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Children's Publishing Blogs - buy one just one open letter book blog posts

Years and years ago, when Karl Pohrt and I were launching the Reading the World program to enable independent bookstores to promote more literature in translation, we found out that May was officially World in Translation Month. This was a pretty happy coincidence, since we had already planned all of our activities to take place in May, and since people don’t celebrate this near enough.
In fact, after Reading the World morphed into the Best Translated Book Awards and whatnot, the concept of World in Translation month sort of faded to the background . . . Which is really too bad. May is the month for the PEN World Voices Festival, and the time when everyone gets out of school and has time to read something from another culture.
So, what I’d like to propose is that for World in Translation Month—and because our book sales for this fiscal year have been rather lagging—is that everyone reading this buy just one Open Letter title this month. But it from your local independent bookstore, from B&N, or Amazon—wherever you want. As a special incentive, we’re offering free shipping on all orders this month that are placed through our website.

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News about translation, interpreting, intercultural communication, terminology and lexicography - as it happens
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UN Careers - jobs in this network (Translators, Revisers, Editors, etc.)

UN Careers -  jobs in this network (Translators, Revisers, Editors, etc.) | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it

Vacancies in this network: Translators, Revisers, Editors, etc.

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The How to Speak so People Listen Dictionary Part 14: Complicated Conversations

The How to Speak so People Listen Dictionary Part 14: Complicated Conversations | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it
How to Speak so People Listen is filled with specific concepts and models. To make a valuable resource for readers, and to introduce non-readers to some of the core concepts of the book, I have cre...
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FILL | Consultation publique sur les outils d'aide à la traduction | DGLFLF | traduction | outil d'aide à la traduction | traducteurs |

Grâce au développement des technologies de la langue, les outils d'aide à la traduction font aujourd'hui partie intégrante de l'environnement de travail des traducteurs. La DGLFLF souhaite mesurer l'adéquation entre ces outils d'aide à la traduction et les besoins des traducteurs au quotidien: une consultationpublique, ouverte du 9 au 30 septembre 2014, a donc été lancée. 
Les réponses permettront d'élaborer un guide sur les outils d'aide à la traduction pour aider à les choisir et les faire évoluer.

Charles Tiayon's insight:

Grâce au développement des technologies de la langue, les outils d'aide à la traduction font aujourd'hui partie intégrante de l'environnement de travail des traducteurs. La DGLFLF souhaite mesurer l'adéquation entre ces outils d'aide à la traduction et les besoins des traducteurs au quotidien: une consultationpublique, ouverte du 9 au 30 septembre 2014, a donc été lancée. 
Les réponses permettront d'élaborer un guide sur les outils d'aide à la traduction pour aider à les choisir et les faire évoluer.

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Publishers Lunch Job Board: Associate Managing Editor (#11122)

Position: Associate Managing Editor (Full Time) | Offered by: ABRAMS (New York, NY) | posted: Sept. 18, 2014
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Associate Managing Editor  
  posted: Sept. 18, 2014
 Offered by: 
ABRAMS
 Benefits: 
Health, Dental, 401K
 Duration: 
Full Time
 Location: 
New York, NY
 Requirements: 
ABRAMS seeks a detail-oriented individual, with expert-level copyediting and proofreading skills (both hard copy and electronically) to help manage the editorial process for a midsize illustrated book publisher with an annual list of 200+ titles, including art books, illustrated books, cookbooks and craft books. Individual will be responsible for working with Editorial, Design and manufacturing Production departments to guide books through the preproduction process. Individual will be responsible for copyediting and proofreading materials; hiring, managing and evaluating freelancers; creating and tracking schedules; utilizing a title management system to track book data and schedules and update data; track book-related materials for sales and marketing uses; and working on seasonal catalogs.

Qualifications include a bachelor's degree; 3+ years' experience as a managing editor or production editor in the book industry, preferably for an illustrated-book publisher. We are seeking someone with a thorough command of the Chicago Manual of Style and proven abilities to track multiple projects and meet important editorial production dates in a deadline-driven environment; create and manage schedules; experienced in hiring and managing freelancers; and work collaboratively and diplomatically across departments. Strong interpersonal and communication skills. Familiarity with Firebrand/Quality Solutions Title management software a plus.
 About Our  
Company: 
ABRAMS is the preeminent publisher of high-quality illustrated books for adults, adolescents and young children. ABRAMS is the publisher of bestsellers such as the wildly popular "The Diary of A Wimpy Kid" series, award-winning cookbooks of Alton Brown and the stunning photography of Yann Arthus-Bertrand's "Earth from Above" series. ABRAMS is conveniently located in the NYC mid-town Chelsea area. We offer competitive salaries, generous benefits, 401 (k) plan, tuition assistance, summer hours and paid Christmas vacation. Visit our website at www.abramsbooks.com
 E-mail:  Special  
Instructions: 
Please submit resume and cover letter indicating salary requirements. Indicate "Associate Managing Editor" in the email subject line.
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New Words Added to the Oxford English Dictionary

New Words Added to the Oxford English Dictionary | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it
The Oxford English Dictionary adds words to its collection periodically to keep up with changes in language. Many of the newest words are ab
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The Oxford English Dictionary adds words to its collection periodically to keep up with changes in language. Many of the newest words are abbreviations commonly used in text messages like SMH and WDYT. Others are merges of two words, like humblebrag and listicle. To find out what some of these mean and to see even more words, click here.   hot diggity EXCLAMATION Used to express excitement or delight Origin   Alteration of hot dog     listicle NOUN An article on the Internet presented in the form of a numbered or bullet-pointed list Origin   Early 21st century; blend of list and article   hot mess NOUN A person or thing that is spectacularly unsuccessful or disordered   dox VERB Search for and publish private or identifying information about a particular individual on the internet, typically with malicious intent   - See more at: http://www.bvswnews.com/features/2014/09/18/new-words-added-to-the-oxford-english-dictionary/#sthash.OfrrcnLi.dpuf

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International Psychoanalysis » Blog Archive » Emotions & Cognition: When emotions are strong, our cognitive functions can be profoundly affected with Leon Hoffman, MD at NYPSI

International Psychoanalysis » Blog Archive » Emotions & Cognition: When emotions are strong, our cognitive functions can be profoundly affected with Leon Hoffman, MD at NYPSI | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it

Wednesday, October 22, 2014. 8 – 9:15 p.m.
Emotions & Cognition: When emotions are strong, our cognitive functions can be profoundly affected with
Leon Hoffman, MD

Free and open to the public
RSVP HERE or visit nypsi.org

Neural pathways responsible for cognition and those responsible for emotions are always interconnected. When emotions are strong, our cognitive functions can be profoundly affected. Therefore, psychological approaches, plus remediation, may be helpful to children with cognitive problems.

Q & A to follow.

Leon Hoffman, M.D. is Director of The Pacella Parent Child Center at New York Psychoanalytic Society & Institute and also works with parents and children in private practice. Dr. Hoffman has written widely for professional and general audiences on common parenting and child rearing issues and is frequently a quoted expert during media interviews, including most recently, Bloomberg Radio. His additional roles at NYPSI include Training and Supervising Analyst in child, adolescent, and adult psychoanalysis as well as co-Director of NYPSI’s Research Center. Dr. Hoffman continues to serve as Chief Psychiatrist for West End Day School in Manhattan and is on the Faculty of Mount Sinai School of Medicine.

“Dialogues on…” events are geared towards professionals and parents who are involved with the care of children in the school and home environments. Educators, school administrators, community leaders, grandparents and parents are welcome.

The “Dialogues on…” series is made possible by a generous donation to NYPSI from The Poses Family Foundation. Additional funding was received from The James and Judith K. Dimon Foundation in honor of Ms. Themis Dimon.

NO CME OR CE CREDIT WILL BE OFFERED.

For information about NYPSI training programs please visit  BODY,.aolmailheader {font-size:10pt; color:black; font-family:Arial;} a.aolmailheader:link {color:blue; text-decoration:underline; font-weight:normal;} a.aolmailheader:visited {color:magenta; text-decoration:underline; font-weight:normal;} a.aolmailheader:active {color:blue; text-decoration:underline; font-weight:normal;} a.aolmailheader:hover {color:blue; text-decorat

Charles Tiayon's insight:

Wednesday, October 22, 2014. 8 – 9:15 p.m.
Emotions & Cognition: When emotions are strong, our cognitive functions can be profoundly affected with
Leon Hoffman, MD

Free and open to the public
RSVP HERE or visit nypsi.org

Neural pathways responsible for cognition and those responsible for emotions are always interconnected. When emotions are strong, our cognitive functions can be profoundly affected. Therefore, psychological approaches, plus remediation, may be helpful to children with cognitive problems.

Q & A to follow.

Leon Hoffman, M.D. is Director of The Pacella Parent Child Center at New York Psychoanalytic Society & Institute and also works with parents and children in private practice. Dr. Hoffman has written widely for professional and general audiences on common parenting and child rearing issues and is frequently a quoted expert during media interviews, including most recently, Bloomberg Radio. His additional roles at NYPSI include Training and Supervising Analyst in child, adolescent, and adult psychoanalysis as well as co-Director of NYPSI’s Research Center. Dr. Hoffman continues to serve as Chief Psychiatrist for West End Day School in Manhattan and is on the Faculty of Mount Sinai School of Medicine.

“Dialogues on…” events are geared towards professionals and parents who are involved with the care of children in the school and home environments. Educators, school administrators, community leaders, grandparents and parents are welcome.

The “Dialogues on…” series is made possible by a generous donation to NYPSI from The Poses Family Foundation. Additional funding was received from The James and Judith K. Dimon Foundation in honor of Ms. Themis Dimon.

NO CME OR CE CREDIT WILL BE OFFERED.

For information about NYPSI training programs please visit  BODY,.aolmailheader {font-size:10pt; color:black; font-family:Arial;} a.aolmailheader:link {color:blue; text-decoration:underline; font-weight:normal;} a.aolmailheader:visited {color:magenta; text-decoration:underline; font-weight:normal;} a.aolmailheader:active {color:blue; text-decoration:underline; font-weight:normal;} a.aolmailheader:hover {color:blue; text-decorat

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Student interpreters help New Orleans attorneys aid influx of child migrants - Loyola University New Orleans

Student interpreters at Loyola University New Orleans are lending their skills to help local lawyers and other immigration advocates aid an influx of unaccompanied minors fleeing from Central America.


The group of at least 17 student interpreters from Loyola’s new Spanish/English Translation and Interpreting Certificate Program are joining in on a pro bono project led by the New Orleans-based immigration law firm,Ware | Gasparian and managing partner Kathleen Gasparian '95, J.D. '02. The project, called PB&J—Pro Bono and Juveniles—is a way to connect these child migrants with not only the free legal help they so desperately need, but also the interpreters necessary to break through the language barrier.


The Loyola student interpreters are gaining hands-on experience and volunteering their skills for what many in New Orleans see as a developing humanitarian crisis. The New Orleans immigration court, for example, is handling more than 1,200 cases of these unaccompanied minors fleeing Central America, according to The Lens, a nonprofit news organization with offices at Loyola.


“Loyola University New Orleans puts student interpreters at the forefront of not only addressing an urgent need in the local community, but the university is also helping its students hone skills that are in high demand all across the U.S.,” said Lisbeth Philip, Ph.D., academic director of Loyola’s Translation and Interpreting Program. “When our students help interpret for child migrants coming into the New Orleans area, they are not only volunteering their skills for a great cause, but are also practicing the Jesuit ideals they’ve learned at Loyola—to think critically and act justly.”


The project, in its beginning phases, is currently determining the most vulnerable of these children and how to help them through the U.S. immigration system. At least some of the children may qualify for a relief called Special Immigrant Juvenile status, which is available for abused, abandoned or neglected children, allowing them to stay in the U.S., as opposed to facing deportation.


Loyola student translators such as Lisa Ponce de Leon, who is pursuing certification to be an interpreter in the health care and legal fields through Loyola’s program, says helping these child migrants is not only a service to the community, but also a way for her to put herself in their shoes and help them when they need it most.

Loyola’s Certificate in Translation & Interpreting Program is a non-credit certificate program designed for fully bilingual students who are interested in learning techniques and codes of practice in the fields of Spanish/English, English/Spanish translation and interpreting in legal and/or health care settings. Students can choose between the smaller concentrated certificate in either Healthcare or Legal Translation & Interpreting or the combined Healthcare and Legal Certificate in Translation & Interpreting.

Charles Tiayon's insight:

Student interpreters at Loyola University New Orleans are lending their skills to help local lawyers and other immigration advocates aid an influx of unaccompanied minors fleeing from Central America.


The group of at least 17 student interpreters from Loyola’s new Spanish/English Translation and Interpreting Certificate Program are joining in on a pro bono project led by the New Orleans-based immigration law firm,Ware | Gasparian and managing partner Kathleen Gasparian '95, J.D. '02. The project, called PB&J—Pro Bono and Juveniles—is a way to connect these child migrants with not only the free legal help they so desperately need, but also the interpreters necessary to break through the language barrier.


The Loyola student interpreters are gaining hands-on experience and volunteering their skills for what many in New Orleans see as a developing humanitarian crisis. The New Orleans immigration court, for example, is handling more than 1,200 cases of these unaccompanied minors fleeing Central America, according to The Lens, a nonprofit news organization with offices at Loyola.


“Loyola University New Orleans puts student interpreters at the forefront of not only addressing an urgent need in the local community, but the university is also helping its students hone skills that are in high demand all across the U.S.,” said Lisbeth Philip, Ph.D., academic director of Loyola’s Translation and Interpreting Program. “When our students help interpret for child migrants coming into the New Orleans area, they are not only volunteering their skills for a great cause, but are also practicing the Jesuit ideals they’ve learned at Loyola—to think critically and act justly.”


The project, in its beginning phases, is currently determining the most vulnerable of these children and how to help them through the U.S. immigration system. At least some of the children may qualify for a relief called Special Immigrant Juvenile status, which is available for abused, abandoned or neglected children, allowing them to stay in the U.S., as opposed to facing deportation.


Loyola student translators such as Lisa Ponce de Leon, who is pursuing certification to be an interpreter in the health care and legal fields through Loyola’s program, says helping these child migrants is not only a service to the community, but also a way for her to put herself in their shoes and help them when they need it most.

Loyola’s Certificate in Translation & Interpreting Program is a non-credit certificate program designed for fully bilingual students who are interested in learning techniques and codes of practice in the fields of Spanish/English, English/Spanish translation and interpreting in legal and/or health care settings. Students can choose between the smaller concentrated certificate in either Healthcare or Legal Translation & Interpreting or the combined Healthcare and Legal Certificate in Translation & Interpreting.

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Confused about English translations of the Bhagavad Gita?

Confused about English translations of the Bhagavad Gita? | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it
At Patheos Gathering Nectar, Deepika Birks discusses English translations of the Bhagavad Gita, and recommends five according to the reader's purpose.
Charles Tiayon's insight:

Translation is tricky. There is the issue of what the individual words mean, and the issue of the idea being translated. For example, you’ve probably seen signs in Spanish that say, “Prohibido fumar.” You could translate this, “smoking is prohibited” but everyone translates it, “no smoking.” Why? Because that’s how you say the exact same idea in English.

When you translate literally what the words actually mean in a dictionary, you risk a stilted rendering. When you translate freely the ideas expressed, you risk over-interpreting the text for the reader.

When I head to the bookstore, I hit the Hinduism section first. It’s usually tiny and comprised entirely of five books I’ve already read. Sometimes four of those books are translations of the Bhagavad Gita. Over the years I’ve read a dozen or so translations, some better than others. Here are a few of my favorites (for comparison, I’ve chosen chapter 4 śloka 11):

The Bhagavad Gita by Eknath Easwaran

4.11 “As men approach me, so I receive them. All paths, Arjuna, lead to me.”

Eknath Easwaran’s translation is hand-down my absolute favorite. The English is clear and beautiful. Easwaran fell in love with English literature as a child and grew up to be an English Professor before he moved to America to teach meditation. All of his writing, whether scripture translations or otherwise, reads smoothly. This translation contains neither the Sanskrit text nor a commentary. Easwaran also wrote a three volume commentary, The Bhagavad Gita for Daily Living, which does contain each verse in Devanagari script, as well as a simpler commentary called Essence of the Bhagavad Gita which does not.

The Living Gita by Sri Swami Satchidananda

4.11 “However people sincerely call on me, I come to them and fulfill their hearts’ desires. They use many paths to reach me.”

This is a translation with the commentary interspersed. The verses are offset in bold font and numbered, and every so many verses there is commentary that fills between a few paragraphs to a few pages and often includes stories about saints or little anecdotes from Satchidananda’s life. The commentary on this verse is about a page and a half and ends, “In a way, everybody has his or her own religion. Because minds vary, each mind has its religion. Your approach is your religion.” This version contains my favorite commentary. It doesn’t contain the Sanskrit.

The Holy Geeta by Swami Chinmayananda

4.11 “In whatever way men approach Me, even so do I reward them; My path do men tread in all ways, O son of Pritha.”

Ever notice that bookstores have an entire aisle (or two!) filled with Bibles? They come in all different sizes and various styles of cover. I browse those aisles just to look at all the beautiful options (even though, no matter how pretty the cover, the text still doesn’t resonate with me). I’ve often wished for a copy of the Gita in a beautiful cover.

This is my prettiest Gita. It’s hard cover, with an illustration on the inside and a bookmark attached with a ribbon. Unfortunately, the paper is also the onion paper used in Bibles, so thin the text on the other side bleeds through, and after only a few pages of reading it starts to cause eye strain (for this reason, I wish it also came in ebook form, but it doesn’t).

The verses appear in the original Sanskrit, both in Devanagari and transliterated, as well as in translation (but the translation is not directly under the Sanskrit).The commentary is meaty – a direct translation of just the verses with nothing else could easily come in at 100 pages, while this version is a whopping 1273 pages. No wonder it uses such thin paper! The commentary for 4.11 reads in part, “Attachment and aversion are not the weaknesses of the Lord. He is a mass of Dynamism, the source of all activities and achievements. We are given the equipment through which we can, as we like, invoke this Infinite Mind. If we rightly invoke and carefully use the equipments, as a reward for our intelligent self-application, we can reach the Goal of our activities. If we misuse them, the very same Divine Force can be the cause of our utter disaster.”

Bhagavad Gita by Swami Satyananda Saraswati

4.11 “Son of She Who Excels (Arjuna), in every way which men seek Me, in that same way I come to them, for every way that men follow is My path.”

I’ve been taking online classes from the Devi Mandir for years. Shree Maa and Swami Satyanana Saraswati have taught me how to do puja, and I’ve tuned in to their webcam on many holidays. I can’t tell you how many sentences I’ve started with, “Swamiji says…” I’ve watched thousands of hours of classes and bhajan and puja from these gurus and completed two separate courses on this text.

This translation contains the original text in Sanskrit, in large bold transliteration, and in English. The verses are sometimes awkward in English due to Swamiji’s habit of translating the meaning of names instead of the name itself. For example, in the first two ślokas, instead of “Dhritarashtra said” and “Sanjaya said,” it’s translated, “Blind Ambition said” and “He Who is Victorious Over All said.” This style of translation blends the commentary into the translation itself, which may or may not be what you want. This edition contains the Gita Mahatmya and the viniyoga – in other words, this book assumes you plan to chant the Gita in Sanskrit (or, in my case, listen along while a professional singer on my iPod chants the Gita in Sanskrit. I’m partial toGeetamritam: Melodious Rendition of the Complete Bhagavad Gita by Vanishree and Vijayalakshmi).

The Bhagavad-Gita: A New Translation by Georg Feuerstein
4.11 “Just as these [yogins] resort to Me, so do I love them [in turn]. Everywhere, O son-of-Prithā, humans follow My ‘track.’” (There is a footnote for the word track that reads, “The terms vartman (‘track’) can also be rendered as ‘path.’”

This is the most scholarly translation I own. The left-hand page contains the Sanskrit in both Devanagari and transliteration, while the right-hand page contains a very literal translation, usually with several footnotes. People who are familiar with how in-depth Bible studies are conducted would be at home with this version. A section in the back contains a word-by-word literal translation if you want to check which word meant what. For 4.11 it says, “ye (plural) = who; yatha – just as; mam = to me; prapadyante = they resort; tams (tan) = them; tathaiva (tatha + eva) = thus verily, here: so; bhajami = I love; aham = I; mama = my; vartmanuvartante (varma +anuvartante) = they follow [my] track; manusyas = humans; partha = O son-of-Pritha; sarvasas = everywhere.” This is clearly not a book you’d pick up for casual reading, but I’m just nerdy enough to appreciate it.

The translation you prefer will depend on how you plan to use the text.

  • Want a version that reads clearly in excellent prose? Try The Bhagavad Gita by Eknath Easwaran.
  • Want a friendly commentary that isn’t too bulky or academic? Try The Living Gita by Sri Swami Satchidananda.
  • Want a beautiful, heirloom-quality book? Try The Holy Geeta by Swami Chinmayananda.
  • Want to chant the Gita or to follow along while someone chants? TryBhagavad Gita by Swami Satyananda Saraswati.
  • Want to study the text verse-by-verse in-depth and study the Sanskrit?Try The Bhagavad-Gita: A New Translation by Georg Feuerstein.

The best translation is the one you get the most out of.

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Notícias ao Minuto - Palavras possíveis de traduzir (apenas) em desenho

Notícias ao Minuto - Palavras possíveis de traduzir (apenas) em desenho | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it
Veja o que fez uma artista britânica quando foi desafiada a representar, em desenhos, palavras tipicamente russas.
Charles Tiayon's insight:

Existem palavras que às vezes não têm tradução. É o que acontece, por exemplo, com ‘saudade’, palavra portuguesa sem semelhante em qualquer outro país.

PUB

Na Rússia, existem uma série de termos que enfrentam o mesmo problema. Sem tradução possível, a artista Ella Sanders decidiu criar uma série de trabalhos onde, através do desenho, tenta explicar ao que se refere determinado tema.

‘Razliubit’, por exemplo, é o termo russo que se utiliza quando se quer dizer que já não se está apaixonado. No entanto o termo não possui, em nenhum outra língua, um termo literal de tradução.

A artista britânica Ellen Sanders esteve na Rússia em trabalho, e no âmbito de um estágio que realizou, foi-lhe pedido que tentasse representar, em desenho, onze palavras tipicamente russas.

Os trabalhos de Ellen acabaram por ser partilhados no Huffigton Post e um editor acabou por contactá-la via Twitter dizendo-lhe que o que havia criado tinha potencial para se tornar num livro

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Dangereuses dérives de la traduction sur manuscrits - La République Des Livres par Pierre Assouline

Dangereuses dérives de la traduction sur manuscrits - La République Des Livres par Pierre Assouline | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it
Le phénomène n’est plus tout à fait neuf, mais il n’en est pas moins inquiétant et me semble aller croissant, celui qui consiste à faire traduire en français des manuscrits encore inédits en anglais, et donc parfois très incomplets, ou encore imparfaits, au moment de leur traduction. Certains l’attribuent au phénomène Harry Potter, où les [...]
Charles Tiayon's insight:

Le phénomène n’est plus tout à fait neuf, mais il n’en est pas moins inquiétant et me semble aller croissant, celui qui consiste à faire traduire en français des manuscrits encore inédits en anglais, et donc parfois très incomplets, ou encore imparfaits, au moment de leur traduction. Certains l’attribuent au phénomène Harry Potter, où les éditeurs français auraient été “doublés” par nombre de lecteurs français impatients de connaître la suite, qu’ils ont alors achetée en anglais puisqu’elle n’était pas encore disponible en français… Il se peut que ce soit cela, oui, ou bien, de plus en plus fréquemment, le désir de caler la sortie française sur l’américaine ou l’anglaise pour bénéficier des retombées marketing.

Corollaire tout aussi inquiétant, le racourcissement du temps de traduction, trois mois au lieu de six, avec pour conséquence un travail manquant de recul, donc de qualité, et pouvant par ailleurs être préjudiciable à la réputation de l’impuissant traducteur. En ce qui me concerne, cela a débuté en 2003 par cette curiosité : quand j’ai reçu le texte inédit de The Lovely bones à traduire – La Nostalgie de l’ange, futur best-seller inattendu – le dernier chapitre n’existait tout bonnement pas ! Cela ne m’a demandé, il est vrai, aucun effort supplémentaire à part celui de devoir le traduire in extremis, mais cela signalait néanmoins l’apparition d’un tournant dans la traduction de langue anglaise, pour certains ouvrages en tout cas.

Cela a continué en 2004 avec Ne m’oubliez pas de Trezza Azzopardi (2006), qui n’avait pourtant rien du best-seller annoncé, et qui d’ailleurs ne l’a pas été, mais que j’ai reçu sous forme de manuscrit. Encore inexpérimentée à l’époque, j’ai vaillemment encodé toutes les modifications de dernière minute – non signalées par l’auteur – sans ciller, en dépit de la deuxième relecture anglais/français, et donc de tout le travail supplémentaire, que cela nécessitait. Puis en 2005 j’ai dû traduire Les Cinq personnes que j’ai rencontrées là-haut, de Mith Albom – best-seller prévisible, celui-ci – et là j’ai été confrontée une nouvelle fois au “work in progress” du manuscrit inédit en anglais, sauf que, de nouveau, je ne l’ai appris qu’en fin de parcours. Je n’avais pas saisi non plus ce que cela comportait vraiment au niveau de la finalisation. Et, de fait, tout comme Trezza Azzopardi, sieur Albom avait effectué une kyrielle de modifications de dernière minute, et bien que cet auteur chevronné soit automatiquement traduit en de multiples langues, il n’avait absolument pas pris la peine de signaler lesdites modifications, qui là étaient très nombreuses : permutation de paragraphes qu’il fallait repérer et aller repêcher à l’autre bout du livre, suppression de passages compliqués (par exemple sur le base-ball) qui avaient demandé des heures, remplacés par d’autres qui ne l’étaient pas moins et qu’il fallait à présent traduire dans l’urgence !

Résultat : un surplus de travail insensé, en dernière minute qui plus est, avec tout le stress que cela comporte à la clé. Dans ce cas-ci, je me dois néanmoins de saluer l’attitude pour le moins respectueuse de l’éditeur (Oh éditions), qui m’a demandé de son propre chef de lui facturer les heures supplémentaires passées sur ce travail ! Et c’est bien sûr ce qui, dans l’idéal, devrait être négocié, à chaque fois que ce genre de prouesse est demandé, dont les éditeurs ne mesurent pas toujours l’ampleur. Après quoi, le phénomène du manuscrit non définitif est devenu assez fréquent pour certains livres traduits de l’anglais, ou pour certains éditeurs, et j’ai appris à prendre les devants, ce que je recommande à tout traducteur moins aguerri de faire : et d’une, je me renseigne à présent systématiquement sur l’état d’avancement du texte à traduire – et me réserve le droit de refuser en conséquence, un luxe que l’on ne peut hélas que rarement s’offrir – ; et de deux, par mesure de précaution, je ne relis éventuellement pas les textes anglais et français au fur et à mesure – mais cela m’oblige à changer ma méthode de travail, ce qui m’handicape – ; et de trois j’informe dès le départ et clairement l’éditeur du surcroît de travail et du changement de méthode que de telles exigences peuvent occasionner. Car il est possible que, en toute innocence et ignorance du processus de traduction, il n’en soit pas conscient.

C’est ce que j’ai fait pour Le Chardonneret, fameux best-seller s’il en est, où j’ai travaillé à partir des épreuves non définitives pour une bonne partie du roman, devais absolument relire l’anglais et le français au fur et à mesure étant donné l’urgence qui entourait cette traduction, et n’ai donc pas pu intégrer tous les changements de dernière minute faute de temps, ce que l’éditeur a dû accepter de bonne grâce puisqu’il avait lui-même fixé des limites temporelles déjà fort difficiles à tenir sans les fameux changements ! Au prix où nous sommes payés – 3,95 euros net de l’heure en ce qui me concerne vu mon nombre de relectures -  il me semble qu’il y a des limites à ce qu’un traducteur peut humainement assurer, et si les éditeurs ne le comprennent pas d’eux-mêmes, il est dans notre intérêt, et dans l’intérêt de tous d’ailleurs, de le leur faire comprendre gentiment mais fermement avant toute signature : nous traduirons un livre une fois, pas deux, et de préférence dans des délais raisonnables.

C’est en étant tous solidaires sur ce point-là que nous arriverons à nous faire respecter, et à ne pas perdre de contrat si nous réagissons tous de la même manière en “osant” rappeler les limites de nos fonctions, qui sont avant tout artistiques et devraient cesser d’être tributaires d’impératifs commerciaux stressants et infiniment préjudiciables à la qualité des livres mis sur le marché, ainsi qu’à nos réputations dans la foulée, sans parler du malheureux lecteur se retrouvant devant des textes hautement imparfaits pour cause d’un maximum de travail en un minimum de temps. Le livre est menacé ? Face à de telles pratiques et à la qualité médiocre – traductions ou pas, d’ailleurs – de ce qui est régulièrement déversé sur le marché, l’on ne peut guère s’en étonner !

EDITH SOONcKINDT

(Ce billet est paru une première fois sur le site de l’ATLF)

(« Edith Soonkindt et Dona Tartt, la traductrice et l’auteur du Chardonneret, photos D.R.)

 

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Dans le bois / Premier Acte  : Huis clos à ciel ouvert

Dans le bois / Premier Acte  : Huis clos à ciel ouvert | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it
Deux jeunes hommes s'isolent dans la nature afin de reconstruire leur vision de l'amour à l'abri des regards. Ironiquement, c'est sous les yeux du public que se tisse la tension entre les deux protagonistes, à force de mots couverts, de sous-entendus et de silences chargés d'émotions. 
Charles Tiayon's insight:

Deux jeunes hommes s’isolent dans la nature afin de reconstruire leur vision de l’amour à l’abri des regards. Ironiquement, c’est sous les yeux du public que se tisse la tension entre les deux protagonistes, à force de mots couverts, de sous-entendus et de silences chargés d’émotions. 

Ce scénario, imaginé par David Mamet en 1977, avait d’abord été écrit pour une relation entre un homme et une femme. Il y a deux ans, le texte est passé entre les mains de Danielle Le Saux-Farmer, d’André Robillard et de Karine Mecteau Bouchard, qui décident de monter la pièce, non sans l’adapter à une réalité correspondant davantage au paysage social actuel.

Le processus de travail derrière la mise en scène de Dans le bois a toutefois été marqué par une rencontre très importante, provoquée par la recherche d’une traduction francophone des mots de Mamet. «Il existait une traduction manuscrite, cachée dans le fond d’un placard, même pas publiée», explique avec enthousiasme Danielle Le Saux-Farmer, metteure en scène du projet. «Après deux semaines de recherches, on a fini par trouver Rose-Marie Belisle. C’est elle qui a eu le mandat de traduire la pièce dans les années 1980, pour une compagnie de Montréal», indique André Robillard. «Elle nous a expliqué plein de choses sur le texte […], sur les images utilisées par l’auteur et les liens avec la psychanalyse, par exemple. Ça l’habite, ce texte-là. Elle le connaît comme si elle l’avait traduit hier.»

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'Lost In Translation' book gives untranslatable words meaning

'Lost In Translation' book gives untranslatable words meaning | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it
A UK author and illustrator brings life and meaning to words we don't have in the English language. Morgan Manousos (@MorganManousos) has more.
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Riversand Expands Multi-Language Capabilities in MDM and PIM Solution for International Clients

Houston, TX (PRWEB) September 18, 2014 -- MDMCenter™ Now Offers Seamless Integration With Any Translation Management System
Charles Tiayon's insight:

Houston, TX (PRWEB) September 18, 2014

Riversand Technologies, a worldwide provider ofMaster Data Management (MDM), Product Information Management (PIM) and data quality solutions, announced today that it has further expanded its global footprint by offering enhanced multi-language capabilities for its MDM and PIM solution,MDMCenter™, to companies located in North America, South America, Europe and Asia.

“MDMCenter now offers seamless integration with any translation management system for ease of automating item data translation into multiple target languages to address our worldwide customers’ requirements for product content in multiple languages,” added Upen Varanasi, CEO of Riversand. “The elegant architecture of the MDMCenter data model allows for the distribution of content and localization of languages (i.e. Mexican Spanish vs. Spanish in Columbia and Peru) to be easier, faster, and at a lower cost than other solutions.”

The existing user interface in Riversand’s MDMCenter is translated into 14 languages (English, Chinese Simplified, Chinese Traditional (Taiwan), Czech, Dutch, Italian, Japanese, Polish, Spanish, Swedish, Korean, French and German), and 160 languages for content, making Riversand’s MDM and PIM solutions usable at the local level by companies worldwide. In addition, the application can handle item data entry in any language.

About Riversand Technologies

Riversand Technologies, Inc. is a worldwide provider of Master Data Management (MDM), Product Information Management (PIM), and data quality solutions. Customers include VF Corporation, Bed, Bath & Beyond, PC Connection, Schneider Electric, ESAB, Teva Pharmaceuticals, ConocoPhillips and ExxonMobil. Riversand's PIM and MDM solutions allow clients to manage accurate, timely and up-to-date information through their supply chains, providing accelerated time-to-market, vendor data on-boarding, product assortment growth and an enhanced cross-channel customer experience. For more information, visit Riversand.com and follow @RiversandMDM on Twitter.

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Journée Européenne des langues / Institut français

Journée Européenne des langues / Institut français | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it

La journée européenne des langues a été mise en place par la Commission Européenne il y a 11 ans. Cette journée de la diversité linguistique permet de démontrer tous les avantages de l’apprentissage d’une langue (possibilité de compréhension des natifs dans leur propre langue, liberté de circulation et d’information, promotion de différentes forme de coopération internationale et possibilité de découvrir la diversité linguistique et culturelle européenne).

 

PROGRAMME DE L’EDITION 2014

JEU URBAIN, « LE TRÔNE DES SIX ROYAUMES » 
Derrière collines et rues, encerclée par des dictionnaires et langues sans dessus-dessous, existe une contrée constituée de six royaumes, gouvernés par le Souverain de toutes les contrées. Malheureusement, le trône est vide depuis des années, car les rois, parlant tous une langue différente, ne se comprennent plus. Celui qui réussira à réunir les royaumes dispersés, deviendra le nouveau Souverain des six royaumes unifiés…

DATE : Samedi 27 septembre de 10h à 15h
LIEU : Stare Miasto, Rynek Gółwny
PARTICIPANTS : 60 groupes de 4 à 5 personnes
ÂGE : 12 et +
START : à 10h, Teatr Groteska, rue Skarbowa

En jeu:
1ère place – un bon d’achat de 1250 zł dans un restaurant français
2ème place – un bon d’achat de 1000 zł dans un restaurant italien
3ème place – un bon d’achat de 750 zł dans un restaurant espagnol

Règlement et informations à partir du 1er septembre 2014:www.grymiejskie.krakow.pl

 

Pour la soirée de clôture, tous les participants sont invités à prendre part au bal royal et au concert du groupe « Midlife Crysis », au Club « Bal » .
DATE : Samedi 27 septembre, 21 h
LIEU : « Bal », Zabłociu, Ulica Ślusarska 9

Charles Tiayon's insight:

La journée européenne des langues a été mise en place par la Commission Européenne il y a 11 ans. Cette journée de la diversité linguistique permet de démontrer tous les avantages de l’apprentissage d’une langue (possibilité de compréhension des natifs dans leur propre langue, liberté de circulation et d’information, promotion de différentes forme de coopération internationale et possibilité de découvrir la diversité linguistique et culturelle européenne).

 

PROGRAMME DE L’EDITION 2014

JEU URBAIN, « LE TRÔNE DES SIX ROYAUMES » 
Derrière collines et rues, encerclée par des dictionnaires et langues sans dessus-dessous, existe une contrée constituée de six royaumes, gouvernés par le Souverain de toutes les contrées. Malheureusement, le trône est vide depuis des années, car les rois, parlant tous une langue différente, ne se comprennent plus. Celui qui réussira à réunir les royaumes dispersés, deviendra le nouveau Souverain des six royaumes unifiés…

DATE : Samedi 27 septembre de 10h à 15h
LIEU : Stare Miasto, Rynek Gółwny
PARTICIPANTS : 60 groupes de 4 à 5 personnes
ÂGE : 12 et +
START : à 10h, Teatr Groteska, rue Skarbowa

En jeu:
1ère place – un bon d’achat de 1250 zł dans un restaurant français
2ème place – un bon d’achat de 1000 zł dans un restaurant italien
3ème place – un bon d’achat de 750 zł dans un restaurant espagnol

Règlement et informations à partir du 1er septembre 2014:www.grymiejskie.krakow.pl

 

Pour la soirée de clôture, tous les participants sont invités à prendre part au bal royal et au concert du groupe « Midlife Crysis », au Club « Bal » .
DATE : Samedi 27 septembre, 21 h
LIEU : « Bal », Zabłociu, Ulica Ślusarska 9

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Marketing Terminology 101--Terms You Need to Know

Marketing Terminology 101--Terms You Need to Know | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it
Marketing terminology 101 includes definitions and explanation of the key terms you need to know to start actively marketing your business.
Charles Tiayon's insight:

The field of marketing is a lot like other specialty fields. There are industry terms for everything. It helps create order and ensure that when marketers talk and share ideas, they’re discussing the same ideas. Jargon, aka industry terminology, helps create communication shortcuts.

If you’re not a marketer, you need marketing terminology 101. As a business owner and marketer, understanding the basic marketing terminology and definitions can help you strengthen your own marketing strategy and plan.  When you’re out there networking and trying to uncover the best resources for your company, understanding some of the terms will help you ask better questions.

Content

Anything you read, view, or interact with online can be considered content. A picture published on your blog or social media page of you shaking hands with a customer is content. It might be categorized as “visual content,” which is different from a blog post, press release or an email message, but it’s still content.

Because there are so many different formats, content is now subcategorized. For example, you might see the following categories:

-  Visual content – infographics, memes, cartoons, photos, etc…
–  Print content – blog posts, articles, case studies, press releases, etc…
–  Audio content – podcasts, MP3 recordings, etc…
–  Video content – YouTube, Vimeo, and Vine are all video content creation and sharing tools.
–  Blog content – Blog content can be print, video, audio, visual, etc…
–  Social media content – Tweets, Facebook posts, comments, etc…

The list could go on and on. In fact, more than 100 different types of content have been identified. They include everything from a 140 character Tweet to a 140 page, or longer, eBook. It’s all content.

As a marketer and business owner, it’s essential to understand that content is considered to be virtually any information that you share with your audience. Its goal can be to educate, entertain, inspire, motivate, persuade, inform or something else altogether.

Content Marketing

Content marketing is the practice of using content, in any of the many formats and subcategories mentioned above, to connect people to your business. Let’s back up for a minute and talk about marketing specifically. Marketing is really about generating awareness for your company and getting people to take action. It’s typically created to achieve a specific goal – to generate leads or to convert those leads. It’s also used to build relationships and create customer loyalty.

Content marketing then uses content to connect your business with your target audience and customers.

Inbound Marketing

Inbound marketing is about marketing tactics that help your customer find you. It replaces or supplements the practice of seeking customers through activities like cold calling, advertising, or direct mail. Inbound marketing involves creating and publishing or sharing valuable content for your customers. You promote the content through a variety of methods that can include blogging, email, social media, even advertising and direct mail too.

The effect of providing and promoting your content builds relationships with potential customers, and thus pulls them to you. The goal is to get them to visit your website, sign up for a free consultation, or become part of your community.

Inbound marketing strategies are used to achieve a number of lead generation goals including:

-  Increasing and creating brand awareness
–  Improving search engine optimization
–  Building a reputation as a credible and authoritative resource

Inbound marketing builds trust. As you provide value-driven content to your audience, prospects learn to turn to you for information, and eventually for products or services. It’s also a more subtle form of marketing.

It gets through the walls that people put up to shield themselves from hard and more intrusive marketing tactics. Let’s face it, we get tired of companies trying to sell to us and we tune them out. Inbound marketing is available at your prospect’s leisure. They seek it out and they can seek it out when they’re ready for it – 24 hours a day, seven days a week.

Outbound Marketing

If inbound marketing pulls prospects to you, outbound marketing is the process of pushing your marketing outward in the attempt to connect with those businesses which may be interested in your products or services. Outbound marketing reaches out to prospects via advertising, cold calling, direct mail lists as well as other tactics.

The most effective marketers today employ a combination of inbound and outbound marketing tactics to build the most successful programs.  There are pros and cons to both inbound and outbound techniques but when you use them together, you get the best results.

Marketing Campaign

A marketing campaign is an organized and structured effort to achieve a specific marketing goal. A marketing campaign is comprised of specific detailed steps that can include a variety of marketing channels for a very specific purpose. For example, you may create a marketing campaign for a new product or service launch.  Each of the tactics in the campaign is directed at generating awareness and leads for that specific product or service.

Lead

A lead is someone who has shown interest in your company’s products or services. They’ve visited your website, signed up for your email messages, connected with you on social media or requested more information.

The majority of your marketing efforts will likely be to generate leads, which is to find organizations that are interested in what your business has to offer.

A raw lead is someone that is just a name and email address.  This kind of lead hasn’t been qualified.

A ‘qualified lead’ is a name and with contact information that meets some level of pre-established criteria.  Usually that criteria includes has a time-frame for purchase, has a budget, and has indicated they have a need that your product or service can solve.  There may be other criteria established, however, these are the initial points used to qualify the lead.

Lead Capture

Lead capture is actually a technique, and it’s more passive and less threatening than it sounds. To “capture a lead” means to get some sort of information from them that allows you to begin the process of building on your new relationship and specifically marketing to that individual.

How do you capture a lead? Through a call to action in your content, you invite or motivate prospects to share information with you. For example, you might give them access to an eBook, a consultation, or a promotional offer when they share their email address with you. You now have the opportunity to do what’s called “nurturing the lead.”

Lead Nurture

Once a lead has reached out to you and connected with you, it’s up to you to make sure they’re taken care of. That’s accomplished by following up with a consistent flow of valuable and credible information.  The concept is really about keeping yourself ‘top of mind.’

We’re all busy and have a thousand things on our mind at any one time.  And while the need for your product or service might not be that great today—meaning they’re not in enough pain to do anything about it or are prepared to spend money solving it—keeping yourself top of mind, puts you in a great position to capture that business in the future when the need is greater.

The goal is to build a relationship of trust so that when they have a need, they turn to your company for a solution.

Conversion

Conversion is action. When a prospect takes a desired action, that is a conversion. For example, when you invite someone to follow you on social media and they do, that’s a conversion. If you ask for someone to click on a link in your email and when they follow through, that’s a conversion. And of course when someone clicks on a “buy” link and becomes a customer, that’s a conversion too. Conversions are often the primary goal of your marketing efforts. A series of smaller conversions can lead to a larger one. A social media follow can lead to an email subscription, which can lead to a purchase.

You have to think in small steps as prospects go through the buyer journey.

From content to conversions, marketing terminology 101 makes it less complicated. Once you understand the basics, it’s much easier to begin to build your own powerful lead generation strategy where you can also establish the measurement criteria necessary.

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TAUS - Enabling better translation - TAUS Annual Conference 2014

October 27 & 28, Vancouver, BC (Canada)

For the TAUS Annual Conference 2014 we will go to Vancouver, BC (Canada), co-located with the Localization World Conference which takes place in the Convention Center on October 29-31.
Mark the dates:
Charles Tiayon's insight:
TAUS ANNUAL CONFERENCE 2014
October 27 & 28, Vancouver, BC (Canada)"Together We Know More"




Monday, October 27

Welcome and introductions

9:00 / Welcome and agenda overviewby Jaap van der Meer (TAUS)

9:10 / TAUS Membership Program 2015by Jaap van der Meer (TAUS)

1. Speech Translation

9:20 / Keynote presentation by Dr. Alexander Waibel (Facebook)
Alex Waibel is the ‘inventor’ of the software app, Jibbigo, the world’s first commercially available speech translator running on a telephone (iPhone and Android). Jibbigo launched in 2009, and allows you to select from over 25 languages, record a voice snippet in that language or type in some text, and then get a translation displayed on screen and read aloud to you in a language of your choosing. In 2013 Facebook acquired Mobile Technologies, the company that Alex Waibel and his partners founded in 2001. The Jibbigo team writes: “Facebook, with its mission to make the world more open and connected, provides the perfect platform to apply our technology at a truly global scale.” In this keynote address we will hear from Alex Waibel when and how spoken translation will be ready for prime time, for use in multilingual chat, real-time customer support, conference interpretation, rescue operations, government-citizen and doctor-patient conversations. Furthermore we hope to hear more about how the social media giant will develop great new features around spoken translation, power a voice Graph Search, translating real-time news feed posts and comments.

9:50 / Speech Translation Panel discussionmoderated by Mark Seligman (Spoken Translation)
The panel will attempt a family snapshot of the automatic speech translation field at this moment when it is graduating from grammar school and is poised for its teenage growth spurt. The panelists will share their eyewitness perspectives on the field's childhood and their hopes for its future. Discussion will touch on current players and projects; scientific, commercial, and practical challenges still ahead; potential applications and markets; and likely effects on world society at large.

The panelists are Mark Seligman (Spoken Translation)Alex Waibel (Facebook)Chris Wendt (Microsoft) and Macduff Hughes (Google).

The goal of this session is to gather ideas and input for a TAUS report on the emerging Speech Translation sector covering the trends, challenges, opportunities, products and applications.

10:15 / COFFEE BREAK

2. Access over Ownership and Power of the End User

10:45 / Panel discussionmoderated by Andrew Lawless (Rockant)
What is the role of quality metrics if the crowd prefers “25 words or less” when it should actually be “25 words or fewer”? Where are the benefits of maintaining an in-house translation memory, when the end-user is its judge? Cloud computing, social media and new collaboration tools are now empowering your customers to re-shape your language - and the perception of its quality.

This panel session explores how localization departments can capture and respond to end user feedback, integrate user experience into research and development and balance customer opinion with language quality metrics.

The panelists are Sonia Zamborsky (Marriott)Pablo Vazquez (NetApp)Terri Lynch (KeySight)Leona Frank (Vistaprint).

The goal of this session is to explore how end-users can be engaged in translation and localization via cloud computing, social media and collaboration tools.

3. Language and the Internet of Things

11:30 / Panel discussionmoderated by Jonathan Clark (Sine-Wave)
It's not science fiction. It is really happening: tractors talk to tractors, cars talk to the garage (or they should) and implantable medical devices talk to the hospital. The Internet of Things (IoT) brings big business opportunities, environmental and life improvements. And language is part of it. How exactly is the language industry impacted by the IoT? Might the need for real-time translation create new demands on our tools and processes, or do we already have the technology to handle the deluge?

The panelists are Terena Bell (In Every Language), more TBC.

The goal of this session is to identify the areas where language intersects the flow of data in the Internet of Things and to outline approaches to enable, create, input, manage, and analyze multi-language data.

4. Recruiting and building the human capital

12:00 / Session leader: Paul Mangell (AlphaCRC)
In the 2013 TAUS Translation Technology Landscape report we marked the shortage of talent as one of the biggest constraints for growth and innovation in the global translation sector. In this session we talk about the sustainability of the professional human resource versus the requirement for translation and localization. We ask recruiters from both client and vendor corporations to join this discussion and talk about the challenges they face in recruiting talent. We will also get the views of a localization recruitment professional, and a leading university. We talk about the most effective way to roll out the new free TAUS Academic Membership program which will give students at all universities in the world access to the TAUS Data repository and Dynamic Quality Framework resources as well as the various knowledge bases to help future translation and localization staff in their studies and with their experiments in translation quality evaluation and machine translation training.

The panelists are Salvatore "Salvo" Giammarresi (Paypal)Edmund Blogg (Adaptive Globalization)Pete Smith (University of Texas)Max Troyer (Monterey Institute)

The goal of this session is to agree on an industry-coordinated plan to combat the shortage of skills in the translation industry. TAUS offers the Academic Membership program as a key component in this plan.

12:30 / LUNCH BREAK

5. Translation quality in a personalized world

13:45 / Panel discussionmoderated by Attila Görög (TAUS)
Today’s changing expectations towards translation quality is a hot topic for all players of the industry: translation buyers want different types of quality and flexible ways of pricing; LSPs want to know whether their customized MT engine is improving; and translators want to set the threshold of TM/MT matches at the most optimal levels. And these are just a few examples where translation quality becomes more and more tuned to different user needs. But how do we make the balance between right quality and budgetary restrictions? And how do we go about quality in our highly personalized world where cookies and social media dominate the landscape?
Since TAUS launched the Dynamic Quality Framework in 2011, we have learned to apply different methods of QE such as adequacy, fluency, productivity testing, etc. We have also learnt to compare results to previous projects, to minimize subjectivity by using a standardized workflow. But we want more. We want to be able to compare evaluation results consistently across the whole industry. We need benchmarking to satisfy user needs and to provide the right level of quality for each user. In this session we continue the dialogue from the 2014 Industry Leaders Forum where we discussed the topic of compliance vs. acceptance and we concluded that user experience is the ultimate validation of quality. The last word has not been said about this delicate topic, but one thing is certain: this problem can’t be solved in isolation. Let’s try to find a solution together.

The panelists are Olga Beregovaya (Welocalize)Christian Arno (Lingo24)Alison Toon (Smartling)Horacio Carman (Trusted Translations)Clove Lynch (VMWare)

The goals of this session are:

  1.  Try to define different quality levels required by customers today. Are the common assumptions on quality levels related to different content types and purposes still correct?
  2. Discuss different ways of benchmarking quality. Specify the type of evaluation data, tools and metrics needed to create valid benchmarks.
  3. Define a minimum level of quality. A basic translation quality. How to measure that efficiently?
  4. Share best practices on offering the right level of quality while staying within the budget.

6. Multimedia: More Important Than Text?

14:45 / Session leader: Greg Oxton (Consortium for Service Innovation)
The explosion of multimedia over the past five years has been enabled by growing bandwidth, easy access to production means, cheap storage, and the pervasive presence of recording capability via smart phones. 

Not only are we creating multimedia content at an unprecedented rate, but we are also consuming it: YouTube is the number two search engine in the world. 
It has 1 billion unique user visits a month, localized in 61 countries and 61 languages… and 80% of YouTube traffic comes from outside the US. 

A recent Forbes article, “Why Online Video is Vital…” cited a survey that showed most respondents prefer video over white papers and case studies for marketing materials. 

How do we integrate multimedia into our content strategies and localization strategies?

The panelists are Jessica Roland (SDL)Melissa Biggs (Informatica)Karen Combe (PTC)Loic Dufresne de Virel (Intel), more TBC.

The goal of this session is to discuss:

  • How important is it to have multimedia as part of one’s content strategy?
  • When does multimedia make sense?
  • The multimedia localization challenges and best practices.  
15:15 / REFRESHMENT BREAK

Break-out sessions

During the sessions, throughout the day, attendees can write on a flip chart the topics or questions they like to discuss in the break-out sessions. After the last panel discussion they decide which break-out session they will join.
15:45 / Break-out discussions. Discussion leaders will coach the groups to review and analyze the questions and steer towards conclusions and recommendations. 
16:50 / Revert to plenary session. Each of the four groups will report back to all attendees what their conclusions are and will also make recommendations for possible collaborative industry actions.

19:00 / Networking dinner at restaurant TBC

Tuesday, October 28

7. Global Customer Experience & MT

9:00 / Session leader: Donald DePalma (Common Sense Advisory)
Consumer and business research has demonstrated a decided preference for local-language content at every phase of the customer experience. It has also indicated an elastic attitude toward linguistic quality on the part of online users and a growing tendency to use MT to deal with untranslated content. In this session, we will outline the parameters of the customer experience, share data on several aspects of quality and the use of MT, and discuss real-world applications of MT to deal with linguistic gaps in the customer experience. Participants in the session will benefit from an understanding of where MT fits in.

The panelists are Hassan Sawaf (eBay)Akshay Madan (Adobe)Roth Fouty (NextIT)

The goal of this session is to identify touch points in the customer experience where MT can play a more active role and outline success factors for its usage in this context. Conclusions from this discussion will be published in an article, shortly after the conference.

8. Interoperability: the TAUS Translation API

9:45 / Session leader: Achim Ruopp (TAUS)
In consultation with the translation industry TAUS studied the basic set of features that should be included in a translation services API leading to the proposal of a standard API - the TAUS Translation API. The TAUS Translation API focuses on the system interactions, follows RESTful design principles and allows for a broad variety of translation workload formats, including file centric standards like XLIFF. The industry has invested significantly in these file standards and the TAUS Translation API was designed in a way to carry these investments into the new world of cloud-based services. In this session members of the working group will meet with industry stakeholders to discuss use cases and implementation requirements of a common industry translation API.

The panelists are Derek Coffey (Welocalize)Jan Nelson (Microsoft)Kevin Cohn (Smartling)Alolita Sharma (Wikipedia)

The goal of this session is to drive adoption of this common API and to get support and contributors to these efforts. 

10:30 / REFRESHMENT BREAK

9. Always Connected Insights: Real-time Customer Listening and Learning

11:00 / Session leader: Diane Wagner (Microsoft)
With the explosion in instant, always connected communication, customers are constantly sharing exactly what they think—be it a five star experience or a total fail. Complement or complaint, in Chinese or in Czech, do you know where your customers are and what they’re saying about your products? Join this discussion about where your customer may be talking, plus tips and tools on how to analyze and gain insight across languages and markets.

The panelists are Christine Duran (Adobe)Bill Dean (Microsoft) and Loy Searle (Intuit)

The goals of this session is to raise awareness around where customers are talking (social media, product reviews, directories like Yelp), highlight sentiment analytics tools & tips that span across markets.

10. MT Adoption and Usage

11:45 / Session leader: Willem Stoeller
In this session we will discuss the changing nature of the MT market as documented in the just published 2014 TAUS Machine Translation Market Report. We will discuss new trends like agile domain adaptation and automated real-time learning. We will also hear from translation technology operators about MT usage patterns and usage volumes, geographical spread, adoption of MT post-editing, productivity scores, etcetera.

The panelists are David Canek (Memsource)Udi Hershkovich (Safaba)Scott Gaskill (Sovee)Chris Wendt (Microsoft)Marco Trombetti (Translated)Steve Richardson (LDS Church)

The goal of this session is to gather state-of-the-art trending features in MT, best practices and use cases and document these in an update on the TAUS MT Market Report. 

12:30 / LUNCH BREAK

11. Evaluating MT

14:00 / Session leader: Attila Görög (TAUS)
Evaluating MT is becoming an art and a science in its own right. Small language service providers and large global buyers alike face the same kind of difficult questions. How do I rank and compare engines? Do I have to buy them first, train and customize them before evaluating the engines? Can we rely on automated metrics? What do they mean? How do you measure productivity on post-editing in an objective way? How do we calculate the return-on-investment? How do I compare the pricing?

The panelists are Antonio Tejada (Capita)Olga Pospelova (eBay)Olga Beregovaya (Welocalize)Tony O'Dowd (KantanMT)John Paul Barraza (SYSTRAN)

The goal of this session is to document best practices and common sense and use that among others as input for improvement of the shared TAUS DQF resources.

12. Human Language Project

14:45 / Session leader: Jeannette Stewart (TAUS)
It’s no secret: data are the fuel for automating translation. Sharing translation memory data therefore seems a ‘no-brainer’. In 2008 TAUS and its members launched the TAUS Data platform. The data repository now contains 55 billion words in 2,200 language pairs, shared by around 140 large and small translation operators. 
Imagine what happens if we can expand the scope to include linguists, users and creators of multilingual content.. Imagine we could kick off the Human Language Project and extend our coverage of languages and domains to almost anything anyone ever needs. The Human Language Project is intended to be a global collaboration between business, government, academia and individuals with the goal of making language data and technology accessible to all stakeholders in the world.

Jeannette Stewart from TAUS with the help of the panelists will pitch a vision and invite the participants audience to participate in the brainstorming.

The panelists are TBC.

The goal of this session is to lay out a plan for the Human Language Project and to gather support from a global network of ambassadors whose mission it will be to lobby for data gathering in all Human Languages. For details please see “The Call for the Human Language Project”.

15:15 / REFRESHMENT BREAK

Break-out sessions

During the sessions, throughout the day, attendees can go to the corners of the room and write down on a flip chart the topics or questions they like to discuss in the break-out sessions. After the last panel discussion they decide which break-out session they will join.
15:45 / Break-out discussions. Discussion leaders will coach the groups to review and analyze the questions and steer towards conclusions and recommendations. 
16:50 / Revert to plenary session. Each of the four groups will report back to all attendees what their conclusions are and will also make recommendations for possible collaborative industry actions.

TAUS EXCELLENCE AWARD & CLOSURE AT 17:30
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IndiaGlitz - 'Baahubali' dubbing work started - Telugu Movie News

IndiaGlitz - 'Baahubali' dubbing work started - Telugu Movie News | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it
The shooting of S.S.Rajamouli's magnum opus 'Baahubali' is being done at Ramoji Film City currently and the dubbing of the first part of 'Baahubali' has been started at Prasad Labs in Hyderabad.
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Amazon introduces new Kindle for readers in India

Amazon introduces new Kindle for readers in India | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it

Mumbai: Amazon on September 18 introduced the all-new Rs 5,999 Kindle — now with a 20% faster processor, twice the storage, and a touchscreen interface. Pre-orders for the new Kindle start today, on September 18. 

 “Our new Kindle is small and light, with weeks of battery life, a 20% faster processor, twice the storage, and a touch interface,” said Peter Larsen, Vice President, Amazon Kindle. “The new Kindle includes all the features readers love—Whispersync, built-in dictionary and new exclusive features like Vocabulary builder, Kindle Freetime and Goodreads integration. It’s never been a better time to be a reader.”

  • The new Kindle is small, light, and portable—toss it in your bag or put it in a pocket to always have your reading with you. The new Kindle is great for anyone who’s new to e-reading:
  • Readers who haven’t yet experienced an e-reader will be surprised by how easy it is to read on, with no glare even in bright sunlight, and weeks of battery life
  • Readers who have never tried eBooks will love enhanced reading features like instant dictionary look-up and adjustable font sizes
  • Parents will love that they can give their kids a purpose-built e-reader with an easy-to-navigate touch interface, plus great features that help kids learn— Kindle Freetime, Smart Lookup, Vocabulary Builder, and more—for just Rs 5,999.

Kindle features include:

Kindle FreeTime: Gives parents a simple, engaging way to encourage kids to spend more time reading. Hand-select books for your kids to read, and hand out achievement badges when they hit reading milestones. A progress report keeps parents updated on total time spent reading, number of words looked up, badges earned, and books finished.

Vocabulary builder: Words looked up in the dictionary are automatically added to Vocabulary Builder to expand your knowledge and reinforce retention. Swipe through your vocabulary words, quiz yourself with flashcards and instantly see those words in context.

No set up required: Kindle arrives pre-registered so you can start reading immediately.

Whispersync: Saves and synchronizes your last page read, bookmarks, and annotations across all of your devices and Kindle apps, so you can always pick up where you left off.

Smart Lookup: Integrates a full dictionary definition with other reference information via X-Ray and Wikipedia.

Weeks of Battery Life: Kindle e-readers have battery life that is measured in weeks, not hours.

Worry-Free Archive: Automatically backs up your Kindle books in the cloud, so you never need to worry about losing your books—re-download your books wirelessly anytime for free.

Time to Read: Tells you how much time it will take to finish a chapter or a book based on your personalized reading speed.

Kindle Page Flip: Skim page-by-page, scan by chapter, or jump to anywhere in your book all without losing your place.

Vocabulary Builder: Compiles words you look up in the dictionary into an easy-to-access list. Use these lists to quiz yourself with flashcards and instantly see words in context.

Facebook and Twitter: Share book recommendations, highlighted sections, and meaningful quotes with friends.

Vast Selection, Low Prices

Kindle e-readers come with instant access to the Kindle Store, which includes:

Massive selection: Millions of books, including the latest best sellers, Kindle Singles, and more.

Kindle exclusives: Over 600,000 books are exclusive to the Kindle Store.

Low book prices: More than 30,000 Free-ebooks and over one million titles at Rs 299 or less and over 250,000 titles at Rs 99 or less.

Over the next couple of months, new features like Word Wise and Enhanced Search will be introduced as part of a free, over-the-air software update and will also be available on Kindle Paperwhite.

The new Kindle is available for Rs 5,999 on Amazon, and will start shipping on October 9, 2014.

Charles Tiayon's insight:

Mumbai: Amazon on September 18 introduced the all-new Rs 5,999 Kindle — now with a 20% faster processor, twice the storage, and a touchscreen interface. Pre-orders for the new Kindle start today, on September 18. 

 “Our new Kindle is small and light, with weeks of battery life, a 20% faster processor, twice the storage, and a touch interface,” said Peter Larsen, Vice President, Amazon Kindle. “The new Kindle includes all the features readers love—Whispersync, built-in dictionary and new exclusive features like Vocabulary builder, Kindle Freetime and Goodreads integration. It’s never been a better time to be a reader.”

  • The new Kindle is small, light, and portable—toss it in your bag or put it in a pocket to always have your reading with you. The new Kindle is great for anyone who’s new to e-reading:
  • Readers who haven’t yet experienced an e-reader will be surprised by how easy it is to read on, with no glare even in bright sunlight, and weeks of battery life
  • Readers who have never tried eBooks will love enhanced reading features like instant dictionary look-up and adjustable font sizes
  • Parents will love that they can give their kids a purpose-built e-reader with an easy-to-navigate touch interface, plus great features that help kids learn— Kindle Freetime, Smart Lookup, Vocabulary Builder, and more—for just Rs 5,999.

Kindle features include:

Kindle FreeTime: Gives parents a simple, engaging way to encourage kids to spend more time reading. Hand-select books for your kids to read, and hand out achievement badges when they hit reading milestones. A progress report keeps parents updated on total time spent reading, number of words looked up, badges earned, and books finished.

Vocabulary builder: Words looked up in the dictionary are automatically added to Vocabulary Builder to expand your knowledge and reinforce retention. Swipe through your vocabulary words, quiz yourself with flashcards and instantly see those words in context.

No set up required: Kindle arrives pre-registered so you can start reading immediately.

Whispersync: Saves and synchronizes your last page read, bookmarks, and annotations across all of your devices and Kindle apps, so you can always pick up where you left off.

Smart Lookup: Integrates a full dictionary definition with other reference information via X-Ray and Wikipedia.

Weeks of Battery Life: Kindle e-readers have battery life that is measured in weeks, not hours.

Worry-Free Archive: Automatically backs up your Kindle books in the cloud, so you never need to worry about losing your books—re-download your books wirelessly anytime for free.

Time to Read: Tells you how much time it will take to finish a chapter or a book based on your personalized reading speed.

Kindle Page Flip: Skim page-by-page, scan by chapter, or jump to anywhere in your book all without losing your place.

Vocabulary Builder: Compiles words you look up in the dictionary into an easy-to-access list. Use these lists to quiz yourself with flashcards and instantly see words in context.

Facebook and Twitter: Share book recommendations, highlighted sections, and meaningful quotes with friends.

Vast Selection, Low Prices

Kindle e-readers come with instant access to the Kindle Store, which includes:

Massive selection: Millions of books, including the latest best sellers, Kindle Singles, and more.

Kindle exclusives: Over 600,000 books are exclusive to the Kindle Store.

Low book prices: More than 30,000 Free-ebooks and over one million titles at Rs 299 or less and over 250,000 titles at Rs 99 or less.

Over the next couple of months, new features like Word Wise and Enhanced Search will be introduced as part of a free, over-the-air software update and will also be available on Kindle Paperwhite.

The new Kindle is available for Rs 5,999 on Amazon, and will start shipping on October 9, 2014.

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Artist Defines Untranslatable Words Through Charming Illustrations

Artist Defines Untranslatable Words Through Charming Illustrations | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it
In the new book 'Lost in Translation,' writer Ella Sanders illustrates more than 50 untranslatable words.
Charles Tiayon's insight:

There will never be an English translation for the word "razliubit."

The Russian term means "to fall out of love, a bittersweet feeling." It's a heady concept, for which there is no direct equivalent in the English language. These are the kind of linguistic treats you'll read about in Ella Sanders' new book,Lost in Translation.

The UK-based writer and illustrator was working as an intern for Maptia last year when she was tasked with illustrating 11 untranslatable words. As far as internships go, it was a fun assignment among other regular fare, like "making serious amounts of tea and coffee, emailing too many people than was strictly necessary [and] compiling photo essays," Sanders, 21, tells Mashable via email.

The illustrated list was republished by The Huffington Post and caught the eye of a book editor, who reached out to Sanders on Twitter ("A tweet, I tell you!"), saying the untranslatable words had "book potential." About a year later, Lost in Translation finally landed on bookshelves.

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Kadazan translation of enactment in the works

Kadazan translation of enactment in the works | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it
PENAMPANG: The Kadazan Language Foundation (KLF) has been tasked to translate the Sabah Natives Courts Enactment 1992 into the Kadazan language. UPKO Penampang chief Datuk Donald Mojuntin said that...
Charles Tiayon's insight:

PENAMPANG: The Kadazan Language Foundation (KLF) has been tasked to translate the Sabah Natives Courts Enactment 1992 into the Kadazan language.

UPKO Penampang chief Datuk Donald Mojuntin said that presently, the enactment was presented in Bahasa Melayu and English.

“This will be the first attempt to translate the enactment into the Kadazan language … I feel it is important to have it translated into this language because this is what we use in Penampang,” he said during a cheque presentation ceremony held at the Penampang District Office near here yesterday.

He added that a copy would be brought to the Chief Justice of Sabah and Sarawak, Tan Sri Richard Malanjum, for his perusal and to ensure that the translated copy adhered to the original document before they were delivered to the Penampang district native court.

Donald also said they would ask Kadazan lawyers to look into the translated copy before publishing the final copy.

“We will be printing 1,000 copies initially,” he said.

Present to support the effort was local businessman Datuk Albert Boyou who presented RM10,000 and the United Pasokmomogun Kadazandusun Murut Organisation (UPKO) which presented RM5,000.



Read more: http://www.theborneopost.com/2014/09/19/kadazan-translation-of-enactment-in-the-works/#ixzz3DimPtbDZ

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A arte da tradução é o tema da edição do Zoom Cultural - Rodrigo Garcia Lopes - Diversão e Cultura - Bonde. O seu portal

A arte da tradução é o tema  da edição do Zoom Cultural - Rodrigo Garcia Lopes - Diversão e Cultura - Bonde. O seu portal | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it
Rodrigo Garcia Lopes, que está lançando O Trovador no qual um dos protagonistas é o tradutor Adam Blake, participa do debate na sexta- feira
Charles Tiayon's insight:
O Sesi Londrina realiza na próxima sexta-feira, 19 de setembro, a partir da 19h30, mais uma edição do projeto Zoom Cultural que terá como tema a Tradução Literária. O debate contará com a participação dos poetas e tradutores Rodrigo Garcia Lopes, que estará também lançando seu mais novo livro, o romance O Trovador (Editora Record), e Vinícius Lima. A mediação é da escritora e professora de Letras da Universidade Estadual de Maringá, Marcele Aires. O evento acontece no Centro Cultural Sesi/AML (Praça Primeiro de Maio, 130 – em frente à Concha Acústica). A entrada é gratuita. 

Rodrigo Garcia Lopes atualmente é um dos nomes referenciais da literatura brasileira. Seu livro O Trovador tem a cidade de Londrina do início de sua colonização como cenário e dois protagonistas que conduzem a trama – Lord Lovat e o tradutor Adam Blake. A presença de um tradutor na narrativa não é um acaso. Garcia Lopes tem se dedicado à tradução ao longo de toda a sua carreira sendo responsável por trazer ao público brasileiro versões preciosas de escritores como Walt Whitman, Arthur Rimbaud, Sylvia Plath e Laura Riding. 

Além de tradutor, Garcia Lopes também é poeta e compositor. No ano passado lançou o CD "Canções do Estúdio Realidade" e o livro de poemas Estúdio Realidade (7 Letras). Além disso, também destaca-se o livro Vozes e Visões em que entrevistou grandes figuras da arte contemporânea do século XX como o escritor William Burroughs e o compositor John Cage. 

Vinícius Lima é doutor em Letras pela Universidade Estadual de Londrina, poeta e especialista na tradução autores de língua espanhola. Entre os autores estão Nicanor Parra, Leopoldo María Panero, Carlota Caulfield, Marosa di Giorgio e Alejandro Jodorowsky. Tem publicado seus textos e traduções em revistas, como a londrinense Coyote. Publicou os livros Geometria do Grito (2009) e Herbarium (2013). 

O Sesi Zoom Cultural tem como objetivo discutir a literatura na sua relação com outras linguagens artísticas. Estão programadas mais duas edições para este ano em Londrina nos meses de outubro e novembro.
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L’Owasp sort sa nouvelle version de son guide de test des applications

L’Owasp sort sa nouvelle version de son guide de test des applications | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it
6 ans après la précédente version, l’Open Web App Security Project (Owasp) présente sa nouvelle version revue et corrigée de son testing guide dédié au web. Au programme, 111 pages détaillant les scenarios et bonnes pratiques à prendre en compte pour sécuriser ses applications.
Charles Tiayon's insight:

Le Testing Guide d’OWASP est disponible en anglais et librement sur le net. Ce document de 111 pages est le résultat d’une collaboration entre plusieurs dizaines d’experts en sécurité qui ont cherché à compiler et à rassembler leurs bonnes pratiques de test des applications web.

« Le document s’adresse évidemment à la communauté des pentesters et des experts en sécurité » explique à ZDNet.fr Sebastien Gioria, porte parole de la division française d’Owasp « Mais on peut aussi envisager que des équipes chargées des tests applicatifs s’en emparent afin de mettre en place des scénarios de tests. »

La version 4 apporte plusieurs nouveautés : environ 87 cas de tests sont ainsi décrits par le document contre 64 dans la version précédente. « L’idée majeure de ce type de guide, c’est de faciliter la mise en place de scénarios de tests pour ses applications » rappelle Sebastien Gioria.

Pour la traduction, il faudra attendre

Les différents guides Owasp ont également été harmonisés afin de les rendre plus cohérents. Enfin de nouveaux groupes de contrôle ont été ajoutés, afin de prendre en compte de nouveaux cas de figures : parmi les nouveaux, on retrouve notamment la cryptographie qui bénéficie d’un peu plus de soin que dans la version préférence, ou encore la gestion des identités et les tests clients.

Mise à jour à 16h42 Une traduction française a été initiée, "à la demande générale" précise Sebastien Gioria. Mais cette traduction ne dépendra que du volontariat : si vous voulez rejoindre l'effort de traduction, il suffit de contacter les porte-paroles du chapitre français dont les adresses sont disponibles ici. Car Owasp est avant tout une fondation, comparable à Mozilla ou Linux et offre ses guides et autres ressources de manière gratuite et désintéressée.

Le chapitre français ne compte que quelques dizaines de membres, difficile donc de s’avancer sur une traduction même si des versions espagnoles et chinoises ont déjà vu le jour pour la précédente version du guide. Mais si l’anglais ne vous effraie pas, le guide (ainsi que les autres documents publiés par Owasp) est disponible librement sur le web à l’adresse suivante

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Hyper-Polyglot, Greek Translator Speaks 32 Languages

Hyper-Polyglot, Greek Translator Speaks 32 Languages | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it
Hyper-Polyglot, Greek Translator Speaks 32 Languages
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BRUSSELS — Inside a gray office building in Brussels, Ioannis Ikonomou's workload is marked in different colors on his computer screen. The 49-year-old Greek translator manages the work himself, which in the next two weeks alone includes two long texts from German and French into Greek. It's a little boring, he says in perfect German, "but it's ...

Read the full article: Hyper-Polyglot, Greek Translator Speaks 32 Languages 
Worldcrunch - top stories from the world's best news sources 
Follow us: @worldcrunch on Twitter | Worldcrunch on Facebook

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Shakespeare en mandarin, pour des échanges économiques avec la Chine

Shakespeare en mandarin, pour des échanges économiques avec la Chine | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it
Être ou ne pas être un partenaire commercial
Charles Tiayon's insight:

Pas d'anniversaire sans cadeau, et pour la Royal Shakespeare Company, celui-ci vaut 1,5 million £. Le gouvernement britannique a fait un don significatif pour aider la société à traduire les œuvres du dramaturge en mandarin. Sajud Javid, secrétait d'État à la Culture britannique explique que cette démarche vise à établir « des liens plus étroits avec la Chine ».

 

 

Scott Retterg, CC BY SA 2.0

 

 

Mort depuis près de 400 ans, Shakespeare reste le représentant d'une langue anglaise, autant que le magicien articulant des univers de tragédies et de poésie. Quoi de mieux que d'exporter un savoir-faire littéraire plusieurs fois centenaire, adapté au théâtre, en films, et on en passe, et on en oublie, pour mieux se faire connaître ?

 

La RSC profitera également de la manne gouvernementale pour partir en vadrouille à la rencontre des Chinois, en 2016, en plus de la traduction des 14 plus importantes pièces de théâtre. Un échange culturel réciproque entre les États, sachant que la première approche de Shakespeare remonte à 1922, et que le traducteur de l'époque, Tian Han, travaillait à partir d'une version déjà traduite, en japonais.

 

Les œuvres complètes furent traduites en mandarin en 1967, dans le cadre d'un projet emporté par Liang Shiqiu, ancien étudiant de Harvard et Columbia. Pour les Britanniques, cette démarche est essentielle. Gregory Doran, directeur artistique de la RSC, la traduction favorisera « une meilleure compréhension entre les cultures, par le partage, et en se racontant des histoires ».

 

Pour les besoins du voyage, 300.000 £ ont été débloquées par le gouvernement anglais, et s'inscrivent dans une grande vague de coopération qui servira les intérêts de chacun. La Culture serait donc le meilleur moyen de favoriser des relations étroites entre le Royaume-Uni et la Chine, certifient les autorités. 

 

Cette subvention, généreusement accordée dans une période où les bibliothèques britanniques souffrent cruellement de coupes budgétaires, représente un investissement certain. Le financement tant de la traduction, que du voyage, tentera d'exporter une certaine vision du Royaume-Uni, alors même que l'Écosse s'apprêter à voter pour décider d'une possible indépendance ?

 

Bien entendu, passer par la culture pour entretenir des liens économiques autant que financier est une démarche pleinement assumée, et la RSC ne l'ignore pas le moins du monde. Dans le cadre d'un dialogue sur les échanges marchands possibles entre les deux pays, le Royaume-Uni souhaite « stimuler les entreprises à travers la culture ». Et il ne faut malgré tout pas perdre de vue la performance à venir du traducteur.

 

Cette tournée de la RSC coïncidera par ailleurs avec le 400e anniversaire de la mort du Barde. Et pour mémoire, au cours de ces siècles, Shakespeare a été traduit en plus de 80 langues. 

Sources : BBC , New York Times , Telegraph

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¿Debes llamar en un idioma que no hablas? Skype te ayudará

¿Debes llamar en un idioma que no hablas? Skype te ayudará | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it
Si estás en cualquier lugar de Colombia y necesitas comunicarte con cualquier parte del mundo, pero no sabes el idioma de ese país, Skype te facilitará la vida....
Charles Tiayon's insight:
¿Debes llamar en un idioma que no hablas? Skype te ayudará
Foto: Skype

Si estás en cualquier lugar de Colombia y necesitas comunicarte con cualquier parte del mundo, pero no sabes el idioma de ese país, Skype te facilitará la vida. Próximamente las videollamadas de Microsoft tendrán traductor simultáneo gracias aTwitter y Facebook.

Skype ha derribado muchas barreras desde su creación y se ha convertido en una herramienta fundamental para estudiantes de Erasmus, expatriados y otros colectivos que tienen que lidiar con la barrera de la lejanía para mantener el contacto con amigos y familiares.

El programa también se ha convertido en un estándar para hablar cara a cara con personas de otras nacionalidades que se encuentran a miles de kilómetros de distancia. Entrevistas de trabajo, reuniones o reencuentros han sido posibles de manera gratuitas gracias a Skype, Google Hangouts y otras empresas especializadas.

Según publica el portal Tecnoxplora.com, a todas las alternativas les falta una cosa, y sus propios responsables lo saben: ninguna ha logrado derribar la barrera del lenguaje. De momento, no existe un sistema de videoconferencia 'online' que gestione de forma elegante la diversidad de idiomas. De nuevo Skype, ahora en el seno de Microsoft, pretende ser la solución. Si todo marcha sin contratiempos, a finales de este año harán pública a modo de 'beta' su función de traducción simultánea.

Esto quiere decir que un latinoamericano y un alemán podrán entenderse sin cambiar de idioma, empleando cada uno su lengua materna. La máquina se encargará de traducir de viva voz y/o subtitular lo que ambos están diciendo en tiempo real. Parece increíble que, si existen Siri, Cortana y Google Now, esto aún no estuviera disponible. Los servicios de traducción y el reconocimiento de voz están muy avanzados, pero aún no hay en el mercado un verdadero traductor simultáneo para videoconferencia marca Apple, Microsoft o Google.

Sin embargo, serán muchas las barreras que estos gigantes tienen que superar para hacerlo posible. Los actuales traductores 'online' funcionan tirando de probabilidad y estadística. Un análisis de miles de textos disponibles en varios idiomas sirve a estas empresas para generar un corpus, una gigantesca base de datos a la que recurrirán luego los robots de traducción para buscar coincidencias. Por simplificar, si una frase ha sido traducida de la misma forma muchas veces en los textos de ese corpus, el robot ofrecerá esa equivalencia porque es la más probable.

Este sistema tiene algunas carencias. La primera es que la máquina no entiende de veras lo que está traduciendo. Busca coincidencias, pero se hace un lío cuando las palabras están en un orden diferente al que esperaba o las oraciones son muy complejas y llenas de subordinadas. Esto sucede porque no entiende que los distintos idiomas tienen sintaxis diferentes. Cuando en español la norma es “sujeto + verbo + predicado”, en japonés es “sujeto + predicado + verbo”. Y las normas, por si fuera poco, están para romperse.

Este primer inconveniente lo salva Microsoft utilizando un 'software' pionero que sí tiene en cuenta la sintaxis. En lugar de limitarse a establecer equivalencias entre frases comunes, este mecanismo las divide en palabras y busca coincidencias individualmente (que es bastante más difícil).

Aun salvada esta barrera, hay otra que aleja la traducción automática de la simultánea que pronto estará disponible para Skype: los humanos no hablamos igual que escribimos. Basarse en un gigantesco corpus de textos escritos para buscar coincidencias no es suficiente cuando se trata de traducir una conversación oral.

De viva voz hacemos pausas, dudamos, utilizamos diferentes entonaciones... No es lo mismo preguntar “¿me vas a traer un regalo?” que exclamar “¡me vas a traer un regalo!” con tono de ilusión  (ni tampoco que decir eso mismo mostrando enfado). Las consecuencias de una mala traducción en este caso, y en otros similares, pueden ser terribles.

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