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Vacancy: Copy editor for youthstart knowledge products, Home base

Vacancy: Copy editor for youthstart knowledge products, Home base | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it

Copy editor for youthstart knowledge products, Home base
Closing Date: Wednesday, 23 May 2012

COPY EDITOR FOR YOUTHSTART KNOWLEDGE PRODUCTS
Location : home base Application Deadline : 23-May-12 Type of Contract : Individual Contract Post Level : International Consultant Languages Required :
English Starting Date :
(date when the selected candidate is expected to start) 01-Jun-2012
Duration of Initial Contract : Up to 30 days
Background
UN Capital Development Fund is the UN’s capital investment agency for the world’s 48 least developed countries . It creates new opportunities for poor people and their communities by increasing access to microfinance and investment capital. UNCDF focuses on Africa and the poorest countries of Asia, with a special commitment to countries emerging from conflict or crisis. It provides seed capital – grants and loans – and technical support to help microfinance institutions reach more poor households and small businesses, and local governments finance the capital investments – water systems, feeder roads, schools, irrigation schemes – that will improve poor peoples’ lives. UNCDF programmes help to empower women, and are designed to catalyze larger capital flows from the private sector, national governments and development partners, for maximum impact toward the Millennium Development Goals.

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Metaglossia: The Translation World
News about translation, interpreting, intercultural communication, terminology and lexicography - as it happens
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UN Careers - jobs in this network (Translators, Revisers, Editors, etc.)

UN Careers -  jobs in this network (Translators, Revisers, Editors, etc.) | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it

Vacancies in this network: Translators, Revisers, Editors, etc.

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Japanese telco Docomo to tackle machine translation with new joint venture

Japanese telco Docomo to tackle machine translation with new joint venture | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it
The international partnership will start from October.
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NTT Docomo (“Docomo”) is best known as Japan’s most widely used mobile carrier. Now, the company is also branching into machine translation. Docomo announced it will create a new company, Mirai Translate, in a joint venture with European translation service provider SysTran and Japanese speech technology firm FueTrek. Initial capital for the venture comes at JPY 990 million (US$ 9.05 million), with Docomo supplying 51 percent ownership, SysTran 30 percent, and FueTrek the remaining 19 percent. Mirai Translate will go live in October. Docomo says that the new company will specialize in translation for a wide range of topics across multiple industries in English, Japan, Korean, and Chinese. Citing the expected increase in visitors to Japan ahead of the 2020 Olympic Games, Docomo anticipates a strong demand for translation services. In this deal, SysTran sticks out as the critical piece. According to FueTrek’s company profile, Docomo is a major investor of theirs. The telco actually has a rarely talked about translation service of its own, which means SysTran was brought into the deal in order to make Mirai Translate a viable service. SysTran’s history stretches back to 1968 and it has long attracted high-profile clients like Xerox, the US Air Force, PwC, and AltaVista Babelfish to its translation service. In fact, Systran even powered Google Translate until 2007 when the search giant turned to its own in-house team. Despite its longevity, SysTran has not become a household name. It’s most recent financial report shows that its top five customers make up 46.2 percent of its EUR 10.7 million (US$13.6 million) annual revenue. Further, that revenue only boils down to EUR 579,000 (US$734,716) in net income. The partnership with Docomo could help SysTran increase its global profile, however. That EUR 10.7 million in revenue last year? None of it came from Asia. Revenue projections aside, Mirai Translate will have to answer one major question before it can call itself a success – can machine translation be superior to human translation? History suggests we should be skeptical.

Read more: Japanese telco Docomo to tackle machine translation with new joint venture http://www.techinasia.com/docomo-machine-translation/

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'So Notre Dame:' translations of ND cliches // The Observer

'So Notre Dame:' translations of ND cliches // The Observer | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it
Now that we’ve been at school for a month, we’ve once again gotten used to (or introduced to, for freshmen readers) being around Notre Dame students 24/7. One important part of this unique culture, as with any, is the common language used to communicate ideas. And just like any language, sometimes there’s a hidden meaning
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Connecticut Coalition Against Domestic Violence to launch Spanish-language hotline

Connecticut Coalition Against Domestic Violence to launch Spanish-language hotline | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it
HARTFORD >> The Connecticut Coalition Against Domestic Violence will launch a new statewide hotline Oct. 1 “aimed at strengthening access to services for Spanish-speaking victims of domestic violence,&
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“CCADV and our 18 member organizations are committed to providing the best possible service to all victims of culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds,” CCADV Chief Executive Officer Karen Jarmoc said, also in the release. “It is incredibly important that someone on the other end of the phone not only speaks the same language as you, but also understands how culture can impact your experience.”



“The new Spanish hotline will complement the existing toll-free statewide hotline, which will still be available to accept calls from any victim of domestic violence regardless of what language she or he speaks. Counselors answering either hotline are able to use Language Line, a national translation service that accommodates over 200 languages. However, CCADV prioritized the development of a dedicated Spanish hotline as Connecticut’s Spanish-speaking population continues to grow,” the release said.




The launch of the new hotline will be supported by a statewide campaign - “Vida...hay opciones para violencia domestica” or “Life...there are options for domestic violence,” the release said. “Culturally relevant materials designed specifically for Spanish-speaking individuals will be distributed throughout the state to help raise awareness about the new resource. Outreach efforts will also include partnerships with local government and other community partners as we work together to eliminate barriers to service for all victims of domestic violence.”



“We are extremely excited about the new hotline and outreach campaign,” CCADV Director of Diversity and Accessibility Wendy Mota Kasongo said, also in the release, .



“CCADV has prioritized advocacy for funding for a dedicated Spanish-hotline, which was allocated earlier this year by the General Assembly through the Judicial Branch Office of Victim Services. Funding was secured in large part by” Sen.Beth Bye, D-West Hartford, and Reps. Toni Walker. D-New Haven, Mae Flexer, D-Killingly, and Cathy Abercrombie, D-Meriden, the release said.



Those who need help with domestic violence can call toll-free statewide hotline: 844-831-9200 (Spanish) or 888-774-2900 (English). Both are available 24/7 and all services are free and confidential. Victims speaking any language can seek assistance through either hotline, the release said. “Victims will be connected to their local domestic violence organization where they can find, among other resources, counseling, safety planning, emergency shelter or safe homes, group support, services for children and advocacy within the court system.”

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Symposium on endangered languages held to preserve the Ryukyuan languages

Symposium on endangered languages held to preserve the Ryukyuan languages | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it
September 18, 2014 Ryukyu Shimpo On September 17 at the Okinawa Convention Center in Ginowan City, the 18th Foundation of Endangered Languages Symposium was held. It was the first time for the event to be held in East Asia. Researchers presented the critical problem of the dying out of Ryukyuan languages. They also reported on preservation efforts in Hawaii, where the Okinawan community has initiated various activities to perpetuate use of the language. Presenting Ryukyuan ...
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On September 17 at the Okinawa Convention Center in Ginowan City, the 18th Foundation of Endangered Languages Symposium was held. It was the first time for the event to be held in East Asia. Researchers presented the critical problem of the dying out of Ryukyuan languages. They also reported on preservation efforts in Hawaii, where the Okinawan community has initiated various activities to perpetuate use of the language. Presenting Ryukyuan dance and performing arts, the symposium showcased the cultural diversity and uniqueness of Okinawa to the world. About 100 people from 21 countries, including speakers and researchers of endangered languages, took part in the symposium.

Chair Shinsho Miyara of the Ryukyuan Heritage Language Society explained the origin and structure of Ryukyuan languages. Professor Masahide Ishihara from the University of the Ryukyus stated, “It is possible for Ryukyuan languages to coexist with Japanese language. If Shimakutuba (Ryukyuan languages) are more used in our daily life, this will establish a positive image of the language, eventually leading us to preserve Ryukyuan languages.”

Professor Tatsuro Maeda from the Tokyo University of Foreign Languages gave a presentation on Amami languages, saying; “In Amami, Kagoshima Prefecture has the administrative authority, and the population size and economic power are also small. Amami faces a more severe situation than Okinawa in preserving its languages. People in Amami and Okinawa need to work together for inheritance of the endangered languages.”

Professor Emeritus at the University of Hawaii Kyoko Hijirida reported on Okinawan language inheritance activities at the university. On September 18 and 19 at the Okinawa International University, researchers attended additional presentations in English that were not open to public.

(English translation by T&CT and Megumi Chibana)

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COPD Strongly Associated with Cognitive Deterioration

COPD Strongly Associated with Cognitive Deterioration | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it
According to study results published in the International Journal of COPD, researchers found chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients had the highest cognitive deterioration rates compared to patients who were asymptomatic smokers (AS) or had chronic non-obstructive bronchitis (CNOB).
 
For their study, Italian researchers enrolled 402 patients (COPD n=229, CNOB n=127, and AS n=46) and used the Mini Mental Status test (MMSE) to assess patients’ time orientation, attention, and calculation (normal score: greater than or equal to 27 points; moderate cognitive impairment: 24–18 points; severe cognitive impairment: less than 18 points); the Clock Drawing test to gauge memory and symbolic representation (normal score: 7–10 points; cognitive impairment: less than 6 points); Trail Making test (TMT) to gauge visual processing and reproduction of numeric sequences (cognitive impairment: greater than or equal to 94 seconds); and the TMT B test to measure cognition flexibility, and shifting capacity skills  (cognitive impairment: greater than or equal to 283 seconds). 
 
To find a possible link, the researchers created multiple regression models between cognitive impairment (P<0.005 indicated statistical significance) and the patient’s age, sex, body mass index (BMI), smoking habit, forced expiratory volume in the first second (FEV1), FEV1/forced vital capacity (FVC), arterial partial pressure of O2 (PaO2) and CO2 (PaCO2), CAT score, MRC score, and possible comorbid conditions.
 
Based on their analysis, the investigators noted COPD patients had the highest cognitive deterioration rate, followed by CNOB and AS subjects (P<0.001). Furthermore, the writers found forced expiratory volume in the first second, and arterial partial pressure of O2 and of CO2 was associated with cognitive deterioration. Specifically, COPD, CNOB, and AS subjects aged 40–69 years had the most accelerated rates of cognitive impairment (P<0.01 compared to normal values), with the trend being especially pronounced in COPD subjects.
 
“Cognition can deteriorate substantially in subjects with chronic airway flow limitation (ie, COPD subjects), but also in subjects with other milder persistent airway disorders (ie, CNOB subjects and AS). The extent and the prevalence of this deterioration were directly related to the severity of the respiratory impairment,” the authors noted.
 
Despite their overarching discovery, the investigators recommended additional research be conducted further exploring chronic airway disorders and their effect on other aspects of cognition.
 



Further Reading
Diabetes and Resistant Hypertension: Microvascular Complications
Resistant hypertension is common among patients with type 2 diabetes, and is strongly associated with microvascular disease.
Study: Autistic Kids Out of Shape
Schools could do more to ensure that children with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD) are getting adequate exercise, a team of Oregon State University researchers found. Writing in Autism Research and Treatment Kiley Tyler and colleagues reported on their study measuring the physical fitness of children with ASD. The study was done at OSU in Corvallis, OR, where Tyler is a doctoral student in exercise and sport science.
Tales of the Anion Gap, Part II: Metabolic Acidosis
In this installment, we look at underlying causes of metabolic acidosis, approaches for evaluating patients with suspected metabolic acidosis, and why measurement of the anion gap is of great usefulness in these cases.
New Data Provides Physicians with Confident Weight Loss Recommendations
There is a wide variety of evidence to support benefits of low-fat diets versus low carbohydrate diets and vice versa. As of today, no one can tell us with certainty whether the well-worn dictum "calories in calories out" is really true. The National Weight Control Registry data give us some confidence in recommending that to lose weight most people need to alter their diet to reduce calories, and need to exercise on a near-daily basis.
Pediatricians Endorse Intrauterine Devices, Implants for Teen Birth Control
Long-acting contraceptive devices should be the first choice of birth control for teenage girls, new recommendations from the American Academy of Pediatrics state. The guidelines were published online Sept. 29 in Pediatrics.
ESICM: Fenoldopam Offers Limited Benefit After Cardiac Surgery
For critically ill cardiac surgery patients, fenoldopam does not reduce the need for renal replacement therapy, according to a study published online Sept. 29 in the Journal of the American Medical Association. The study was published to coincide with the annual meeting of the European Society of Intensive Care Medicine, held from Sept. 27 to Oct. 1 in Barcelona, Spain.
Daytime Cholecystectomy May Be Better for Acute Cholecystitis
Patients who require cholecystectomy for acute cholecystitis are more likely to have a minimally invasive procedure if they have the surgery during daytime rather than at night, according to a study published online Sept. 20 in the American Journal of Surgery.
Charles Tiayon's insight:

According to study results published in the International Journal of COPD, researchers found chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients had the highest cognitive deterioration rates compared to patients who were asymptomatic smokers (AS) or had chronic non-obstructive bronchitis (CNOB).   For their study, Italian researchers enrolled 402 patients (COPD n=229, CNOB n=127, and AS n=46) and used the Mini Mental Status test (MMSE) to assess patients’ time orientation, attention, and calculation (normal score: greater than or equal to 27 points; moderate cognitive impairment: 24–18 points; severe cognitive impairment: less than 18 points); the Clock Drawing test to gauge memory and symbolic representation (normal score: 7–10 points; cognitive impairment: less than 6 points); Trail Making test (TMT) to gauge visual processing and reproduction of numeric sequences (cognitive impairment: greater than or equal to 94 seconds); and the TMT B test to measure cognition flexibility, and shifting capacity skills  (cognitive impairment: greater than or equal to 283 seconds).    To find a possible link, the researchers created multiple regression models between cognitive impairment (P<0.005 indicated statistical significance) and the patient’s age, sex, body mass index (BMI), smoking habit, forced expiratory volume in the first second (FEV1), FEV1/forced vital capacity (FVC), arterial partial pressure of O2 (PaO2) and CO2 (PaCO2), CAT score, MRC score, and possible comorbid conditions.   Based on their analysis, the investigators noted COPD patients had the highest cognitive deterioration rate, followed by CNOB and AS subjects (P<0.001). Furthermore, the writers found forced expiratory volume in the first second, and arterial partial pressure of O2 and of CO2 was associated with cognitive deterioration. Specifically, COPD, CNOB, and AS subjects aged 40–69 years had the most accelerated rates of cognitive impairment (P<0.01 compared to normal values), with the trend being especially pronounced in COPD subjects.   “Cognition can deteriorate substantially in subjects with chronic airway flow limitation (ie, COPD subjects), but also in subjects with other milder persistent airway disorders (ie, CNOB subjects and AS). The extent and the prevalence of this deterioration were directly related to the severity of the respiratory impairment,” the authors noted.   Despite their overarching discovery, the investigators recommended additional research be conducted further exploring chronic airway disorders and their effect on other aspects of cognition. - See more at: http://www.hcplive.com/articles/COPD-Strongly-Associated-with-Cognitive-Deterioration#sthash.gVIqG5Xg.dpuf

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ICC - Basic Legal Texts

The Official Journal

The Official Journal of the ICC was created pursuant to regulation 7 of the Regulations of the Court and contains the following texts and amendments there to:

  1. The Rome Statute;
  2. The Rules of Procedure and Evidence;
  3. The Elements of Crimes;
  4. The Regulations of the Court;
  5. The Regulations of the Office of the Prosecutor;
  6. The Regulations of the Registry;
  7. The Code of Professional Conduct for counsel;
  8. The Code of Judicial Ethics;
  9. Staff rules of the International Criminal Court;
  10. The Staff Regulations;
  11. The Financial Regulations and Rules;
  12. The Agreement on the Privileges and Immunities of the International Criminal Court;
  13. Agreement between the International Criminal Court and the United Nations;
  14. The Headquarters Agreement with the Host State;
  15. Any other material as decided by the Presidency in consultation with the Prosecutor and/or the Registrar.

Legal Tools 

The Legal Tools Project aspires to equip users with the legal information, digests and software required to work effectively with international criminal law.

It seeks to serve as a complete virtual library on international criminal law and justice. The Tools comprise the largest online collection of relevant documents and legal digests available through the Case Matrix application. Some 13 collections of legal documents are included, together with four legal research and reference tools developed by lawyers connected with the Court and external partners: the Case Matrix, the Elements Digest, the Proceedings Digest and the Means of Proof Digest.

Text in these tools - or the organization of legal information in the collections - does not necessarily represent views of the ICC, any of its Organs or any participants in the proceedings before the ICC.

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The Official Journal

The Official Journal of the ICC was created pursuant to regulation 7 of the Regulations of the Court and contains the following texts and amendments there to:

  1. The Rome Statute;
  2. The Rules of Procedure and Evidence;
  3. The Elements of Crimes;
  4. The Regulations of the Court;
  5. The Regulations of the Office of the Prosecutor;
  6. The Regulations of the Registry;
  7. The Code of Professional Conduct for counsel;
  8. The Code of Judicial Ethics;
  9. Staff rules of the International Criminal Court;
  10. The Staff Regulations;
  11. The Financial Regulations and Rules;
  12. The Agreement on the Privileges and Immunities of the International Criminal Court;
  13. Agreement between the International Criminal Court and the United Nations;
  14. The Headquarters Agreement with the Host State;
  15. Any other material as decided by the Presidency in consultation with the Prosecutor and/or the Registrar.

Legal Tools 

The Legal Tools Project aspires to equip users with the legal information, digests and software required to work effectively with international criminal law.

It seeks to serve as a complete virtual library on international criminal law and justice. The Tools comprise the largest online collection of relevant documents and legal digests available through the Case Matrix application. Some 13 collections of legal documents are included, together with four legal research and reference tools developed by lawyers connected with the Court and external partners: the Case Matrix, the Elements Digest, the Proceedings Digest and the Means of Proof Digest.

Text in these tools - or the organization of legal information in the collections - does not necessarily represent views of the ICC, any of its Organs or any participants in the proceedings before the ICC.

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Legal Dictionary


Welcome to the Multilingual Legal GlossaryTo begin your search:(1)Enter a term below(2)Select your language (Optional)(3)Click Search
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Welcome to the Multilingual Legal GlossaryTo begin your search:(1)Enter a term below(2)Select your language (Optional)(3)Click Search
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WIPO Pearl launched, a Free Multilingual Terminology Database | IPR Helpdesk

WIPO Pearl launched, a Free Multilingual Terminology Database | IPR Helpdesk | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it

The World Intellectual Property Organization (WIPO) has launched a new database providing free access to a wealth of multilingual scientific and technical terminology.

Through its web-based interface, WIPO Pearl promotes accurate and consistent use of terms across different languages, and makes it easier to search and share scientific and technical knowledge.

The database initially includes terms found in applications filed via WIPO’s Patent Cooperation Treaty (PCT) and will eventually include collections from other areas of WIPO, such as trademarks, industrial designs, and terminology found in other treaties administered by WIPO.

For further information, please click here.

Charles Tiayon's insight:

The World Intellectual Property Organization (WIPO) has launched a new database providing free access to a wealth of multilingual scientific and technical terminology.

Through its web-based interface, WIPO Pearl promotes accurate and consistent use of terms across different languages, and makes it easier to search and share scientific and technical knowledge.

The database initially includes terms found in applications filed via WIPO’s Patent Cooperation Treaty (PCT) and will eventually include collections from other areas of WIPO, such as trademarks, industrial designs, and terminology found in other treaties administered by WIPO.

For further information, please click here.

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Atelier projet de traduction littéraire - Actualité - BEP

Atelier projet de traduction littéraire - Actualité - BEP | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it
Participez à l'atelier projet de traduction littéraire le 2 octobre 2014.
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Atelier projet de traduction littéraire

29/09/2014

Le PCC Europe (Point Contact Culture Wallonie-Bruxelles) organise un atelier projet de traduction littéraire le 2 octobre 2014.

Soutien à la traduction littéraire

Cet atelier est destiné aux maisons d'édition qui souhaitent déposer un projet de traduction d’œuvres littéraires dans le cadre d'Europe Créative. Ce programme de financement européen va lancer un appel pour le soutien à la traduction littéraire.

Infos pratiques

Cet atelier aura lieu le 2 octobre 2014 de 13h30 à 17h00 à la Maison des Auteurs - Rue du Prince Royal, 87 - 1050 Bruxelles

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James Franco on His Lost Documentary ‘Saturday Night’ and Obstacles to Creativity

James Franco on His Lost Documentary ‘Saturday Night’ and Obstacles to Creativity | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it
The multi-tasking actor talks about his lost documentary about the iconic sketch show.
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In 2008, James Franco was given an assignment for his New York University film class to put together a seven-minute documentary on a subject of his choice. The actor had recently hosted “Saturday Night Live” and thought a good subject for his school project would be following cast member Bill Hader.

But once he got the sign off from a few key “SNL” people, the project ballooned into something much bigger, where he spent an entire week with the cast and host, John Malkovich. He simply called the film “Saturday Night” and it was intended to get a theatrical release, making the rounds on the festival circuit in 2010. But bureaucracy got in the way, causing it to be shelved – until last week. The film arrived on Hulu this past Friday.

From the onset, it’s clear that this movie is more than just a vanity project or something to get a passing grade on. For anyone interested in comedy and the creative process, it’s essential viewing. Franco gives a window into how the show comes together so quickly, with many interviews of cast members like Fred ArmisenWill ForteSeth Meyers,Kristen Wiig, in their prime. Franco talked with Speakeasy last week about “Saturday Night,” creativity, and his love-hate relationship with the Internet.

“Saturday Night” was shot in 2008 but it’s now just getting a release. What happened?

I shot it when I was a film student at NYU. It started as an assignment. We were supposed to do a seven-minute observational documentary. I asked Bill Hader, because I had recently been on the show, if I could follow him for a week. I’d make a seven-minute portrait of him. Once I realized if I was really going to follow him, I’d need to get certain kinds of permissions like the permission of the host, maybe Lorne Michaels permission. Once I saw that Lorne was going to let me film so much behind the scenes, I thought I shouldn’t waste it on a school assignment. Let’s make a feature-length film. But we didn’t have all the official signatures a responsible documentarian would have before going into a subject. After we made it and cut it together, everybody loved it and the cast all signed off – but then there was NBC. It’s a documentary about one of their longest running shows. There were certain regime changes at NBC and it was this frustrating, run-out thing that I wasn’t even a part of. Lorne gave me permission like 10 times.

Once you got all that sorted out, we’re you like “Screw it, let’s get it out there” so you put it up on a streaming platform like Hulu?

One of the weird steps in the story is that Ocilloscope [Films] bought it right when we made it. We were going to put it out in theaters with Oscilloscope five years ago. But then really sadly, [Beastie Boys member/founder] Adam Yauch died. Now, we thought we need to put it out on Hulu because it’s NBC’s channel. It’s a great channel. It’s the 40th anniversary of “SNL” coming up. From my own experience, I just know that many, many more people watch documentaries online than in the theater. A theatrical release would be a little more glamorous – but practically speaking, this is probably the best outlet for it.

One of the things I noticed when watching “Saturday Night” is the cast seems utterly exhausted throughout a typical week. This can’t be good for their bodies.

I think one of the interesting things about this documentary, is that we go behind the scenes. Normally with these “SNL” docs, you get a lot of talking heads, talking about what the process was like. Rarely do you get an experiential view of what they go through.

It feels like the pressure to be funny could be very stressful.

Here’s the thing: I think that approach – the “All night writing sessions on Tuesday” – it just becomes a tradition. That’s the way it’s done. I don’t understand why they don’t write on Monday and during the day on Tuesday. In my documentary, people like Will Forte, they just thrive on that. That’s the rhythm they’ve gotten into. I guess someone like Will Forte will have some of his best ideas at eight in the morning. Part of it is going through the event at night like a madman.

Whether it’s films you did behind the camera or in front, when you look back at older work, do you tend to still love it or are you nit-picky?

I still like it. With something like this, to me, it’s a valuable document. One of the reasons I originally wanted to follow Bill Hader and why I got so excited about the form that the documentary took on is that it engages with a subject that interests me. I’m very interested in how things are made. One of the very mysterious things that people rarely show is how comedy is made. Regardless of the time that’s passed, it’s still incredibly valuable, because of the way it reveals process and the comedic process.

What do you think is the biggest obstacle to creativity these days?

Obviously there’s different kinds of creativity. Within the film and television and now I guess Internet industries – there’s always that old balance of art and business. We still call the film business “The Film Business” for a reason. It’s a mass-market form of art or entertainment. So that means that thing on the scale that you’re aiming for or the scale that you make the thing on, you’re thinking about the audience to a larger degree. Because it’s an investment. You’re looking to recoup an investment. That pushes creative people into specific kinds of realms. You’re delivering a product that you want people to like. I think it goes back to what the New Wave directors admired in the Hollywood directors: The fact that a Howard Hawks or Hitchcock could go into the studio system and still create a signature style. One of the hindrances to creativity in my business is trying to please or fit a specific model to where it hinders an artistic voice. But I’m not also one who says “Screw the audience.” Even in the movies that I make that are a little more esoteric, or based on William Faulkner, I’m still keeping in mind that this is a product. This is an investment. So I try to be responsible about my budget when I’m doing something like that.

In a situation with “Saturday Night” and getting the work out there on Hulu, the internet is your best friend. But at other times, it’s a forum for everyone to obsess over your private life. Do you have a love-hate relationship with the internet these days?

[Pauses.] Yeah…the only reason I’m pausing is…part of me has just accepted this fact. That’s my crazy life. I just live in public. I’ve been acting for almost 20 years, I guess I’ve had more attention in the last 10 years. I guess I’ve just learned to deal with it. What I would hate about the internet is the spotlight that’s on me more sometimes than others…I’ve learned that if I use it in certain ways, like here in this documentary, it allows me to make the kinds of stuff that I want to make. Of course there are ups and downs to the internet. Of course there are things that upset me or annoy me. But I’ve learned to deal with it more or less.

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Chief Sub-Editor

Chief Sub-Editor | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it
International content company Barcroft Media are recruiting for a Chief Sub-Editor to be responsible for sub-editing news and feature copy
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International content company Barcroft Media are recruiting for a Chief Sub-Editor to be responsible for sub-editing news and feature copy.

Barcroft Media supply editorial content to newspapers, websites and broadcasters in the UK and around the world. In addition to our photographic and words content, we make television shows and ready-for-broadcast video content. Our flagship YouTube channel Barcroft TV boasts over 600 million views.

Working out of our fast-paced London bureau, this is an ideal position for an ambitious and experienced journalist or editor looking to enhance their career within an exciting company. The successful candidate will possess an eye for detail and a high regard for quality control. They will ensure that all of our copy meets the exacting demands of our target audiences with error-free text, brilliant headlines and authoritative captions, while hitting our tight deadlines without fail. They will be responsible for editing the content on our websites.

Ideal candidates will:

  • Possess a journalistic background, with a strong understanding of online and social media.
  • Be skilled in the art of meeting non-negotiable deadlines
  • Have knowledge of CMS and page layout
  • Possess the necessary initiative and drive to succeed in a pressurised environment
  • Be highly adaptable to change
  • Be a team player and posses a positive attitude with a strong desire to learn and develop
  • Have a minimum of three years experience within a press agency, newspaper, website or broadcast environment
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A seulement 16 ans, cet Américain parle 20 langues !

Pendant que certains jouent à FIFA 15 sur PS4 ou regardent les nouveaux épisodes des Simpson pour tuer l'ennuie, le youtubeur Polyglot Pal s'est lancé dans une activité plus étonnante. En effet, ce je...
Charles Tiayon's insight:

Pendant que certains jouent à FIFA 15 sur PS4 ou regardent les nouveaux épisodes des Simpson pour tuer l'ennuie, le youtubeur "Polyglot Pal" s'est lancé dans une activité plus étonnante. En effet, ce jeune américain a décidé d'apprendre à parler 20 langues différentes avant de faire une petite compilation de ses exploits sur le net. Résultat ? Google Traduction songerait à prendre sa retraite.

Un défi surprenant

Vous regrettez encore d'avoir pris allemand en LV2 au collège ? Rassurez-vous ça aurait pu être pire, vous auriez pu apprendre le russe ou même le chinois. Toutefois, si ces cours ressemblent à des séances de torture bien plus efficaces que la moindre méthode utilisée par Jack Bauer dans 24 heures chrono, ce défi ne semble pas refroidir Polyglot Pal.

Une vidéo hallucinante

Au contraire, ce dernier est un passionné des langues, à commencer par le français (qui a parlé de Frenck Kiss ?) comme le prouve son incroyable vidéo postée sur Youtube. Au programme ? Un véritable échange à travers 20 langues différentes, que ce soit le français, l'indonésien, l'italien, le yiddish ou encore le Pachto et l'ojibwé. Et oui, comme vous pouvez vous en douter, l'apprentissage de certaines d'entre elles semble aussi compliqué que d'écrire leurs noms sans faire une seule faute de frappe...

De quoi nous prouver que l'on peut encore trouver des vidéos originales sur Youtube en dehors des podcasts et fails de chats, offrir à Secret Story un futur candidat crédible avec un véritable secret (pour une fois), et nous poser une question (ainsi qu'à Barney Stinson) : Est-ce vraiment utile pour draguer ? A suivre.

La rédac en découvrant les exploits de Polyglot Pal
La rédac en tentant d'apprendre une nouvelle langue
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Language Quiz - European Commission

Language Quiz - European Commission | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it
With our Language Quiz you can test your language knowledge in a fun way.
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Celebrate Bible Translation Day with Wycliffe

Celebrate Bible Translation Day with Wycliffe | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it
Wycliffe Bible Translators USA shares the history of Bible Translation Day and the state of worldwide Bible translation today.
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Happy International Translation Day 2014

Dear Metaglossia friend,


A VERY HAPPY INTERNATIONAL TRANSLATION DAY TO YOU. This year's theme is "Language Rights: Essential to All Human Rights" (http://www.fit-ift.org/?page_id=1062). As we celebrate, let's try as hard as we can to think out of the box and ask ourselves what such language rights truly mean in the current context, wherever you are. I would love to hear from you. 


Thank you again for your supportive presence. 


With warm regards,


Charles Tiayon

Charles Tiayon's insight:

A VERY HAPPY INTERNATIONAL TRANSLATION DAY TO YOU. This year's theme: "Language Rights: Essential to All Human Rights" (http://www.fit-ift.org/?page_id=1062). As we celebrate, let's try as hard as we can to think out of the box and ask ourselves what such language rights truly mean in the current context. I would love to hear from you.

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Endangered Language Fund | Breath of Life Archival Institute for Indigenous Languages

Endangered Language Fund | Breath of Life Archival Institute for Indigenous Languages | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it
The Endangered Language Fund is a small non-profit organization based in New Haven, Connecticut. E.L.F. supports endangered language maintenance and documentation projects that aim to preserve the world's languages while contributing rare linguistic data to the scientific community. The Fund has sponsored over 100 language projects in 30 countries since 1997, and has recently begun developing a large digital archive of endangered language data.
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Qu'est-ce qu'un "projet suisse"? | L'Hebdo

Qu'est-ce qu'un "projet suisse"? | L'Hebdo | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it

Interrogé par L’Hebdo dans son édition du 25 septembre dernier, l’économiste et spécialiste des questions linguistiques François Grin soulignait que l’abandon du français dans les écoles primaires alémaniques ferait courir « de sérieux risques de délitement au projet politique que constitue la Suisse ».

Le débat est important et même si, pour ma part, je ne suis pas intiment convaincu de la nécessité de l’apprentissage de la seconde langue nationale dès le primaire, il ne fait aucun doute que les Helvètes doivent rester attentifs à favoriser une maîtrise affinée des autres langues, gage non seulement du maintien de la cohésion nationale mais, et peut-être surtout, d’une ouverture culturelle et intellectuelle indispensable dans un univers où la spécialisation à outrance tend à borner les horizons.

Les décisions prises dans certains cantons d’outre-Sarine ont d’ailleurs déjà stimulé de nouvelles réflexions sur les échanges linguistiques et les méthodes d’enseignement : le pragmatisme helvétique serait-il sur le point d’imposer une fois de plus sa marque sur un thème politique à forte densité émotionnelle ?Notre capacité à affronter de manière non passionnée des sujets délicats, et Dieu sait si l’histoire suisse récente ou ancienne n’en manque pas, peut-il débusquer des pistes de solution y compris pour la question des langues ? Je le crois.

C’est cette dimension pragmatique de la mentalité politique suisse qui me semble faire défaut dans l’analyse de François Grin. Autant j’approuve ses considérations sur la place relative à la place de la langue anglaise dans notre pays, autant son allusion au péril qui menacerait un éventuel projet politique suisse me surprend.

A quel « projet » pense-t-il ? Jamais il n’y eut en Suisse un « projet » visant à faire cohabiter diverses cultures sous le même toit national. Ce sont les circonstances, les aléas de l’histoire et l’intelligence de certaines personnalités à des moments cruciaux qui ont construit la Suisse que nous connaissons. De conjonctures variables et parfois pénibles, les différents peuples constitutifs de la future Suisse ont tiré des règles de comportement, de fonctionnement, et fondé sur une quête du consensus que nourrit le fédéralisme et que les mécanismes de la démocratie directe renforceront par la suite.

Se référer à un « projet suisse », qu’il se matéralise dans nos équilibres linguistiques ou dans la fameuse « Willensnation » dont les contours sont assez flous, pose un problème de fond. Ce lien avec un « projet » pourrait laisser entendre qu’une volonté supérieure, surplombant le déroulement historique de la Suisse, piloterait, mue par une sorte de finalité presque téléologique, les destinées de notre pays pour le mener vers une sorte de modèle archétypal de la coexistence pacifique. Ce serait une manière inédite de proroger notre « Sonderfall »...

En politique ou en économie, la Suisse a toujours refusé de se subordonner à des plans venus d’une autorité appelée à deviner le bien des populations concernées. La Suisse s’est édifiée dans un esprit libéral, qui accorde le primat de l’action à l’individu, aux collectivités publiques qui lui sont proches et aux associations nées de son initiative. Le fédéralisme et la démocratie semi-directe reflètent cette hiérarchie des pouvoirs.

Aucun projet issu des cerveaux de sages philosophes lecteurs de l’ « autoritaire » Platon n’a présidé à l’organisation foncièrement empirique de la Suisse. Domine en revanche l’effort constant des citoyennes et des citoyens désireux de confronter la solidité des consensus innombrables qui jalonnent notre vie politique à une réalité qui bouge sans cesse, qui n’est jamais condamnée à l’immobilité.

Glisser la concorde linguistique dans un « projet suisse » n’est pas innocent. En faisant appel à une sorte d’objectif qui se dresserait comme un « lien commun » entre les Helvètes, on accrédite l’idée qu’à un pouvoir revient la tâche de mettre en oeuvre ce « projet », voire de le fortifier au besoin, sinon de la sauver en cas de nécessité.

Et que serait ce pouvoir sinon l’Etat fédéral ? Accepter cette idée reviendrait à cautionner, dans la foulée, l’hypothèse qu’une loi pourrait régler la question linguistique. Je pense que cette dérive enterrerait non seulement l’idée de « projet suisse », s’il existait, mais la Suisse elle-même, en minant dans ses fondements la liberté des individus et des collectivités qui ont fait sa force. La force d’un pays toujours appelé à se remettre en question au grés des conflits politiques inhérents à notre démocratie, et à les dépasser en puisant dans la logique de ses institutions.

Il n’empêche que, je l’ai dit, la question linguistique doit nous interpeller.Je l’ai dit aussi, notre « nation » suisse repose sur une foule de consensus, en permanence renégociés. L’histoire politique suisse se résume à une quêtte infine de recherche de solution à des antagonismes souvent graves. Ils peuvent être linguistiques, entre villes et campagnes, entre droite et gauche, moins religieux de nos jours quand bien même les mentalités locales restent souvent modelées par  leurs rapports à la divinité.

La question de l’enseignement des langues doit être replacé dans ce contexte plus large, la recherche de réponses aux question du moment dans un dialogue entre les parties, entre les intérêts des uns et des autres, avec la volonté d’expérimenter de nouvelles solutions, comme seuls le permettent le fédéralisme et la démocratie diirecte.

 


< Retour au sommaire du blog "Le scalpel de l'histoire"




Christophe VuilleumierUn projet suisse, à dire vrai, a bel et bien existé. Oui, ce « sont les circonstances, les aléas de l’histoire et l’intelligence de certaines personnalités à des moments cruciaux qui ont construit la Suisse que nous connaissons ». Si l’on remonte aux origines de la Confédération, Il convient ainsi d’évoquer le Convenant de Sempach aussi appelé « Charte des Dames », signé par huit cantons (Uri, Schwyz, Unterwald, Lucerne, Zurich, Zoug, Glaris et Berne) en 1393. Il s’agit du premier accord sur un même document réunissant autant de cantons que l’on peut dès lors nommer Confédérés. On est là bien évidemment très loin de la question linguistique puisque cet accord était une régulation de quelques pratiques guerrières que certains considèrent même comme un établissement d’un droit archaïque de la guerre. Ce qu’il faut en retenir, je pense, c’est que ce consensus entre régions souveraines, ou en quête de souveraineté, représente une première pierre d’un sentiment de cohésion et de solidarité. 

Un siècle plus tard, les cantons confédérés étaient divisés quant à la question de l’admission des cités alliées de Fribourg et Soleure, en raison principalement de la dimension urbaine de ces dernières. Les armes auraient sans doute tranché le litige si un « sage philosophe » – avait-il lu Platon – n’était intervenu. Nicolas de Flue, dont la réputation de piété et de sagesse n’avait d’égal que son désir de paix et de modération, conseiller des grands d’Europe, allait adresser un message clair : « N'allez pas trop loin. Vous n'êtes pas appelés à la puissance extérieur, mais à la liberté dans des limites clairement tracées ». C’était faire appel à la solidarité des Confédérés plutôt qu’à leurs rivalités.

Les Radicaux allaient se positionner exactement sur ce positionnement politique entre 1914 et 1918, lorsque la Suisse fut confrontée aux répercussions de la Première Guerre mondiale. De là à dire que Nicolas de Flue était un Radical avant la lettre… je n’oserais pas !

L’appel du mystique suisse allait être écouté et formalisé au travers d’un nouveau traité, le Convenant de Sempach, qui, à nouveau, devait permettre de consolider la cohésion, pour ne pas dire l’unité des Confédérés. Celle-ci allait être en quelque sorte sacralisée par la guerre de Souabe de 1499 puisque les Suisses scellèrent leur union dans le sang versé lors des batailles de Bruderholz, de Schwaderloh, de Frastanz, de Calven et de Dornach, obligeant leur suzerain, le Saint Empire Romain Germanique, à les libérer de leurs liens de vassalité. Ainsi était née la Suisse, dans la douleur et la mort, mais également dans la fraternité et la solidarité. Ainsi se concrétisait le « projet » suisse d’indépendance et de liberté, de reconnaissance de ses droits souverains. Dès lors, les Diètes allaient se succéder en conservant un principe de cohésion entre cantons confédérés, un principe évidemment fondamental pour la sauvegarde de l’unité fédérale. 

La question de langues devait se poser en 1829, lorsque Genève, nouvellement arrivée au sein de la Confédération, malgré ses liens séculaires avec cette dernière qui avaient mené ses magistrats – on se souvient de Michel Roset ou de Jacques de la Maisonneuve – sur les chemins de la « Suisse », demanda que les comptes rendus, les recès, soient traduits en français. Vaud, le Valais, Neuchâtel ainsi que le Tessin allaient se joindre à cette requête. Ce faisant, c’était faire appel au principe de solidarité dans un souci de compréhension et de partage des informations, le but supérieur étant bien la préservation de la Confédération, une liberté, pour reprendre Nicolas de Flue, dans des limites clairement tracées. Des limites que seul l’État fédéral, en tant qu’autorité supérieur, peut, ou devrait, être amené prendre.

Une telle démarche minerait-elle les fondements du pays, l’État fédéral imposant un diktat aux cantons dont les souverainetés sont de plus en plus compromises ? Je ne crois pas que le maintien et le partage de cultures régionales remette en question cette souveraineté, bien au contraire, alors que dans un même temps les transferts de charge que la Confédération opère sur les cantons entravent progressivement leur liberté d’action, les obligeant dans une certaine mesure à recourir à de nouvelles configurations d’accords, les concordats cantonaux, nouvelles formes de traité de combourgeoisie. 
30.09.2014 - 01:23
Charles Tiayon's insight:

Interrogé par L’Hebdo dans son édition du 25 septembre dernier, l’économiste et spécialiste des questions linguistiques François Grin soulignait que l’abandon du français dans les écoles primaires alémaniques ferait courir « de sérieux risques de délitement au projet politique que constitue la Suisse ».

Le débat est important et même si, pour ma part, je ne suis pas intiment convaincu de la nécessité de l’apprentissage de la seconde langue nationale dès le primaire, il ne fait aucun doute que les Helvètes doivent rester attentifs à favoriser une maîtrise affinée des autres langues, gage non seulement du maintien de la cohésion nationale mais, et peut-être surtout, d’une ouverture culturelle et intellectuelle indispensable dans un univers où la spécialisation à outrance tend à borner les horizons.

Les décisions prises dans certains cantons d’outre-Sarine ont d’ailleurs déjà stimulé de nouvelles réflexions sur les échanges linguistiques et les méthodes d’enseignement : le pragmatisme helvétique serait-il sur le point d’imposer une fois de plus sa marque sur un thème politique à forte densité émotionnelle ?Notre capacité à affronter de manière non passionnée des sujets délicats, et Dieu sait si l’histoire suisse récente ou ancienne n’en manque pas, peut-il débusquer des pistes de solution y compris pour la question des langues ? Je le crois.

C’est cette dimension pragmatique de la mentalité politique suisse qui me semble faire défaut dans l’analyse de François Grin. Autant j’approuve ses considérations sur la place relative à la place de la langue anglaise dans notre pays, autant son allusion au péril qui menacerait un éventuel projet politique suisse me surprend.

A quel « projet » pense-t-il ? Jamais il n’y eut en Suisse un « projet » visant à faire cohabiter diverses cultures sous le même toit national. Ce sont les circonstances, les aléas de l’histoire et l’intelligence de certaines personnalités à des moments cruciaux qui ont construit la Suisse que nous connaissons. De conjonctures variables et parfois pénibles, les différents peuples constitutifs de la future Suisse ont tiré des règles de comportement, de fonctionnement, et fondé sur une quête du consensus que nourrit le fédéralisme et que les mécanismes de la démocratie directe renforceront par la suite.

Se référer à un « projet suisse », qu’il se matéralise dans nos équilibres linguistiques ou dans la fameuse « Willensnation » dont les contours sont assez flous, pose un problème de fond. Ce lien avec un « projet » pourrait laisser entendre qu’une volonté supérieure, surplombant le déroulement historique de la Suisse, piloterait, mue par une sorte de finalité presque téléologique, les destinées de notre pays pour le mener vers une sorte de modèle archétypal de la coexistence pacifique. Ce serait une manière inédite de proroger notre « Sonderfall »...

En politique ou en économie, la Suisse a toujours refusé de se subordonner à des plans venus d’une autorité appelée à deviner le bien des populations concernées. La Suisse s’est édifiée dans un esprit libéral, qui accorde le primat de l’action à l’individu, aux collectivités publiques qui lui sont proches et aux associations nées de son initiative. Le fédéralisme et la démocratie semi-directe reflètent cette hiérarchie des pouvoirs.

Aucun projet issu des cerveaux de sages philosophes lecteurs de l’ « autoritaire » Platon n’a présidé à l’organisation foncièrement empirique de la Suisse. Domine en revanche l’effort constant des citoyennes et des citoyens désireux de confronter la solidité des consensus innombrables qui jalonnent notre vie politique à une réalité qui bouge sans cesse, qui n’est jamais condamnée à l’immobilité.

Glisser la concorde linguistique dans un « projet suisse » n’est pas innocent. En faisant appel à une sorte d’objectif qui se dresserait comme un « lien commun » entre les Helvètes, on accrédite l’idée qu’à un pouvoir revient la tâche de mettre en oeuvre ce « projet », voire de le fortifier au besoin, sinon de la sauver en cas de nécessité.

Et que serait ce pouvoir sinon l’Etat fédéral ? Accepter cette idée reviendrait à cautionner, dans la foulée, l’hypothèse qu’une loi pourrait régler la question linguistique. Je pense que cette dérive enterrerait non seulement l’idée de « projet suisse », s’il existait, mais la Suisse elle-même, en minant dans ses fondements la liberté des individus et des collectivités qui ont fait sa force. La force d’un pays toujours appelé à se remettre en question au grés des conflits politiques inhérents à notre démocratie, et à les dépasser en puisant dans la logique de ses institutions.

Il n’empêche que, je l’ai dit, la question linguistique doit nous interpeller.Je l’ai dit aussi, notre « nation » suisse repose sur une foule de consensus, en permanence renégociés. L’histoire politique suisse se résume à une quêtte infine de recherche de solution à des antagonismes souvent graves. Ils peuvent être linguistiques, entre villes et campagnes, entre droite et gauche, moins religieux de nos jours quand bien même les mentalités locales restent souvent modelées par  leurs rapports à la divinité.

La question de l’enseignement des langues doit être replacé dans ce contexte plus large, la recherche de réponses aux question du moment dans un dialogue entre les parties, entre les intérêts des uns et des autres, avec la volonté d’expérimenter de nouvelles solutions, comme seuls le permettent le fédéralisme et la démocratie diirecte.

 


< Retour au sommaire du blog "Le scalpel de l'histoire"




Christophe VuilleumierUn projet suisse, à dire vrai, a bel et bien existé. Oui, ce « sont les circonstances, les aléas de l’histoire et l’intelligence de certaines personnalités à des moments cruciaux qui ont construit la Suisse que nous connaissons ». Si l’on remonte aux origines de la Confédération, Il convient ainsi d’évoquer le Convenant de Sempach aussi appelé « Charte des Dames », signé par huit cantons (Uri, Schwyz, Unterwald, Lucerne, Zurich, Zoug, Glaris et Berne) en 1393. Il s’agit du premier accord sur un même document réunissant autant de cantons que l’on peut dès lors nommer Confédérés. On est là bien évidemment très loin de la question linguistique puisque cet accord était une régulation de quelques pratiques guerrières que certains considèrent même comme un établissement d’un droit archaïque de la guerre. Ce qu’il faut en retenir, je pense, c’est que ce consensus entre régions souveraines, ou en quête de souveraineté, représente une première pierre d’un sentiment de cohésion et de solidarité. 

Un siècle plus tard, les cantons confédérés étaient divisés quant à la question de l’admission des cités alliées de Fribourg et Soleure, en raison principalement de la dimension urbaine de ces dernières. Les armes auraient sans doute tranché le litige si un « sage philosophe » – avait-il lu Platon – n’était intervenu. Nicolas de Flue, dont la réputation de piété et de sagesse n’avait d’égal que son désir de paix et de modération, conseiller des grands d’Europe, allait adresser un message clair : « N'allez pas trop loin. Vous n'êtes pas appelés à la puissance extérieur, mais à la liberté dans des limites clairement tracées ». C’était faire appel à la solidarité des Confédérés plutôt qu’à leurs rivalités.

Les Radicaux allaient se positionner exactement sur ce positionnement politique entre 1914 et 1918, lorsque la Suisse fut confrontée aux répercussions de la Première Guerre mondiale. De là à dire que Nicolas de Flue était un Radical avant la lettre… je n’oserais pas !

L’appel du mystique suisse allait être écouté et formalisé au travers d’un nouveau traité, le Convenant de Sempach, qui, à nouveau, devait permettre de consolider la cohésion, pour ne pas dire l’unité des Confédérés. Celle-ci allait être en quelque sorte sacralisée par la guerre de Souabe de 1499 puisque les Suisses scellèrent leur union dans le sang versé lors des batailles de Bruderholz, de Schwaderloh, de Frastanz, de Calven et de Dornach, obligeant leur suzerain, le Saint Empire Romain Germanique, à les libérer de leurs liens de vassalité. Ainsi était née la Suisse, dans la douleur et la mort, mais également dans la fraternité et la solidarité. Ainsi se concrétisait le « projet » suisse d’indépendance et de liberté, de reconnaissance de ses droits souverains. Dès lors, les Diètes allaient se succéder en conservant un principe de cohésion entre cantons confédérés, un principe évidemment fondamental pour la sauvegarde de l’unité fédérale. 

La question de langues devait se poser en 1829, lorsque Genève, nouvellement arrivée au sein de la Confédération, malgré ses liens séculaires avec cette dernière qui avaient mené ses magistrats – on se souvient de Michel Roset ou de Jacques de la Maisonneuve – sur les chemins de la « Suisse », demanda que les comptes rendus, les recès, soient traduits en français. Vaud, le Valais, Neuchâtel ainsi que le Tessin allaient se joindre à cette requête. Ce faisant, c’était faire appel au principe de solidarité dans un souci de compréhension et de partage des informations, le but supérieur étant bien la préservation de la Confédération, une liberté, pour reprendre Nicolas de Flue, dans des limites clairement tracées. Des limites que seul l’État fédéral, en tant qu’autorité supérieur, peut, ou devrait, être amené prendre.

Une telle démarche minerait-elle les fondements du pays, l’État fédéral imposant un diktat aux cantons dont les souverainetés sont de plus en plus compromises ? Je ne crois pas que le maintien et le partage de cultures régionales remette en question cette souveraineté, bien au contraire, alors que dans un même temps les transferts de charge que la Confédération opère sur les cantons entravent progressivement leur liberté d’action, les obligeant dans une certaine mesure à recourir à de nouvelles configurations d’accords, les concordats cantonaux, nouvelles formes de traité de combourgeoisie. 
30.09.2014 - 01:23
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Invista impugna el diccionario de la RAE por el uso de la palabra “lycra”

Invista impugna el diccionario de la RAE por el uso de la palabra “lycra” | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it
Abogados de Wichita contra eruditos de la Real Academia de la lengua Española (RAE). La multinacional estadounidense Invista, uno de los...
Charles Tiayon's insight:

Abogados de Wichita contra eruditos de la Real Academia de la lengua Española (RAE). La multinacional estadounidense Invista, uno de los mayores grupos industriales del mundo del sector de la moda, planta cara a la academia española de la lengua por el uso indebido de su marca estrella: Lycra. La empresa ha impugnado la entrada de la palabra lycra en el diccionario de la RAE y ha conseguido que la academia la modifique en la próxima edición del libro, que publicará el 17 de octubre.

 

Actualmente, el diccionario de la RAE incluye la palabra lycra con la definición de “tejido sintético elástico, utilizado generalmente en la confección de prendas de vestir”. Así, la palabra lycra es considerada por la academia como un genérico para referirse al tejido que tantas prendas de ropa incorporaron en los años ochenta, en pleno apogeo de fenómenos como Flashdance, con sus mallas coloridas y sus calentadores.

 

El pasado verano, el departamento legal de Invista se dirigió a la RAE para pedir la rectificación de la entrada del diccionario, acogiéndose a que Lycra es una marca registrada y a que se trata de una fibra, y no un tejido, como dice la academia.

 

La fibra Lycra, propiedad actualmente de Invista, fue inventada en 1958 por un equipo de científicos para sustituir el caucho utilizado para la producción de lencería. El ingeniero que creó esta fibra que ha revolucionado la moda fue Joe Shiver, que en aquel momento trabajaba para Dupont. En 2003, Dupont vendió su división de fibras textiles, Invista, aKoch Industries.

 

Lycra es una fibra sintética que pertenece a la clasificación genérica de elastano –señala Invista-; nunca se usa sola, sino que se mezcla con otras fibras para obtener tejidos con una elasticidad única y que no se deforman”.

 

La popularización de la ropa elástica ha hecho que el consumidor identifique la marca Lycracon un nombre genérico del tejido. Invista es el único fabricante del mundo de Lycra, aunque compañías como Creora o Roica también abastecen a los fabricantes de moda de fibra elástica utilizando composiciones químicas y nombres comerciales diferentes.

 

La fibra elástica es una de las materias primas que más se utiliza en las prendas, sobre todo de íntimo y baño, porque proporciona una mayor comodidad. En los últimos años, el consumo de esta fibra ha aumentado gracias, por un lado, a las tendencias de moda y al éxito de la prenda exterior ajustada, y, por otro lado, al incremento de la producción de prendas a nivel global.

 

 

Los académicos cambian licra por lycra

 Desde hace algunas semanas, la entrada lycra del diccionario aparece como “Artículo enmendado” e incluye la precisión de que se trata de una marca registrada. La RAE ha publicado un avance de la vigésima tercera edición del diccionario (que incorpora 271 artículos enmendados sólo con la letra L) y en ella dejará de incluirse la palabra lycra, que se cambiará por licra, señalando que procede del inglés lycra, una marca registrada.

 

La definición de licra se mantiene como un “tejido sintético elástico”, por lo que Invista sigue batallando con la RAE para que la modifique por fibra, según han explicado a Modaes.es fuentes del grupo estadounidense, que acaba de poner en marcha un cambio de estrategia en la política de márketing para Lycra con el objetivo de conseguir que el consumidor la identifique como una marca y no como un genérico.

 

Invista es uno de los mayores grupos fabricantes y distribuidores de fibras sintéticas para la industria textil, ya sea para la moda, el textil hogar o los textiles técnicos. En 2003, el gigante químico Koch Industries, considerada la segunda mayor empresa de Estados Unidos, compró Invista por 4.400 millones de dólares al también grupo químico DuPont, que se desprendió así de su negocio textil.

 

En España, la compañía opera a través de una filial, con sede en Barcelona. En el último año, la empresa ha continuado invirtiendo en incrementar su capacidad productiva, con ampliaciones de plantas ya existentes o la apertura de nuevas, como la de nylon de Shanghái. El pasado marzo la empresa anunció una inversión de mil millones de dólares para la construcción de un macro complejo en China para producir nylon. 

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Free online legal terminology database open | OCNA

Free online legal terminology database open | OCNA | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it
Thanks to funding from The Law Foundation of British Columbia and the Notary Foundation, Vancouver Community College Centre for Continuing Education Studies has created a web site containing 5,000 plain language legal terms to assist professionals and
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Thanks to funding from The Law Foundation of British Columbia and the Notary Foundation, Vancouver Community College Centre for Continuing Education Studies has created a web site containing 5,000 plain language legal terms to assist professionals and multicultural users participating in court or legal processes. The glossary covers terms in criminal law, street language heard in court for drugs and arms, and other court-related terms in eight different languages (Chinese, Farsi, Korean, Punjabi, Spanish, Russian, Vietnamese, and English).

Entries made for each language have been approved by bilingual lawyers and legal translators, and was overseen by a Steering Committee representative of the legal and multicultural community in British Columbia.

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WIPO Pearl launched, a Free Multilingual Terminology Database

WIPO Pearl launched, a Free Multilingual Terminology Database | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it
Through its web-based interface, WIPO Pearl promotes accurate and consistent use of terms across different languages, and makes it easier to search and share scientific and technical knowledge.
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The World Intellectual Property Organization (WIPO) today launched a new database providing free access to a wealth of multilingual scientific and technical terminology.

Through its web-based interface, WIPO Pearl promotes accurate and consistent use of terms across different languages, and makes it easier to search and share scientific and technical knowledge.

The database initially includes terms found in applications filed via WIPO’s Patent Cooperation Treaty (PCT) and will eventually include collections from other areas of WIPO, such as trademarks, industrial designs, and terminology found in other treaties administered by WIPO.

The 90,000+ terms and 15,000 concepts in 10 languages have all been entered and validated by WIPO-PCT language experts and terminologists, who have experience working with technical documents in multiple languages. Regular additions to the data are planned.

WIPO Pearl offers powerful search features, including the ability to select source and target languages, search by subject field as well as with abbreviations, and “fuzzy,” “exact” and Boolean search functions.

Users can obtain a quick list of results, which can be expanded, while browsing via “concept maps” that show linkages among related concepts by language and subject field - for example, showing concepts that are broader or narrower in scope than other concepts.

Key features
  • Ten languages: Arabic, Chinese, English, French, German, Japanese, Korean, Portuguese, Russian and Spanish
  • Classification of concepts by 29 subject fields
  • Fully validated content with reliability scores
  • “Concept maps” that give an innovative graphical display of related concepts by language and subject field
  • Context provided for all terms
  • Term labelling (e.g. “recommended”, “standardized” or “avoid”)
  • Integrated with PATENTSCOPE and CLIR (Cross-Lingual Information Retrieval) 
  • Users can rate the quality of results

WIPO Pearl can be accessed from the Reference page, along with WIPO’s PATENTSCOPE technology database - which now contains nearly 40 million patent records – and WIPO’s other searchable data collections.


About WIPO

The World Intellectual Property Organization (WIPO) is the global forum for intellectual property policy, services, information and cooperation. A specialized agency of the United Nations, WIPO assists its 187 member states in developing a balanced international IP legal framework to meet society's evolving needs. It provides business services for obtaining IP rights in multiple countries and resolving disputes. It deliverscapacity-building programs to help developing countries benefit from using IP. And it provides free access to unique knowledge banks of IP information.

For further information, please contact the Media Relations Section at WIPO:
  • Tel: (+41 22) - 338 81 61 / 338 72 24
  • Fax: (+41 22) - 338 81 40
  • E-mail
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Frontiers | Multisensory Training can Promote or Impede Visual Perceptual Learning of Speech Stimuli: Visual-Tactile versus Visual-Auditory Training | Frontiers in Human Neuroscience

In a series of studies we have been investigating how multisensory training affects unisensory perceptual learning with speech stimuli. Previously, we reported that Aaudiovisual training with speech stimuli can promote auditory-only perceptual learning in normal-hearing adults but can impede learning in congenitally deaf adults with late-acquired cochlear implants. Here, impeder and promoter effects were sought in normal-hearing adults who participated in lipreading training. In Experiment 1, visual-only (VO) training on paired associations between CVCVC nonsense word videos and nonsense pictures demonstrated that VO words could be learned to a high level of accuracy even by poor lipreaders. In Experiment 2, visual-auditory (VA) training in the same paradigm but with the addition of synchronous vocoded acoustic speech impeded VO learning of the stimuli in the paired-associates paradigm. In Experiment 3, the vocoded auditory-only (AO) stimuli were shown to be less informative than the VO speech. Experiment 4 combined vibrotactile speech stimuli with the visual stimuli during training. Vibrotactile stimuli were shown to promote visual perceptual learning in participants whose training scores were similar. In Experiment 5, no-training controls were used to show that training with visual speech carried over to consonant identification of untrained CVCVC stimuli but not to lipreading words in sentences. Across this and previous studies, multisensory training effects depended on the functional relationship between pathways engaged during training. Two principles are proposed to account for stimulus effects: (1) Stimuli presented to the trainee’s primary perceptual pathway will impede learning by a lower-rank pathway. (2) Stimuli presented to the trainee’s lower rank perceptual pathway will promote learning by a higher-rank pathway. The mechanisms supporting these principles are discussed in light of multisensory reverse hierarchy theory.
Charles Tiayon's insight:

In a series of studies we have been investigating how multisensory training affects unisensory perceptual learning with speech stimuli. Previously, we reported that Aaudiovisual training with speech stimuli can promote auditory-only perceptual learning in normal-hearing adults but can impede learning in congenitally deaf adults with late-acquired cochlear implants. Here, impeder and promoter effects were sought in normal-hearing adults who participated in lipreading training. In Experiment 1, visual-only (VO) training on paired associations between CVCVC nonsense word videos and nonsense pictures demonstrated that VO words could be learned to a high level of accuracy even by poor lipreaders. In Experiment 2, visual-auditory (VA) training in the same paradigm but with the addition of synchronous vocoded acoustic speech impeded VO learning of the stimuli in the paired-associates paradigm. In Experiment 3, the vocoded auditory-only (AO) stimuli were shown to be less informative than the VO speech. Experiment 4 combined vibrotactile speech stimuli with the visual stimuli during training. Vibrotactile stimuli were shown to promote visual perceptual learning in participants whose training scores were similar. In Experiment 5, no-training controls were used to show that training with visual speech carried over to consonant identification of untrained CVCVC stimuli but not to lipreading words in sentences. Across this and previous studies, multisensory training effects depended on the functional relationship between pathways engaged during training. Two principles are proposed to account for stimulus effects: (1) Stimuli presented to the trainee’s primary perceptual pathway will impede learning by a lower-rank pathway. (2) Stimuli presented to the trainee’s lower rank perceptual pathway will promote learning by a higher-rank pathway. The mechanisms supporting these principles are discussed in light of multisensory reverse hierarchy theory.

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How the Nuremberg Trials changed translation forever

How the Nuremberg Trials changed translation forever | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it
We take simultaneous interpretation for granted today, watching world leaders at the UN and other organizations listen to speeches being translated in real time. But there was a time not too long ago when even the thought of someone instantly translating speech was impossible.
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Lynn Visson was a UN interpreter during the height of the Cold War. She can still rattle off grandiose Soviet titles like it was yesterday.

“General Secretary of the Central Committee of the Communist Party — you had that practically memorized,” Visson recalls.

After 23 years, she's still at it, interpreting from French and Russian into English. She's witnessed — and spoken for — some pretty heavy hitters. “I remember Castro spoke for all of eight minutes, but the charisma was incredible," Visson says. "The electricity the man generated — Bill Clinton could do that too, Gorbachev could do that. Some other delegates were great speakers, but they didn't light that spark.”

These days, we're long used to seeing diplomats at the UN plugged into earphones, listening to speeches that are instantaneously translated into one of the six official UN lanugages — English, French, Arabic, Chinese, Spanish and Russian, but simultaneous interpretation is actually a rather recent invention, developed in 1945 for a very different global event: the Nuremberg Trials.



Credit: 
Francesca GaibDefendants, Defense Counsel and Interpreters rise as the eight members of the Tribunal enter the courtroom. Monitors, front: Leon Dostert, back: E. Peter Uiberall and Joachim von Zastrow.

Before the Nuremberg Trials, any kind of interpretation was done consecutively — talk first, and then wait for the interpreter to translate. But at the end of World War II, the Allies created the International Military Tribunal, which was charged with an explicit mission: "fair and expeditious trials" of accused Nazi war criminals.

“Those two words put enormous constraints on the people organizing the trial,” says interpreter and historian Francesca Gaiba, who has studied the origins of simultaneous interpretation at the Nuremberg Trials.

She says holding a trial that was "fair" and "expeditious" meant speeding up translations of the four languages of the nations involved: English, German, Russian and French. The solution was thought up by Col. Leon Dostert. Born in France and a native French speaker, Dostert became an American citizen and a foreign language expert for the US Army. 

“He was the person who thought it was possible for a human being to listen and speak at the same time,” Visson says.

Possible, yes, but far from easy. And then there was the problem of transmitting all of those languages in real time. This was 1945, so digital recordings and tapes weren't around. But Dostert pressed on and consulted with IBM to develop a system of microphones and headsets to transmit the cacophony of languages. He hired interpreters and practiced this new type of interpreting with them. 

And somehow, despite a few episodes of tripping over cords in the courtroom, Dostert's system worked.


Credit: Francesca Gaiba

Interpreters at the Nuremberg Trial; Front: English desk; Back: French desk. To the left, monitor.

Even before the Nuremberg trials were over, Dostert had taken his system to the UN in New York. It's still the model being used today, albeit with some minor upgrades in technology.

“When I started, all interpreters were lugging around heavy dictionaries," Visson remembers. "Now they’re lugging around iPads and notebook computers because most glossaries are in those." She says TV monitors in the back booths also let interpreters watch the expressions of diplomats and the movements of their mouths.

But technology still hasn't advanced enough to replace the interpreters themselves. “The computer can't pick up the intonation,” Visson says.

But one of the biggest challenges for interpreters is often not the tone, but simply figuring out what a diplomat is saying.

“People with foreign accents for example, you want to be careful that when you hear somebody saying, ‘Mr. Chairman, we wish to congratulate you on your defective leadership.’ You know he didn’t mean his ‘defective leadership,’ he meant his ‘effective leadership.’" Visson says. "But you've got to not be simply auto-translating word for word, because heaven help you if you say we congratulate you on your defective leadership."

Of course, relaying the words of world leaders also means not mincing them, be they Holocaust denials, carefully crafted insults or strongly worded Cold War rhetoric.

“One of the things you are taught is that you're like an actor on stage," Visson says. "There are plenty of actors who play the part of people who are absolutely vile. So I think if you look on it as acting, it can almost become fun — even if you are saying things that you personally find repugnant or hateful."

The World in Words podcast is on Facebook and iTunes.

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Philip Roth, Salman Rushdie join Authors United against Amazon, new translation prize for women, and more - Quill and Quire

Philip Roth, Salman Rushdie join Authors United against Amazon, new translation prize for women, and more - Quill and Quire | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it
Lack of fiction in translation by women inspires new literary prize Bringing out the big guns: Philip Roth, Orhan Pamuk,… Read More »
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Are You Ready to Get Creative?

Are You Ready to Get Creative? | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it

Five factors, in particular, seem to make a difference. They have emerged, over the years, as common to a series of analyses, case studies, and research projects. They are all related to your company’s R&D readiness: its ongoing abilities and disciplines that prepare it for managing innovation well. If you are an R&D leader, or a top executive at a company seeking to be more innovative, these elements may provide you with your highest leverage for improvement: 

• Strategic alignment. The most successful innovators can articulate a clear group of R&D priorities that are “fit for purpose”: aligned to the company’s overall business agenda. The ability to do this should not be taken for granted; getting the story right, and tying it to innovation priorities, can take a great deal of thought and iteration. 

• Innovative capabilities. These are the everyday activities within your R&D department that you follow along the path from customer engagement, to generating ideas, to commercializing them, to executing the launch. The most successful innovators have developed distinctive R&D processes tailored to their own value proposition, not benchmarked from studying other companies. The best of these innovative capabilities tend to be cross-functional (involving people from marketing, IT, manufacturing, and other disciplines as well as R&D) and creative (prepared to experiment, iterate, and evolve practices as needed).

• External networks and partnerships. Successful innovators are proficient at building and maintaining productive relationships with outside suppliers, distributors, educational institutions, and service providers. They know how to draw ideas and capabilities from outside the enterprise as needed, for use at various points along the innovation value chain.

• Organization and processes. Organizational design is natural to successful innovators. They make sure the right incentives, decision rights, and information flows are in place to drive innovation performance. They also know how to place the right talent in the right place at the right time.

• Cultural alignment. These companies foster thinking and conversation that promotes innovation. Their cultural attributes and behaviors lay a foundation for risk-taking, and they also support the innovation strategy.

Research on innovation often focuses on one or two of these factors at a time, but it doesn’t consider how they overlap and interrelate. To help understand how these factors fit together, and the leverage they can provide, we’ve developed an online profiler called the Innovation Accelerator. We believe that using a profiler like this—and applying the insights it provides—can be the first in a series of steps companies take to increase their innovation readiness.

At the heart of the Innovation Accelerator is an online attitudinal survey. It asks employees questions about what they do, and evaluates the answers accordingly. For example: “How does your company acquire customer insights?” Or, “What do you do to encourage creative thinking?” The way you answer these questions, and others, sheds light on your innovation readiness and how effective your investments will be.

We have tested the innovation accelerator a variety of companies—for instance, with a group of UK-based railroad firms that wanted to evaluate their current level of innovation capability and focus their future efforts more effectively. The survey is not specific to any industry or geography, and we think it has something to teach all companies that rely on innovation. It can help you see your own innovation-related proficiencies more clearly, and the relative gaps that you might need to fill.

The idea of surveying companies on their innovation prowess isn’t new. But most current surveys are relatively narrow in their focus on process issues. They ask about the percentage of revenue the company allocates to R&D, the number of milestones in its quality-gate process, and the level of IT support their innovation teams are getting. This is important for understanding innovative capabilities, but in itself, data like this does not seem to provide enough insight about the factors that help or hurt a company’s creative efforts.

For instance, suppose a company that produces a complex product is moving into a fast-developing new area that requires a great deal of interdepartmental coordination. One unseen factor might be a lack of cross-functional work on building innovation capabilities, or organizational incentives that subtly discourage work across departmental lines. Having identified those weaknesses, the firm can set a detailed action plan for improvement and then move to implement it.

A tool like the Innovation Accelerator can thus provide the first step in developing innovation readiness. It is designed to be used within companies, for both startups and for mature enterprises. Even corporations that were once great at innovation can lose their touch. For those that feel they may be slipping, or simply want to do better, the tool can show them where they may need improvement.

The tool can be applied across the full company or limited to certain functions, geographies, and business units with perceived problems. It asks enough questions in each of the five dimensions to determine a company’s score for each. In turn, these scores form the basis of a data-informed discussion. A full analysis of the results of the survey is slated to appear instrategy+business after we have collected enough data.

Companies don’t need to be best in class in every area related to innovation. But companies that are struggling with their R&D performance need to start by getting a clear picture of where they might be weak. Innovators don’t always like to look at their strengths and weaknesses. But in this case, what you don’t know, can’t see coming, and haven’t measured, can hurt you.

Charles Tiayon's insight:

Five factors, in particular, seem to make a difference. They have emerged, over the years, as common to a series of analyses, case studies, and research projects. They are all related to your company’s R&D readiness: its ongoing abilities and disciplines that prepare it for managing innovation well. If you are an R&D leader, or a top executive at a company seeking to be more innovative, these elements may provide you with your highest leverage for improvement: 

• Strategic alignment. The most successful innovators can articulate a clear group of R&D priorities that are “fit for purpose”: aligned to the company’s overall business agenda. The ability to do this should not be taken for granted; getting the story right, and tying it to innovation priorities, can take a great deal of thought and iteration. 

• Innovative capabilities. These are the everyday activities within your R&D department that you follow along the path from customer engagement, to generating ideas, to commercializing them, to executing the launch. The most successful innovators have developed distinctive R&D processes tailored to their own value proposition, not benchmarked from studying other companies. The best of these innovative capabilities tend to be cross-functional (involving people from marketing, IT, manufacturing, and other disciplines as well as R&D) and creative (prepared to experiment, iterate, and evolve practices as needed).

• External networks and partnerships. Successful innovators are proficient at building and maintaining productive relationships with outside suppliers, distributors, educational institutions, and service providers. They know how to draw ideas and capabilities from outside the enterprise as needed, for use at various points along the innovation value chain.

• Organization and processes. Organizational design is natural to successful innovators. They make sure the right incentives, decision rights, and information flows are in place to drive innovation performance. They also know how to place the right talent in the right place at the right time.

• Cultural alignment. These companies foster thinking and conversation that promotes innovation. Their cultural attributes and behaviors lay a foundation for risk-taking, and they also support the innovation strategy.

Research on innovation often focuses on one or two of these factors at a time, but it doesn’t consider how they overlap and interrelate. To help understand how these factors fit together, and the leverage they can provide, we’ve developed an online profiler called the Innovation Accelerator. We believe that using a profiler like this—and applying the insights it provides—can be the first in a series of steps companies take to increase their innovation readiness.

At the heart of the Innovation Accelerator is an online attitudinal survey. It asks employees questions about what they do, and evaluates the answers accordingly. For example: “How does your company acquire customer insights?” Or, “What do you do to encourage creative thinking?” The way you answer these questions, and others, sheds light on your innovation readiness and how effective your investments will be.

We have tested the innovation accelerator a variety of companies—for instance, with a group of UK-based railroad firms that wanted to evaluate their current level of innovation capability and focus their future efforts more effectively. The survey is not specific to any industry or geography, and we think it has something to teach all companies that rely on innovation. It can help you see your own innovation-related proficiencies more clearly, and the relative gaps that you might need to fill.

The idea of surveying companies on their innovation prowess isn’t new. But most current surveys are relatively narrow in their focus on process issues. They ask about the percentage of revenue the company allocates to R&D, the number of milestones in its quality-gate process, and the level of IT support their innovation teams are getting. This is important for understanding innovative capabilities, but in itself, data like this does not seem to provide enough insight about the factors that help or hurt a company’s creative efforts.

For instance, suppose a company that produces a complex product is moving into a fast-developing new area that requires a great deal of interdepartmental coordination. One unseen factor might be a lack of cross-functional work on building innovation capabilities, or organizational incentives that subtly discourage work across departmental lines. Having identified those weaknesses, the firm can set a detailed action plan for improvement and then move to implement it.

A tool like the Innovation Accelerator can thus provide the first step in developing innovation readiness. It is designed to be used within companies, for both startups and for mature enterprises. Even corporations that were once great at innovation can lose their touch. For those that feel they may be slipping, or simply want to do better, the tool can show them where they may need improvement.

The tool can be applied across the full company or limited to certain functions, geographies, and business units with perceived problems. It asks enough questions in each of the five dimensions to determine a company’s score for each. In turn, these scores form the basis of a data-informed discussion. A full analysis of the results of the survey is slated to appear instrategy+business after we have collected enough data.

Companies don’t need to be best in class in every area related to innovation. But companies that are struggling with their R&D performance need to start by getting a clear picture of where they might be weak. Innovators don’t always like to look at their strengths and weaknesses. But in this case, what you don’t know, can’t see coming, and haven’t measured, can hurt you.

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Academy’s Literature Magazine Comes Back to Life

Academy’s Literature Magazine Comes Back to Life | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it
BANGALORE : Karnataka Sahitya Academy has revived its quarterly journal Aniketana. The journal is published in two editions: Kannada and English. "It is a happy...
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BANGALORE : Karnataka Sahitya Academy has revived its quarterly journal Aniketana. The journal is published in two editions: Kannada and English.

"It is a happy moment as we are publishing Aniketana after four years. It was started as Chandana when G S Shivarudrappa was the chairman," Malati Pattanashetti, academy chairperson, told City Express.

She described Aniketana as a serious journal focusing on translation. "We hope the reach of Kannada literature becomes wider and we have new readers joining our fold," she said.

The academy intends to popularise the journal in a big way, and will soon launch a publicity drive. “We want to fill the need for translation journals,” Pattanashetti said.

Each edition of the journal will focus on a theme. In the latest edition, Anketana's English version focuses on the rural imagination in Kannada literature.

Editor Deepa Ganesh said, "The subject is vast and the selection representative. Our idea is to generate interest and curiosity among those who want to know about Kannada literature through English.”

“A young and vibrant team of translators has worked for these issues. We aim to reach out to young readers and bring out theme-based issues," she said.

The issue has poetry selections from Pampa's Vikramarjuna Vijaya, S R Ekkundi (The Warrior and the Woman), D R Bendre (Mother Earth's Eldest Son), T P Kailasam (It is a Long, Long Way to Tipparahalli) and Kuvempu (The Saint Who Carries A Plough).

It also features essays by Belagere Krishna Shastri (All Are Mukundooru Swamis), Goruru Ramaswamy Iyengar (Connoisseurs of My Village), M R Srinivasamurthy (Ranganna's Dream Days), and Yashwanta Chittal (Hanehalli, God and I). Classic short stories, such as Ananda's The Girl I Killed and Mirji Annaraya Beera's Well, are also in the latest Aniketana. Basavarj Kalgudi has written on Dynamics of the Rural in Kannada Literature and veteran critic G S Amur has paid tribue to late novelist Yashwanta Chittal.

The Kannada version of Aniketana, edited by writer Lakshmipathy Kolara, has selections from Urdu (Ismat Chugtai), Oriya (Seetakant Mahapatra), Bengali (Rabindranath Tagore and Taslima Nasrin), and Malayalam (M T Vasudevan Nair), with additional articles on the freedom of women and Gandhian ideals.

Aniketana is priced at `30 and the annual subscription is `100. A life subscription comes for `300. Contact Registrar C H Bhagya at Karnataka Sahitya Academy, Kannada Bhavan, J C Road, Bangalore. Phone: 080-2221 1730.

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