it
El Consello Galego de Universidades autorizó ayer su implantación tras el informe de los evaluadores externos
Charles Tiayon's insight:

La Universidad de Vigo impartirá el próximo curso, que comienza el día 1 de septiembre, el nuevo grado en Ciencias del Lenguaje y Estudios Literarios, que comenzó a preparar hace ya dos años la Facultad de Filología y Traducción.
 Aunque este grado ya se había incluido en la  oferta de titulaciones del sistema universitario de Galicia para este curso, en espera de que se cumpliesen los trámites para su visto bueno definitivo, el hecho es que se anuncia tan solo unos días antes de que se abra el primer plazo de matrícula en las universidades gallegas (el próximo lunes se publica la lista de admitidos y el primer plazo de matrícula abre del 16 al 18 de julio). 
La noticia que esperaba la Universidad de Vigo y que la mantuvo en silencio durante todo el proceso era el informe final favorable de la Acsug (Axencia para a Calidade do Sistema Universitario) y la posterior aprobación por parte del Consello Galego de Universidades. La confirmación se hizo pública ayer, con la celebración de un pleno extraordinario de este último organismo, que preside el conselleiro de Educación, Xesús Vázquez Abad, y en el que se autorizó la implantación este grado el curso que viene, el de 2014-2015.
La Universidad de Vigo introdujo en las últimas semanas las modificaciones que había solicitado inicialmente la agencia de evaluación independiente (Acsug), como una nueva denominación de la carrera (antes se llamaba solo Ciencias del Lenguaje), así como una reestructuración de las materias.
Este título sustituirá al grado en Estudios de Gallego y Español, que  se había implantado en 2009 en la Facultad de Filología y Traducción y que era exclusivo en España,  aprovechando el proceso en el que se hallaba inmersa la Universidad por la adaptación al Espacio Europeo de la Educación Superior.
El detonante del cambio fue un decreto de la Xunta de 2011 para la ordenación de las enseñanzas universitarias oficiales en Galicia que fijaba un mínimo de 50 estudiantes de nuevo ingreso (45 alumnos en los campus de Ourense y de Pontevedra) para permitir la supervivencia de una titulación en la Comunidad Autónoma.
 En ese momento, el grado en Estudios de Gallego y Español había logrado estabilizar su matrícula, pero no alcanzaba los mínimos exigidos por el decreto de titulaciones: partió de 21 alumnos en 2009, su primer año, hasta ponerse por encima de los 30 alumnos en años sucesivos. Nada más publicarse el decreto de la Xunta, el rector, Salustiano Mato,celebró distintas reuniones con los centros de la Universidad de Vigo que tenían grados en riesgo de no alcanzar el número mínimo de alumnos, entre ellos con Filología y Traducción. El equipo decanal se decidió entonces a trabajar en una nueva propuesta sin esperar a la fecha tope marcada por la Xunta, en 2015.
 El resultado es el estreno este curso del grado en Ciencias del Lenguaje y Estudios Literarios, que es la principal novedad académica junto con el doble grado de Derecho y ADE, que también echa a andar en septiembre. Para Ciencias del Lenguaje se ofertan 50 plazas y otras 10 plazas que serán en régimen semipresencial, a través de las plataformas virtuales y cumpliendo una serie de requisitos establecidos por la facultad.
Ciencias del Lenguaje y Estudios Literarios, que incluye el gallego, castellano y portugués, permite al alumno elegir en tercer y cuarto curso el itinerario a seguir, de tal forma que se especializará en la rama de su elección, con salidas laborales en el mundo docente, la empresa editorial, el asesoramiento lingüístico, la creación literaria, las industriales culturales, entre otros sectores que se darán a conocer en una rueda de prensa que convocara el rector de la Universidad de Vigo, Salustiano Mato, y los responsables de la Facultad de Filología y Traducción. n

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Presentado el Diccionario de Automoción, un diccionario especializado creado por seis empresas del sector - Euskadi+innova

Presentado el Diccionario de Automoción, un diccionario especializado creado por seis empresas del sector - Euskadi+innova | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it
Las empresas BATZ, Cikautxo, Ekin, Elay, GKN y Maier, con el asesoramiento de los terminólogos de la unidad de Lengua y Tecnología de Elhuyar, han elaborado el Diccionario de Automoción, un diccionario especializado en el sector de la automoción que puede consultarse en seis idiomas: inglés, castellano, euskera, francés, alemán y chino.
Charles Tiayon's insight:

El diccionario, presentado en el Automotive Intelligence Center de Amorebieta, recoge 2.637 conceptos de automoción, clasificados en 16 áreas, y puede consultarse en Internet.

En los últimos años, empujados por la globalización, las empresas de automoción se han abierto al mercado internacional, y fruto de la experiencia que han obtenido han concluido que es imprescindible gestionar adecuadamente los idiomas y utilizar una terminología especializada y unificada.

Según los promotores, si se desea que la comunicación sea efectiva en los procesos de trabajo, en las relaciones con los clientes y proveedores, y en la relaciones entre los trabajadores, lo primero es superar las barreras lingüísticas.

 

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Writing, Rhetoric and Discourse (MA) | Graduate Programs | Academics | DePaul University

Writing, Rhetoric and Discourse (MA)
The Master of Arts in Writing, Rhetoric and Discourse (WRD) combines a strong theoretical foundation in rhetoric and discourse with practical training, preparing students to:
  • Write and create content in professional, technical, Web or nonprofit settings;
  • Teach writing and language in post-secondary institutions; and/or
  • Continue academic study in related PhD programs.
Real-World Experience

Students are offered unique internship and community-based experiential learning opportunities, drawing on the city of Chicago as an extension of our classroom. These opportunities give students practical experience in grant writing, workplace writing, writing for the Web, and teaching and tutoring adult literacy and English as Second Language (ESL) in community centers and two-year colleges.

Program Highlights

Strong Curriculum. The rich graduate curriculum engages students in a range of professional, academic and civic genres and experiences. Required courses in rhetoric and discourse provide students with breadth in a range of theoretical and historical disciplinary perspectives, while optional concentrations allow students to focus in an area of particular relevance to their own professional goals.

Faculty Expertise and Experience. The programs faculty are teacher-scholars and active professionals. The faculty shares a commitment to graduate education, and the program incorporates numerous events, which aim to mentor and support our graduate students.

Global Outlook. Through the optional graduate certificate in TESOL, students develop expertise in second-language teaching, especially in working with multilingual writers. This knowledge is key to teaching writing in the U.S. today, and it opens up opportunities abroad.

Program Structure

As a WRD student, youll complete a proseminar course, three courses focused on rhetoric and discourse, and an exit requirement (either a portfolio, final project or thesis). In addition, you can choose a concentration (or you can complete the program without a concentration):

Teaching Writing & Language. Courses in this concentration raise issues pertinent to the teaching of writing and language, college composition, ESL writing and learning, and writing program administration. Courses ask students to write syllabi, lesson plans, classroom materials and academic papers. A competitive teaching apprenticeship program allows advanced students an opportunity to work as classroom teachers in DePaul's first-year writing program.

Professional & Technical Writing. Courses in this concentration prepare students to write effectively in business, non-profit and technical contexts, such as technical writing, Web writing, grant writing and document design. Practical applications focus on the management of complex information on technical subject matter for diverse audiences while also emphasizing the utility of a critical stance toward writing technologies and workplace culture.

Flexible Locations and Times

All courses in the program are taught once per week (for a total of 10 regular class sessions plus finals) in the evenings from 6 to 9:15 p.m. at the Lincoln Park campus.

Program Length

Twelve courses are required to complete the WRD program. Full-time students take two courses per quarter and complete the program in six academic quarters (not including summer term). Many students take longer to complete the program by taking courses part time.

Optional Certificates

The MA in WRD may also be expanded to include select graduate certificate programs. The combined programs require either the completion of additional coursework or careful elective selection to fulfill all requirements. Certificates are available in:

  • Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL)
  • Teaching English in Two-Year Colleges

If you're interested in a certificate combination with WRD, a separate application process is required. Contact the program office for additional information.

Charles Tiayon's insight:
Writing, Rhetoric and Discourse (MA)
The Master of Arts in Writing, Rhetoric and Discourse (WRD) combines a strong theoretical foundation in rhetoric and discourse with practical training, preparing students to:
  • Write and create content in professional, technical, Web or nonprofit settings;
  • Teach writing and language in post-secondary institutions; and/or
  • Continue academic study in related PhD programs.
Real-World Experience

Students are offered unique internship and community-based experiential learning opportunities, drawing on the city of Chicago as an extension of our classroom. These opportunities give students practical experience in grant writing, workplace writing, writing for the Web, and teaching and tutoring adult literacy and English as Second Language (ESL) in community centers and two-year colleges.

Program Highlights

Strong Curriculum. The rich graduate curriculum engages students in a range of professional, academic and civic genres and experiences. Required courses in rhetoric and discourse provide students with breadth in a range of theoretical and historical disciplinary perspectives, while optional concentrations allow students to focus in an area of particular relevance to their own professional goals.

Faculty Expertise and Experience. The programs faculty are teacher-scholars and active professionals. The faculty shares a commitment to graduate education, and the program incorporates numerous events, which aim to mentor and support our graduate students.

Global Outlook. Through the optional graduate certificate in TESOL, students develop expertise in second-language teaching, especially in working with multilingual writers. This knowledge is key to teaching writing in the U.S. today, and it opens up opportunities abroad.

Program Structure

As a WRD student, youll complete a proseminar course, three courses focused on rhetoric and discourse, and an exit requirement (either a portfolio, final project or thesis). In addition, you can choose a concentration (or you can complete the program without a concentration):

Teaching Writing & Language. Courses in this concentration raise issues pertinent to the teaching of writing and language, college composition, ESL writing and learning, and writing program administration. Courses ask students to write syllabi, lesson plans, classroom materials and academic papers. A competitive teaching apprenticeship program allows advanced students an opportunity to work as classroom teachers in DePaul's first-year writing program.

Professional & Technical Writing. Courses in this concentration prepare students to write effectively in business, non-profit and technical contexts, such as technical writing, Web writing, grant writing and document design. Practical applications focus on the management of complex information on technical subject matter for diverse audiences while also emphasizing the utility of a critical stance toward writing technologies and workplace culture.

Flexible Locations and Times

All courses in the program are taught once per week (for a total of 10 regular class sessions plus finals) in the evenings from 6 to 9:15 p.m. at the Lincoln Park campus.

Program Length

Twelve courses are required to complete the WRD program. Full-time students take two courses per quarter and complete the program in six academic quarters (not including summer term). Many students take longer to complete the program by taking courses part time.

Optional Certificates

The MA in WRD may also be expanded to include select graduate certificate programs. The combined programs require either the completion of additional coursework or careful elective selection to fulfill all requirements. Certificates are available in:

  • Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL)
  • Teaching English in Two-Year Colleges

If you're interested in a certificate combination with WRD, a separate application process is required. Contact the program office for additional information.

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Tuscola Today » The power of the pen

Tuscola Today » The power of the pen | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it

It’s probably no surprise to anyone, but as an editor you end up proofreading an awful lot.

Once you get into that mode of looking for mistakes, it’s extremely difficult to turn it off. At my former job as a copy editor, I got paid to basically read the entirety of a day’s newspaper. We had a policy of having at least three pairs of eyes on each page, hopefully preventing glaring mistakes from sneaking through.

Of course, this doesn’t always work, and once in a while one slips through. All it does is tick you off and make you pay more attention next time.

Charles Tiayon's insight:

It’s probably no surprise to anyone, but as an editor you end up proofreading an awful lot.

Once you get into that mode of looking for mistakes, it’s extremely difficult to turn it off. At my former job as a copy editor, I got paid to basically read the entirety of a day’s newspaper. We had a policy of having at least three pairs of eyes on each page, hopefully preventing glaring mistakes from sneaking through.

Of course, this doesn’t always work, and once in a while one slips through. All it does is tick you off and make you pay more attention next time.

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iTranslate maintenant disponible sur Mac - Apple Mind

iTranslate maintenant disponible sur Mac - Apple Mind | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it
Le logiciel de traduction iTranslate est maintenant disponible sur Mac.
Charles Tiayon's insight:

Le logiciel de traduction iTranslate, populaire sur iOS, est maintenant disponible sur Mac. L'application prend en charge jusqu'à 80 langages et peut prononcer à voix haute du texte afin d'apprendre la prononciation. iTranslate intègre également des dictionnaires pour qu'on puisse choisir la meilleure traduction en fonction du contexte.

iTranslate est disponible sur le Mac App Store pour 4.49€. L'app vient se loger dans la barre d'état afin d'être facilement accessible.

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Légal de recevoir un avis de paiement dans une langue étrangère ?

Légal de recevoir un avis de paiement dans une langue étrangère ? | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it
Un avis de paiement reçu dans une langue qu’on ne maîtrise pas est-il légal? Le SPF Finances et la CPCL ont des opinions divergentes à ce propos.
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Un avis de paiement reçu dans une langue qu’on ne maîtrise pas est-il légal? Le SPF Finances et la CPCL ont des opinions divergentes à ce propos.

Le document avait un caractère officiel: il émanait du Service Public Fédéral (SPF) des Finances. L’adresse de sa destination était étrangement rédigée: «5000 Namen», au lieu de «5000 Namur». Car l’avis de paiement était libellé entièrement en néerlandais, une langue que sa destinataire ne maîtrise pas. Le montant à régler, lui, était par contre particulièrement clair: 797,58 euros, à payer dans les quinze jours. En application d’un jugement rendu le 14 décembre 2011 par le tribunal correctionnel de Courtrai, sur des faits commis le 1er août 2010, apprendra-t-elle, après avoir obtenu l’aide d’une personne pratiquant lamoedertaal.

Une «faculté»? Voire…

L’avis, on le saura plus tard – voir ci-contre – ne lui était pas destiné. Mais devait-elle s’y conformer? L’erreur d’adressage lui permettait-elle de le refuser? Le document n’aurait-il pas dû être rédigé en français? Ou à tout le moins une phrase, en français, n’aurait-elle pas dû lui indiquer comment en obtenir une copie dans sa langue?

«La langue d’avis dépend du lieu d’émission de la condamnation», explique le SPF Finances. Et «la loi ne fait aucune obligation de mentionner dans la langue du destinataire la possibilité d’obtenir une copie dans cette langue. Il s’agit d’une simple faculté». Quant aux adresses, «elles sont issues directement de notre base de données qui les reprend à partir des sources authentiques»: le registre national, et les banques carrefours des entreprises et de la sécurité sociale.«L’habitude de traduire le nom des villes en Belgique n’est pas une particularité du SPF Finances. Refuser un avis de paiement sur ce motif ne semble pas judicieux».

À la Commission Permanente de Contrôle Linguistique (CPCL), en charge du«contrôle de la loi sur l’emploi des langues dans les administrations et dans leurs relations avec le public et les particuliers», on juge les choses différemment. Même si l’emploi des langues en matière judiciaire répond à une logique propre.

«Ici, l’avis émanait d’une autorité administrative, qui s’adressait à une particulière», y précise-t-on. Le SPF devait s’exprimer dans la langue utilisée par la personne. Et faute de la connaître, «utiliser sa langue présumée, en fonction de son domicile». En l’occurrence, donc, le français, «comme la CPCL en a jugé à plus d’une reprise», rappelle son porte-parole…

Et par surcroît, il y avait confusion !

L’avis de paiement en néerlandais envoyé à cette habitante de Namur posait problème linguistique. Mais, vérification opérée, une autre anomalie s’est révélée: l’amende avait été infligée par le tribunal correctionnel de Courtrai à… une homonyme de la destinataire.

Si cette dernière s’était acquittée du montant exigé, aurait-elle pu le récupérer? Et si elle ne l’avait pas fait, le SPF Finances ne l’aurait-il pas ajouté à ses impôts?

«Effectivement, tous les dossiers d’amendes pénales sont introduits dans la balance fiscale, et les dettes peuvent être payées par prélèvement sur les éventuels remboursements d’impôts» confirme le SPF Finances. Et si, par prudence, l’intéressée «avait payé avec la communication structurée qui lui avait été communiquée, il n’y aurait eu aucune intervention manuelle de la part du bureau de Recouvrement non fiscal. Et l’erreur n’aurait pas été relevée».

La destinataire pouvait toujours «écrire au bureau où l’argent aurait été versé erronément», en justifiant «sur base de sa carte d’identité (qu’elle) n’était pas la personne condamnée» pour en ob

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Two Koreas make strides to talk the same language

Two Koreas make strides to talk the same language | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it
The Korean People's Comprehensive Dictionary will iron out the differences between the North and South
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Joo Yeon-ah did not realise how hard it would be to settle in South Korea. The 45-year-old defector says she was prepared for the dangerous journey out of North Korea, and the unfamiliarity of everyday devices such as mobile phones and cash machines.

But what she wasn't expecting was a communication barrier with people who spoke the same language.

"I didn't understand [what people were saying]," said Joo, who has lived in Seoul since 2009. "Everything is so different in South Korea, but I thought at least our language would be the same."

What she discovered is that after more than 60 years of division, different forms of the Korean language have evolved, with the South incorporating many words from English.

For example, North Koreans express anxiety by saying in Korean, "My head hurts", while South Koreans use the English word stress, which they pronounce "suh-tu-reh-suh".

Now scholars from both sides of the peninsula are collaborating on a project funded by the South Korean government to create a unified Korean language dictionary. Known as Gyeoremal-kunsajeon (the Korean People's Comprehensive Dictionary), the initiative is intended to bridge the linguistic divide in a future where the two Koreas are reunified.

"Time has passed and the language has evolved," said project director Han Yong-un in an interview at his office in Seoul. "Those changes will continue, but when reunification happens, we need to be ready."

After the 1950-53 Korean war, South Korea opened its economy and society to outside influences while the North resisted any foreign incursions, particularly from the English language which the Pyongyang regime associates with American imperialism.

Rather than borrowing new words from English, North Korea has come up with homegrown substitutes. For example, when watching or playing football, South Koreans simply use the English expression "penalty kick", while in the North they use a Korean term that translates as "11-metre punishment". South Koreans use the English word "juice", North Koreans a term that means "sweet fruit water" in translation.

Han says that in daily life, the languages are "about two-thirds" the same. But in business or professional settings these differences become more pronounced. "We could end up with a situation where doctors are in an operating room performing surgery and aren't able to understand each other," said Han.

The project's hope is that in a reunified Korea, people will be able to consult the dictionary when there is confusion over unfamiliar words, and to solve the misunderstandings that may arise.

But the work, which began in 1989, has been stalled in the peninsula's political turmoil. It was supposed to completed by 2012, but lost time due to political holdups. Almost all inter-Korean exchange has been halted since 2010, when the previous South Korean administration put sanctions in place to punish North Korea for sinking of South Korea's Cheonan warship.

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New search engine goes for simple | Russia Beyond The Headlines

New search engine goes for simple  | Russia Beyond The Headlines | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it
Sputnik hopes to appeal to those who see the Internet as a tool to make life easier
Charles Tiayon's insight:

The search engine Sputnik (sputnik.ru), which was officially launched in May at the St. Petersburg International Economic Forum, is the third public search engine created by Russian programmers. Developed by KM Media, a subsidiary of state-owned telecommunications firm Rostelecom, Sputnik has been called an attempt to create a state-controlled search engine to compete with dominant web search firm Yandex, whose influence on the Russian media landscape has been monitored by the government since 2008. Yandex, which dominates search on the Russian segment of the Internet, sees itself as a web company competing with Google and not a media holding. It has argued that it should not be subject to government monitoring since only its homepage, Yandex.ru, has any media influence and that the stories that link from the page are only news stories, not analytical or opinion texts. However, given the influence Russian government officials believe that firms such as Yandex have over Russian citizens, it should come as no surprise that the government wants control over a search engine. Rostelekom launches state-owned search engine Sputnik Dmitry Medvedev was the first advocate of a national search engine. Medvedev, who was known for his Internet-savvy and use of Twitter, made the suggestion in 2011, while he was still president. Medvedev, who is now prime minister, considered the creation of a search engine a point of pride for the government and a sign that it was interested in developing IT in Russia. Today the creators of Sputnik.ru are trying to distance themselves from the state, but they still emphasize that an important part of their project is to help citizens interact with government institutions as well as private in taking care of such matters as receiving government documents, paying utilities, registering cars and real estate and purchasing train and airline tickets. According to one of Sputnik’s creators, Alexei Basov, the project is aimed at those who have only recently gotten access to the Internet, or who use it very rarely. Basov notes that Rostelecom can help in this process because it is one of Russia’s biggest developers of Internet infrastructure. When Sputnik’s creators talk about their audience, they are not referring to Moscow hipsters who check in on Facebook and update their Instagram accounts. They are not interested in reaching those who live their lives online, but in those who are interested in using the Internet to make their lives easier. Older people may not want to send their friends pictures of their dacha gardens on Snapchat, but they may be interested in using the web to learn more about growing techniques, what kind of plants are best for the local climate, as well as weather predictions. They might also welcome the ability to use the Internet to pay their electric bills or register their vehicles. Because of Sputnik’s association with the government, users who want to take advantage of these services can be assured that the site is up-to-date on the latest regulations and all the instructions are in accordance with the most recent legislation. These potential users do not need to be attracted with the latest technology out there. They are not looking for a search engine with a “wow effect.” They use the Internet not to kill time, but to conduct business that can be done offline more efficiently.
Source: Russia Beyond the Headlines - http://rbth.com/opinion/2014/07/11/new_search_engine_goes_for_simple_38147.html)

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IATE Can Now Be Downloaded

IATE Can Now Be Downloaded | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it
IATE, the EU's living terminology database, can now be downloaded for specific needs. Some of the data contained in IATE will be easily accessible following a short download. The file contains about 8 million terms in all the 24 official EU languages, and will be provided in TermBase eXchange (TBX) format.
Charles Tiayon's insight:

IATE, the EU’s living terminology database, can now be downloaded for specific needs. Some of the data contained in IATE will be easily accessible following a short download. The file contains about 8 million terms in all the 24 official EU languages, and will be provided in TermBase eXchange (TBX) format.

For further details and to download your copy, clickhere.

Inter-Active Terminology for Europe (IATE) recently celebrated its 10 year anniversary as a vibrant and living termbank after having been used by the language services of the EU institutions and agencies since 2004.

It is a living database in that it is constantly updated with new content. Indeed, it is estimated that in 2013, almost 97 000 new terms were added to the database, and even more were revised and modified.

To read more about IATE, click here.


Compiled by Oscar Larsson
Student at University of Glasgow, School of Social & Political Sciences
Communication Trainee at TermCoord


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Euro-Méditerranée: La traduction dans l’EuroMed : la Fondation Anna Lindh organise un atelier à Madrid

Euro-Méditerranée: La traduction dans l’EuroMed : la Fondation Anna Lindh organise un atelier à Madrid | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it
La Fondation Anna Lindh, en partenariat avec Transeuropéennes, la Fondation du Roi Abdul Aziz à Casablanca, et Casa Arabe à Madrid, organise un atelier sur le « Projet de collaboration pour la traduction des sciences humaines et sociales » qui a lieu les 24 et 25 Juin au siège de Casa Arabe à Madrid, en Espagne.
 
Cette initiative pilote lancée à Amman en 2012 dans le cadre de la cartographie de la traduction dans la région Euro-Méditerranéenne, est consolidée par des ateliers collectifs de traduction à Madrid, réunissant des traducteurs français, italiens et espagnols. Le projet vise à créer un forum permanent et indépendant pour la consultation, la discussion et la coopération à travers des groupes d’ateliers et une plate-forme numérique de traduction, avec la perspective de l’élaboration de projets de traduction dans les domaines des sciences humaines et sociales au niveau Euro-Méditerranéen.
 
L’atelier va  collecter des textes écrits par des intellectuels et des jeunes chercheurs arabes, concernant les dynamiques culturelles, sociales et politiques en Syrie, au Yémen, à Bahreïn, en Egypte, en Tunisie et en Libye et les manifestations qui se sont produites en Algérie, au Maroc, en Jordanie et dans la Péninsule Arabique. A terme, ces données seront compilées dans un livre intitulé les Sociétés Arabes, Visions de l’Intérieur, inspiré par le travail de l’anthropologue Franck Mermier.
 
En 2012, la Fondation Anna Lindh et Transeuropéennes ont lancé la première étude de cartographie sur l’état actuel et les enjeux de la traduction dans la région Méditerranéenne. La publication de la cartographie, disponible en arabe, en anglais et en français, a été le résultat d’un processus qui a duré 2 ans.
 
La Fondation Anna Lindh pour le dialogue interculturel favorise la connaissance, le respect mutuel et le dialogue interculturel entre les peuples de la région euro-méditerranéenne, à travers un réseau de plus de 3000 organisations de la société civile dans 43 pays. Son budget est co-financé par l'Union européenne (7 millions d’euros) et les États membres de l'UE (6 millions d’euros). 
 
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Charles Tiayon's insight:
La Fondation Anna Lindh, en partenariat avec Transeuropéennes, la Fondation du Roi Abdul Aziz à Casablanca, et Casa Arabe à Madrid, organise un atelier sur le « Projet de collaboration pour la traduction des sciences humaines et sociales » qui a lieu les 24 et 25 Juin au siège de Casa Arabe à Madrid, en Espagne.
 
Cette initiative pilote lancée à Amman en 2012 dans le cadre de la cartographie de la traduction dans la région Euro-Méditerranéenne, est consolidée par des ateliers collectifs de traduction à Madrid, réunissant des traducteurs français, italiens et espagnols. Le projet vise à créer un forum permanent et indépendant pour la consultation, la discussion et la coopération à travers des groupes d’ateliers et une plate-forme numérique de traduction, avec la perspective de l’élaboration de projets de traduction dans les domaines des sciences humaines et sociales au niveau Euro-Méditerranéen.
 
L’atelier va  collecter des textes écrits par des intellectuels et des jeunes chercheurs arabes, concernant les dynamiques culturelles, sociales et politiques en Syrie, au Yémen, à Bahreïn, en Egypte, en Tunisie et en Libye et les manifestations qui se sont produites en Algérie, au Maroc, en Jordanie et dans la Péninsule Arabique. A terme, ces données seront compilées dans un livre intitulé les Sociétés Arabes, Visions de l’Intérieur, inspiré par le travail de l’anthropologue Franck Mermier.
 
En 2012, la Fondation Anna Lindh et Transeuropéennes ont lancé la première étude de cartographie sur l’état actuel et les enjeux de la traduction dans la région Méditerranéenne. La publication de la cartographie, disponible en arabe, en anglais et en français, a été le résultat d’un processus qui a duré 2 ans.
 
La Fondation Anna Lindh pour le dialogue interculturel favorise la connaissance, le respect mutuel et le dialogue interculturel entre les peuples de la région euro-méditerranéenne, à travers un réseau de plus de 3000 organisations de la société civile dans 43 pays. Son budget est co-financé par l'Union européenne (7 millions d’euros) et les États membres de l'UE (6 millions d’euros). 
 
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iTranslate - traducteur & dictionnaire maintenant disponible sur Mac

iTranslate - traducteur & dictionnaire maintenant disponible sur Mac | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it
Après avoir connu un fort succès sur iOS iTranslate - traducteur & dictionnaire débarque sur Mac au prix de 4,49€.
Charles Tiayon's insight:

Après avoir connu un fort succès sur iOS [gratuit] iTranslate – traducteur & dictionnaire débarque sur Mac au prix de 4,49€. iTranslate pour Mac est conçu comme une application qui réside sur la barre d’état, permettant un accès rapide en un seul clic ou avec une touche personnalisée.

L’application vous permet de traduire facilement les mots et expressions dans plus de 80 langues, avec le soutien d’une voix de d’homme ou femme. L’application dispose également de plusieurs dictionnaires sensibles au contexte.

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Budget's Braille vision from Modi book? - The Times of India

Budget's Braille vision from Modi book? - The Times of India | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it
For blind people, Union Budget 2014-15 presented on Thursday was historic - for the first time, the word 'Braille' was given the importance of being mentioned in a central Budget.
Charles Tiayon's insight:
AHMEDABAD: For blind people, Union Budget 2014-15 presented on Thursday was historic - for the first time, the word 'Braille' was given the importance of being mentioned in a central Budget. The role of a teacher from Gujarat, Geeta Vaghela, who wrote the Braille version of Narendra Modi's book on education, 'Kelve te Kelavanikar', may be behind this sudden impetus given to Braille in the central Budget. The Budget made the provision for 15 Braille presses and Braille-embossed currency. Vaghela had gifted the Braille edition of the book to Modi in 2007, when he was the chief minister.

Director of Blind People's Association, Bhushan Punani - an IIM graduate who chose the social sector over the corporate sector - says Vaghela's gift sparked Modi's interest in Braille, a tactile writing system used by blind people.

"I got a call from the CMO and it was communicated by CM Modi that Vaghela's efforts should not go waste," says Punani. Vaghela teaches in Guzariya Primary School in Mansa, Gandhinagar. Modi's interest in Braille continued to be sustained and in 2012, his government in Gujarat offered another gift to blind children of the state - 'Bal Srushti' (The World of Children) - a monthly magazine for school children. That too was released in Braille by Modi. The magazine is read by 9,000 children enrolled in blind schools.

According to Census 2011, Gujarat has 3 lakh people with sight problems of whom roughly 60,000 are children; 12,000 of them go to school. India has 23 lakh people with visual impairments, 6 lakh of whom are children. "These are small numbers but allocations in the Union budget for Braille presses and the Institute of Universal Design for aids and devices along with currency, give a boost to the integration of blind people in the mainstream," says Punani.

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Frightened African Asylum Seekers Allegedly Not Given Missile Safety Information - FailedMessiah.com

Frightened African Asylum Seekers Allegedly Not Given Missile Safety Information - FailedMessiah.com | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it
African asylum seekers in Tel Aviv – almost all of whom are legally refugees under international law but who have not been treated as such by Israel – reportedly say they have not received instructions on what to do when...
Charles Tiayon's insight:

Outside of the detention centers, the main problem seems to be a lack of instructions African languages.

“This is a new experience for us. Like everyone else, we’re frightened when bombs go off, but we don’t know what to do when the siren is heard. We’ve received no help from the authorities. During the day the children are in kindergarten where there’s a protected space, but later we’re all at home. We didn’t know we had to go out to the stairwell. Now a friend told me that when the alarm sounds we have to go to the stairwell, but we haven’t received any official instructions on what to do,” Gabriel Sekela, a refugee from Eritrea, told Ha’aretz adding that “We saw there was information from the army on Facebook in Tigrinya [spoken by many Eritreans] and spread it, but I don’t know how many people got it.”

In the Holot detention center in the Negev near the boarder with Egypt and Gaza, prison authorities reportedly posted instructions in Arabic. But that hasn’t eliminated the problems.

“There are small protected rooms but often during the sirens they are locked. They call out instructions through megaphones but only in Hebrew, not very clearly, and not everyone understands. Before the siren they held a drill but not many people took part. I told the guard that I heard a drill had been held but the protected rooms aren’t open. He said it was only a drill and isn’t important,” Sadik, an asylum seeker from Sudan, told the paper.

The Israel Prison Service denies those claims, calling them “groundless.”

“[Those] claims are groundless.…The Holot center was planned for emergency situations with numerous protected rooms in every part. During an alarm, instructions are given on loudspeakers in Hebrew, English and Tigrinya. Before this operation we held several drills and the Home Front Command’s instructions are posted on the notice boards. No rockets were fired in this direction and we had only one false alarm, but the facilities are prepared for any scenario. The protected rooms are usually locked up…and when an alarm sounds the prison guards nearby unlock them and let the internees in,” the prison service said.

The City of Tel Aviv municipality also denied that it wasn’t properly informing African asylum seekers of what to do when sirens sound.

“Every municipal service such as protection, evacuation and assistance, if needed, will be given any person in the city’s jurisdiction,” the city reportedly said in a statement, adding that it provides these asylum seekers it calls migrants and infiltrators with details on what to do in an emergency and said it plans on distributing leaflets with this information in Hebrew, Arabic, English and Tigrinya sometime in the next few days – several days after missile warning began sounding in Tel Aviv.

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Why Creatives Fail: The Difficulties Of Staying Innovative For An Entire Career

Why Creatives Fail: The Difficulties Of Staying Innovative For An Entire Career | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it
Forget thinking outside the box. If you want a long creative career you have to learn to create inside other people's boxes.
Charles Tiayon's insight:

I was lucky enough to come up as a journalist working for the legendary Art Cooper, at GQ. Art was one of the last lions of literary journalism, both an exceptionally keen editor and stylist to his core. Art liked his writers to write. He didn’t just encourage voice—often he demanded it.

I once spent three months writing an article for him in a style that was not my own. I had been long fascinated by the urgent present tense writing of John McPhee, especially as found in “Center Court,” his classic piece on Wimbledon. I thought the piece was great. Art wasn’t so sure.

“Good,” he said, “the piece is good—but where’s that thing you do, that Steven Kotler thing, that’s what this piece needs for great.”

In the early 2000s, I stopped writing for GQ and started working with Wired. I’ll never forget my first assignment for them. I spent over a month living in the deep swamps of Florida, writing a story about the Everglades Restoration Project, which was both the largest public works project in American history and the world’s first terraforming effort. I spent another two months writing the piece. When I turned it in, I was pretty proud. That piece was chockablock with that “Steven Kotler thing.”

My editor read it and got back to me.

“So I read your piece,” he said. “And there’s just one thing I don’t understand.”

“What’s that?” I asked.

“Well, to be blunt, every goddamn word you wrote.”

Mind you, this took place over a decade into my writing career. I’d written bestselling books. I was known, at least by some, for my personality and voice. But here’s the important part—none of it mattered.

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How to Think Creatively

How to Think Creatively | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it
I grew up hungry to do something creative, to set myself apart. I also believed creativity was ma...
Charles Tiayon's insight:

I grew up hungry to do something creative, to set myself apart. I also believed creativity was magical and genetically encoded. As early as the age of 8, I began sampling the arts, one after another, to see if I'd inherited some gift.

Eventually, I became a journalist. For many years, I told other people's stories. I was successful, but I rarely felt truly creative.

The first hint I might have sold myself short came in the mid-1990s. In the course of writing a book called What Really Matters, Searching for Wisdom in America, I took a five-day seminar on how to draw, led by Betty Edwards, author of Drawing on the Right Side of the Brain.

When Edwards peered down at the self-portrait I had drawn on the first day, she smiled. My artistic development, she told me gently, seemed to have been arrested somewhere around the age of six. This was, she hastened to add, no evidence of lack of ability, but rather of training.

From an early age, we're taught in school to develop the logical, language-based, rational capacities of the left hemisphere of our brain, which is goal oriented and impatient to reach conclusions.

The left hemisphere gives names to objects in order to reduce and simplify them. One nose is like another, for example, so when we're asked to draw one, we retrieve the symbol we have for "nose" from our memory, reproduce it and move on.

The right hemisphere, by contrast, is visual rather than verbal. It's capable of seeing more deeply and subtly than the left, immersing itself in what's actually there, in all its richness. Once you learn to do that, Edwards told us, drawing what you see is -- relatively speaking -- a breeze.

Sure enough, by the fifth and final day of the workshop, I was able to produce a self-portrait that was undeniably me, and surprisingly realistic. After several months of practice, I was able to draw myself with a significant degree of skill, and even expressiveness. I had effectively begun to learn a wholly new and non-verbal language.

But what did that have to do with creativity?

A little more than a decade ago, I switched careers, and began collaborating with a sports psychologist, to define what makes it possible for people to perform sustainably at their best. Over the years, working with other colleagues, I've turned these ideas and strategies into a curriculum that our company delivers today in corporations, government agencies, schools, hospitals and public workshops.

Our curriculum is grounded in a series of ancient and enduring universal principles and it's buttressed by the findings of modern science. But it's also been profoundly shaped by a series of insights and intuitive leaps I've had about how to work in ways that are more productive, sustainable and satisfying.

To nurture and sustain my own creativity, I've followed a systematic process and it's one I believe anyone can learn.

Over the past hundred years, researchers have reached a surprising degree of consensus about the predictable stages of creative thinking. It was Betty Edwards who first pointed out to me that the stages move back and forth between right and left hemisphere dominance:

1. Saturation: Once the problem or creative challenge has been defined, the next stage of creativity is a left hemisphere activity that paradoxically requires absorbing one's self in what's already known. Any creative breakthrough inevitably rests on the shoulders of all that came before it. For a painter, that might mean studying the masters. For me, it involves reading widely and deeply, and then sorting, evaluating, organizing, outlining, and prioritizing.

2. Incubation: The second stage of creativity begins when we walk away from a problem, typically because our left hemisphere can't seem to solve it. Incubation involves mulling over information, often unconsciously. Intense exercise can be a great way to shift into right hemisphere in order to access new ideas and solutions. After writing for 90 minutes, for example, the best thing I can do to jog my brain, is take a run.

3. Illumination: Ah-ha moments - spontaneous, intuitive, unbidden - characterize the third stage of creativity. Where are you when you get your best ideas? I'm guessing it's not when you're sitting at your desk, or consciously trying to think creatively. Rather it's when you've given your left hemisphere a rest, and you're doing something else, whether it's exercising, taking a shower, driving or even sleeping.

4. Verification: In the final stage of creativity, the left hemisphere reasserts its dominance. This stage is about challenging and testing the creative breakthrough you've had. Scientists do this in a laboratory. Painters do it on a canvas. Writers do it by translating a vision into words.

The first key to intentionally nurturing our creativity is to understand how it works. I've found the stages often unfold in unpredictable sequence, and wrap back on one another. Still, keeping them in mind lets me know where I am in the creative process, and how to get to where I need to go.

Ultimately, the highest creativity depends on making frequent waves - learning to engage the whole brain by moving flexibly and intentionally between the right and left hemisphere, activity and rest, effort and letting go. That's also a pretty good prescription for how to live.

Read more posts on The Energy Project »

This article originally appeared at The Energy Project. Copyright 2014.



Read more: http://theenergyproject.com/blog/how-think-creatively-0#ixzz37Ctp2vb6

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In Budget translation blooper, govt gives one IIM to 2 states - Hindustan Times

In Budget translation blooper, govt gives one IIM to 2 states - Hindustan Times | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it

Finance minister Arun Jaitley’s speech in English — read out in the Lok Sabha — gave the IIM to Maharashtra, apart from one each to Himachal Pradesh, Punjab, Bihar and Odisha. 

Read: Modi feels heat from credit agencies on 1st budget

The Hindi version of the same speech, however, named Rajasthan in place of Maharashtra.

The error has left the National Democratic Alliance NDA) government red-faced with the human resource development (HRD) ministry ordering a probe.

The government would inform the Parliament of the mistake and accordingly move a corrigendum, said an HRD ministry official. The Budget is now the property of Parliament.

This isn’t the first instance of such an error with Rajasthan having benefitted the last time such a mistake was committed by the previous UPA regime in 2009. 

Read: It's a goal! Arun Jaitley's budget makes shots right on target

Presenting the interim budget in the Lok Sabha before the 2009 polls, then finance minister Pranab Mukherjee announced that, of the six new IIMS, teaching was expected to commence in four institutes, to be located in Haryana, Rajasthan, Jharkhand and Tamil Nadu.

Rajasthan, however, wasn’t supposed to be on the list as the IIM had been allocated to Chhattisgarh. The typographical mistake had been made by the HRD ministry, and Rajasthan was dropped from the list.

Read: Jaitley's maiden budget aims for higher economic growth, provides tax breather

Subsequent protests by members from Rajasthan forced the UPA to compensate for the error with Mukherjee announcing an IIM for Rajasthan during his reply to the debate on the budget in the Rajya Sabha.

The announcement of new IIMs and IITs in Thursday’s Budget was said to be the brain child of Prime Minister Narendra Modi, who had talked about widening the spread of the premier institutes during his election campaign. Jaitley set aside Rs. 500 crore for initiating work on the new IITs and IIMs.”

Charles Tiayon's insight:

Finance minister Arun Jaitley’s speech in English — read out in the Lok Sabha — gave the IIM to Maharashtra, apart from one each to Himachal Pradesh, Punjab, Bihar and Odisha. 

Read: Modi feels heat from credit agencies on 1st budget

The Hindi version of the same speech, however, named Rajasthan in place of Maharashtra.

The error has left the National Democratic Alliance NDA) government red-faced with the human resource development (HRD) ministry ordering a probe.

The government would inform the Parliament of the mistake and accordingly move a corrigendum, said an HRD ministry official. The Budget is now the property of Parliament.

This isn’t the first instance of such an error with Rajasthan having benefitted the last time such a mistake was committed by the previous UPA regime in 2009. 

Read: It's a goal! Arun Jaitley's budget makes shots right on target

Presenting the interim budget in the Lok Sabha before the 2009 polls, then finance minister Pranab Mukherjee announced that, of the six new IIMS, teaching was expected to commence in four institutes, to be located in Haryana, Rajasthan, Jharkhand and Tamil Nadu.

Rajasthan, however, wasn’t supposed to be on the list as the IIM had been allocated to Chhattisgarh. The typographical mistake had been made by the HRD ministry, and Rajasthan was dropped from the list.

Read: Jaitley's maiden budget aims for higher economic growth, provides tax breather

Subsequent protests by members from Rajasthan forced the UPA to compensate for the error with Mukherjee announcing an IIM for Rajasthan during his reply to the debate on the budget in the Rajya Sabha.

The announcement of new IIMs and IITs in Thursday’s Budget was said to be the brain child of Prime Minister Narendra Modi, who had talked about widening the spread of the premier institutes during his election campaign. Jaitley set aside Rs. 500 crore for initiating work on the new IITs and IIMs.”

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Cone On In!: The Power of Writing

Cone On In!: The Power of Writing | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it

Today I met with a brilliant new writer who has yet to publish officially. Of course he's not "new" to writing at all. In fact, he's just retired from a full career as an elementary teacher, and he's been writing seriously for himself and for his students for thirty years.

In the past few years, he's done this remarkable thing: He's begun rewriting all of his old prose as poetry. He's telling stories in poems, and he has this remarkable feel for when to break a line. He described to me his process of going back through his stories, his words, and cutting out everything--words, punctuation--that isn't absolutely essential. It's like Homeric poetry but in simple, immediately accessibly free-verse.
So now he's working on manuscripts that are entirely his own writing world. There's this lovely, dark edge to them as they tell lightly funny stories about damaged characters. One project in particular, which he's titled The Incredible Shrinking Boy, sounds ready to be a classic--a haunting story with the power to change how readers see the world.
Charles Tiayon's insight:

Today I met with a brilliant new writer who has yet to publish officially. Of course he's not "new" to writing at all. In fact, he's just retired from a full career as an elementary teacher, and he's been writing seriously for himself and for his students for thirty years.

In the past few years, he's done this remarkable thing: He's begun rewriting all of his old prose as poetry. He's telling stories in poems, and he has this remarkable feel for when to break a line. He described to me his process of going back through his stories, his words, and cutting out everything--words, punctuation--that isn't absolutely essential. It's like Homeric poetry but in simple, immediately accessibly free-verse.
So now he's working on manuscripts that are entirely his own writing world. There's this lovely, dark edge to them as they tell lightly funny stories about damaged characters. One project in particular, which he's titled The Incredible Shrinking Boy, sounds ready to be a classic--a haunting story with the power to change how readers see the world.
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Business of One: Career Development Tips for Freelance Writers

Business of One: Career Development Tips for Freelance Writers | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it
Successful career development for freelance writers is reliant on the ability to transition your previous writing skills to a business of one.
Charles Tiayon's insight:

Whether you’re an accomplished news writer or a “mom blogger,” the shift to freelancing full-time for brands can feel daunting. Luckily, the writing skills and experience you already have can translate into creating branded content. Learning how to transition those skills can lead to your successful career development as a business of one.

Prior to embarking on my journey into the world of branded content, I began my career in screenwriting. While writing lifestyle content for brands is quite different from writing dialogue for cartoon characters, with a bit of a learning curve I was able to use the knowledge I had acquired working in the film industry. I’ll admit that I did make mistakes, but my ability to adapt, take some risks, and learn from those mistakes is what has helped me succeed. Here are a few of the lessons I learned along the way.

Know Your Strengths and Weaknesses

In the film industry, writers are constantly worried about being pigeonholed in a particular style or genre. So, when I began writing branded content, I assumed that I should cover as many topics as possible. I learned the hard way that the opposite was true. I took on work from a new client because it fell into my lap, but the topic I was covering was not really in my field of expertise. It quickly became apparent to the client, and to me, that I was struggling to create content that went beyond the information I could find with a simple Google search.

Needless to say the client and I parted ways, but I learned from my mistake; moving forward, I made sure to only chase work that I was both qualified for and passionate about. When you find your niche, it will reflect in the quality of your writing, help you build your personal brand, and earn you more work.

Always Be Closing

One of the things that struck me when I met successful comedy writers was that many of them were “always on.” In other words, they were comedians by nature, constantly being funny even when they were just shooting the breeze. Their natural abilities helped sell them as talented writers even before anyone had read a single line they had written.

While you don’t have to be Robin Williams to be a successful freelance writer, the ability to sell yourself is important no matter what business you’re in. Promoting yourself can feel like stepping outside of your comfort zone, but it is an integral part of your career development. What I didn’t understand as I transitioned to brand journalism, however, is that there is a proper technique to selling your personal brand and your writing. Simply tweeting your articles into the Internet ether isn’t enough. To make an impact, you need to develop a strong social media presence across multiple platforms. You also need to grow your audience by regularly engaging followers. Block off some time every day for building and promoting your personal brand.

Don’t Get Too Comfortable

In film school, I spent a lot of time analyzing and learning about story structure and writing techniques that have been used for generations. Although the entertainment industry does evolve, changes come about very slowly and the tried-and-true methods almost always remain in some form.

When I transitioned into working as a brand journalist, I thought I’d be able to learn the ropes and be set, but I discovered that the branded content landscape is almost constantly shifting to keep up with marketing trends. Change can be difficult, but as Charles Darwin said, “It is not the strongest or the most intelligent who will survive, but those who can best manage change.” The ability to stay on the cutting edge is integral to your career development as a freelance writer. I try to take a little time each week to read up on new marketing strategies and determine how to apply those concepts to my work.

It’s Not Really a One-Man Show

Writing for film and television is a collaborative process and, although freelancing is a business of one, the same is true for branded content. When you’re writing for a brand you have to get used to the idea that you are not just speaking for yourself. You don’t have to lose your personal style, but you do have to learn to strike a balance between the brand’s voice and your own. In addition to learning to adapt your writing style to each client’s needs, it’s also important to be able to take constructive criticism from editors and to comfortably apply their notes to your work.

A successful career as a freelance writer won’t just fall into your lap, no matter what your previous experience is. As your own business, you not only have to create high-quality content, but you also have to be your own marketing and development team.

Take the leap today and start developing your own career as a full-time freelance writer by joining Skyword’s community of writers.

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A style guide for spies misses its grammatical target - FT.com

A style guide for spies misses its grammatical target - FT.com | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it
Now that the war on terror is cooling down, the war on grammar is hotting up. Last week, a 185-page style guide written by the CIA to help its agents write a respectable sentence was circulated online, proving that the agency takes the protection of
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High quality global journalism requires investment. Please share this article with others using the link below, do not cut & paste the article. See our Ts&Cs and Copyright Policy for more detail. Email ftsales.support@ft.com to buy additional rights. http://www.ft.com/cms/s/0/eedf807e-082b-11e4-acd8-00144feab7de.html#ixzz37C07dog0

This news will make pedants the world over feel very safe indeed. In an age in which people no longer fear reds under beds and mainly don’t expect to be blown up in the course of a normal day, one of the few things that still terrifies them is misuse of grammar.

Last Wednesday, I overheard colleagues discussing the most bruising football match in World Cup history and one said: “Did you hear the commentator said ‘disinterested’, when he meant ‘uninterested’?”

I turned from that conversation to see on Twitter people criticising the pop star Ariana Grande for her lyric “I got one less problem without ya”, when she should have sung one fewer.

Equally, by far the most controversial column I’ve written recently enraged readers not because I suggested the average male ego could not cope with having a higher earning wife, but because the title read “Divorce is a risk when she earns more than him”. Angry emails poured in claiming it should have been “than he does”.

The reason we get so excited about grammar is because it is one of the few means left of establishing our social superiority.

I was the victim of a groovy education in the 1960s and 1970s, and grew up not knowing a preposition from a proposition, yet because my mother once warned me against the dangling participle, I am a life-long, sworn enemy of it. Every time I catch one I feel a powerful mixture of outrage and condescension, and so am delighted to see that the CIA takes just as dim a view of this weapon of misconstruction as I do.

Yet in every other way The Style Manual & Writers Guide for Intelligence Publications is a misguided, worrying document. The very title is a giveaway that the contents are going to be a dud: it is so long that I was bored before I’d even got to the end of it and, worse, contains a grammatical howler. The guide belongs to the writer. And so there should be an apostrophe in there somewhere.

In an age in which people no longer fear reds under beds, one of the few things that still terrifies is misuse of grammar

Inside, the attention to detail is as impressive as it is pointless. There is a 13-page discussion on the use of capital letters, in which it is revealed that I really should have used a big A for Agency in paragraph two above. There is also a detailed section on how to refer to a range of numbers in which it decrees: “The march covered 10 to 15 kilometres (not 10-15 kilometres)”.

After 150 pages of rules, the agency/Agency offers some tips, or “helpful precepts” as it calls them, on how to write well. “Favour the active voice and shun streams of polysyllables and prepositional phrases,” it urges. George Orwell (“never use a long word where a short one will do” etc) would not have been impressed.

The point about language is that it changes, though it seems to be doing so slowly at the CIA. This version of the guide, updated in 2011, feels the need to explain that “email” is “a way to transmit messages electronically, or a message or messages so transmitted”.

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Global STS Translation Market 2014-2018

STS translation is a technology to convert spoken words into digital signals that can be recognized and automatically translated into the spoken commands of another language. A STS translation system or software is deployed for real-time communication between two or more individuals who speak different languages. Such systems can be employed in handheld PDAs, smartphones, desktops, and laptops, as well via landlines. A STS translation system is cost-effective compared to human translators.

The analysts forecast the Global STS Translation market will grow at a CAGR of 19.11 percent over the period 2013-2018.

The Global STS Translation market can be divided into three segments: Speech Recognition, Speech Translation, and Speech Synthesis. These segments indicate the procedure of doing STS Translation.

The report, the Global STS Translation Market 2014-2018, has been prepared based on an in-depth market analysis with inputs from industry experts. The report covers the Americas and the EMEA and APAC regions; it also covers the Global STS Translation market landscape and its growth prospects in the coming years. The report also includes a discussion of the key vendors operating in this market.

The study was conducted using an objective combination of primary and secondary information including inputs from key participants in the industry. The report contains a comprehensive market and vendor landscape in addition to a SWOT analysis of the key vendors. 

Read more: http://www.digitaljournal.com/pr/2049584#ixzz37ByzNZBT

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STS translation is a technology to convert spoken words into digital signals that can be recognized and automatically translated into the spoken commands of another language. A STS translation system or software is deployed for real-time communication between two or more individuals who speak different languages. Such systems can be employed in handheld PDAs, smartphones, desktops, and laptops, as well via landlines. A STS translation system is cost-effective compared to human translators.

The analysts forecast the Global STS Translation market will grow at a CAGR of 19.11 percent over the period 2013-2018.

The Global STS Translation market can be divided into three segments: Speech Recognition, Speech Translation, and Speech Synthesis. These segments indicate the procedure of doing STS Translation.

The report, the Global STS Translation Market 2014-2018, has been prepared based on an in-depth market analysis with inputs from industry experts. The report covers the Americas and the EMEA and APAC regions; it also covers the Global STS Translation market landscape and its growth prospects in the coming years. The report also includes a discussion of the key vendors operating in this market.

The study was conducted using an objective combination of primary and secondary information including inputs from key participants in the industry. The report contains a comprehensive market and vendor landscape in addition to a SWOT analysis of the key vendors. 

Read more: http://www.digitaljournal.com/pr/2049584#ixzz37ByzNZBT

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Appel à contributeurs Rubrique (X)HTML, êtes-vous notre prochain rédacteur, traducteur, modérateur, newser ?

Appel à contributeurs Rubrique (X)HTML, êtes-vous notre prochain rédacteur, traducteur, modérateur, newser ? | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it
Bonjour à tous, membres fidèles ou nouveaux arrivants,Le (X)HTML est aussi vieux (ou presque) que le Web. Ce format de données (on ne peut pas appeler le HTML un langage de programmation) a subit au fil des années de nombreuses évolutions, chacune le rendant plus puissant.Tout comme la technologie, notre rubrique (X)HTML existe depuis plusieurs années. Et comme vous le savez, la rubrique essaye de vous proposer un maximum d'aide dans vos développements de sites Web, quel que soit leur horizon, a...
Charles Tiayon's insight:
Le (X)HTML est aussi vieux (ou presque) que le Web. Ce format de données (on ne peut pas appeler le HTML un langage de programmation) a subit au fil des années de nombreuses évolutions, chacune le rendant plus puissant.

Tout comme la technologie, notre rubrique (X)HTML existe depuis plusieurs années. Et comme vous le savez, la rubrique essaye de vous proposer un maximum d'aide dans vos développements de sites Web, quel que soit leur horizon, aux travers des forums et des ressources telles que les articles et tutoriels, les FAQ, la traduction de la documentation et d'articles techniques, les sources, les critiques de livres, les news, les choix d'outils, les débats, etc.

Pour vous assurer un service de qualité, nous avons sans cesse besoin de nouveaux membres pour nous aider, membres qui ont suivi les évolutions du (X)HTML et qui sont les mieux placés pour en parler. Peut-être que vous, lecteur assidu et passionné, vous seriez intéressé de nous rejoindre pour améliorer la rubrique ; vous aussi, visiteur de passage, vos compétences peuvent aider à atteindre cet objectif.

Comment contribuer ?

  • Alimentation de la FAQ : elle est déjà fournie mais ne demande qu'à l'être plus ;
  • Rédaction d'articles ou de tutoriels : pourquoi ne pas devenir rédacteur sur Developpez.com ? Que vous soyez amateurs ou professionnels, débutants ou chevronnés, passionnés par le développement Web et cherchant à partager votre passion, au travers d'articles orientés vers les débutants ou les experts ;
  • Traductions de tutoriels en anglais : il existe de nombreuses ressources anglophone qui mériteraient d'avoir leur équivalent en français ;
  • Rédaction d'actualités : suivre l'actualité et faire découvrir aux autres membres toutes les nouvelles informations sur le développement Web ;
  • Correction orthographique : vérifier la correction orthotypographique des ressources proposées ;
  • Modération : aider à la bonne tenue du forum afin de présenter la meilleure base de connaissances possible (au moins dix fois plus de personnes lisent ce forum que ceux qui y écrivent) ;
  • Création de Quiz : un très bon moyen d'apprendre tout en s'amusant.
  • ...


Travailler au sein d'une communauté vous permettra de profiter du savoir de chacun. En tant que traducteur, rédacteur, modérateur ou newser pour la rubrique (X)HTML :

  • vous serez accompagné au fur à mesure de votre travail, peu importe le temps que vous prendrez pour effectuer une tâche ;
  • vous pourrez poser en direct des questions sur le forum si vous avez des doutes ou des hésitations dans la traduction ou la rédaction ;
  • vous verrez toutes vos publications relues par l'équipe et publiées à votre nom.


Il n'y a pas besoin de passer des heures par jour sur le forum : peu importe votre profil, les projets (tant en traduction que rédaction) sont divisés en tâches de relativement faible ampleur (un article, un bout d'article), qui vous permettront de vous investir plus ou moins, en fonction du temps que vous pourrez y consacrer.

Être contributeur pour notre communauté représente une véritable opportunité. Cela vous permettra d'enrichir votre savoir sur un sujet technique mais aussi d'apprendre continuellement de nouvelles choses, grâce au travail en équipe ; de plus, pour la traduction, d'augmenter considérablement vos connaissances dans une langue comme dans l'autre.

Si vous êtes motivé et souhaitez participer à l'évolution de la rubrique (X)HTML, n'hésitez pas un seul instant : Contactez-nous !

Dans tous les cas, MERCI de nous être fidèle !

Êtes-vous notre prochain rédacteur, traducteur, modérateur, newser ?
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12 Favorite World Cup Words | Wordnik

12 Favorite World Cup Words | Wordnik | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it
We wouldn’t call ourselves rabid fans of soccer (or football, depending on your side of the Atlantic), but then that guy bit that other guy (and gave us
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We wouldn’t call ourselves rabid fans of soccer (or football, depending on your side of the Atlantic), but then that guy bit that other guy (and gave us Suarezing), the Colombia team danced after every goal, and Tim Howard made 16 record-breaking saves (and while he couldn’t save the U.S. team, he did save the internet). Now we’re hooked.

And we’re celebrating the best way we know how: with words. Here are 12 of our favorites from the world of the World Cup.

corridor of uncertainty

“The Netherlands could not have gone much closer when a ball scythed along the corridor of uncertainty, somehow eluding two Dutch attackers and three Costa Rica defenders, only to fall to the feet of van Persie.”

Callum Hamilton, “Netherlands vs. Costa Rica: Final score 0-0, Dutch win on penalties after dramatic finale,” SB Nation, July 5, 2014

The corridor of uncertainty is a pass delivered into the area between the goalkeeper and the last line of defense. The phrase originates from cricket and refers to “an area where a cricket ball can pitch during a delivery” and where “a batsman struggles most to determine whether to play forward or back, or whether to leave the delivery.”

According to the Oxford English Dictionary (OED), corridor of uncertainty, which seems to have originated in the mid-1980s, is particularly associated with English cricketer and commentator Geoffrey Boycott.

dummy

“First, Thomas Muller managed to fall over as he attempted to dummy the ball, before Toni Kroos played in a shocking chip that was easily swept up by the Algerian defence.”

Hannah Duncan, “Thomas Muller ‘fall’ in German free-kick ‘fail’ was all a big ruse, reveals Benedikt Howedes,” Metro, July 1, 2014

To dummy in soccer means to deceive your opponent into thinking you’re going to pass, shoot, or receive the ball, and then do something different. The OED says this term originated in the 1950s.

The meaning comes from the sense of dummy, “an imitation of a real or original object, intended to be used as a practical substitute,” which perhaps comes from the bridge or whist term referring to “an imaginary player represented by an exposed ‘hand’, managed by and serving as partner to one of the players.”

These senses seem to ultimately come from the original meaning of dummy, a dumb or mute person. The Old English dumb means “silent, unable to speak,” and comes from the Proto-Indo-European dheubh-, “confusion, stupefaction, dizziness.” Dheubh- originates from the root dheu-, “dust, mist, vapor, smoke,” perhaps with the idea of “defective perception or wits,” according to the Online Etymology Dictionary.

flopping

“The practice of the flop is a tried-and-true method of manipulating each game’s referee to make calls go your way by aggressively exaggerating fouls or the appearance of fouls.”

Eric Levenson, “Dissecting American Soccer’s Hatred of the Flop Is a World Cup Tradition,” The Wire, June 16, 2014

Flopping, also known as diving as well as simulation, if you’re FIFA, means pretending to be fouled, and is usually evinced by exaggerated falling and howls of pain.

We couldn’t find when the term flopping originated exactly. It also applies to basketball, and in 1963 Frank Ramsey described his “deceptive” techniques to Sports Illustrated, although he never calls it flopping. He says the most reliable “eye-catcher” is the pratfall. Perhaps flopping, with the idea of flopping over, comes from the these exaggerated falls.

[Photo via The Wire]

giant-killing

“They now take on Greece, the runners up in Group C, in a round-of-16 match in the early hours of Monday morning and will be strongly fancied to continue their giant-killing run.”

Michael Lynch, “World Cup 2014: North and Central American region provides success stories of the tournament,” The Sydney Morning Herald, June 28, 2014

Giant-killing refers to, in sports, “the defeat of a team by a much weaker opponent.” The phrase may come from the story of David and Goliath, although the OED’s earliest citations refer to “Jack the giant killer” and “giant-killing Jack” of Jack and the Beanstalk.

[Illustration: "The Chronicle of the Valiant Feats"]

group of death

“Advancing out of the Group of Death is significant, but playing in the second round of the World Cup is not.”

Mike Foss, “Just escaping the group of death isn’t good enough for the U.S. at the World Cup anymore,” USA Today, June 27, 2014

group of death is “a group in a multi-stage tournament which is unusually competitive, because the number of strong competitors in the group is greater than the number of qualifying places available for the next phase of the tournament.”

This term may come from the Spanish grupo de la muerte, which was coined by Mexican journalists in 1970.

Kop

“A favourite of the Kop – the Liverpool faithful – Suarez enjoyed an ambivalent relationship with rest of the Premiership fans who slowly warmed to his goal-scoring abilities but never forgot his other escapades.”

Siddharth Saxena, “Fifa bites back: Suarez gets nine-match ban,” The Times of India, June 27, 2014

Kop, short for Spion Kop, refers to the stadium terraces “attended by hardcore fans, particularly in the United Kingdom.” The original Spion Kop, which translates from Afrikaans as “spy hill,” is a mountain in South Africa and the site of the Battle of Spion Kop, which was fought during the Second Boer War.

Sports stadium terraces may have first been referred to as Spion Kop in the early 1900s, shortly after the battle, which seems to pre-date the OED’s citation of 1924.

lost the dressing room

“Kiss’ appointment was welcomed by the players – Rory Best said getting Kiss was ‘brilliant for Ulster Rugby’ – but amid talk Anscombe lost the dressing room, Kiss will have to breathe new life into the province.”

Tom Hamilton, “Ulster’s knock-on effect on Ireland,” ESPN Scrum, July 3, 2014

The term lost the dressing room refers to when a sports team’s “manager is deemed to have lost control and support of the players” and may soon get fired. The term may come from the idea that it’s in the dressing or locker room that the manager raises his players’ spirits.

magic sponge

“Kicking a football [on Jupiter] would be like kicking a lump of concrete. More than the magic sponge would be needed to sort out that injury.”

Stuart Clark, “Across the Universe,” The Guardian, June 11, 2014

The magic sponge is a seemingly ordinary sponge that has a miraculous “reviving effect on injured players.” The OED says it originated around 1961:

Consider what is said of players and ‘the magic sponge’. Of how they are supposed to go down on the slightest pretence and, with scarcely a squeeze from the sponge, continue playing vigorously within a matter of seconds.

nutmeg

“Higuain had poked the ball through his legs to set up the shooting chance. Ouch! That’s called ‘a nutmeg in soccer.’”

Don Cuddy, “On the World Cup: Costa Rica Nearly Pulls off Historic Upset,” South Coast Today, July 6, 2014

The nutmeg is a technique used in “soccer, field hockey or basketball, in which a player rolls or throws the ball through an opponent’s legs.” The OED’s earliest citation is from 1968:

Three times I pushed the ball between the legs of the same full-back. This is the worst thing a forward can do to a defender because it makes him look foolish; and if, as I did, the forward then shouts ‘Nut Meg’ (the traditional taunt) the defender’s ego takes a sharp knock.

It’s not clear why this maneuver is called the nutmeg. Wikipedia offers a few theories: that it comes from slang meaning of nutmeg as “testicles”; that nutmeg is Cockney rhyming slang for leg; and that nutmeg at one point came to mean duping someone because nutmegs “were such a valuable commodity that unscrupulous exporters were to pull a fast one by mixing a helping of wooden replicas into the sacks being shipped to England.”

rabona

“Then, with no-one around him and time to pick out a man, he went for an unnecessary, extravagant rabona pass.”

Sam Cunningham, “Angel Di Maria played one of the worst match-winning performances in history,” The Daily Mail, July 2, 2014

rabona is “a method of kicking the football whereby the kicking leg is wrapped around the back of the standing leg.” (Not clear on what that means? This compilation might help.)

Apparently the first to perform the rabona was Argentina’s Ricardo Infante in 1948, and the Argentinian magazine, El Grafico, was the first to come up with the term. Their cover showed Infante (which means “infant” in Spanish) “dressed as a pupil with the caption ‘Infante played hooky,’” where rabona means to play hooky or skip school.

[Photo via Flickr, CC BY 2.0 by Kiernan Clarke]

tifo

Tifos are sort of a continental European thing — you’ll especially see the Italians throwing up large choreographed displays to show their support for their teams.”

Kathy Willens, “Where is Soccer City, USA?” Kens5.com, June 16, 2014

tifo is “a form of choreography displayed by supporters on the terraces of an arena or stadium, where they make a large-scale pattern or picture by holding up, or wearing, various materials.”

The tifo originated in Italy and Southern Europe, and is a shortened form of tifosi, Italian for “fans.” See also Ultras.

[Photo via Flickr, CC BY 2.0 by psmag.net]

tiki-taka

“In its six years of global supremacy, [the Spanish team] perfected an innovative way of playing the game, known as tiki-taka, which has players string together a series of rapid, short passes, many of them on first touch, denying their opponents the ball for long periods and, ultimately, wearing them down.”

John Cassidy, “Adios to the tiki-taka men,” The New Yorker, June 18, 2014

Tiki-taka is soccer style “characterised by short passing and movement, working the ball through various channels, and maintaining possession.” The word tiki-taka is imitative and may translate as “touch-touch” in Spanish.

While the term was already in colloquial use in Spanish football, perhaps originating with retired midfielder Javier Clement, Spanish broadcaster Spanish broadcaster Andrés Montes is credited with coining and popularizing the phrase.

- See more at: http://blog.wordnik.com/12-favorite-world-cup-words?utm_source=feedly&utm_reader=feedly&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=12-favorite-world-cup-words#sthash.kHUKvCOB.dpuf

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En ce moment - Site internet du Centre national du Livre

En ce moment - Site internet du Centre national du Livre | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it
11 traducteurs vietnamiens accueillis au CNL pour un séminaire

Du 15 au 25 juillet, 11 traducteurs vietnamiens, encadrés par 2 traducteurs expérimentés, participeront à des ateliers de traduction au CNL et rencontreront des professionnels français du monde de l’édition.

Les matinées de travail rythmeront le voyage des jeunes traducteurs à Paris qui se concentreront sur les ouvrages de JMG Le Clézio, Tempête (Éditions Gallimard, 2014) et de Trinh Xuan Thuan, Le destin de l’Univers : le Big-Bang et après (Éditions Gallimard, 2008). Les après-midi seront consacrées aux rencontres avec des professionnels français (éditeurs, libraire, bibliothécaire, critique littéraire, traducteur…).

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11 traducteurs vietnamiens accueillis au CNL pour un séminaire

Du 15 au 25 juillet, 11 traducteurs vietnamiens, encadrés par 2 traducteurs expérimentés, participeront à des ateliers de traduction au CNL et rencontreront des professionnels français du monde de l’édition.

Les matinées de travail rythmeront le voyage des jeunes traducteurs à Paris qui se concentreront sur les ouvrages de JMG Le Clézio, Tempête (Éditions Gallimard, 2014) et de Trinh Xuan Thuan, Le destin de l’Univers : le Big-Bang et après (Éditions Gallimard, 2008). Les après-midi seront consacrées aux rencontres avec des professionnels français (éditeurs, libraire, bibliothécaire, critique littéraire, traducteur…).

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'No, I Said' Command Lets Google Correct Itself

'No, I Said' Command Lets Google Correct Itself | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it
Google has announced a new innovation to its Google Now search allowing any correction if it has been misinterpreted the spoken words. This feature has been revealed to both Android and iOS versions of the Google search application.
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When the "OK Google" feature is used, the accuracy of the words seems to a challenge. According to Droid Life, it depends on many factors, such as quietness of the surroundings and clarity of speech. Therefore, the results can be inaccurate sometimes.

Google acknowledges the problem and introduced the "No, I Said" command which makes the Google voice search more natural and conversational. This is easier compared with performing the search over again either by typing or stressing certain words to make sure the voice assistant gets it right.

Google announced the feature by posting a brief video demo in Google+. The video clearly shows how the command "No, I Said" works instantly and easily corrects a misheard word.

In the video, the user asks to search for "baroque artists" which Google misinterprets as "broke artists" and shows plenty of witty results. Immediately, with the help of the voice command the user says "No, I Said baroque" which ultimately clears the misunderstood word and provides the actual desired results.

Techradar further reports Google does not mention of such a unique feature being added in the latest notes which were released for the Google Search apps and had only the usual "bug fixes and performance improvements" on Google Play.

Google Now and Apple's Siri are constantly updating their voice assistant apps in order to make them more human and easier to use. However, according to Techradar, with the addition of "No, I said" command, the voice-activated, Google Now-powered assistant becomes much more powerful than Apple's Siri, which does not have the feature of recovering when words are misunderstood.

Another update is Google's addition of offline support for its Google Now cards. Users can now view the cards even without an Internet connection. Also, Google added support for Indian dialect to its Voice Search improving the search experience for Indian users.

To contact the editor, e-mail: editor@ibtimes.com

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