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La RAE rectifica la polémica definición de manga

La RAE rectifica la polémica definición de manga | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it
La Real Academia Española, RAE, rectifica la polémica definición de manga y lo califica de ¿género de cómic de origen japonés¿...
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Metaglossia: The Translation World
News about translation, interpreting, intercultural communication, terminology and lexicography - as it happens
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UN Careers - jobs in this network (Translators, Revisers, Editors, etc.)

UN Careers -  jobs in this network (Translators, Revisers, Editors, etc.) | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it

Vacancies in this network: Translators, Revisers, Editors, etc.

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5 Memory Strategies For Learning Anything Fast

5 Memory Strategies For Learning Anything Fast | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it

If you want to do get to the top of your class or climb the ladder at work, you give yourself a gigantic advantage over everybody else if you can recall more information at a faster speed. 

Developmental psychologists and cognitive scientists have found range of factors that help do just that — and some of them are pretty weird. 

Here are a few. 

Reading physical books will improve your memory of what you read, since memory is also tactile. 

We usually think of reading as a totally visual exercise; after all, it's just your eyes scanning the page, right? 

Not quite. Turns out that we remember things better when we read them in a more physical form, like say, for instance, a book. It's because the experience of reading is also tactile. When you're reading a book, you're also holding it, feeling the heft of it in your hands. As you read through the text, the pages move from your right hand to your left, redistributing the weight of the book. Research suggests that your brain uses this movement of weight as an anchor of memory. 

A happy marriage lets you "distribute" your memory tasks between you and your partner. 

In news that will delight monogamists everywhere, research shows that people in long-term relationships have several memory benefits stemming from their couplehood — like recalling people's names or what happened at events. 

When two people are in an intimate, long-term relationship, they distribute the responsibilities of thinking in the same way that they split up household chores.

One psych writer observed that a couple isn't just two individuals spending lots of time together, but a "socially distributed cognitive system." Put in plain English, two heads really are better than one. 

A little "expressive writing" will free up your mental resources, thus improving your ability to recall. 

For 30 years, psychologists have been studying "expressive writing" — writing about difficult experiences for at least 15 minutes. Experiments show the introspective exercise is much more than just navel gazing. People who regularly write expressively have lower blood pressure, higher productivity, and a greater sense of personal well-being.

North Carolina State University psychologist Kitty Klein has shown that expressive writing increases memory, too. Her explanation: Expressive writing lets people disclose thoughts they otherwise spend mental energy trying to avoid, allowing more energy to be allocated toward memory. 

A walk through the woods will put you at ease — and improve your memory.

University of Michigan psychologists asked two groups of experiment participants to go for walks. One group walked around an urban environment, and the others wandered around a forest. Then they were given a recall test. The folks who sauntered among the trees performed 20% better on the memory test. 

Connecting what you just learned with what you already know will strengthen your memory. 

Washington University cognitive scientists Henry L. Roediger III and Mark A. McDaniel co-authored "Make It Stick," a masterful book on the way we learn. The book's got tons of great takeaways, but the most immediate are approaches for training memory. One of those techniques is elaboration — the process of connecting novel information to what you already know. 

"The more you can explain about the way your new learning relates to prior knowledge," the authors write, "the stronger your grasp of the new learning will be, and the more connections you create that will help you remember it later." 

Say, for example, you're learning about heat transference. Instead of memorizing the definition — heat moves from a hot object to a cooler object — you could use an example the way that the heat from a hot cup of cocoa warms up your hand on a chilly winter's day. 



Read more: http://www.businessinsider.com/tricks-to-improve-your-memory-2014-9#ixzz3DtE5NuXJ

Charles Tiayon's insight:

If you want to do get to the top of your class or climb the ladder at work, you give yourself a gigantic advantage over everybody else if you can recall more information at a faster speed. 

Developmental psychologists and cognitive scientists have found range of factors that help do just that — and some of them are pretty weird. 

Here are a few. 

Reading physical books will improve your memory of what you read, since memory is also tactile. 

We usually think of reading as a totally visual exercise; after all, it's just your eyes scanning the page, right? 

Not quite. Turns out that we remember things better when we read them in a more physical form, like say, for instance, a book. It's because the experience of reading is also tactile. When you're reading a book, you're also holding it, feeling the heft of it in your hands. As you read through the text, the pages move from your right hand to your left, redistributing the weight of the book. Research suggests that your brain uses this movement of weight as an anchor of memory. 

A happy marriage lets you "distribute" your memory tasks between you and your partner. 

In news that will delight monogamists everywhere, research shows that people in long-term relationships have several memory benefits stemming from their couplehood — like recalling people's names or what happened at events. 

When two people are in an intimate, long-term relationship, they distribute the responsibilities of thinking in the same way that they split up household chores.

One psych writer observed that a couple isn't just two individuals spending lots of time together, but a "socially distributed cognitive system." Put in plain English, two heads really are better than one. 

A little "expressive writing" will free up your mental resources, thus improving your ability to recall. 

For 30 years, psychologists have been studying "expressive writing" — writing about difficult experiences for at least 15 minutes. Experiments show the introspective exercise is much more than just navel gazing. People who regularly write expressively have lower blood pressure, higher productivity, and a greater sense of personal well-being.

North Carolina State University psychologist Kitty Klein has shown that expressive writing increases memory, too. Her explanation: Expressive writing lets people disclose thoughts they otherwise spend mental energy trying to avoid, allowing more energy to be allocated toward memory. 

A walk through the woods will put you at ease — and improve your memory.

University of Michigan psychologists asked two groups of experiment participants to go for walks. One group walked around an urban environment, and the others wandered around a forest. Then they were given a recall test. The folks who sauntered among the trees performed 20% better on the memory test. 

Connecting what you just learned with what you already know will strengthen your memory. 

Washington University cognitive scientists Henry L. Roediger III and Mark A. McDaniel co-authored "Make It Stick," a masterful book on the way we learn. The book's got tons of great takeaways, but the most immediate are approaches for training memory. One of those techniques is elaboration — the process of connecting novel information to what you already know. 

"The more you can explain about the way your new learning relates to prior knowledge," the authors write, "the stronger your grasp of the new learning will be, and the more connections you create that will help you remember it later." 

Say, for example, you're learning about heat transference. Instead of memorizing the definition — heat moves from a hot object to a cooler object — you could use an example the way that the heat from a hot cup of cocoa warms up your hand on a chilly winter's day. 



Read more: http://www.businessinsider.com/tricks-to-improve-your-memory-2014-9#ixzz3DtE5NuXJ

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Glenview Library Offers Literacy Class To Sharpen Skills

Glenview Library Offers Literacy Class To Sharpen Skills | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it
Residents wishing to improve their English skills are invited participate in free adult literacy classes offered by the Glenview Public Library.
Charles Tiayon's insight:

Residents wishing to improve their English skills are invited participate in free adult literacy classes offered by the Glenview Public Library.

Classes for the fall session started Sept. 2 and run to Nov. 25 in the library’s Community Room West. There are also summer, winter and spring sessions.

“This is mainly for people where English is not their first language,” said Janet McIntyre, outreach librarian in the Reader Services Dept. and library representative for the program. “Participants could also be American-born who have lower reading and writing skills.”

Nearly 20 participants signed up for the summer class with teacher Josephine Nocula. The classes are conducted through Lifelong Learning and Oakton Community College.

“Since the new library building opened in 2011, we started offering these classes,” McIntyre said. “We used to offer them at the old library, but classes became too large for the meeting room space.”

McIntyre said the classes are a good way for the library to promote literacy. “There are a lot of immigrants in the area who are anxious to learn the language and to read,” she said. “These classes help people get jobs and encourage people with younger children to become more literate. Most immigrants have college educations from their country. Everyone is willing to learn the language and extremely enthusiastic.”

Students are taught lessons for the day followed by small groups with volunteer tutors. Activities include reading books, newspapers or essays along with any kind of hands-on activities.

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Colloque internationa "Langage(s) et traduction" - Le Dit et le Non-dit

Ce Colloque de linguistique appliquée est organisé conjointement par les filières de Philologie, LEA et de Traducteurs-Interprètes-Terminologues du Département de français, Faculté des Langues et des Littératures Etrangères de l’Université de Bucarest sous un titre générique qui joue délibérément sur la polysémie du terme delangage – faculté de l’esprit (faculté de langage) et système de signes (langue), mais également, voire surtout usage (style(s)discours) – vise à mieux cerner les rapports entre problématique de la variation linguistique (langages spéciaux /vs/ langage courant /vs/ langage littéraire) et problématique de la traduction, dans une perspective à la fois descriptive et didactique.

Le thème autour duquel se dérouleront les débats entend traiter des diverses théories de l’expression du sens et de la signification en langue et en discours, ainsi que les problèmes de traduction qui peuvent intervenir dans le passage d’une langue source à une langue cible de les unités porteuses d’une composante linguistique et d’une forte composante interculturelle.

 

Description du projet

La problématique du DIRE (processus d’énonciation), du DIT (sens de l’énoncé, ce que l’on dit lorsqu’on parle), du NON-DIT (tout ce que le locuteur aurait voulu dire sans pour autant s’exprimer explicitement par des mots ou par des signes perceptibles et interprétables par son interlocuteur) a préoccupé depuis toujours les linguistes, les philosophes du langage, les anthropologues, les sémioticiens, les exégètes de l’art. Entre tous ces concepts il y a une relation d’interdépendance : l’un sans l’autre ne fonctionne pas. Préexistant au non-dit, le dit (la parole) « nous accompagne presque à chaque instant, et même le silence, devenu si rare dans les sociétés modernes, prend son sens par rapport à elle. » (Ph. Breton, 2003 : 5.). On pourrait même dire que le non-dit est en fait un dit déguisé derrière les divers mécanismes de production.

Plusieurs perspectives s’ouvrent dans l’analyse de ce phénomène : d’une part, une perspective sémantico-pragmatique (du type O. Ducrot ; voir à cet égard : Dire et ne pas dire, 1972 ; La preuve et le dire, 1974 ; Le dire et le dit, 1984 ; ou bien du type C. Kerbrat-Orecchioni - L’Implicite, 1986 ) faisant des deux phénomènes une question d’interprétation et, d’autre part, une perspective logico-sémantique du type Robert Martin (Langage et croyances, 1987 ; Pour une logique du sens, 1992) qui fait du phénomène du non-dit un élément de calcul du sens.

En deçà du dit du discours ou en delà de l’unité discursive, l’opposition du dit et dunon-dit pourrait correspondre à l’opposition entre contenu explicite /vs/ contenu implicite, ou sens dénotatif /vs/ sens connotatif. On parlera ainsi, avec R. Barthes, de l’existence dans la langue d’un contenu manifeste (explicite) et d’un contenu latent (implicite). Pourtant, si pour le dit le terme « explicite » ne fait pas opposition, pour le non-dit, le terme « implicite » n’est pas le synonyme parfait.

Cette distinction apparaît d’une part, dans les recherches de C. Kerbrat-Orecchioni (1986) pour laquelle les seules formes de l’implicite sont la présupposition et le sous-entendu, le reste étant du non-dit, et d’autre part, dans les travaux de Robert Martin qui, se situant dans une sémantique véri-conditionnelle, définit le non-ditcomme un phénomène rassemblant « les cas où, pragmatiquement et sémantiquement, l’énoncé induit un énoncé corrélatif, mais dont la valeur de vérité ne dépend pas directement de la valeur de l’énoncé lui-même comme dans l’implication » (1987 : 27). Le rapport entre « complétude » et « non-dit » apparaît clairement dans les recherches dues à Robert Martin (La monovalence de la négation). Etant donné le flou existant dans la structure sémantique des unités composant les séquences discursives, il y aura toujours une quête de la complétude du sens au niveau manifeste, le reste étant affaire de non-dit.

Aspect de l’indécidable et de l’indéterminé, le non-dit est placé par Robert Martin (1987) entre l’ambiguïté et le vague et se distingue de ces concepts par l’absence d’une lecture alternative (pour le premier terme) et par l’absence de liaison avec le continu (pour le second).

 

Le colloque se propose d’explorer quelques axes de recherche :

 

En tant que phénomène de nature pragmatiquele dit et le non-dit représentent la production de l’action des instances énonciatives, des règles du discours, de la situation de communication. L’un des axes du colloque est d’essayer de tracer, si c’est le cas, une limite entre les diverses manifestations de l’au-delà du dit : implicite, présuppositions, sous-entendus, allusion, insinuation…et d’autres non-dits. Les modalités de combler ces incomplétudes laissées par la manifestation latente du sens sont une question d’interprétation. Or, « interpréter », signifie dans une lecture de Umberto Eco (Lector in fabula) savoir identifier et lire les non-dits d’un texte.

Le niveau sémantique amène dans la discussion le rôle du co-texte (ou contexte linguistique), du sens dénoté/vs/connoté, du sens conventionnel attribué à un énoncé induit d’un autre, de la polysémie, des sélections sémiques, du changement de sens (la métaphore, le figement, les détournements de sens étant des sources principales de non-dit) et du lieu du non-dit. Nous nous intéressons aussi aux divers déclencheurs sémantico-discursifs du non-dit : négation, adjectifs évaluatifs, connecteurs discursifs, les modes/temps verbaux : conditionnel, imparfait, passé composé, etc.

Nous invitons ainsi à un débat sur l’étendue/les limites de ces marqueurs dans l’expression du dit et du non-dit. 

Le niveau morpho-syntaxique nous permet de nous interroger sur les diverses structures génératrices de non-dit. Ce qui est clairement DIT par une séquence discursive correctement construite du point de vue morphosyntaxique peut laisser la place au NON-DIT dans des structures elliptiques, les répétitions (de sons, d’éléments et de structures), des interruptions dans la structure phrastique, tout étant mis en marche pour des raisons stylistiques (niveaux de langue, effets de sens), argumentatives. L’absence d’un composant à l’intérieur d’une phrase commeSans blague ! Ah, bon ! Qu’importe ! Si j’ose dire…représente une source formelle de non-dit, génératrice d’effets de sens et de stratégies argumentatives.

Au niveau phonétique et phonologique, le colloque invite à l’exploitation des silences dans le discours, des hésitations, des allongements, de l’intonation, de l’intensité de la voix, des inflexions du ton, des exclamatifs, des interjections, des éléments phatiques, du rythme oral et de la prononciation particularisée, autant de manifestations de l’attitude du locuteur qui préfère se servir de ces non-dits pour intensifier l’effet qu’il veut produire sur son interlocuteur/lecteur.

À côté de ces marques d’oralité, le non-dit surgit derrière des marques graphiques : les points de suspension, les phrases inachevées, les divers types de rupture, la commutation des graphèmes, etc.

Si pour le dit on trouve sans difficulté la source (pronoms à la première personne, modalisateurs, déictiques spatiaux et temporels, temps verbaux, références au monde culturel auquel il appartient, l’intertextualité et l’intratextualité, la présence directe des instances énonciatives dans un texte), on peut bien se demander quelle est la source/les sources du non-dit. Quelle est sa nature : verbale, non-verbale ? Langagière ? Culturelle ? Civilisationnelle ?

Ces questions suscitent d’autres distinctions. Il faut savoir qu’on ne pourrait pas toujours poser un signe d’équivalence entre non-dit et non-verbal. La danse, la peinture, par exemple, sont des expressions non-verbales mais qui « disent » un message. La gestuelle se rapproche plus du non-dit, en accompagnant souvent le dit ou en le doublant parfois de façon contradictoire.

 

« Dit », « non-dit », anthropologie et traduction

- Le non-dit n’est pas toujours lié à la connotation (qui doit être exprim

Charles Tiayon's insight:

Ce Colloque de linguistique appliquée est organisé conjointement par les filières de Philologie, LEA et de Traducteurs-Interprètes-Terminologues du Département de français, Faculté des Langues et des Littératures Etrangères de l’Université de Bucarest sous un titre générique qui joue délibérément sur la polysémie du terme delangage – faculté de l’esprit (faculté de langage) et système de signes (langue), mais également, voire surtout usage (style(s)discours) – vise à mieux cerner les rapports entre problématique de la variation linguistique (langages spéciaux /vs/ langage courant /vs/ langage littéraire) et problématique de la traduction, dans une perspective à la fois descriptive et didactique.

Le thème autour duquel se dérouleront les débats entend traiter des diverses théories de l’expression du sens et de la signification en langue et en discours, ainsi que les problèmes de traduction qui peuvent intervenir dans le passage d’une langue source à une langue cible de les unités porteuses d’une composante linguistique et d’une forte composante interculturelle.

 

Description du projet

La problématique du DIRE (processus d’énonciation), du DIT (sens de l’énoncé, ce que l’on dit lorsqu’on parle), du NON-DIT (tout ce que le locuteur aurait voulu dire sans pour autant s’exprimer explicitement par des mots ou par des signes perceptibles et interprétables par son interlocuteur) a préoccupé depuis toujours les linguistes, les philosophes du langage, les anthropologues, les sémioticiens, les exégètes de l’art. Entre tous ces concepts il y a une relation d’interdépendance : l’un sans l’autre ne fonctionne pas. Préexistant au non-dit, le dit (la parole) « nous accompagne presque à chaque instant, et même le silence, devenu si rare dans les sociétés modernes, prend son sens par rapport à elle. » (Ph. Breton, 2003 : 5.). On pourrait même dire que le non-dit est en fait un dit déguisé derrière les divers mécanismes de production.

Plusieurs perspectives s’ouvrent dans l’analyse de ce phénomène : d’une part, une perspective sémantico-pragmatique (du type O. Ducrot ; voir à cet égard : Dire et ne pas dire, 1972 ; La preuve et le dire, 1974 ; Le dire et le dit, 1984 ; ou bien du type C. Kerbrat-Orecchioni - L’Implicite, 1986 ) faisant des deux phénomènes une question d’interprétation et, d’autre part, une perspective logico-sémantique du type Robert Martin (Langage et croyances, 1987 ; Pour une logique du sens, 1992) qui fait du phénomène du non-dit un élément de calcul du sens.

En deçà du dit du discours ou en delà de l’unité discursive, l’opposition du dit et dunon-dit pourrait correspondre à l’opposition entre contenu explicite /vs/ contenu implicite, ou sens dénotatif /vs/ sens connotatif. On parlera ainsi, avec R. Barthes, de l’existence dans la langue d’un contenu manifeste (explicite) et d’un contenu latent (implicite). Pourtant, si pour le dit le terme « explicite » ne fait pas opposition, pour le non-dit, le terme « implicite » n’est pas le synonyme parfait.

Cette distinction apparaît d’une part, dans les recherches de C. Kerbrat-Orecchioni (1986) pour laquelle les seules formes de l’implicite sont la présupposition et le sous-entendu, le reste étant du non-dit, et d’autre part, dans les travaux de Robert Martin qui, se situant dans une sémantique véri-conditionnelle, définit le non-ditcomme un phénomène rassemblant « les cas où, pragmatiquement et sémantiquement, l’énoncé induit un énoncé corrélatif, mais dont la valeur de vérité ne dépend pas directement de la valeur de l’énoncé lui-même comme dans l’implication » (1987 : 27). Le rapport entre « complétude » et « non-dit » apparaît clairement dans les recherches dues à Robert Martin (La monovalence de la négation). Etant donné le flou existant dans la structure sémantique des unités composant les séquences discursives, il y aura toujours une quête de la complétude du sens au niveau manifeste, le reste étant affaire de non-dit.

Aspect de l’indécidable et de l’indéterminé, le non-dit est placé par Robert Martin (1987) entre l’ambiguïté et le vague et se distingue de ces concepts par l’absence d’une lecture alternative (pour le premier terme) et par l’absence de liaison avec le continu (pour le second).

 

Le colloque se propose d’explorer quelques axes de recherche :

 

En tant que phénomène de nature pragmatiquele dit et le non-dit représentent la production de l’action des instances énonciatives, des règles du discours, de la situation de communication. L’un des axes du colloque est d’essayer de tracer, si c’est le cas, une limite entre les diverses manifestations de l’au-delà du dit : implicite, présuppositions, sous-entendus, allusion, insinuation…et d’autres non-dits. Les modalités de combler ces incomplétudes laissées par la manifestation latente du sens sont une question d’interprétation. Or, « interpréter », signifie dans une lecture de Umberto Eco (Lector in fabula) savoir identifier et lire les non-dits d’un texte.

Le niveau sémantique amène dans la discussion le rôle du co-texte (ou contexte linguistique), du sens dénoté/vs/connoté, du sens conventionnel attribué à un énoncé induit d’un autre, de la polysémie, des sélections sémiques, du changement de sens (la métaphore, le figement, les détournements de sens étant des sources principales de non-dit) et du lieu du non-dit. Nous nous intéressons aussi aux divers déclencheurs sémantico-discursifs du non-dit : négation, adjectifs évaluatifs, connecteurs discursifs, les modes/temps verbaux : conditionnel, imparfait, passé composé, etc.

Nous invitons ainsi à un débat sur l’étendue/les limites de ces marqueurs dans l’expression du dit et du non-dit. 

Le niveau morpho-syntaxique nous permet de nous interroger sur les diverses structures génératrices de non-dit. Ce qui est clairement DIT par une séquence discursive correctement construite du point de vue morphosyntaxique peut laisser la place au NON-DIT dans des structures elliptiques, les répétitions (de sons, d’éléments et de structures), des interruptions dans la structure phrastique, tout étant mis en marche pour des raisons stylistiques (niveaux de langue, effets de sens), argumentatives. L’absence d’un composant à l’intérieur d’une phrase commeSans blague ! Ah, bon ! Qu’importe ! Si j’ose dire…représente une source formelle de non-dit, génératrice d’effets de sens et de stratégies argumentatives.

Au niveau phonétique et phonologique, le colloque invite à l’exploitation des silences dans le discours, des hésitations, des allongements, de l’intonation, de l’intensité de la voix, des inflexions du ton, des exclamatifs, des interjections, des éléments phatiques, du rythme oral et de la prononciation particularisée, autant de manifestations de l’attitude du locuteur qui préfère se servir de ces non-dits pour intensifier l’effet qu’il veut produire sur son interlocuteur/lecteur.

À côté de ces marques d’oralité, le non-dit surgit derrière des marques graphiques : les points de suspension, les phrases inachevées, les divers types de rupture, la commutation des graphèmes, etc.

Si pour le dit on trouve sans difficulté la source (pronoms à la première personne, modalisateurs, déictiques spatiaux et temporels, temps verbaux, références au monde culturel auquel il appartient, l’intertextualité et l’intratextualité, la présence directe des instances énonciatives dans un texte), on peut bien se demander quelle est la source/les sources du non-dit. Quelle est sa nature : verbale, non-verbale ? Langagière ? Culturelle ? Civilisationnelle ?

Ces questions suscitent d’autres distinctions. Il faut savoir qu’on ne pourrait pas toujours poser un signe d’équivalence entre non-dit et non-verbal. La danse, la peinture, par exemple, sont des expressions non-verbales mais qui « disent » un message. La gestuelle se rapproche plus du non-dit, en accompagnant souvent le dit ou en le doublant parfois de façon contradictoire.

 

« Dit », « non-dit », anthropologie et traduction

- Le non-dit n’est pas toujours lié à la connotation (qui doit être exprim

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Le Centre de langues d’Al Akhawayn accrédité pour la deuxième fois

Le Centre de langues d’Al Akhawayn  accrédité pour la deuxième fois | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it
 Le centre de langues de l’Université Al Akhawayn d’Ifrane vient d’obtenir pour la seconde fois son accréditation par la CEA (Commission pour l’accréditation des programmes de la langue anglaise) pour les dix prochaines années.
Charles Tiayon's insight:

Après une accréditation initiale pour cinq ans en 2009, il figurait parmi les quatre centres hors des Etats-Unis à l’obtenir et le seul en Afrique. Depuis, il a été rejoint par l’Université américaine du Caire. Aujourd’hui, ils sont une quinzaine hors des Etats-Unis à afficher ce label.

Le Centre de langues de l’Université Al Akhawayn accueille actuellement près de 300 étudiants avec 21 professeurs spécialisés dans l’enseignement de l’anglais en tant que langue étrangère. Il a pour mission d’assurer une mise à niveau en anglais aux étudiants de l’Université avant qu’ils n’intègrent les programmes académiques.

Un des premiers centres à utiliser les technologies de l’information

Il est par ailleurs le premier à utiliser les nouvelles technologies de l’information au Maroc étant donné que l’Université Al Akhawayn a eu le premier nœud Internet au Maroc avec une connexion directe avec l’Europe.

L’accréditation s’inscrit parmi les choix stratégiques et les orientations académiques de l’Université Al Akhawayn. Le recours au Système d’Assurance Qualité (que ce soit au niveau des formations et compétences des enseignants chercheurs, de la qualité des programmes, des cursus, des examens, tests et autres formes d’évaluation, de l’encadrement académique et administratif, du suivi personnalisé des étudiants, de l’utilisation des technologies de l’information et de la communication ou de l’évaluation et ajustements éventuels de programmes) est de plus en plus utilisé dans un nombre sans cesse croissant d’universités de renom à travers le monde. Pour rappel, la CEA, créée en 1999 par des professionnels de la langue anglaise, est une agence spécialisée dont la vocation est de s’assurer de la qualité des programmes de langue anglaise. Elle fait partie d’un consortium d’organismes d’accréditation américains qui sont eux-mêmes reconnus par le gouvernement fédéral des Etats-Unis. Son rôle est aussi de faciliter les échanges entre les universités et les programmes d’enseignement dans d’autres pays.

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Mali : Abdoulaye Barry : Un Géant de la Culture

Mali : Abdoulaye Barry : Un Géant de la Culture | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it
Homme de principe très dur avec lui-même, Barry a été un des plus grands défenseurs de la culture malienne en général et des langues nationales en particulier. Militant infatigable du mouvement démocratique, Abdoulaye Barry aura participé à toutes les luttes politiques, syndicales, culturelles, de notre pays.
Charles Tiayon's insight:

Militant infatigable du mouvement démocratique, Abdoulaye Barry aura participé à toutes les luttes politiques, syndicales, culturelles, de notre pays.

Il a vécu toutes les difficultés inhérentes à ce genre d’engagement : mutations arbitraires, arrestations, sans jugement, qui ne fîrent que raffermir son sentiment patriotique.

Homme de grande culture, il a toujours fait preuve de tolérance, d’ouverture d’esprit et d’honnêteté intellectuelle. Ces qualités lui ont permis de jeter les ponts entre les différentes tendances du mouvement démocratique.

Né en 1940, à Bamako, Abdoulaye Barry avant sa mort le 22 septembre 1991, n’a ménagé ni son temps, ni ses ressources, ni sa santé pour les causes qu’il défendait.

Inscrit à l’école rurale de Bamako-Coura (actuelle Ecole Mamadou Konaté) en novembre 1947, il obtint son certificat d’Etudes primaires élémentaires en 1953 et son brevet au collège technique de Bamako (actuelle lycée Technique).

Nommé instituteur adjoint en novembre 1958, Barry réussit au certificat d’aptitude pédagogique en 1960 et en lower certificate de Cambridge la même année. C’était à l’issue d’un stage de formation de Maîtres d’Anglais. Assistant, à l’institut national des langues et cultures orientales de Paris (INALCO) Abdoulaye Barry obtient en 1986 le diplôme de sociolinguistique de l’école des Hautes études en sciences sociales de Paris.

La vie et l’œuvre de Abdoulaye Barry sont intimement liées à la Coopérative Culturelle « Jamana ».

Membre fondateur et vice-président de la Coopérative, Barry a occupé en son sein différentes fonctions. Il a notamment été directeur de la série langues nationales des Editions Jamana. Rédacteur en chef de Sorofé, (journal parlé sur cassettes de Jamana en langues nationales) et de Jekabaara, journal en bamanan de la CMDT, et de l’ODIPAC. Il fût aussi membre du comité de rédaction de la revue culturelle Jamana et directeur de publication du journal « Les Echos ». Barry a été directeur de « Jamablon », le centre de cultures maliennes de la Coopérative Jamana… Membre fondateur du groupe d’études et de réflexion pour la promotion des langues nationales (Benbakan dungew) créé en 1975, Barry a publié de nombreux articles dans des revues spécialisées sur le bamanan en France, en Norvège, au Japon et au Mali.

Rédacteur en chef de la revue Sankoré Jama de l’institut des sciences humaines, Barry a enseigné la langue et la littérature bamanan à l’Institut national des Arts de 1979 à 1987.

Traducteur de l’hymne nationale du Mali et du chant national des pionniers en bamanan en 1980, co-traducteur de l’international en bamanan en 1981, auteur de l’hymne aux langues nationales en 1981, il était membre du jury du baccalauréat français pour l’épreuve de langue bamanan à Paris en 1985 et 1986.

Après la victoire du mouvement démocratique, précisément en avril 1991, Abdoulaye Barry sera nommé directeur de la DNAFLA. Poste qu’il occupera jusqu’à sa mort le 22 septembre 1991.

L’itinéraire de Barry est aussi celui des combattants pour la démocratie au Mali. Et l’histoire retiendra son apport exceptionnel dans l’avènement du 26 mars 1991. Mais déjà, il importe de savoir que Abdoulaye Barry a été parmi les initiateurs de l’appel au peuple malien, de la « lettre ouverte au président de la République », du comité de suivi de la lettre ouverte, un des premiers responsables de la création de l’Adéma-Association et de l’Adéma-Parti africain pour la solidarité et la justice.

Présent sur tous les fronts de la lutte démocratique depuis sa tendre jeunesse, Barry aura essayé partout, de mettre ses actes en conformités avec ses idéaux.

Paix à son âme !

- See more at: http://maliactu.net/mali-abdoulaye-barry-un-geant-de-la-culture/#sthash.pBn0c3vC.dpuf

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From Morocco to Bağcılar | Features | Daily Sabah

From Morocco to Bağcılar | Features | Daily Sabah | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it
The world we live in is full of different languages and cultures. However, there are moments and experiences that tear down the walls and make us realize we are really not that different from each another | Daily Sabah
Charles Tiayon's insight:

On Saturday the Moroccan Cultural and Handicraft week opened in Eminönü, and was covered on Wednesday. The glorious colors and goods for sale are described there. When I went to the opening on Monday, it was the atmosphere, smack bang next to the Spice Market, that struck me; this exhibition is perfect in keeping with the atmosphere of Eminönü. One lady asked us: "Where is this exhibition from?" Hearing the answer "Morocco" she quizzed, "Is it foreign then?" Her confusion is understandable. At first glance, the goods could be from a Turkish region. Yet, they so obviously are not. 

The exhibition gives a feeling of familiarity mixed with something quite exotic. The athletic G'naouas dancers, with their enthusiastic drumming, flips and spins, draw in huge crowds. And then there is the more sedate orchestra, playing what sounds like Turkish ilahi (hymns); it isn't until you pay attention to the words, and realize that they are singing in Arabic that it dawns on you that this is something quite different. The entire experience is new, yet familiar, fascinating, yet comforting.

On Tuesday I was fortunate enough to accompany some visitors from Morocco to Bağcılar, to the Engelliler Sarayı (Palace for the Disabled).

This was my fourth visit to Bağcılar Engelliler Sarayı. The name is not inaccurate. This is truly a palace dedicated to the benefit of the disabled. It consists of five stories, with wide corridors, silent lifts that are spacious and efficient, stairs with railings that have braille inscriptions on them so that the visually impaired can find their way round the building, and classrooms everywhere. And the magnificently stylish decorations on the wall have all been hand-painted to underline the palatial theme of this very functional building.

There is a kitchen designed for people in wheelchairs; here they can learn how to cook, for themselves or in a professional kitchen. There is a 
classroom set up as a barbershop and another as a hairdresser's, not only teaching the students professional skills, but also providing them with the opportunity to be pampered and given a new hairstyle. There is a spacious cinema, with a large empty area in the front for wheelchairs. Here the students can put on theater performances or they can watch films. There are computers with special programs that help the visually impaired to learn to type, with audio prompts, and printers that print out the articles in braille.

There is a room dedicated to growing mushrooms, there are art rooms, music rooms, a woodwork shop and a sports hall, with special equipment designed to be used by ablebodied people and people confined to wheelchairs. Whatever comes to your imagination, it is here. And it is not only the physically or mentally disabled who can benefit from the Engeliler Sarayı. Classes are offered to the parents of disabled children as well, giving them much needed respite.

We were taken into the classroom in which students, ranging in age from 7-70, are taught techniques for overcoming the cruel disability of stammering. We were shown a video of a student on the first day of his class; every time he got hung up on a word he stamped his foot. The foot stamps drowned out his words. We were shown another video; this one was of the same boy, taken three weeks later; now he spoke fluently, although carefully. We were told that three months later his speech was no different from any other person's.

In the palace there is a room that is referred to as the "black room;" here, children with ADS or autism are treated. The black walls have a calming effect, as do the soft lights and special equipment, all designed to soothe the senses. This room is paired with the "white room," which has, not surprisingly, white walls and more vibrant colors. The "white room" is used to treat autistic children who are introverted, with the colors and textures that stimulate all five senses. These two rooms are unique in Turkey, with very few similar examples throughout the world.

In another classroom we were treated to a concert from a group of seven young men, some in wheel chairs, some with learning difficulties, and some who were visually impaired. They sang a song that had been written by the singer, Zafer. It told us how the palace had torn down the walls for these young people, bringing them into society, opening doors for them to walk through; now when they went out onto the street they could hold their heads up high. The Turkish speakers were moved by the words; the Moroccan visitors were moved by the visible emotion of the performance. Indeed, it was the Moroccan guests who started the standing ovation, but there was not a dry eye in the place.

This time, it was the Moroccan visitors who had the experience of something new, yet familiar, different yet known. The familiarity of being accepted, without question of language or nationality. In each classroom we entered, children and young adults came over eager to talk to us. As we walked by they enthusiastically waved at us. Unperturbed by the lack of language skills they asked questions like: "How are you? This is my painting. Do you like it?"
The love and affection shown to us by the young people here was unquestioning; it was complete acceptance. The warmth, hospitality and love that thrives in this palace makes it a place where I want to return, again and again. Here one gets the feeling that it does not matter where you came from or how you came here. What is important is that you came.

From the exotic sounds and sights of Morocco to the warm embrace of Bağcılar Engelliler Sarayı, these two days have filled me with memories that will remain. I left a bit of my heart at the exhibition, watching the people listen to the music, negotiate prices with someone who spoke a different language and take in the atmosphere. But another bit of my heart is, and always will be, in Bağcılar.

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A language by any other name…

A language by any other name… | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it
Language: With its name change, the department hopes for awareness of its academic opportunitiesJavier Muro de Nadal / Staff Photographer

For universities,
Charles Tiayon's insight:

For universities, including Saint Louis University, developing a name for an academic department that incorporates all the elements of the department can be difficult, especially if that department is home to all the language and cultural courses on a campus. The Department of Languages, Literatures, and Cultures at SLU showcased its new name this fall—a name it hopes is a good representation of all its programs and offerings.

The department was previously known as the Department of Modern and Classical Languages. The new name, department members hope, will provide deeper clarity of the department’s mission and goals and be a better representation of the language, literature and culture classes that expand beyond the modern and classical languages. While other campuses choose to divide the language aspect of their curriculum into different sections, SLU holds one department that is home to a variety of languages with different roots. Languages include Italian, Russian, Spanish, Arabic, German, French, Classics, and Chinese. The department hopes the new name covers the diversity of each language and the culture it is connected to, which is what the faculty cherishes most about its division of academics.

Dr. Angela Smart, department chair, is proud to reveal the name change that has been in the works for the past 10 to 15-years. “It’s difficult to find a common ground within all the programs offered. Our name puts all the languages and cultures under one umbrella. It better embodies what the department does, which is unite all the languages, literatures and cultures,” she said.

Originally, certain aspects of the department were not reflected in the title, like the faculty’s approach to educating students in a different language. This approach involves integrating culture into the classroom and connecting it back to the language. By understanding that language is an expression of a culture, the students are better able to grasp the value of the foreign language they are learning and how to connect with it in a more meaningful way, the department says. By adding “Literatures and Cultures” into the title, the department better markets this unique aspect of its curriculum.

“Studying languages and cultures is a transformative experience. It leads a student to think more about who he or she is. Both studying a language and studying abroad allows a student to decode the cultural differences of a country,” said Smart, who is also a professor of French.

The name change follows the example of universities around the country who are taking the step to exemplify their aspects of their departments. The University of Massachusetts Amherst and Stanford University are two examples of universities nationwide that are rebranding their language departments.

Smart believes the name change will also refresh the general knowledge of the department’s programs and the diversity of the classes offered.

“Our faculty is like a little U.N.! There are people from all different cultures, which makes for a vibrant faculty. All are actively engaged in both research and a dynamic learning approach,” she said.

The department also offers opportunities to expand knowledge on cultures and languages outside of the classroom. The French program offers activities such as teaching traditional Parisian ballroom dancing, and the Italian program offers a weekly “Tavola Italiana” (Italian Table) for students to practice the language skills they acquire in class.

Smart explained that the faculty provides unique opportunities to incorporate elements from each program into individual classes. Courses offered this semester include a class on Israeli culture and one on World War I, both of which involve many of the cultures individually offered in the department.

Also fresh to the department is the name change of the Language Learning Center to the Language Resource Center. The LRC, now located in Morissey Hall, along with the rest of the department’s labs and faculty, is a place for students to work on group projects, rent cultural movies or work with tutors. Smart hopes the LRC will provide a study environment for students taking the classes in the Department of Languages, Literatures, and Cultures.

The department is also home to two M.A. programs, French and Spanish, and offers Latin American Studies and Classical Humanities Studies majors. The department, in addition to the changes it has already made, is also working to incorporate  a Chinese minor into the curriculum.

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5 of the world’s most beautiful (and endangered) alphabet

SINCE THE BIRTH OF THE ALPHABET in the Near East around 2000 BC, endless writing systems from different languages and cultures have thrived and perished. The classic example is Egyptian, a highly developed civilization whose legacy remains the form of a famous hieroglyphic writing system…which we’ve never been able to fully decipher.

Over the last 2,500 years, the Latin alphabet has become so popular it’s swept away writing systems of peoples once dominated by the Romans. However, more than two billion people still write in other formats, and a few of them display an impressive handmade beauty.

Below are five of the most aesthetically attractive alphabets in the world, and the reasons why you’re probably never going to read them.

  1. Burmese (Myanmar)
  2. Sinhalese (Sri Lanka)
  3. Georgian (Georgia)
  4. Tagalog (Philippines)
  5. Hanacaraka (Indonesia)

Read the full article in Matador Network here: http://matadornetwork.com/abroad/5-beautiful-endangered-alphabets/

Charles Tiayon's insight:

SINCE THE BIRTH OF THE ALPHABET in the Near East around 2000 BC, endless writing systems from different languages and cultures have thrived and perished. The classic example is Egyptian, a highly developed civilization whose legacy remains the form of a famous hieroglyphic writing system…which we’ve never been able to fully decipher.

Over the last 2,500 years, the Latin alphabet has become so popular it’s swept away writing systems of peoples once dominated by the Romans. However, more than two billion people still write in other formats, and a few of them display an impressive handmade beauty.

Below are five of the most aesthetically attractive alphabets in the world, and the reasons why you’re probably never going to read them.

  1. Burmese (Myanmar)
  2. Sinhalese (Sri Lanka)
  3. Georgian (Georgia)
  4. Tagalog (Philippines)
  5. Hanacaraka (Indonesia)

Read the full article in Matador Network here: http://matadornetwork.com/abroad/5-beautiful-endangered-alphabets/

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Ambiguity When Translating

Ambiguity When Translating | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it
The layman usually considers language and dialects as a literal and clear medium for precisely conveying concepts and views. On one hand, even when people use language in a literal manner, meanings may change and misunderstandings may unavoidably come to pass.
Charles Tiayon's insight:

The layman usually considers language and dialects as a literal and clear medium for precisely conveying concepts and views. On one hand, even when people use language in a literal manner, meanings may change and misunderstandings may unavoidably come to pass. Anyone can become unintentionally or intentionally ambiguous even without really trying.

On the other hand, most words can have connotations, denotations, double entendres, apparent meanings, implied or hidden messages, and so on that naturally obfuscate whatever message a person tries to convey.

Ambiguity and Translation

People often utilize words in a figurative manner in ordinary dialogue, even though it's a type of speech more often associated with fiction and poetry. Ambiguity isn't only a poetic vehicle; it's also natural for humans to find deeper meanings within a correspondence or exchange. Text is given, and we provide our interpretation of it in return. Our own experiences and knowledge enable us to comprehend what is presented before us.

On that note, ambiguity is also a factor when it comes to translation, whether it's machine or human translation. After all, anyone doing translation work (whether it's someone from a solo translation service or an agent of a professional translation agency) is also interpreting through his experience and knowledge the text that is presented to him, only this time he has to do it from one language to another.


Ambiguity in History

Translation services and the concept of professional translation were unheard of in the olden days because faithfulness to the text was the order of the day for human translation at the time. Take for instance the various interpretations that the bible went through during the fourth to sixteenth centuries. Insisting on only one truth to avoid ambiguity of message was part of the reason why the bible was left in Latin (the Latin version itself was translated from other languages) by the Roman Catholic Church for quite some time.

Because the bible is situated in the heart of many of the world's most important religions, it has been subjected to a massive amount of scrutiny and inspection. As such, many of the denominations of just one religion (Christianity) sprouted from diverse interpretations of scripture, and Christianity itself (as well as Islam) was born from the reinterpretation of an even older holy scripture (the Torah) and religion (Judaism). Wars, persecution, excommunications, and other religious conflicts have occurred because of the continuous battle between ambiguousness, interpretation, and one single, unified truth.

Ambiguity and Literature

Postmodern literature and other trends within the late twentieth and early twenty-first century has made ambiguity a factor when it comes to calling into question past certainties, which opened a window for it to become an appropriate form of communication in both the written word and verbal dialogue.

Adding that complexity to modern-day translation will provide people a threefold example of meaning being further pushed back by both the current vogue of ambiguity and other factors such as cultural differences, multiple interpretations, and an altogether nebulous message. As much as ambiguity presents a new avenue for people to naturally express themselves, it also presents a pitfall by which no person would be able to express himself at all.

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One Hour Translation is the world’s fastest professional human translation service. One Hour Translation provides Fast, High Quality Professional Translation on a 24/7 basis thanks to a community of over 8000 certified translators from all over the world.

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Literary Translation Workshop Oct 2014 | British Council

British Council and Oxford University Press, in partnership with the British Centre for Literary Translation (BCLT) will host a literary translation workshop, based on t
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British Council and Oxford University Press, in partnership with the British Centre for Literary Translation (BCLT) will host a literary translation workshop, based on the BCLT International Literary Translation Summer School, held at the University of East Anglia since 2000.

Through consensus translation, the workshop will explore the challenges of understanding the author’s intentions and conveying them appropriately in the target language.  Two parallel workshops will be held, on translating short stories from English to Urdu and Urdu to English with the respective authors in residence. The English writer whose text will be translated into Urdu will be Sunjeev Sahota and the Urdu writer whose text will be translated into English will be Azra Abbas.

Participants will explore in depth all elements of the text, from cultural nuances and historical context to linguistic concerns and punctuation.  Participants of each workshop will work independently and meet in plenary sessions on a daily basis.

Those with a professional interest in literary translation are invited to apply. The literary translation workshop will benefit mid-career translators or translation academics keen to experience different, more practical methodologies for the teaching of translation by practising literary translators.

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Catalá rechaza abrir otra guerra con la RAE por la definición de valencià

Catalá rechaza abrir otra guerra con la RAE por la definición de valencià | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it
La consellera dice que trabajan para que la AVL también varíe su diccionario. Rebaja el tono del debate generado pese a que no han accedido al cambio
Charles Tiayon's insight:

La consellera de Educación, Cultura y Deporte, María José Catalá, rebajó el tono respecto a la polémica por la definición del valenciano para defender el trabajo del Ejecutivo regional en su intento de modificar lo establecido en el diccionario de la Real Academia de la Lengua Española (RAE) y en el de la Acadèmia Valenciana de la Llengua (AVL). Catalá evitó abrir otra guerra por la lengua y, lejos del tono de las manifestaciones del conseller Luis Santamaría, quien dijo que la AVL “debería reflexionar y volver a ser lo que nunca debió dejar de ser”, indicó ayer a preguntas de este diario que está trabajando “para que se modifique” en los dos ámbitos.

Al respecto, la consellera recordó que el Gobierno de Alberto Fabra ya ha solicitado estos cambios en la definición de la lengua valenciana, y esperán “que se hagan, que se modifiquen”.

Como ayer publicó Mediterráneo, el diccionario de la RAE mantiene su definición como variedad del catalán en su avance de la edición del 2014 que se puede leer on line a través de la web de la propia institución. La definición de valenciano aparece como “artículo enmendado”, y según la redacción propuesta, el valenciano es “una variedad del catalán que se usa en gran parte del antiguo reino de Valencia y se siente allí comúnmente como lengua propia”, es decir, las mismas palabras recogidas en la anterior edición, que se quería modificar. Este nuevo escollo surge justo en plena polémica con la Acadèmia Valenciana de la Llengua debido a que su diccionario también mantiene el criterio de la unidad de la lengua. Así pues, y según las palabras de ayer de la consellera Catalá, las negociaciones para hacer efectivas estas modificaciones no cesarán. De todos modos, como apuntan fuentes de la Generalitat, la capacidad de presión del Consell con la Real Academia de la Lengua Española no es tan fuerte como con la AVL, ya que la primera es un organismo estatal y no autonómico. H

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Camille Rowe-Pourcheresse, Robert Pattinson

Camille Rowe-Pourcheresse, Robert Pattinson | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it
Apprendre le français de façon sexy avec le mannequin Camille Rowe-Pourcheresse
Charles Tiayon's insight:

Le magazine britannique ID a eu l’idée de mettre en scène des mannequins de différentes nationalités prodiguant les basiques de leurs langues aux lecteurs. Camille Rowe-Pourcheresse, égérie Chloé, se charge du français.

Do you speak French ? Dans le style du "français pour les nuls", le magazine "ID" a pensé à une façon ludique de motiver ses lecteurs pour apprendre la langue de Molière. Avec sa série de vidéos postées en ligne, intitulée «Model Mother Tongue» (la langue maternelle des mannequins), le magazine britannique spécialisé dans l’information mode et culture, a demandé à des mannequins polonais, danois, russe, chinois ou encore français d’expliquer les basiques de leurs langues aux internautes, de façon décalée.

Leçon numéro 1 : le français, avec le top du moment, Camille Rowe-Pourcheresse. Le mannequin de 23 ans a fait chavirer le cœur de l’acteur américain Robert Pattinson dansla dernière campagne très sexy du parfum Dior Homme. C’est dire si la jeune femme, installée à New York, dégage une sensualité sans borne.

 

Glamour toujours

Pour le clip imaginé par "ID", Camille Rowe-Pourcheresse joue sur les clichés français avec délicatesse et humour. En sept phrases, censées être indispensables pour tout Frenchie qui se respecte, la demoiselle arrive à placer les mots macarons, croissants, fromage, et bien évidemment… vin rouge. Mais surtout, la jolie blonde hisse le français au rang des langues les plus romantiques, caractérisée par des auteurs phares comme Stendhal, Flaubert ou Simone de Beauvoir. 

Ainsi, quoi que disent, quoi que fassent les habitants de l’hexagone dans leur quotidien, ils restent glamour. Crise de nerfs, état fiévreux, café en terrasse ou conversations téléphoniques, le Français est toujours dans la séduction. Camille Rowe-Pourcheresse s’assure de vous en convaincre.

Les cours de polonais sont pour leur part dispensés par la jeune Ola Rudnicka, le danois par celle qui a conquis le cœur de tous les créateurs français, incarnant même la Parisienne typique dans une série mode imaginée par "Vogue Paris", Nadja Bender. Pour apprendre le mandarin, qui de mieux que l’égérie Estée Lauder, Liu Wen ou Tao Okamoto pour le japonais . Quant au russe, "ID" a pensé à l’angélique Nastya Sten. Il ne reste plus qu’à faire son choix.

Apprendre le polonais avec Ola Rudnicka:

 

Le danois avec Nadja Bender :

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Poll: Is your writing style geared to the present-day reader? « Hannah Warren

Poll: Is your writing style geared to the present-day reader? « Hannah Warren | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it

I’ve never made an attempt at disguising I’m a fan of 19th century literature (French, Russian, English). Although I read (past and present tense!) plenty of contemporary novels, I am mostly inspired and influenced by the very start of novel-writing as we know it. Austen, the Bronty Sisters, George Elliot, Stendhal, Flaubert, Dostoyevsky to name but a few, and of course my all-time hero Lev Tolstoy. Time after time I can pick up one of his books just for the pleasure of savouring his sentences. This love for old books goes so deep that I’m currently taking a shot at writing a historical novel myself,Daughter of the Alvar, set in Sweden in the 1890s. No Iphones, sex-talk, SatNav or fast-food but horse-and-carriage, chaperoned walks, poachers and kitchen maids.

However, I’m currently going through a phase in which I wonder whether indulging in the work of dead authors may be making my own writing style a tad old-fashioned. I may be running the risk of writing for my own pleasure, with zero commercial appeal. So, from a sales point of view I was interested in writers’ opinions on the marketability of their books and created a poll on Facebook. Ten people were so kind to answer the 6 questions. Thank you so much.

Here are the results!

Charles Tiayon's insight:

I’ve never made an attempt at disguising I’m a fan of 19th century literature (French, Russian, English). Although I read (past and present tense!) plenty of contemporary novels, I am mostly inspired and influenced by the very start of novel-writing as we know it. Austen, the Bronty Sisters, George Elliot, Stendhal, Flaubert, Dostoyevsky to name but a few, and of course my all-time hero Lev Tolstoy. Time after time I can pick up one of his books just for the pleasure of savouring his sentences. This love for old books goes so deep that I’m currently taking a shot at writing a historical novel myself,Daughter of the Alvar, set in Sweden in the 1890s. No Iphones, sex-talk, SatNav or fast-food but horse-and-carriage, chaperoned walks, poachers and kitchen maids.

However, I’m currently going through a phase in which I wonder whether indulging in the work of dead authors may be making my own writing style a tad old-fashioned. I may be running the risk of writing for my own pleasure, with zero commercial appeal. So, from a sales point of view I was interested in writers’ opinions on the marketability of their books and created a poll on Facebook. Ten people were so kind to answer the 6 questions. Thank you so much.

Here are the results!

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Useful Ideas To Improve Your Search Engine Optimization! | KC SEO Company - Search Engine Optimization

Useful Ideas To Improve Your Search Engine Optimization! | KC SEO Company - Search Engine Optimization | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it
TIP! Just because you advertise more does not mean that your rank will improve. It can help get traffic to your page, though, which is important. Now you have started your site and you want visitors, you might be wondering how to drive more traffic to it. You need to get your site appear in the search results. This article will teach you to achieve this. Look at competitors' sites' source codes found on the websites of your competition. This lets you see how the SEO on their websites and which k
Charles Tiayon's insight:

Now you have started your site and you want visitors, you might be wondering how to drive more traffic to it. You need to get your site appear in the search results. This article will teach you to achieve this.

Look at competitors’ sites’ source codes found on the websites of your competition. This lets you see how the SEO on their websites and which keywords they use.

Meta Tags


TIP! Find out how many years of experience they have in the business. Also make sure to know what kind of risks you’re taking, and what could go wrong.


Meta tags are an extremely useful tool for optimizing your website. Description tags have great value and they will be utilized in your site coming up during a search. Make the meta tags have valuable and concise content. This type of tag usage will help to draw more guests into your site.


TIP! When creating anchor text for your website, simply using “click here” or other generic terms is not enough. Using generic anchor text like “click here” is a wasted opportunity to integrate more keywords.


Using product feeds can really help to reach new customers. Feeds can contain information about your business such as prices, descriptions and prices. Submit these to comparisons sites which compare prices and to the major search engines.

Site Map


TIP! Spiders cannot read session ids and dynamic language very well, so remember that when making URL names. Therefore, you should come up with a relevant name for each URL.


A vital step towards optimizing your search engine optimization is to include a site map for your website. Search engine spiders will crawl the site more easily with a site map of your site.A large site might need more than 1 site map. A good rule of thumb is to not have lots of links maximum on each site map.

Users aren’t going to spend time at a site unless they can find the information they need, and you can get more traffic if your content current and useful.


TIP! Use a properly descriptive title tag to make sure that search engines can best understand the content of your web page. Keep your text down to 60 characters or less, since many search engines cut off the content at that point.


Use an accurate title tag to make sure that search engines can easily find and read your content. Your title tag should be 60 characters or less, as this is the limit of the majority of search engines.They also tend to give less weight to terms at that point.

Try including transcripts for any visual or audio content on your site.


TIP! Creating a site map can help search engines classify the content on your site. The site map, or navigation bar, lets the search engines access your pages from all other pages on the site.


Don’t overextend by packing in too thin by trying to include too many keywords.Focus on the most important phrases that can improve your rank. Use Google Analytics to learn which words and phrases really bring in the most traffic.


TIP! Your website should be easy to read. The clearer and more functional you make your site, the higher the ranking your site will be on search engines.


Captions are a tremendous SEO process. This means that when you’re someone with a ton of things on a website like news articles, take advantage of this and use captions which are rich in keywords to improve your visibility and traffic.

Image Links

Image links are a role in search engine optimization.Image links only give the linked file URL for search engines effectively.

The page’s ranking will be improved, so keywords included in these tags will improve page ranking.


TIP! If you use the plural form or longer form of keywords, you will get more listings in the search results. Keyword stemming is a popular technique of some search engines.


The first sentences in your content should have terms that can also be the HTML description tag. There are search engines that utilize this information rather than the tag itself as the blurb for your site is about in their results. Poor content in this area can hurt your rankings.

Search Engine


TIP! Talk about current events and their relation to the products you are selling. This will help you get visitors that were searching for an unrelated topic.


Use plurals and longer or plural form of keywords to generate more hits on a search engine. Keyword stemming is a popular technique of search engines. If you chose a search term like “accountant” for your keyword, the search engine might not find the words banking or banker! Use keyword stemming by using a longer version of a word, using “accounting” can also grab readers who were searching for “accountant.”


TIP! Make sure you implement the use of social networking sites as a means to improve your SEO. YouTube can showcase videos of your product, while Facebook and Twitter can let you interact with clients directly.


To get a lot of traffic, you need to provide information that is different from that on other sites and other Web pages. People stay and click around your site are likely to come back a second time.


TIP! If you use a shared server, make sure you are not sharing your proxy with a site that has been banned by any of the major search engines. Sharing proxies with sites that spam or banned sites will reflect negatively on you.


Using keywords that go with your subjects will help search engines find your articles. This will make internet traffic flow to your content. Your primary keyword should be included in your article title, and in its summary and title, depending on the length of the article.


TIP! Email marketing will give you an edge on the competition. Use your keywords in the emails and include any social sites you belong to.


A good thing to remember about marketing on the Internet is to always try to tie current events and topics that have relevance to your product. This helps you bring visitors to your site is about. This also help your site to be more information to regular visitors.

Think as a consumer when you are coming up with tags to include.Determine the relevant terms that people will use in searching.

Search Engine Bots


TIP! The links throughout your site should all be interconnected and have keyword phrases within them. If the page you link to is about planting roses, be sure to use that within the anchor text.


Search engine bots seek out new material, unique content which is full of useful information, you are giving the search engine bots an excuse to drop in. People will also share your articles they are good. This will encourage people to your site.

Your website’s server needs to be configured so that it is case-sensitive with regards to URLs.


TIP!


Registering your site with multiple search engines can allow them to better crawl your website for optimized content. You will find a link for site submission on each search engine. Use strong descriptions and relevant keywords so it is categorized correctly.


TIP!


You have to make every page on your website to be unique. Your title selection should be varied and keyword focused. These are very important for search engine optimization purposes.

Use the keyword phrases in your META tags. Try to keep your keywords that are most relevant to web searches.


TIP!


If your site one related to business, getting the owner or CEO active on the site it will help boost your traffic. People like hearing from important members of the big guy himself.

Even if your pages, every title should be creative, unique and attention grabbing. The initial words are vital for grabbing reader attention.

Do not copy content from another website; if a search engine detects duplicate content on our website, Google will catch it and drop your rank.

Traffic Flowing


TIP!


As was mentioned before, SEO is essential for getting the largest number of site visitors. When your website shows up as the result of a web search, the traffic flowing to your page is increased. This article has hopefully given you some great steps to get that traffic flowing.

Many people would like to understand Search Engine Optimization Kansas City, but they don’t always know how they should go about it. This article has so much information, you’ll be ready to move forward with confidence. Use the information you’ve learned, and get busy

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Foreign language: Call for redesigning English syllabus – The Express Tribune

Foreign language: Call for redesigning English syllabus – The Express Tribune | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it
Educat­ionist­s say Englis­h langua­ge should be taught as a separa­te disipl­ine.
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They spoke at an international conference arranged by the Society of Pakistan English Language Teachers (SPELT) at the Allama Iqbal Open University. The three-day conference was organised in collaboration with the AIOU and the Oxford University Press (OUP).

The participants from home and abroad emphasised that English should be introduced and taught as a language instead of a discipline of social sciences. They noted that the way the English is being taught at schools and colleges is hardly helpful in overcoming language barriers, being faced by teachers and students.

The speakers said that all stakeholders including heads of English departments at educational institutes should be involved in redesigning English language courses.

AIOU English Department Chairman Dr Abdul Hafeez offered SPELT to hold sessions at the university’s regional campuses around the country.

About 40 papers were presented during 16 working sessions of the conference, said Malik Tariq Mahmood, a local representative of the SPELT.

Published in The Express Tribune, September 20th, 2014.


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Humane society launches reading program for children

Humane society launches reading program for children | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it
TANGENT — In an effort to help kids brush up on reading skills and allow shelter animals some additional socialization time, SafeHaven Humane Society has launched its Happy Tales reading
Charles Tiayon's insight:

TANGENT — In an effort to help kids brush up on reading skills and allow shelter animals some additional socialization time, SafeHaven Humane Society has launched its Happy Tales reading program.

“We developed the reading program to encourage children to increase their reading skills by reading aloud to dogs and cats. Kids often find it intimidating to read in front of classmates, and we’re hoping this program will help them build their self-confidence,” said Chris Storm, SafeHaven Humane Society’s executive director. “It also benefits our adoptable animals by allowing them some time to socialize with people.”

The program is open to children from kindergarten through middle school, year-round. They are invited to come with a parent or guardian to the shelter at 32220 Old Hwy. 34 and read to one of the humane society’s dogs or cats that are participating in the program. They can bring a book from home or use one from the shelter’s library.

As they accumulate reading time with the animals, the children become eligible for prizes. For more information about the program or to sign up, call 541-926-2924 or send an email to HumaneEd@safehaven

humane.com.

SafeHaven Humane Society is a nonprofit, full adoption shelter that does not euthanize animals for population control. SafeHaven is solely supported by donations, events and adoption fees.

Each year, the humane society finds homes for more than 1,600 cats and dogs.

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La langue basque enseignée aux adultes

La langue basque enseignée aux adultes | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it
Apprendre à parler l’euskara, la langue du Pays basque : voilà ce que propose la coordination des cours de basque aux adultes (AEK) qui regroupe les associations locales de gau eskola....
Charles Tiayon's insight:


Quelques enseignants et élèves au moment de lancer la nouvelle campagne d’inscriptions.© PHOTO 


Apprendre à parler l'euskara, la langue du Pays basque : voilà ce que propose la coordination des cours de basque aux adultes (AEK) qui regroupe les associations locales de gau eskola. Celle qui a son siège à Ascain, et qui œuvre également à Sare et à Saint-Pée-sur-Nivelle, vient de lancer sa nouvelle campagne d'inscription.

Publicité

Sous le slogan, « Le basque pratique », l'accent est mis cette année encore sur la méthodologie qui met les élèves en situation de communication.

« Parler en basque le plus rapidement possible, et ce dès le premier jour : tel est l'objectif » précise Christian Jauregui, per- manent et enseignant de l'association. « Ici, comme dans la centaine de centres d'apprentissage répartis en Pays basque Nord, le programme suit le Cadre européen commun de référence pour les langues (CECRL). »

Deux fois par semaine

Il n'y a pas d'âge pour s'inscrire. Dispensés aux adultes à partir de 16 ans, les cours ont lieu en petits groupes, par niveaux. Débutants complets ou élèves confirmés, bascophones souhaitant améliorer leur connaissance de la langue ou personnes désirant préparer le certificat d'aptitude (EGA), les élèves ont le choix entre suivre des cours en matinée, l'après-midi ou en soirée. Et cela, deux fois par semaine à raison de 5 à 6 heures de cours hebdomadaires.

« Les effectifs sont en hausse », se réjouit Sébastien Castet, également permanent et enseignant.

L'an dernier, ils étaient quelque 80 élèves dans les trois villages concernés - Ascain, Sare et Saint-Pée - à fréquenter ces cours d'euskara. « Afin d'organiser l'enseignement, mais aussi afin d'obtenir des locaux adaptés de la part des municipalités, il est important que les inscriptions soient faites avant la reprise des cours, aux heures et dates des permanences assurées dans chacune des communes », souligne Christian Jauregui.

Annie Dumay

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La langue basque se délie à toutes les sauces

La langue basque se délie à toutes les sauces | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it
Le 3e rendez-vous avec l’euskara, se déroulera du 22 au 28 septembre. Durant sept jours, quelque 70 activités seront proposées pour valoriser la langue basque. muriel bonneville...
Charles Tiayon's insight:

Bien qu'elle soit toujours vivante, la langue basque ne se transmet et ne s'emploie plus suffisamment. C'est un constat mais pas une fatalité pour la Commission extra-municipale de la langue basque à Biarritz qui, pour enrayer ce déclin et prouver combien l'euskara a en lui de nombreuses ressources pour perdurer, a lancé, en 2011, les journées de la langue basque, baptisées Mintzalasai (littéralement, parler sans complexe). Durant une semaine, du 22 au 28 septembre, le basque va se pratiquer ou se découvrir sous toutes ses formes grâce à l'implication d'acteurs de la ville qui ont la volonté commune de le faire vivre au quotidien.

Pour cette troisième édition, vingt-cinq associations biarrotes ont répondu présent pour concocter un programme innovant. « Le but de cette semaine culturelle est de rendre le basque plus visible à Biarritz et de le mettre à la portée de tous, explique Eneko Gorri, chargé de la langue à la Ville de Biarritz. Nous avons allié audace et inventivité dans le but d'explorer de nouveaux domaines, comme l'œnologie, la communication ou le graffi- ti. »

Une thématique par jour

Pendant sept jours, les quelque 70 activités proposées (la plupart gratuites) vont s'attacher à faire pratiquer, apprendre, connaître, défendre, valoriser et se réapproprier la langue basque.

Chaque journée se déclinera autour d'une identité forte. Ainsi, lundi 22, au lycée hôtelier, la thématique sera « cours de cuisine et dégustation de vins ». De 18 à 21 heures, trois ateliers seront proposés aux participants (1). Les deux premiers permettront de cuisiner en compagnie de Ramuntxo Berria, chef cuisinier à Olatua à Saint-Jean-de-Luz, ou de Txomin Agirre du Sin à Biarritz, le troisième de concocter des tapas avec Iñaki Albistur du Kalostrape à Bayonne. De 18 h 30 à 21 heures, l'œnologue Jenofa Irubetagoyena fera découvrir des vins basques. Le tout, évidemment en basque.

Mardi, de 18 à 20 heures à la Maison des associations, deux conférences seront données (4 euros l'entrée pour chacune). L'une sur la conduite de réunions en euskara, l'autre sur la communication associative en euskara. « L'idée est de donner des outils pratiques pour ne plus tenir éloignée la langue basque des réunions », précise Eneko Gorri.

Mercredi sera dédié aux enfants. Dès midi, Uda Leku, le centre de loisirs biarrot bascophone, fera portes ouvertes. De 14 à 16 heures, sur le campus de Surfrider, six ateliers (gratuits) autour de l'éveil au goût et à la gastronomie seront proposés. De 16 à 18 heures, à l'Atabal, les enfants pourront goûter et assister à un spectacle de magie (2 euros).

Conférences et rencontres

Jeudi, à 18 heures à la médiathèque, Kike Amonarriz animera une conférence sur « les bascophones au XXIe siècle » (entrée libre). À 21 heures, au cinéma Le Royal, sera projeté un documentaire réalisé par l'association Garabide « qui est allée voir ce qui se fait ailleurs pour mieux comprendre ce qui se joue ici » (3 euros).

Vendredi, à Denekin dès 18 heures, on pourra participer à un cours de langues parlées dans le quartier Pétricot. On pourra aussi voir l'exposition Déjouer Babel. À 18 h 30, au gaztetxe Mizanbu, démonstration et tournoi de pelote commentés par un bertsulari.

Enfin le week-end sera placé sous le signe de la culture et de l'amusement (lire ci-contre).

La première année, Mintzalasai avait attiré 2 000 personnes, 3 000 l'an passé. Cette troisième édition devrait battre un nouveau record. C'est en tout cas en ce sens que ce programme grand public a été bâti.

(1) Chaque atelier cuisine le lundi est fixé à 15 €. L'entrée pour la soirée cabaret, samedi, est à 5 €, 20 avec le repas. Inscriptions sur euskara@biarritz.fr

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Swype | Android | Supported Languages

Swype | Android | Supported Languages | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it
What languages does Swype for Android support? This is a list of all available languages for the Swype platform on Android devices.
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Translating books, transcending boundaries

Translating books, transcending boundaries | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it
How can we have a global Grinnell without global literacy? This was the question behind the Translation Collective, a newly-formed group that seeks to encourage and facilitate the practice of trans...
Charles Tiayon's insight:

How can we have a global Grinnell without global literacy? This was the question behind the Translation Collective, a newly-formed group that seeks to encourage and facilitate the practice of translation on campus.

The group’s co-founders, Professor Hai-Dang Phan, English and Writing Lab Assistant David Perez, hope to supplement the literary scene already established at Grinnell through a series of readings and roundtable discussions with translators. But Phan said that the group’s goals extend beyond promoting the artistic merits of translation. He sees the practice of translation as being inherently interdisciplinary.

“We’re sort of just trying to facilitate translation on campus as both a literary practice, a creative practice and also as a critical model of thinking about what it means to be a citizen in the world today,” Phan said. “I think translation is really vital to Grinnell’s stated mission of a Global Grinnell … not just literary translation, but translation across the disciplines.”

The group emerged from conversations between Phan and Perez about the merits of translation as a teaching tool which can illuminate topics as specific as individual word choice in writing and as broad as what it means to live between two cultures. They were also informed by the students in Phan’s Ethnic American literature seminar and the work they did with translation.

Phan and Perez are optimistic about the ways in which studying the specifics of translation can prompt students to think more critically about the nuances and limitations of language. Perez in particular hopes to include students from non-English speaking backgrounds in a way that encourages diverse perspectives rather than assimilation.

“I always was concerned with how to engage the international students who came to Grinnell and how to give them a way to contribute something, rather than expect them to quickly adapt to Grinnell and write in English and put a lot of pressure on them to adapt to this environment,” Perez said. “Something about the translation project made me think that this is a way that we could turn it around and say, ‘Okay, it’s great that you’re from China or Pakistan and yeah, you’ve got to write papers and all that stuff, but it would be cool if you could contribute what you already have, what you carried with you.’”

The Translation Collective currently includes a number of students working independently to translate texts with faculty support. Its future goals include hosting salons where students and faculty can showcase and respond to one another’s works in translation and reaching out to faculty from the Master of Fine Arts (MFA) in Literary Translation program at the University of Iowa, with whom Phan believes the Translation Collective shares a common goal.

“[The MFA program is] in line with our mission and spirit of trying to integrate translation across the curriculum as both a creative practice but also a method of inquiry that is very much in the spirit of the liberal arts, trying to integrate practice and language,” he said.

The translator series will begin this Thursday, Sept. 25 with Vietnamese translator, poet and fiction-writer Linh Dinh, who Phan describes as a “lively and rebellious spirit.” He will answer questions at a roundtable discussion at 4:15 p.m. in Mears Cottage. He will read from translations as well as his own work at 8 p.m. in Faulconer Gallery.

Ultimately, Phan said that studying translation and expanding literary boundaries is not just beneficial but necessary. “I don’t think it’s enough to read American literature, I think you need to read widely, globally. I think literature in translation actually sort of helps to enliven our literature.”

 
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Sefi Atta, Felicitas Hoppe and Philip Hensher Explain Why Translation is About More than Words

Sefi Atta, author of A Bit of Difference, Philip Hensher, author of Scenes From Early Life and The Emperor Waltz, and Felicitas Hoppe, ...
Charles Tiayon's insight:

Sefi Atta, author of A Bit of Difference, Philip Hensher, author of Scenes From Early Life and The Emperor Waltz, and Felicitas Hoppe, author of Hoppe, spoke to Derrick Higgenbotham about the art of translation.

Higginbotham started the conversation with an explanation of the sensitivities related to translation. Hoppe, one of Germany’s greatest authors, said a book which is translated becomes a very different book. She said both writing and reading are ways of translating.

Atta’s view of translation was very different to Hoppe’s. She told the audience that her first exprience of translated works was growing up in Nigeria reading Hansel and Gretel. Her approach to the translation is more controlled and she prefers to have a firmer say in the end product.

Hensher read passages from his latest novel The Emperor Waltz. The scene was inspired by a real raid on a gay bookshop. During the discussion he elaborated on the intricacies of culture when it comes to word choices.

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Translating in Chinese Mandarin, Chinese Cantonese, Simplified Chinese , or Traditional Chinese

Translating in Chinese Mandarin, Chinese Cantonese, Simplified Chinese , or Traditional Chinese | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it
Every language poses its respective quirks, idiosyncrasies, and difficulties to translators whenever they're being translated into another language.
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Every language poses its respective quirks, idiosyncrasies, and difficulties to translators whenever they're being translated into another language. On that note, the Chinese language can present itself to be quite a nightmare to any professional translationcompany or solo translation service. As such, there have been deficiencies and failures in the way human translation firms handle Chinese translation that's rooted from lack of awareness of the significance of context.

More to the point, in order to be able to translate context, a professional translation service needs to have a firm grasp at the different variations of Chinese. There isn't just one Chinese language; you can pick from four types of Chinese, in fact. You haveChinese Mandarin or Chinese Cantonese speakers and simplified or traditional writers. It's understandably difficult for any translator to have to shift between these four variations when trying to interpret the meaning of a given speech, text, or message.

The Four Chinese Language Variations


Actually, translation services will probably not be able to reach the context of their given work without first understanding, interpreting, and translating the variations contained within the Chinese tongue. To be true, many different misunderstandings have occurred in this particular realm of Chinese translation, which is why this article will provide simple explanations of each of these variants.


  • Spoken Chinese: There isn't only one kind of Chinese spoken in China. Just as English has several variations (American English, Australian English, and British English), so too does this particular Asian language. The two most common Chinese dialects that human translation agencies will encounter when translating the language are Mandarin and Cantonese. If you can tell the difference between the two dialects, then you're off to a good start.
    Mandarin is the main dialect used in China and is the language most people designate as "Chinese". It's the official language of mainland China (also known as the People's Republic of China) and it's spoken in Taiwan as well. Cantonese is distinct from its counterpart dialect save for the fact that's it's also commonly used in Chinese-populated territories. It's mostly spoken in the Guangdong or Canton province in mainland China, Macao, and Hong Kong.


  • Written Chinese: Nowadays, in order to balance out the past complexity of old Chinese writings so that it can be understood by more people, it currently has two forms: simplified and traditional. This came about when simplified Chinese was developed by the Chinese Government in 1949 in order to improve the literacy rates of its populace.
    At this point, the population of mainland China is mostly using the newer version of the Chinese script while other Chinese territories outside the continent—Macao, Hong Kong, and Taiwan—continues to employ the traditional way of writing Chinese. The difference between the two can be seen in their names: Simplified Chinese exercises a simpler way of creating complex characters, while the traditional form in based on earlier symbols that utilize more strokes.

By keeping in mind that the Chinese language has a lot more complexities and variations than meets the eye, a translator can avoid overspecializing on just one particular variety of Chinese and can become a jack-of-all-trades when it comes to translating this Asiatic tongue.

On the other hand, by knowing that there are deviations in the Chinese language, translation services can determine which variant to focus on depending on the nature of their project (e.g., Taiwan writes with traditional Chinese characters and speaks Mandarin Chinese for the most part, so translators should take note of that when doing translation work for a Taiwanese company).

One Hour Translation is the world’s fastest professional translation service. One Hour Translation provides Fast, High Quality Professional Translation on a 24/7 basis thanks to a community of over 8000 certified translators from all over the world.

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Translating Cultures - Arts & Humanities Research Council

Our latest film shines a light on the AHRC’s Translating Cultures theme.

From projects examining languages at borders, to a comparative study on Multicultural Cities, the Translating Cultures theme aims to  increase understanding and communication within, between and across diverse cultures. The Translating Cultures theme addresses this by studying the role of translation in the transmission, interpretation, transformation and sharing of languages, values, beliefs, histories and narratives.

In this film we hear from theme the leadership Fellow, Charles Forsdick; as well as from a variety of academics who have been funded through the theme.

Charles Tiayon's insight:

Our latest film shines a light on the AHRC’s Translating Cultures theme.

From projects examining languages at borders, to a comparative study on Multicultural Cities, the Translating Cultures theme aims to  increase understanding and communication within, between and across diverse cultures. The Translating Cultures theme addresses this by studying the role of translation in the transmission, interpretation, transformation and sharing of languages, values, beliefs, histories and narratives.

In this film we hear from theme the leadership Fellow, Charles Forsdick; as well as from a variety of academics who have been funded through the theme.

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Presentan poemario de Rosa Ausländer traducido por Teresa Ruiz Rosas | El Búho - Noticias Arequipa

Presentan poemario de Rosa Ausländer traducido por Teresa Ruiz Rosas | El Búho - Noticias Arequipa | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it

Este jueves 18 se presentó el poemario “Mi aliento se llama ahora” de la poeta judía Rose Ausländer en el auditorio del Instituto Goethe en Lima. La selección y traducción al español estuvo a cargo de la escritora arequipeña Teresa Ruiz Rosas y de su padre, el reconocido poeta José Ruiz Rosas. La presentación estuvo presidida por la poeta Julia Wong.

Rose Ausländer (Ucrania, 1901-1988) es una de las voces más destacadas de poesía en alemán del siglo XX. Exiliada por los sucesos de la primera Guerra Mundial, escribió más de veinte poemarios tales como El arco iris, entre otros. Sus anteriores poemarios no fueron nunca traducidos. En Alemania recibió muchos premios y la cruz del Mérito del País (1984).

“Mi aliento se llama ahora” es una antología que rescata pasajes de su vida como el tema de la persecución a los judíos de parte de los nazis, el exilio, los procesos de separación, el amor, así como el no poder escribir en el idioma alemán por considerarlo en la época como la “lengua del verdugo”. De otro lado, está la influencia de Paul Celan en su estilo literario y como parte del prólogo del libro.

Durante la mesa de presentación, Teresa Ruiz Rosas refirió que traducir literatura es un acto solitario y que demanda cierta fidelidad al texto original. Sin embargo, “la poesía de Ausländer conlleva más que una buena traducción pues es la filosofía y la vida las que se unen en este tratado poético y allí está la búsqueda de la esencia de la palabra”.

La novelista arequipeña agregó que aunque la poeta publicó de forma tardía sus textos, ella se definía como poeta comprometida con su sociedad y que buscaba crear un diálogo emocional con el lector a través de sus continuas lecturas filosóficas.

Para Julia Wong, la poeta Ausländer tiene el apellido más simbólico que haya podido recibir en lengua alemana pues este significa “lo extranjero”. Empero esta ironía del apellido se remonta al que ella adoptó el de su anterior esposo. Dice: “la voz, la capacidad de Rose denota la imagen como si el libro hubiese sido escrito por todas las mujeres del mundo”. Concluyó con el retrato filosófico que perdura la visión profunda de la poeta y su repercusión en la literatura moderna.

(Por Giuliana Catari )

Charles Tiayon's insight:

Este jueves 18 se presentó el poemario “Mi aliento se llama ahora” de la poeta judía Rose Ausländer en el auditorio del Instituto Goethe en Lima. La selección y traducción al español estuvo a cargo de la escritora arequipeña Teresa Ruiz Rosas y de su padre, el reconocido poeta José Ruiz Rosas. La presentación estuvo presidida por la poeta Julia Wong.

Rose Ausländer (Ucrania, 1901-1988) es una de las voces más destacadas de poesía en alemán del siglo XX. Exiliada por los sucesos de la primera Guerra Mundial, escribió más de veinte poemarios tales como El arco iris, entre otros. Sus anteriores poemarios no fueron nunca traducidos. En Alemania recibió muchos premios y la cruz del Mérito del País (1984).

“Mi aliento se llama ahora” es una antología que rescata pasajes de su vida como el tema de la persecución a los judíos de parte de los nazis, el exilio, los procesos de separación, el amor, así como el no poder escribir en el idioma alemán por considerarlo en la época como la “lengua del verdugo”. De otro lado, está la influencia de Paul Celan en su estilo literario y como parte del prólogo del libro.

Durante la mesa de presentación, Teresa Ruiz Rosas refirió que traducir literatura es un acto solitario y que demanda cierta fidelidad al texto original. Sin embargo, “la poesía de Ausländer conlleva más que una buena traducción pues es la filosofía y la vida las que se unen en este tratado poético y allí está la búsqueda de la esencia de la palabra”.

La novelista arequipeña agregó que aunque la poeta publicó de forma tardía sus textos, ella se definía como poeta comprometida con su sociedad y que buscaba crear un diálogo emocional con el lector a través de sus continuas lecturas filosóficas.

Para Julia Wong, la poeta Ausländer tiene el apellido más simbólico que haya podido recibir en lengua alemana pues este significa “lo extranjero”. Empero esta ironía del apellido se remonta al que ella adoptó el de su anterior esposo. Dice: “la voz, la capacidad de Rose denota la imagen como si el libro hubiese sido escrito por todas las mujeres del mundo”. Concluyó con el retrato filosófico que perdura la visión profunda de la poeta y su repercusión en la literatura moderna.

(Por Giuliana Catari )

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Common Writing Mistakes. Oh, How Common!

Common Writing Mistakes. Oh, How Common! | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it
The great thing about writing is that you can play with language, syntax, tone of voice etc – but there are rules to follow in terms of spelling, punctuation, readability, fact checking. The most important thing about writing, aside from accuracy, is that it should communicate your message well. Here’s my guide to some of...
Charles Tiayon's insight:
The great thing about writing is that you can play with language, syntax, tone of voice etc – but there are rules to follow in terms of spelling, punctuation, readability, fact checking.The most important thing about writing, aside from accuracy, is that it should communicate your message well.Here’s my guide to some of the most common mistakes that writers make – in articles, sales proposals or on Facebook (where grammar is a law unto itself).Feel free to pile in and point out what you think is wrong with this article. Is there anything I could of included that I didn’t?Stop Capitalising Every Word In A SentenceDon’t be fooled. That headline is ALL in capitals because it’s the style of this website to have sub-headings in upper case.Thanks to the internet and the global media explosion, we now commonly read articles published in America. Consequently, we adopt Americanisms, which isn’t always a bad thing. Personally, I can’t wait to start referring to work colleagues as “y’all”.Picking up colloquialisms and words is one thing, but punctuation and grammar are a different thing altogether. The biggest mistake that Britons make is capitalising every word in a headline. That’s how they do it in the USA, but in Blighty we still have the rule that a headline should be structured like a normal sentence – capitalise the first word and proper nouns only.That brings me to another point. What’s with this habit people have of capitalising nouns randomly? People do it in emails, proposals, articles… Just random words given capital letters like they are a brand or a title of something. Here’s an example: “We teach Students the art of Doughnut Making”.Forget for a second that you would probably never come across that sentence in real life. Focus on the nouns. The words student, doughnut and making are not proper nouns. They are just words. Stop giving capital letters to everything For Pete’s Sake.Common Writing Mistakes. Oh, How Common! image petesplumbingCommon Writing Mistakes. Oh, How Common!Common words that are proper nounsSome common words should be capitalised because they are actually brand names. Jacuzzi, for example, is a trademark owned by the Jacuzzi company. If you refer to someone having one in their house, it had better be a Jacuzzi and not another brand of whirlpool bath.The Portakabin company once contacted The Big Breakfast on Channel 4 because the presenters kept referring to their “portakabin”. While it was a portable building, or a shed, it wasn’t one made by the Portakabin company. You can only call something a Portakabin if it is made by that company.Likewise Hoover. We can vacuum the carpet but we can’t Hoover it if we’re using a Dyson.Here’s a list of some trademark names that are used generically. Some can be used generically and some are still proper names, depending on the country (see ‘Fact checking’ below).Common Writing Mistakes. Oh, How Common! image vacuumcleanersCommon Writing Mistakes. Oh, How Common!SellotapeAspirinLinoleumThermosBiroFilofaxJet SkiMemory StickRollerbladeTarmacVelcroOn a side note, I get annoyed when I am in a restaurant or bar and I order a Coke, only to be given a Pepsi. They are not the same thing!!!How many times can you exclaim something?And there’s another thing. Multiple exclamation marks. Why? There is no grammatical rule for any more than one exclamation mark in a sentence. Not only that, they are over-used anyway. Many people add exclamation marks to the end of any sentence they think is important – as if no one will read it unless it has an exclamation mark at the end!PR people often do this when they write press releases. Using exclamation marks at the end of every sentence is a bit like those people on social media who use LOL in place of full stops. (“I said I would see him tomorrow LOL He said not if I see you first LOL We laughed PMSL LOL”)Punctuation in general is perhaps the one area of writing that everyone should understand but few people do.You know the saying that an apostrophe is the difference between “knowing your shit” and “knowing you’re shit”. The same can be said of commas. There is a big difference between saying “let’s eat, Granny” and “let’s eat Granny”.Commas seem to confuse people. Even top publications now have sub-editors who struggle to use commas properly. As a simple rule of thumb, think of a comma as a natural breathing point.They also signify the start and end of a clause within a longer sentence – often people put a comma at only one end of a clause. For example, “The fireman, who is tall, has a long hose.” That works because “who is tall” is a clause that can be removed without breaking the main sentence. “The fireman, who is tall has a long hose” is wrong. This comma usage guide from Skillswise is useful.What are you going jargon about?Many writers fail to explain acronyms or jargon – usually because they are so used to using those terms that they think everyone understands them. You might assume everyone knows what a KPI is or what purpose is served by a SWOT analysis, but not everyone does.A good editing rule followed by reputable publications is that acronyms should be spelled out the first time they are used. If you use jargon, make sure it is comprehensible to a lay person.Common Writing Mistakes. Oh, How Common! image business acronymsCommon Writing Mistakes. Oh, How Common!Fact checking – don’t write if it’s not rightWhat’s the point of writing a perfect article if the information is wrong? Whether it’s a celebrity spelling (Nicolas Cage has no h), a telephone number (have you called to test it?) or a country name (do you know the difference between Colombia and Columbia?), check spellings as well as facts.Do numbers add up? If you have a headline saying £15 million and the story says £14.6 million, which is correct? If you include facts, figures, proper nouns or any other information, make sure your facts are right before you publish.The internet is already full of made-up facts without you claiming that Sir Richard Attenborough played Tinky Winky just because you read it on Wikipedia.A thing is a thing. A group is also a thingPlurals. Now there’s a conundrum. “Tottenham Hotspur are a great football team”, or “Tottenham Hotspur is a great football team”? (No heckling at the back.)A single entity should not be a plural. A company, for example, is a thing, not several things. You say “the company is”, not “the company are”. This gets confusing because we get so used to talking about a group of people and thinking of a company or a football team as a group of people. A company is a single entity.While we’re talking about plurals…A woman is a single person. Women means several people. So many people mix up the two.Similar word mix ups are common, such as then instead of than; upmost instead of utmost, quite instead of quiet. Do you say tackful instead of tactful? How about affect and effect – which is the noun and which is the verb?I listed some common word mix ups in an earlier article, Remember your English, a pedant’s guide to writing.Spelling gets complicated when you have to think about whether your audience is English, American, Canadian or Australian. There are differences across all four for some words. Make sure you are using the right spelling and vocabulary for your intended reader.Punctuation also changes sometimes. For example, in traditional English (you know, the proper one), partial quotes are punctuated after the closing quotation mark. For example: He said the weather was “going to be bad”. In the US, the punctuation comes inside the quote – He said the weather was “going to be bad.”Colloquially speaking, you’re OK, end of, innitOne odd piece of syntax I see often, used by many people, is a mixture of between and from. For example, many people commonly write “Between 200 – 400″ which, spelled out, means “between 200 to 400″ – clearly not correct. You could write “between 200 and 400″ or “from 200 to 400″, or simply “200 – 400″.Colloquialisms are common in writing, which is fine if they make sense. Many people tend to write in a badly structured way, though, if they write as they talk. Phrasing you would use in conversation may not work in written communication.The biggest lesson to take away here is that colloquial writing often makes us unnecessarily verbose. Adding phrases such as “you know” and “sort of” is a waste of time. Some writers use phrasing such as, “The thing is that the weather was bad.” Why not just say the weather was bad?Another common colloquialism is to start a statement with “so” – “So I was walking to the pub…” – which is particularly bad if you tell a story where each new paragraph starts with “so”.If you start a sentence with also, you don’t need to use “as well” at the end. This is common in speech: “Also, I bought batteries, as well.”Another example of colloquialism in writing? “I have got” or “I’ve got”. This doesn’t make sense – you can have something or you can get something but you can’t have got something.This article was syndicated from Business 2 Community: Common Writing Mistakes. Oh, How Common!
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