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Multi-culture media growing fast as immigration increases in capital

Multi-culture media growing fast as immigration increases in capital | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it

Hunsdeep Rangar is an effervescent 36-year-old who likes to say he was “made in India, packaged in Canada.” Bridging the two cultures has become his passion, and multicultural media is his vehicle.

Rangar is producer and host of Mirch Masala Radio, Ottawa’s only South Asian drive-home show. Broadcasting five days a week on CHIN Radio, the House of Commons information analyst spins an hour of the drive-home staples of news, weather and traffic, mixed with updates on health, arts, culture and a heavy dose of music from Bollywood and local artists with roots in India, Pakistan and elsewhere in the region. A second hour is hosted by a rotating crew of Hindi, Punjabi and Urdu-speaking hosts, all volunteers.

Read more: http://www.ottawacitizen.com/news/Multi+culture+media+growing+fast+immigration+increases+capital/6519193/story.html#ixzz1tF63qekZ

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Metaglossia: The Translation World
News about translation, interpreting, intercultural communication, terminology and lexicography - as it happens
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UN Careers - jobs in this network (Translators, Revisers, Editors, etc.)

UN Careers -  jobs in this network (Translators, Revisers, Editors, etc.) | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it

Vacancies in this network: Translators, Revisers, Editors, etc.

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¿Y si los títulos de película en inglés fuesen traducciones literales? (FOTOS)

¿Y si los títulos de película en inglés fuesen traducciones literales? (FOTOS) | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it
Los traductores están de fiesta. ¿Han subido las tarifas de traducción? ¿Ha bajado el precio de la matrícula en las Escuelas Oficiales de Idiomas? ¿Ha aumentado la cuantía de las becas Erasmus?

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Publishers Lunch Job Board: Managing Editor (#11173)

Duties and Responsibilities

Reviews manuscripts for substantive and stylistic problems and adherence to The Chicago Manual of Style; advises authors regarding required alterations and revisions of manuscripts, page proof, and indexes. (cont. below)
(cont. from above) Reviews the work of freelance copy editors, proofreaders, and indexers.
Establishes Press guidelines for editorial style and procedures, regularly researching and implementing updates to accommodate changes in scholarly standards and/or technology.
Analyzes manuscripts to ensure conformity to technical requirements and establish the required level of editing; instructs outside project managers and freelance copy editors regarding specific stylistic and substantive questions.
Exercises sole responsibility for planning, coordinating, and overseeing the flow of manuscripts, illustrations, page proof, and indexes through the editorial and production processes.
Creates a budget for each manuscript for the work of freelance copy editors and proofreaders.
Exercises independent judgment in the drafting and negotiation of contracts for the services of freelancers.
Exercises oversight and serves as the primary conduit of information among authors, freelancers, and Press as manuscripts move from final editorial acceptance to published book.
Establishes and maintains schedules to ensure that books meet their projected publication dates.
Exercises independent judgment regarding schedule changes, ensuring that authors, freelancers, the Production Department, and other staff are informed of schedule progress and changes.
Copyedits discrete parts of manuscripts, such as tables, bibliographies, and indexes, to accepted scholarly standards as needed.
Interviews, hires, and supervises freelance copy editors, proofreaders, and student assistants as needed. Contracts for and supervises the work of outside publications services in preparation of manuscripts from copy editing through composition.
Researches all relevant technical developments in pre-press preparation of manuscripts and updates the training of freelancers and Press staff.
Produces a detailed summary of design and composition elements of manuscripts, which becomes the essential reference for Production during the manufacturing phases of the project.
Oversees and ensures the preparation to Production’s technical standards of the final, updated electronic manuscript and illustration files.
Other duties as assigned

Minimum Qualifications

Possession of a baccalaureate degree in Arts & Sciences or related field and 3 year(s) of progressively responsible professional experience with responsibilities for editing book-length manuscripts or equivalent publishing related experience; or equivalent education/training or experience.
Considerable working knowledge of principles, practices and techniques in the field of editing book-length manuscripts or equivalent publishing related experience as demonstrated by the broad knowledge of the full range of pertinent standard and evolving concepts, principles and methodologies.
Considerable working knowledge and understanding of applicable federal and state laws, rules, regulations and theories and systems associated with editing book-length manuscripts or equivalent publishing related experience.
Demonstrated ability to resolve wide ranging complex problems through the use of creative reasoning and logic to accurately determine the cause of the problems and the resolution of the problems in an effective, innovative and timely manner.
Demonstrated ability to interpret and present information and ideas clearly and accurately in writing, verbally and by preparation of reports and other materials.
Demonstrated ability to establish and maintain effective working relationships with internal and external organizations, groups, team leaders and members, and individuals.
Demonstrated ability to operate a personal computer and apply word processing software.
For supervisory work, demonstrated ability to lead subordinates, manage work priorities and projects, and manage employee relations.
Any equivalent combination of education and/or professional work experience which provides the required education, knowledge, skills and abilities as indicated.
Knowledge of editing book-length manuscripts following The Chicago Manual of Style.

Desirable Qualifications

Supervisory experience assigning duties and scheduling workloads in a book publishing or editorial setting.
Functional knowledge of Asian and/or Pacific Island studies.
Editorial experience at a university press.
Familiarity with Filemaker Pro or comparable relational database application.

 Conta
Charles Tiayon's insight:
Duties and Responsibilities

Reviews manuscripts for substantive and stylistic problems and adherence to The Chicago Manual of Style; advises authors regarding required alterations and revisions of manuscripts, page proof, and indexes. (cont. below)
(cont. from above) Reviews the work of freelance copy editors, proofreaders, and indexers.
Establishes Press guidelines for editorial style and procedures, regularly researching and implementing updates to accommodate changes in scholarly standards and/or technology.
Analyzes manuscripts to ensure conformity to technical requirements and establish the required level of editing; instructs outside project managers and freelance copy editors regarding specific stylistic and substantive questions.
Exercises sole responsibility for planning, coordinating, and overseeing the flow of manuscripts, illustrations, page proof, and indexes through the editorial and production processes.
Creates a budget for each manuscript for the work of freelance copy editors and proofreaders.
Exercises independent judgment in the drafting and negotiation of contracts for the services of freelancers.
Exercises oversight and serves as the primary conduit of information among authors, freelancers, and Press as manuscripts move from final editorial acceptance to published book.
Establishes and maintains schedules to ensure that books meet their projected publication dates.
Exercises independent judgment regarding schedule changes, ensuring that authors, freelancers, the Production Department, and other staff are informed of schedule progress and changes.
Copyedits discrete parts of manuscripts, such as tables, bibliographies, and indexes, to accepted scholarly standards as needed.
Interviews, hires, and supervises freelance copy editors, proofreaders, and student assistants as needed. Contracts for and supervises the work of outside publications services in preparation of manuscripts from copy editing through composition.
Researches all relevant technical developments in pre-press preparation of manuscripts and updates the training of freelancers and Press staff.
Produces a detailed summary of design and composition elements of manuscripts, which becomes the essential reference for Production during the manufacturing phases of the project.
Oversees and ensures the preparation to Production’s technical standards of the final, updated electronic manuscript and illustration files.
Other duties as assigned

Minimum Qualifications

Possession of a baccalaureate degree in Arts & Sciences or related field and 3 year(s) of progressively responsible professional experience with responsibilities for editing book-length manuscripts or equivalent publishing related experience; or equivalent education/training or experience.
Considerable working knowledge of principles, practices and techniques in the field of editing book-length manuscripts or equivalent publishing related experience as demonstrated by the broad knowledge of the full range of pertinent standard and evolving concepts, principles and methodologies.
Considerable working knowledge and understanding of applicable federal and state laws, rules, regulations and theories and systems associated with editing book-length manuscripts or equivalent publishing related experience.
Demonstrated ability to resolve wide ranging complex problems through the use of creative reasoning and logic to accurately determine the cause of the problems and the resolution of the problems in an effective, innovative and timely manner.
Demonstrated ability to interpret and present information and ideas clearly and accurately in writing, verbally and by preparation of reports and other materials.
Demonstrated ability to establish and maintain effective working relationships with internal and external organizations, groups, team leaders and members, and individuals.
Demonstrated ability to operate a personal computer and apply word processing software.
For supervisory work, demonstrated ability to lead subordinates, manage work priorities and projects, and manage employee relations.
Any equivalent combination of education and/or professional work experience which provides the required education, knowledge, skills and abilities as indicated.
Knowledge of editing book-length manuscripts following The Chicago Manual of Style.

Desirable Qualifications

Supervisory experience assigning duties and scheduling workloads in a book publishing or editorial setting.
Functional knowledge of Asian and/or Pacific Island studies.
Editorial experience at a university press.
Familiarity with Filemaker Pro or comparable relational database application.
 Conta
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8 Nombres de películas en español y verdadera traducción en La Primera Plana

8 Nombres de películas en español y verdadera traducción en  La Primera Plana | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it
Después de leer La Primera Plana, no necesitas leer nada más.
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Se conmemora el Día Mundial de la Traducción, vital en tiempos de globalización

Se conmemora el Día Mundial de la Traducción, vital en tiempos de globalización | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it
La fecha que se recuerda desde 1991, tiene curiosamente una connotación religiosa, más concretamente cristiana: se conmemora el fallecimiento de...
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Penn State Smeal MBA students use improv comedy to enhance communication skills | Penn State University

Penn State Smeal MBA students use improv comedy to enhance communication skills | Penn State University | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it
During their two-week orientation to the program, members of the Penn State Smeal MBA Class of 2016 called upon improvisation comedy techniques to improve their communication and networking skills in a session with CSz Business.
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What Can Linguistics Tell Us About Writing Better? An Interview with Steven Pinker.

What Can Linguistics Tell Us About Writing Better? An Interview with Steven Pinker. | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it
I talked recently with Steven Pinker, author of The Language Instinct and other books about language and the mind, about his new book, The Sense of Style: The Thinking Person's Guide to Writing in the 21st Century. 

This seems like quite a different topic from your previous books. Why write about style?

For me, it's the perfect intersection of one of my professional interests, which is trying to convey complex phenomena in clear prose, and the area that I study, which is to say language and cognition.

What do linguistics and cognitive science have to add to a discussion of style?

The major difference between The Sense of Style and other style guides is that I try to use the science of language and mind to provide more systematic and motivated advice. Most style guides reiterate rules of thumb that were stated in previous style guides or the accumulated body of wisdom of some writer or editor. And so the entire discipline of linguistics and cognitive science that has come about in the past 60 years just plays no role in most style guides.

But there's a lot that can be learned from the history of criticism and the analysis of usage, the insights of grammar, the discussion of what ought to be used and not used, where various rules and shibboleths come from, and my own field, the science of cognition and how understanding comes from language.

Joseph Williams' book—simply called Style—comes close: It's a discussion of the science of discourse comprehension and some of the discussion of usage controversies like who ever thought you couldn't split an infinitive. But I thought that the world could use a style guide that took advantage of that kind of scholarship.

What do you think good and bad style look like?

It's about clarity, which is not to neglect grace and beauty—language ought to be a source of pleasure. When a striking image effectively conveys an idea or a feeling, you simultaneously know what the author is trying to communicate and you get that shiver of pleasure that makes reading an enjoyable experience.

Your book also has a lot of examples of writing passages. (Disclosure: I received an advance copy of The Sense of Style.)

I practice what I preach, and I preach the merits of using concrete examples, so it wouldn't be worth saying "Here's an example of things to do" without giving examples. I think generalizations without examples and examples without generalizations are both useless: If you give a list of examples of wretched writing without pointing out what's wretched about them, you can't trust that people will draw the lesson that you're looking for, but if you give a general principle to avoid without giving examples, you can't trust that people will be able to apply the principle when they actually go to write something.

In general the human mind is surprisingly concrete—it's more common to write badly by being too abstract, too highfalutin, than by being too concrete, too down to earth. There are examples of both, but it's harder to be concrete.

But that being said, the emphasis in many style manuals on plain style has been taken to an extreme, especially in the early part of the 20th century, where the style guides were a reaction to the ornate style of the 19th century. So you have advice on never using alliteration, never using an ornate word when a simple one will do, when really language can be clear and stylish without being abstemious and puritanical.  

Hence why you propose classic style?  

Yeah, classic style—a concept that I took from Francis-Noël Thomas and Mark Turner—is a style that they contrast with plain style. It doesn't have a specific goal like providing the reader with information, which is the goal of plain style. Rather, classic style prizes clarity as the ultimate virtue: It simulates a scenario where the writer has noticed something in the world that the reader has not yet noticed, and so the writer places the reader in a position to notice that thing and the reader can see it with their own eyes. The goal is to get the reader to see the truth, which the writing has made self-evident.

Are there limitations to classic style?

Yeah, that's a good question. Clearly there are times when you do want to use a plain and practical style: if you're writing to tell someone how to set a digital clock or fill out a tax return, for example. Or if you're a preacher or moral leader who wants to whip up the emotions of a crowd, you want to use rhetorical and emotional styles, not classic style. But for exposition, commentary, review and other writing in that genre, then classic style coincides with the intuitions of many of us for what makes for good writing. I mean, there's also a personal, reflective style where the author makes an attempt to reflect on personal experience, and some people do enjoy this type of romantic style, but few writers can pull it off, so probably a more realistic expectation for most journalists and essayists is to aim for classic style.

This idea that there's a correct style for all occasions is a shortcoming of many of the existing style manuals: They're often directed at students and tell everyone to write in plain style. Plain style is reasonable advice for student five-paragraph essays, and other kinds of prose that should be in a fixed template, such as instructions, stock prospectuses, and journal articles, but more discursive writing styles can't and shouldn't be done according to a rigid recipe. And yet many of the style manuals will tell you to state the topic of each paragraph and never use a long word when a shorter one will do, and so on. In fact, we see good writers violate this advice all the time, because they're not writing in plain style, they're writing in classic or another style.  So that's part of the reason why the entire genre of the style manual has come into disrepute—it just seems so dull and puritanical. But it's really only plain style that's dull and puritanical.  

The fallacy that there's only one style also frequently leads to the ridiculous questions you see in the media because it assumes that the language used in texting or in tweeting will necessarily bleed over to other styles. But look, if we're delivering a eulogy at a funeral we automatically use a different style than when we're texting our spouse or our friend—it doesn't mean that people are so obtuse that we're going to deploy the texting style in any situation without thinking of the social context. Any usable style guide has to distinguish between various types of style.

There's actually a recent xkcd comic about how texting is a valuable type of peer language practice rather than causing a decline in language.

Oh neat! I haven't seen that one, but I love xkcd.

How has your experience writing for a popular audience influenced your ability to write a style guide?

Writing this book definitely led me to reflect back on what I do when I think to myself, "Don't write like an academic, write clearly and vigorously." One of the reasons that I enjoyed the Thomas and Turner book is that I thought they captured in a coherent way many of the rules of thumb that were floating around in my head when I started unlearning my habits of academese—namely, this idea of directing a reader's attention to something the world.

The reason that this was so profound in my view is that the greatest sin of a scholar is naive realism: that you can just open your eyes and see the world objectively as it is. As scholars, we're all too conscious of the fact that we're susceptible to bias and that we have illusions, and this anxiety creeps into everything we write. But good clear writing works under the pretense that naive realism is true, so the naive realist is a bad scholar but a good writer. And then in the desire not to be seen as a naive realist, academics add all these hedges to their writing, like "virtually," "to some extent," and so on. So in academic writing, nothing is described as it is, but always via the tools we use to understand it: "levels of consumption have increased"; whereas vigorous writing describes the phenomenon itself: "people eat more."

Does that mean that academic writers shouldn't be using classic style?

No, I think classic style is also a boon to academic writing. The thing is, you have to separate style from content, so if a conclusion is uncertain or it applies to some cases but not others, you need to just say that. Instead of sprinkling words like relatively and virtually in every phrase, you can add in the specific qualification of where something holds and where it doesn't. For example, instead of saying that democracies are relatively less likely to go to war with each other more often, you can say democracies are 15 percent less likely to go to war with each other. Or instead of women are relatively better at verbal fluency than men—but you don't want to make an essentialist claim, so you'd better hedge that—you can say "on average" or "but this doesn't mean that every woman is better at verbal fluency than every man" rather than muddying up your prose as a way of softening the claim.

A good writer takes advantage of the ordinary charity that we must indulge in during everyday conversation, the Gricean maxims of cooperation, the commonsense of the reader that means you wouldn't interpret a generalization as a law. And the exception that proves the rule is legalese, where you don't have the presumption of cooperation that you have in ordinary conversation, so you have to include all these qualifications to preemptively anticipate an uncooperative reader.

So, legalese we're stuck with?

Well, but legalese can also be made less impenetrable. In fact, there's a movement in the legal profession to reduce legalese to the minimum necessary, because a lot of legalese doesn't serve that purpose of anticipating an uncooperative reader. For example, "the party of the first part" actually serves no purpose whatsoever. It could be removed from every single legal document, and replaced it with "Jones" or whatever, and it would not have any bearing on the legal interpretation but it would make the document a heck of a lot easier to read. A lot of legalese is just professional bad bits carried over from one generation of lawyers to another with no good reason.

Improving legalese is actually a high priority because there's so much waste and suffering that results from impenetrable legalese: People don't understand what their rights are because they don't understand a contract or they waste money hiring expensive lawyers to decipher contracts for them. I think there's a high moral value in reducing legalese to the bare minimum.

How do you reconcile taking a stance on what constitutes "good" writing with being a descriptivist with respect to language in general?

I think that the general attitude that scientists of language aren't there to pass judgement is a good one, but linguists do have insights that can be applied to how we go about using language and I'd like to see more of them. You do have some intelligent commentary on Language Log but as far as usage goes, they tend to focus on debunking the usage myths that make their way into the media. That's useful, but there's also a lot in linguistics that helps explain the reaction to prose that's turgid or confusing, you know, garden path sentences and so on.

There are well-established areas in applied linguistics like foreign languages, speech therapy, machine translation, but it's odd considering the demand that stylistics isn't a well-established branch of applied linguistics. We're really leaving it to all these people who don't know about applied linguistics, perhaps because we've so overgeneralized the fear of confusing descriptivism and prescriptivism, that we haven't realized that when it comes to prescription we actually have something to say.

William Safire, actually, would sometimes consult Jim McCawley and me for his language columns. He didn't make a habit of it, but he did sometimes. And, I mean, considering that I once wrote an article that satirized him quite heavily, he had no reason to like me, but he was quite magnanimous. We actually became—well, I wouldn't say we were friends, but we did become quite friendly.

A lot of style books seem to believe that people write badly because of some moral failing: they're lazy or ignorant or poorly educated. And yet that's not the stance you take in The Sense of Style: Why do you think bad writing happens?  

For a number of reasons. The first is that good writing is hard: It's not something that people avoid in order to deliberatively sound pretentious and ponderous. In fact, it's hard work to sound simple and natural.

And second, a lot of the sins and failing in language may not actually be sins and failings if you take a more realistic usage of how language is used—they're fully consistent with how good writing looks in the past.

And finally, turgid writing and some of the other flaws of academic prose are hazards of the profession: You forget that the tools that have become clear to you are confusing to everyone else. So you start to start to write about concepts and frameworks, which are tools used by experts, instead of the objects in the real world, which is how non-experts think of things. For example, instead of talking about calling the police, an expert talks about "approaching things from a law-enforcement perspective."

How would you say our notion of what constitutes good style has changed in the past few hundred years? What do you think the future of good style looks like?

It's certainly changed over the long run, and I think there's been an ongoing trend to plainer, simpler language. By contemporary standards, a lot of the nineteenth-century essays and speeches strike us as flowery and ornate, because in the meantime there's been a general streamlining.

So what next? Well, I don't want to call it post-modern because that's its own style which is opaque and pretentious, but whether there will be a reaction to that, with more poetic sentences and imagery, as a backlash to the sparseness, who knows?

So you're not going to go on record as saying that we'll all be speaking with emoji or something like that?

(Laughter) Definitely not!

There are always people who are reacting to style—there are people who will push ornateness to more sparseness, or when things get too abstemious people will push in a direction of color and flamboyance. Language change doesn't happen according to a planned direction; it meanders throughout various possible languages.  

Your earlier books are the kind of thing that I think get people into linguistics, which isn't necessarily what one would expect from a style book. But The Sense of Style includes syntax trees, which probably aren't typical fare for style books, so do you think this is also a book that might whet people's appetites for more linguistics?

I sure hope so! It is in a very real sense a book about applied linguistics, and in order to do that it has a smidgen of linguistic theory, enough that people can understand terms like subordinate clause and the tree diagrams. Now, in doing so I had to choose my grammatical theory carefully, because it had to be one that would lend itself to applied linguistics, and in particular I needed one that would cover all the edge cases of English including those that cause usage controversy. So that ruled out a lot of the formal approaches that you see in the literature these days.

I ended up going with the version in the Cambridge Grammar of the English Language by Rodney Huddleston and Geoffrey Pullum, which is this giant doorstop of a book! But you need that comprehensiveness. For example, in "he's one of those guys who's always complaining about his job," it's idiomatic to use the singular, although most grammars, bringing it back to the parse tree, would tell you to make it plural, to say "he's one of those guys who are always complaining about their jobs." So why is the idiom the singular version? Well, it turns out that Huddleston and Pullum have analyzed all these weird edge cases, and in fact they provide an insightful analysis for why the singular sounds grammatical in that example. And none of the other technical literature would give you an exhaustive treatment like that.

Is there anything else you'd like to say about The Sense of Style?

I'd say the book has two purposes.

The first is a practical source of advice on how to write more clearly, not just for academics or professionals who want to branch out or be clearer on the job, but also for people who want to start a blog or series of reviews or anything like that.

The second purpose is if you're curious about what makes good writing good, or stuffy writing stuffy, just as popular science, I like to think the book can explain what makes good language good using linguistics and cognitive science. It's also an expository book, so it clusters with my earlier books about language for people who are interested in how language works where style is just a set of phenomena that I'm trying to illuminate. So even if you never write yourself but are a consumer of writing and are curious about why you as a reader have the reactions you do, why you enjoy certain styles and not others, I like to think the book will help explain those puzzles.

The Sense of Style is available as of today, September 30th.
Charles Tiayon's insight:

I talked recently with Steven Pinker, author of The Language Instinct and other books about language and the mind, about his new book, The Sense of Style: The Thinking Person's Guide to Writing in the 21st Century

This seems like quite a different topic from your previous books. Why write about style?

For me, it's the perfect intersection of one of my professional interests, which is trying to convey complex phenomena in clear prose, and the area that I study, which is to say language and cognition.

What do linguistics and cognitive science have to add to a discussion of style?

The major difference between The Sense of Style and other style guides is that I try to use the science of language and mind to provide more systematic and motivated advice. Most style guides reiterate rules of thumb that were stated in previous style guides or the accumulated body of wisdom of some writer or editor. And so the entire discipline of linguistics and cognitive science that has come about in the past 60 years just plays no role in most style guides.

But there's a lot that can be learned from the history of criticism and the analysis of usage, the insights of grammar, the discussion of what ought to be used and not used, where various rules and shibboleths come from, and my own field, the science of cognition and how understanding comes from language.

Joseph Williams' book—simply called Style—comes close: It's a discussion of the science of discourse comprehension and some of the discussion of usage controversies like who ever thought you couldn't split an infinitive. But I thought that the world could use a style guide that took advantage of that kind of scholarship.

What do you think good and bad style look like?

It's about clarity, which is not to neglect grace and beauty—language ought to be a source of pleasure. When a striking image effectively conveys an idea or a feeling, you simultaneously know what the author is trying to communicate and you get that shiver of pleasure that makes reading an enjoyable experience.

Your book also has a lot of examples of writing passages. (Disclosure: I received an advance copy of The Sense of Style.)

I practice what I preach, and I preach the merits of using concrete examples, so it wouldn't be worth saying "Here's an example of things to do" without giving examples. I think generalizations without examples and examples without generalizations are both useless: If you give a list of examples of wretched writing without pointing out what's wretched about them, you can't trust that people will draw the lesson that you're looking for, but if you give a general principle to avoid without giving examples, you can't trust that people will be able to apply the principle when they actually go to write something.

In general the human mind is surprisingly concrete—it's more common to write badly by being too abstract, too highfalutin, than by being too concrete, too down to earth. There are examples of both, but it's harder to be concrete.

But that being said, the emphasis in many style manuals on plain style has been taken to an extreme, especially in the early part of the 20th century, where the style guides were a reaction to the ornate style of the 19th century. So you have advice on never using alliteration, never using an ornate word when a simple one will do, when really language can be clear and stylish without being abstemious and puritanical.  

Hence why you propose classic style?  

Yeah, classic style—a concept that I took from Francis-Noël Thomas and Mark Turner—is a style that they contrast with plain style. It doesn't have a specific goal like providing the reader with information, which is the goal of plain style. Rather, classic style prizes clarity as the ultimate virtue: It simulates a scenario where the writer has noticed something in the world that the reader has not yet noticed, and so the writer places the reader in a position to notice that thing and the reader can see it with their own eyes. The goal is to get the reader to see the truth, which the writing has made self-evident.

Are there limitations to classic style?

Yeah, that's a good question. Clearly there are times when you do want to use a plain and practical style: if you're writing to tell someone how to set a digital clock or fill out a tax return, for example. Or if you're a preacher or moral leader who wants to whip up the emotions of a crowd, you want to use rhetorical and emotional styles, not classic style. But for exposition, commentary, review and other writing in that genre, then classic style coincides with the intuitions of many of us for what makes for good writing. I mean, there's also a personal, reflective style where the author makes an attempt to reflect on personal experience, and some people do enjoy this type of romantic style, but few writers can pull it off, so probably a more realistic expectation for most journalists and essayists is to aim for classic style.

This idea that there's a correct style for all occasions is a shortcoming of many of the existing style manuals: They're often directed at students and tell everyone to write in plain style. Plain style is reasonable advice for student five-paragraph essays, and other kinds of prose that should be in a fixed template, such as instructions, stock prospectuses, and journal articles, but more discursive writing styles can't and shouldn't be done according to a rigid recipe. And yet many of the style manuals will tell you to state the topic of each paragraph and never use a long word when a shorter one will do, and so on. In fact, we see good writers violate this advice all the time, because they're not writing in plain style, they're writing in classic or another style.  So that's part of the reason why the entire genre of the style manual has come into disrepute—it just seems so dull and puritanical. But it's really only plain style that's dull and puritanical.  

The fallacy that there's only one style also frequently leads to the ridiculous questions you see in the media because it assumes that the language used in texting or in tweeting will necessarily bleed over to other styles. But look, if we're delivering a eulogy at a funeral we automatically use a different style than when we're texting our spouse or our friend—it doesn't mean that people are so obtuse that we're going to deploy the texting style in any situation without thinking of the social context. Any usable style guide has to distinguish between various types of style.

There's actually a recent xkcd comic about how texting is a valuable type of peer language practice rather than causing a decline in language.

Oh neat! I haven't seen that one, but I love xkcd.

How has your experience writing for a popular audience influenced your ability to write a style guide?

Writing this book definitely led me to reflect back on what I do when I think to myself, "Don't write like an academic, write clearly and vigorously." One of the reasons that I enjoyed the Thomas and Turner book is that I thought they captured in a coherent way many of the rules of thumb that were floating around in my head when I started unlearning my habits of academese—namely, this idea of directing a reader's attention to something the world.

The reason that this was so profound in my view is that the greatest sin of a scholar is naive realism: that you can just open your eyes and see the world objectively as it is. As scholars, we're all too conscious of the fact that we're susceptible to bias and that we have illusions, and this anxiety creeps into everything we write. But good clear writing works under the pretense that naive realism is true, so the naive realist is a bad scholar but a good writer. And then in the desire not to be seen as a naive realist, academics add all these hedges to their writing, like "virtually," "to some extent," and so on. So in academic writing, nothing is described as it is, but always via the tools we use to understand it: "levels of consumption have increased"; whereas vigorous writing describes the phenomenon itself: "people eat more."

Does that mean that academic writers shouldn't be using classic style?

No, I think classic style is also a boon to academic writing. The thing is, you have to separate style from content, so if a conclusion is uncertain or it applies to some cases but not others, you need to just say that. Instead of sprinkling words like relatively and virtually in every phrase, you can add in the specific qualification of where something holds and where it doesn't. For example, instead of saying that democracies are relatively less likely to go to war with each other more often, you can say democracies are 15 percent less likely to go to war with each other. Or instead of women are relatively better at verbal fluency than men—but you don't want to make an essentialist claim, so you'd better hedge that—you can say "on average" or "but this doesn't mean that every woman is better at verbal fluency than every man" rather than muddying up your prose as a way of softening the claim.

A good writer takes advantage of the ordinary charity that we must indulge in during everyday conversation, the Gricean maxims of cooperation, the commonsense of the reader that means you wouldn't interpret a generalization as a law. And the exception that proves the rule is legalese, where you don't have the presumption of cooperation that you have in ordinary conversation, so you have to include all these qualifications to preemptively anticipate an uncooperative reader.

So, legalese we're stuck with?

Well, but legalese can also be made less impenetrable. In fact, there's a movement in the legal profession to reduce legalese to the minimum necessary, because a lot of legalese doesn't serve that purpose of anticipating an uncooperative reader. For example, "the party of the first part" actually serves no purpose whatsoever. It could be removed from every single legal document, and replaced it with "Jones" or whatever, and it would not have any bearing on the legal interpretation but it would make the document a heck of a lot easier to read. A lot of legalese is just professional bad bits carried over from one generation of lawyers to another with no good reason.

Improving legalese is actually a high priority because there's so much waste and suffering that results from impenetrable legalese: People don't understand what their rights are because they don't understand a contract or they waste money hiring expensive lawyers to decipher contracts for them. I think there's a high moral value in reducing legalese to the bare minimum.

How do you reconcile taking a stance on what constitutes "good" writing with being a descriptivist with respect to language in general?

I think that the general attitude that scientists of language aren't there to pass judgement is a good one, but linguists do have insights that can be applied to how we go about using language and I'd like to see more of them. You do have some intelligent commentary on Language Log but as far as usage goes, they tend to focus on debunking the usage myths that make their way into the media. That's useful, but there's also a lot in linguistics that helps explain the reaction to prose that's turgid or confusing, you know, garden path sentences and so on.

There are well-established areas in applied linguistics like foreign languages, speech therapy, machine translation, but it's odd considering the demand that stylistics isn't a well-established branch of applied linguistics. We're really leaving it to all these people who don't know about applied linguistics, perhaps because we've so overgeneralized the fear of confusing descriptivism and prescriptivism, that we haven't realized that when it comes to prescription we actually have something to say.

William Safire, actually, would sometimes consult Jim McCawley and me for his language columns. He didn't make a habit of it, but he did sometimes. And, I mean, considering that I once wrote an article that satirized him quite heavily, he had no reason to like me, but he was quite magnanimous. We actually became—well, I wouldn't say we were friends, but we did become quite friendly.

A lot of style books seem to believe that people write badly because of some moral failing: they're lazy or ignorant or poorly educated. And yet that's not the stance you take in The Sense of Style: Why do you think bad writing happens?  

For a number of reasons. The first is that good writing is hard: It's not something that people avoid in order to deliberatively sound pretentious and ponderous. In fact, it's hard work to sound simple and natural.

And second, a lot of the sins and failing in language may not actually be sins and failings if you take a more realistic usage of how language is used—they're fully consistent with how good writing looks in the past.

And finally, turgid writing and some of the other flaws of academic prose are hazards of the profession: You forget that the tools that have become clear to you are confusing to everyone else. So you start to start to write about concepts and frameworks, which are tools used by experts, instead of the objects in the real world, which is how non-experts think of things. For example, instead of talking about calling the police, an expert talks about "approaching things from a law-enforcement perspective."

How would you say our notion of what constitutes good style has changed in the past few hundred years? What do you think the future of good style looks like?

It's certainly changed over the long run, and I think there's been an ongoing trend to plainer, simpler language. By contemporary standards, a lot of the nineteenth-century essays and speeches strike us as flowery and ornate, because in the meantime there's been a general streamlining.

So what next? Well, I don't want to call it post-modern because that's its own style which is opaque and pretentious, but whether there will be a reaction to that, with more poetic sentences and imagery, as a backlash to the sparseness, who knows?

So you're not going to go on record as saying that we'll all be speaking with emoji or something like that?

(Laughter) Definitely not!

There are always people who are reacting to style—there are people who will push ornateness to more sparseness, or when things get too abstemious people will push in a direction of color and flamboyance. Language change doesn't happen according to a planned direction; it meanders throughout various possible languages.  

Your earlier books are the kind of thing that I think get people into linguistics, which isn't necessarily what one would expect from a style book. But The Sense of Style includes syntax trees, which probably aren't typical fare for style books, so do you think this is also a book that might whet people's appetites for more linguistics?

I sure hope so! It is in a very real sense a book about applied linguistics, and in order to do that it has a smidgen of linguistic theory, enough that people can understand terms like subordinate clause and the tree diagrams. Now, in doing so I had to choose my grammatical theory carefully, because it had to be one that would lend itself to applied linguistics, and in particular I needed one that would cover all the edge cases of English including those that cause usage controversy. So that ruled out a lot of the formal approaches that you see in the literature these days.

I ended up going with the version in the Cambridge Grammar of the English Languageby Rodney Huddleston and Geoffrey Pullum, which is this giant doorstop of a book! But you need that comprehensiveness. For example, in "he's one of those guys who's always complaining about his job," it's idiomatic to use the singular, although most grammars, bringing it back to the parse tree, would tell you to make it plural, to say "he's one of those guys who are always complaining about their jobs." So why is the idiom the singular version? Well, it turns out that Huddleston and Pullum have analyzed all these weird edge cases, and in fact they provide an insightful analysis for why the singular sounds grammatical in that example. And none of the other technical literature would give you an exhaustive treatment like that.

Is there anything else you'd like to say about The Sense of Style?

I'd say the book has two purposes.

The first is a practical source of advice on how to write more clearly, not just for academics or professionals who want to branch out or be clearer on the job, but also for people who want to start a blog or series of reviews or anything like that.

The second purpose is if you're curious about what makes good writing good, or stuffy writing stuffy, just as popular science, I like to think the book can explain what makes good language good using linguistics and cognitive science. It's also an expository book, so it clusters with my earlier books about language for people who are interested in how language works where style is just a set of phenomena that I'm trying to illuminate. So even if you never write yourself but are a consumer of writing and are curious about why you as a reader have the reactions you do, why you enjoy certain styles and not others, I like to think the book will help explain those puzzles.

The Sense of Style is available as of today, September 30th.

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Promotion de la langue française et de la Francophonie aux Jeux Olympiques (...) - Organisation internationale de la Francophonie

Promotion de la langue française et de la Francophonie aux Jeux Olympiques (...) - Organisation internationale de la Francophonie | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it
Dans le cadre de la mission que lui a confiée Abdou Diouf pour appuyer les efforts du Comité organisateur des Jeux Olympiques et Paralympiques d’hiver en 2010 à Vancouver (COVAN), Pascal Couchepin a rencontré du 22 au 28 novembre, les hauts responsables politiques du Canada, du Québec et de Colombie Britannique ainsi que les membres du Comité consultatif pour les langues officielles (CCLO) et du Conseil d’Administration du COVAN.
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Truth is another thing

Truth is another thing | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it
Opinions flew back and forth at the Bangalore Literary Festival; while some had shock value, others were an outcome of study and research

The same stage declared A.K. Ramanujan as great and not-so-great, in his roles as writer and translator respectively. Playwright Girish Karnad hailed him as a rich source of ideas, also attributing the global success of U.R. Ananthamurthy’s novel Samskara to AKR’s translation. In a session on Personal and Universal – Tackling nationhood and translations, poet H.S. Shivaprakash almost termed AKR’s translation of vachanas a disservice to the 12 century mystic poets, referring to the work, Speaking of Siva.

“The vachanas are intensely dialogic in nature and Ramanujan makes it monologic in his bad translation. Kannada doesn’t need Chicago translators,” he said, tongue firmly in cheek. While the former opinion seems far-fetched, the latter was an outcome of valid academic reasoning. However, wise readers are sure to make their own conclusions, even with a flamboyant literary festival that seems to offer a one-stop solution to all literary quests.

“Let’s declare the individual translator dead,” said H.S. Shivaprakash, saying that it is time to usher in the era of collaborative translation works. The Gujarati writer Sitanshu Yashashchandra earlier remarked that he was interested in reading works from other Indian bhashas and bring them into his own mother tongue. “I would rather have Shivaprakash in Gujarathi than Maxim Gorky and Mark Twain. When I see the efforts my contemporary writers put in getting their works translated into English and not into other regional languages of India, I feel there is something wrong. I love my language,” he emphasised. “Isn’t it a pity that a writer like Sitanshu hasn’t been translated to Kannada?” asked Shivaprakash.

“I became universal because I was able to read translations of literatures from other parts of the world in my mother tongue, Telugu,” explained the Telugu writer Volga, who has been extensively translated into Kannada. Recalling the abundance of Soviet Literature in the 60s and 70s, as it was with Maugham, Pearl S. Buck, and Mark Twain, she said that she felt closer to these texts in Telugu than in English. “In fact, Tom Sawyer became my own boy from my own region,” she recalled her early reading years. “I differ with you,” said Sitanshu. Translation is travel, and at once travelogue too. So, even in translation, Tom Sawyer has to remain an American boy, and not become the boy of your immediate neighbourhood, he argued.

“Gems of Indian literature get translated into English, and not into regional languages. A second rate writer gets a good translator and becomes international. Whereas a superior writer, for instance, someone like Chandrashekar Kambar is poorly translated,” observed H.S. Shivaprakash. The other problem he saw in translations was the use of Sanskrit words. He recalled how poet K.S. Narasimha Swamy had reacted to Kuvempu’s excessive use of Sanskrit diction. “‘Kannada putadali enee samskrutada meravanige (what is this procession of Sanskrit words on the Kannada page?)’ he had remarked. In fact, translation can itself give you a sense of cultural politics…,” he remarked and explained how while the poet B.M. Shrikataiah translated Palgrave’s Golden Treasury, poet Da. Ra. Bendre was busy translating the national songs of all countries, except that of Britain.

“Translation is both a cultural and political activity. Often, one finds that culture specific details are sacrificed in English translations, and that is a sad approach,” felt T.P. Rajeevan.

***

In an interesting session on Interface of Hindi Literature and the Arts, the differences between popular and the classical genre of music came to the fore. Of course, notwithstanding ignorant comments from members of the audience who had ‘easy’ notions about music that unsettled even the maestros on stage! Moderated superbly by Yatindra Mishra, Hindustani classical vocalist Shubha Mudgal admitted that even after several attempts that she has not been able to compose a bandish. “My khoj is to write a bandish that fits the contemporary world, but it seems that it requires far greater skills than I have at the moment. It is more than being sensitive to language and its movement,” she said, as graceful as ever. Writer on Hindi film music, Pankaj Raag, said that Hindi film music of yesteryear borrowed traditional bandishes. The famous song “Inhi Logon Ne” from the film Paakeezah is an example. The common thing these days is the use of Sufiana kalam. “Film music has become more eclectic and it is a welcome change,” he said.

Journalist and author Mrinal Pande pointed out to the fact that in music courses there is no study of literature. “The two are inherently related to each other and it is imperative that you know where your composers came from, what they are writing and who they are writing for? Literature is an important aspect of music, and it can hardly be glossed,” she argued. Speaking with remarkable clarity and evidence from treatises on music, she said oral tradition makes many claims, but it is hard to accept them as there is no evidence. “It is important to study tradition carefully. In the north, Sufi is trapped in the hands of the illiterate. They neither understand the spiritual compulsions of the Sufi sect nor do they understand Sufi poetry. Sufi music is in the hands of dangerous patrons,” she added. “There is atameez for sahitya, and a tameez for sangeet, and one has to adhere to both.”

“Film music has to be analysed in its context and changes in society have always had its influences on composers,” said Pankaj Raag. “Rasa is the ultimate yardstick of music. Now music has become like mathematics. But ironically, even great discoveries and formulations in maths took place in moments of creative surge. Basic discipline is important, with it you can couple playfulness,” Mrinal Pande added.

Shubha Mudgal, yet again, stressed the importance of music education. “But it cannot be an uniform idea. You cannot teach Darbari and Malkauns in a general classroom. But music as a system of knowledge and discipline has to be disseminated,” she explained.

Charles Tiayon's insight:
Opinions flew back and forth at the Bangalore Literary Festival; while some had shock value, others were an outcome of study and research

The same stage declared A.K. Ramanujan as great and not-so-great, in his roles as writer and translator respectively. Playwright Girish Karnad hailed him as a rich source of ideas, also attributing the global success of U.R. Ananthamurthy’s novel Samskara to AKR’s translation. In a session on Personal and Universal – Tackling nationhood and translations, poet H.S. Shivaprakash almost termed AKR’s translation of vachanas a disservice to the 12 century mystic poets, referring to the work, Speaking of Siva.

“The vachanas are intensely dialogic in nature and Ramanujan makes it monologic in his bad translation. Kannada doesn’t need Chicago translators,” he said, tongue firmly in cheek. While the former opinion seems far-fetched, the latter was an outcome of valid academic reasoning. However, wise readers are sure to make their own conclusions, even with a flamboyant literary festival that seems to offer a one-stop solution to all literary quests.

“Let’s declare the individual translator dead,” said H.S. Shivaprakash, saying that it is time to usher in the era of collaborative translation works. The Gujarati writer Sitanshu Yashashchandra earlier remarked that he was interested in reading works from other Indian bhashas and bring them into his own mother tongue. “I would rather have Shivaprakash in Gujarathi than Maxim Gorky and Mark Twain. When I see the efforts my contemporary writers put in getting their works translated into English and not into other regional languages of India, I feel there is something wrong. I love my language,” he emphasised. “Isn’t it a pity that a writer like Sitanshu hasn’t been translated to Kannada?” asked Shivaprakash.

“I became universal because I was able to read translations of literatures from other parts of the world in my mother tongue, Telugu,” explained the Telugu writer Volga, who has been extensively translated into Kannada. Recalling the abundance of Soviet Literature in the 60s and 70s, as it was with Maugham, Pearl S. Buck, and Mark Twain, she said that she felt closer to these texts in Telugu than in English. “In fact, Tom Sawyer became my own boy from my own region,” she recalled her early reading years. “I differ with you,” said Sitanshu. Translation is travel, and at once travelogue too. So, even in translation, Tom Sawyer has to remain an American boy, and not become the boy of your immediate neighbourhood, he argued.

“Gems of Indian literature get translated into English, and not into regional languages. A second rate writer gets a good translator and becomes international. Whereas a superior writer, for instance, someone like Chandrashekar Kambar is poorly translated,” observed H.S. Shivaprakash. The other problem he saw in translations was the use of Sanskrit words. He recalled how poet K.S. Narasimha Swamy had reacted to Kuvempu’s excessive use of Sanskrit diction. “‘Kannada putadali enee samskrutada meravanige (what is this procession of Sanskrit words on the Kannada page?)’ he had remarked. In fact, translation can itself give you a sense of cultural politics…,” he remarked and explained how while the poet B.M. Shrikataiah translated Palgrave’s Golden Treasury, poet Da. Ra. Bendre was busy translating the national songs of all countries, except that of Britain.

“Translation is both a cultural and political activity. Often, one finds that culture specific details are sacrificed in English translations, and that is a sad approach,” felt T.P. Rajeevan.

***

In an interesting session on Interface of Hindi Literature and the Arts, the differences between popular and the classical genre of music came to the fore. Of course, notwithstanding ignorant comments from members of the audience who had ‘easy’ notions about music that unsettled even the maestros on stage! Moderated superbly by Yatindra Mishra, Hindustani classical vocalist Shubha Mudgal admitted that even after several attempts that she has not been able to compose a bandish. “My khoj is to write a bandish that fits the contemporary world, but it seems that it requires far greater skills than I have at the moment. It is more than being sensitive to language and its movement,” she said, as graceful as ever. Writer on Hindi film music, Pankaj Raag, said that Hindi film music of yesteryear borrowed traditional bandishes. The famous song “Inhi Logon Ne” from the film Paakeezah is an example. The common thing these days is the use of Sufiana kalam. “Film music has become more eclectic and it is a welcome change,” he said.

Journalist and author Mrinal Pande pointed out to the fact that in music courses there is no study of literature. “The two are inherently related to each other and it is imperative that you know where your composers came from, what they are writing and who they are writing for? Literature is an important aspect of music, and it can hardly be glossed,” she argued. Speaking with remarkable clarity and evidence from treatises on music, she said oral tradition makes many claims, but it is hard to accept them as there is no evidence. “It is important to study tradition carefully. In the north, Sufi is trapped in the hands of the illiterate. They neither understand the spiritual compulsions of the Sufi sect nor do they understand Sufi poetry. Sufi music is in the hands of dangerous patrons,” she added. “There is atameez for sahitya, and a tameez for sangeet, and one has to adhere to both.”

“Film music has to be analysed in its context and changes in society have always had its influences on composers,” said Pankaj Raag. “Rasa is the ultimate yardstick of music. Now music has become like mathematics. But ironically, even great discoveries and formulations in maths took place in moments of creative surge. Basic discipline is important, with it you can couple playfulness,” Mrinal Pande added.

Shubha Mudgal, yet again, stressed the importance of music education. “But it cannot be an uniform idea. You cannot teach Darbari and Malkauns in a general classroom. But music as a system of knowledge and discipline has to be disseminated,” she explained.

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“Escritura y traducción son un acto de rebeldía, una venganza silenciosa” | TodoLiteratura

“Escritura y traducción son un acto de rebeldía, una venganza silenciosa” | TodoLiteratura | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it
El próximo sábado se presenta en Roma el segundo volumen de la Antología bilingüe “Buena Letra” (Commisso Editore). Conversamos con su creadora, la poeta y traductora Marcela Filippi, sobre una propuesta que, como ella misma afirma, nace de la pasión y de la necesidad de compartir la emoción de vivir haciendo literatura.


"Buena Letra"
¿Por qué Buena Letra y por qué autores latinoamericanos?
Buena Letra nace por mi interés hacia la riqueza literaria de países de habla española, portuguesa, y de toda la poesía en general y porque yo misma nací en esas tierras; vivo en Italia, pero soy chilena y lo seré siempre. Domenico Commisso (entonces Editoriale Giorni) me propuso que preparará una antología y me dejó plena libertad. Siempre he mantenido una unión también con Portugal (País que amo por su lengua y por la poesía de Pessoa). Buena letra, en realidad, es una antología Iberoamericana.

¿Por qué la idea de editar un libro bilingüe?
Porque en Italia la importancia del español ha crecido mucho, y se está enseñando en casi todas las escuelas secundarias, y también porque en los países latinos donde hubo un emigración italiana masiva, la lengua italiana es parte de la tradición y además viene considerada como el idioma de la literatura: Virgilio, Ovidio, Dante, Boccaccio, Leopardi, Manzoni, Benedetto Croce, Calvino, Silone, Sciascia, Ungaretti, Montale, Saba, Quasimodo, Pier Paolo Pasolini, son solamente algunos nombres ilustres. Se habla más en el extranjero que en Italia de ellos, muy triste, ¿no? Queremos despertar el perdido amor por la poesía en Italia, y ampliar los conocimientos de la poesía iberoamericana en Italia; solamente un libro bilingüe lo puede hacer.

¿Cómo realiza el trabajo de selección de los textos?
Los textos los selecciono siguiendo mi criterio personal, o sería mejor decir el criterio que se debería usar en estos casos: las emociones que los poemas transmiten. El deber de la poesía es emocionar, y hacer pensar...

¿Qué le dejo el primer volumen de esta antología?
La primera antología me abrió un mundo de poetas en busca de atenciones. Creo que nosotros hemos quebrado ciertas lógicas comerciales de las editoriales, ya que todo esto lo hacemos sin hacer pagar nada a los autores ni por mis traducciones, ni por las publicaciones. Hasta que podamos hacerlo, ya que es una pasión, y esperando recursos de alguien que nos apoye en este proyecto. Comprendí que lo nuestro es algo muy necesario para crear un universo poético autentico, y de real valor artístico: Que es la intención principal de la editorial Commisso.

¿Qué le ofrece al lector el segundo volumen?
El segundo volumen, ofrece poetas de elevada calidad, más orden, más cuidado en todo, con una magnífica portada que lleva la fotografía de Jorge Blanco, fotógrafo excepcional cuyas creaciones son poemas. Algunos de los poetas ya son muy conocidos y con importantes publicaciones. No le hago nombres para no crear una injusta opinión en el lector; eso lo hará quien leerá la antología. A mis poetas los amo como si fueran mis hijos.

¿Es Italia un país difícil para los autores en español?
Italia es un país difìcil en general. En estos últimos años ha habido un empeño "profundo" en destruir el patrimonio cultural que caracterizaba este país en el mundo entero, y la tendencia, siempre más activa de ciertos sectores de la política y de muchos privados en defender solamente sus intereses, han terminado por bajar siempre más el nivel de interés de la gente común en temas de cultura. Y la poesía no queda afuera de todo esto, por supuesto.

En el mercado literario, ¿hacia dónde apunta Commisso Editore?
Commisso Editore tiene por delante un horizonte de expectativas muy amplio. Nos encantaría entrar en las escuelas italianas, en las escuelas de lengua española donde se estudia italiano (para que vuelva el interés por la poesía), y con nuestras publicaciones más avanzadas -con la colección "Fascinoso Verbum" nacida este año de la misma antología en la que hemos publicado nombres importantes como el poeta italiano Domenico Cara, traducido del italiano. Imagínese que este poeta, tenía como amigos a unos señores conocido en el mundo entero: Un tal Ungaretti, Montale,
Charles Tiayon's insight:

El próximo sábado se presenta en Roma el segundo volumen de la Antología bilingüe “Buena Letra” (Commisso Editore). Conversamos con su creadora, la poeta y traductora Marcela Filippi, sobre una propuesta que, como ella misma afirma, nace de la pasión y de la necesidad de compartir la emoción de vivir haciendo literatura.

"Buena Letra"

¿Por qué Buena Letra y por qué autores latinoamericanos?
Buena Letra nace por mi interés hacia la riqueza literaria de países de habla española, portuguesa, y de toda la poesía en general y porque yo misma nací en esas tierras; vivo en Italia, pero soy chilena y lo seré siempre. Domenico Commisso (entonces Editoriale Giorni) me propuso que preparará una antología y me dejó plena libertad. Siempre he mantenido una unión también con Portugal (País que amo por su lengua y por la poesía de Pessoa). Buena letra, en realidad, es una antología Iberoamericana.

¿Por qué la idea de editar un libro bilingüe?
Porque en Italia la importancia del español ha crecido mucho, y se está enseñando en casi todas las escuelas secundarias, y también porque en los países latinos donde hubo un emigración italiana masiva, la lengua italiana es parte de la tradición y además viene considerada como el idioma de la literatura: Virgilio, Ovidio, Dante, Boccaccio, Leopardi, Manzoni, Benedetto Croce, Calvino, Silone, Sciascia, Ungaretti, Montale, Saba, Quasimodo, Pier Paolo Pasolini, son solamente algunos nombres ilustres. Se habla más en el extranjero que en Italia de ellos, muy triste, ¿no? Queremos despertar el perdido amor por la poesía en Italia, y ampliar los conocimientos de la poesía iberoamericana en Italia; solamente un libro bilingüe lo puede hacer.

¿Cómo realiza el trabajo de selección de los textos?
Los textos los selecciono siguiendo mi criterio personal, o sería mejor decir el criterio que se debería usar en estos casos: las emociones que los poemas transmiten. El deber de la poesía es emocionar, y hacer pensar...

¿Qué le dejo el primer volumen de esta antología?
La primera antología me abrió un mundo de poetas en busca de atenciones. Creo que nosotros hemos quebrado ciertas lógicas comerciales de las editoriales, ya que todo esto lo hacemos sin hacer pagar nada a los autores ni por mis traducciones, ni por las publicaciones. Hasta que podamos hacerlo, ya que es una pasión, y esperando recursos de alguien que nos apoye en este proyecto. Comprendí que lo nuestro es algo muy necesario para crear un universo poético autentico, y de real valor artístico: Que es la intención principal de la editorial Commisso.

¿Qué le ofrece al lector el segundo volumen?
El segundo volumen, ofrece poetas de elevada calidad, más orden, más cuidado en todo, con una magnífica portada que lleva la fotografía de Jorge Blanco, fotógrafo excepcional cuyas creaciones son poemas. Algunos de los poetas ya son muy conocidos y con importantes publicaciones. No le hago nombres para no crear una injusta opinión en el lector; eso lo hará quien leerá la antología. A mis poetas los amo como si fueran mis hijos.

¿Es Italia un país difícil para los autores en español?
Italia es un país difìcil en general. En estos últimos años ha habido un empeño "profundo" en destruir el patrimonio cultural que caracterizaba este país en el mundo entero, y la tendencia, siempre más activa de ciertos sectores de la política y de muchos privados en defender solamente sus intereses, han terminado por bajar siempre más el nivel de interés de la gente común en temas de cultura. Y la poesía no queda afuera de todo esto, por supuesto.

En el mercado literario, ¿hacia dónde apunta Commisso Editore?
Commisso Editore tiene por delante un horizonte de expectativas muy amplio. Nos encantaría entrar en las escuelas italianas, en las escuelas de lengua española donde se estudia italiano (para que vuelva el interés por la poesía), y con nuestras publicaciones más avanzadas -con la colección "Fascinoso Verbum" nacida este año de la misma antología en la que hemos publicado nombres importantes como el poeta italiano Domenico Cara, traducido del italiano. Imagínese que este poeta, tenía como amigos a unos señores conocido en el mundo entero: Un tal Ungaretti, Montale, y muchos más. El poeta español Miguel Veyrat es un poeta con una trayectoria muy importante, además es un traductor de gran prestigio, en las universidades. Las personas que voy contactando, ahora que nos conocen, nos reciben con los brazos abiertos, y nuestras publicaciones van adquiriendo un cierto peso en cuanto a calidad.

Usted es, además de traductora, escritora, ¿cómo vincula ambos trabajos?
Nace primero mi amor por la lectura, y luego por la poesía. Todo se desarrolla con espontaneidad cuando comencé a mirar el mundo con curiosidad (no sabría decir cuando ocurrió). Busqué una manera de completarme, de encontrar una espiritualidad, que en mí no corresponde en una fe religiosa. En eso, digamos que se me complicaron muchas cosas; es mucho más simple encontrar respuestas en la religión porque ya están preparadas, y son iguales para todos. Aclaro que siento el máximo respeto hacia los que creen, y - a veces- hasta los admiro. A mí, no me bastó en los años en que creí que creía. Este conflicto me puso por delante una búsqueda constante, y es en la poesía que sé que puedo encontrar la libertad que deseo. Considero la poesía la forma artística de mayor relevancia.

La traducción, en cambio, nace de mis lecturas, donde descubrí errores, o mejor sería decir horrores en la traducción de grandes poetas de lengua española. Puede resultar algo exagerado, pero si hay algo que me duele es la indiferencia de las editoriales en el tema de traducciones. He leído poemas de Gabriela Mistral en ediciones bilingüe, que son un espanto. Y otros tantos de otros poetas. Tal vez es un acto de rebeldía el mío: ¡Una venganza silenciosa! La pasión por la poesía, la traducción y la escritura, hoy son para mí la misma cosa; se mezclaron y no se podrán separar jamás.

Ante los dos volúmenes de Buena Letra, ¿cuál ha sido la respuesta de los lectores italianos?
Creo que para tener una idea más clara de cuál ha sido la respuesta de los lectores con el primer volumen -el segundo recién salió- hay que esperar. Lo que sí puedo decir, que la fórmula con la que hemos ideado Buena Letra -siendo única- ha gustado mucho, mueve mucho interés alrededor de este libro que en mi opinión es un encanto. La pasión, el amor que hemos puesto en nuestras creaciones, ha llegado al corazón de muchos, y si usted hoy habla de Buena Letra antología, encontrará seguramente más de una persona que le sabrá decir qué es: por el momento es el resultado más sorprendente y más bello que pudiéramos esperar. Nosotros traducimos, recreamos emociones. Es lo que hemos encontrado por el camino de nuestra vida.

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Figures du traducteur/de la traductrice.

Pour son deuxième numéro (juin 2015), la revue Convergences francophones (ISSN 2291-7012) recherche des articles portant sur le thème suivant : Figures du traducteur/de la traductrice.

Il s’agira d’interroger dans une perspective diachronique les représentations du traducteur/ de la traductrice émanant au niveau social mais aussi personnel ainsi que leurs conséquences : comment le traducteur/la traductrice et son activité sont-ils perçus ? Comment se perçoit-il lui-même ? Comment la propre perception du traducteur joue-t-elle sur la traduction ? Qu’en est-il de l’autotraduction où la séparation traducteur/auteur est plus que jamais remise en question?  Quels peuvent être les effets d’un discours social ou épitextuel sur le traducteur  et son activité ?

Domaines envisagés : traduction littéraire, traduction audiovisuelle, traduction technique, autotraduction

Les propositions ne devront pas dépasser 300 mots et doivent être envoyées à Antoine Eche (aeche@mtroyal.ca) et Justine Huet (jhuet@mtroyal.ca). Leurs auteurs enverront également une brève notice bio-bibliographique.

Date limite de soumission des propositions : 24 octobre 2014

Notification des propositions retenues : 14 novembre 2014

Date limite de soumission des articles retenus : 30 janvier 2015

Les articles soumis seront ensuite évalués par deux membres du comité de lecture ou spécialistes sollicités pour l’occasion.

Convergences francophones (http://mrujs.mtroyal.ca/index.php/cf/index) est une revue semestrielle, pluridisciplinaire, en libre accès.  

 

Charles Tiayon's insight:

Pour son deuxième numéro (juin 2015), la revue Convergences francophones (ISSN 2291-7012) recherche des articles portant sur le thème suivant : Figures du traducteur/de la traductrice.

Il s’agira d’interroger dans une perspective diachronique les représentations du traducteur/ de la traductrice émanant au niveau social mais aussi personnel ainsi que leurs conséquences : comment le traducteur/la traductrice et son activité sont-ils perçus ? Comment se perçoit-il lui-même ? Comment la propre perception du traducteur joue-t-elle sur la traduction ? Qu’en est-il de l’autotraduction où la séparation traducteur/auteur est plus que jamais remise en question?  Quels peuvent être les effets d’un discours social ou épitextuel sur le traducteur  et son activité ?

Domaines envisagés : traduction littéraire, traduction audiovisuelle, traduction technique, autotraduction

Les propositions ne devront pas dépasser 300 mots et doivent être envoyées à Antoine Eche (aeche@mtroyal.ca) et Justine Huet (jhuet@mtroyal.ca). Leurs auteurs enverront également une brève notice bio-bibliographique.

Date limite de soumission des propositions : 24 octobre 2014

Notification des propositions retenues : 14 novembre 2014

Date limite de soumission des articles retenus : 30 janvier 2015

Les articles soumis seront ensuite évalués par deux membres du comité de lecture ou spécialistes sollicités pour l’occasion.

Convergences francophones (http://mrujs.mtroyal.ca/index.php/cf/index) est une revue semestrielle, pluridisciplinaire, en libre accès.  

 

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Lingo24 Releases APIs for Machine Translation and Professional Service

Lingo24 Releases APIs for Machine Translation and Professional Service | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it
New APIs from Lingo24 help developers integrate high-accuracy machine and professional translation into their applications and products.
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Machine and professional translation service Lingo24 has opened up its services via API. Speaking with ProgrammableWeb at last week’s APIcon UK, CTO David Meikle explained how the service can provide greater accuracy than big-name translators and how the API can learn as it goes to improve accuracy in any given industry vertical.

Lingo24 allows customers to choose the level of quality required for each translation text: from machine learning translation done automatically, to text reviews conducted by professional translators, to trans-creation services where a block of text in one language is completely copy rewritten in the destination language.

The service is used by international clients including the United Nations, the World Bank, Save the Children Fund and the telco Orange.

Now Lingo24 has opened up its services via API, allowing customers to integrate the translation service into their apps, products and websites directly, and to choose a relevant level of service as needed.

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“Thinjiwe!” International Translation Day celebration a big success

“Thinjiwe!” International Translation Day celebration a big success | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it
“Igazi lethu limpompoza ngokufanayo/ Sonke sabelana ngoko kusenz’ abantu (As diverse as we are, we are all human/ As diverse as we are, we have one space to share/ As diverse as we are, we have one life to live).” With these inspiring words, Xolisa Tshongolo of the Department of Cultural Affairs and Sport (DCAS) illustrated the art of literary translation on International Translation Day, 30 September 2014 at Archives.The celebration was organised by DCAS and was attended by 28 language practiti
Charles Tiayon's insight:

Igazi lethu limpompoza ngokufanayo/ Sonke sabelana ngoko kusenz’ abantu (As diverse as we are, we are all human/ As diverse as we are, we have one space to share/ As diverse as we are, we have one life to live).” With these inspiring words, Xolisa Tshongolo of the Department of Cultural Affairs and Sport (DCAS) illustrated the art of literary translation on International Translation Day, 30 September 2014 at Archives.

The celebration was organised by DCAS and was attended by 28 language practitioners from the Western Cape
Government, Western Cape Provincial Parliament, national Parliament and the City of Cape Town.

Watu Kobese, an international chess master and the author of the first isiXhosa chess book, spoke about translating the game. Chess is a war game that originated in India hundreds of years ago. What is now a knight was called an elephant at that time. As the game spread across the world, the pieces have been named in the symbolic idiom of each language. The isiXhosa name for the bishop in chess is intlola, which means a spy or scout during a time of war. This is in line with the role of the bishop in medieval Europe – a strategist and adviser to the king. In isiXhosa culture, a conquered king is not killed; he is taken to the victor’s kraal (ukuthimba). The new name for chess is therefore uthimba (“capturing the king”). Checkmate is thinjiwe! (“The king has been captured!”) Kobese said, “I look forward to the day when I see a taxi driver standing over a chessboard shouting “Thinjiwe! Thinjiwe!”

International Translation Day is celebrated every year on the feast of St Jerome, the patron saint of translators of all beliefs. Dr Franci Vosloo of the University of Stellenbosch said Jerome is the man who translated the Bible from Hebrew and Greek into a form of Latin that ordinary people could understand. Translation is an increasingly important profession in the era of globalisation and at a time when language rights are seen as human rights. Language and culture are intertwined with one another, and translators need to be bi-cultural as well as bilingual.

Thoko Mabheqa, an isiXhosa lecturer of many years’ experience, made a heartfelt plea to those in attendance: “Let us not complain that our languages are not recognised. Let us encourage our children to take pride in their mother tongues.”

Through the Language Forum, DCAS is building the capacity of language practitioners so that the people of the Western Cape can enjoy the right to be served in their own languages, better together.

Media Enquiries: 

Annerie Pruis-Le Roux
Acting Head of Communication Service
Department of Cultural Affairs and Sport
Tel: 021 483 9730
E-mail: annerie.pruis-leroux@westerncape.gov.za

 

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'The Book of Three' Marks 50 Years

'The Book of Three' Marks 50 Years | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it
Two of author Lloyd Alexander's biggest fans are key contributors to the new 50th-anniversary editions of Chronicles of Prydain series-starter 'The Book of Three,' which was originally published in 1964.
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Día Internacional de la Traducción

Día Internacional de la Traducción | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it
30/09, Día Internacional de la Traducción en nombre de una profesión poca reconocida y representada por San Jerónimo, quien tradujo la Biblia.
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Major Scrabble Brouhaha: Can You Copyright a List of Words?

Major Scrabble Brouhaha: Can You Copyright a List of Words? | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it

In the 1980s, when Brian Sheppard created a computer program that played Scrabble, he typed in a lot of words—more than 100,000 of them, from the Official Scrabble Players Dictionary and Merriam-Webster’s Collegiate Dictionary. His program, Maven, revolutionized how expert players thought about and played Scrabble. (It also beat them.)...

Charles Tiayon's insight:

In the 1980s, when Brian Sheppard created a computer program that played Scrabble, he typed in a lot of words—more than 100,000 of them, from theOfficial Scrabble Players Dictionary and Merriam-Webster’s Collegiate Dictionary. His program, Maven, revolutionized how expert players thought about and playedScrabble. (It also beat them.) Sheppard continued to update his software by hand until 1996, when a Scrabble player who helped assemble the third edition of the OSPDgave him the words via a digital file. Electronic word lists have circulated freely ever since.

STEFAN FATSIS

Stefan Fatsis is the author ofWord Freak and A Few Seconds of Panic, a regular guest on NPR'sAll Things Considered, and a panelist on Hang Up and Listen

These lists power the Internet Scrabble Club, a real-time playing room created by a Scrabbler in Romania. They also fuel study and analysis tools with names like ZyzzyvaZarfQuackle, and Elise. But the lists are samizdat—gray-market e-documents traded in the small but intense Scrabble community, which is filled with programmers and math brainiacs. Hasbro Inc., which owns the rights to the game in North America, and Merriam-Webster Inc., which publishes its official lexicons, have never publicly released the digital lists. At the same time, they have never attempted to control their spread—until now.

After two decades, Hasbro is cracking down on the dissemination and use of the word lists, and is seeking to license their use. Players are worried about the future of the programs, apps, and websites that are indispensable to the modern game, and they’re resentful that a multibillion-dollar corporation is hamstringing the developers who designed the Scrabble tools (for no pay) and distributed them (usually for free). The company’s action also raises an intriguing legal question: Can a list of words be copyrighted?

The lexical kerfuffle began over the summer, when Merriam-Webster published, tomuch publicityselfie! hashtag! bromance!—a new, fifth edition of the OSPD. The book contains more than 100,000 words, including 5,000 new ones, of two through eight letters plus inflections. Purged of words labeled “offensive,” the OSPD includes definitions and parts of speech and is intended for home and school play. Separately, Merriam-Webster published a third edition of the Official Tournament and Club Word List. The OWL is sold only to members of the North American Scrabble Players Association, or NASPA; as its name suggests, it governs play in about 150 clubs and more than 300 tournaments a year in North America. The OWL is a straight alphabetical list—no definitions or other descriptive matter—of every word two through 15 letters long acceptable in competitive Scrabble, including the dirty ones, a total of nearly 188,000. It is the primary focus of the ongoing controversy.

While Merriam-Webster publishes both the OSPD and OWL, Hasbro claims the copyright on them. Like any dictionaries, the paper-and-ink books are rabbit holes for word lovers. But competitive Scrabble runs on digital sources. The program Zyzzyva, for instance, allows players to set parameters on words—like length or probability, meaning the likelihood of a word being plucked from a set of 100 tiles—and then solve anagrams one at a time. Players use Zyzzyva to learn and review words, and laptops loaded with the program adjudicate word challenges at tournaments. 

Shortly before the National Scrabble Championship this August, Hasbro told NASPA that it had concerns about the revised word lists getting loose. It wanted to ensure that digital versions of the new OSPD and OWL were not freely downloadable from applications that contained them, as the current lists often have been. Hasbro said Zyzzyva was in violation of the company’s copyright.

Zyzzyva’s creator, Michael Thelen—who designed the program in 2005 as a personal study tool and then shared it with fellow players—was worried about getting sued. He also wanted to ensure that players had access to the new words. So he sold Zyzzyva to NASPA.

NASPA, which reported total revenue last year of $245,775, then negotiated with Hasbro, which reported revenue of more than $4 billion. One person involved in that negotiation said that Hasbro asked for a “significant” annual fee to license the use of the new word lists. The parties agreed on a smaller, one-time payment that will make the OWL and OSPD available through Zyzzyva to dues-paying NASPA members only, with coding tweaked to prevent the word lists from being extracted in large chunks. Hasbro’s vice president for gaming marketing, Jonathan Berkowitz, declined to comment on the payment. “There are all sorts of legal reasons to set up licensing arrangements the way we do,” he told me. Berkowitz added: “Our goal is not to monetize NASPA. Our goal is really about the democratization of this game and getting as many people this content as possible.”  

“We’ve done it as a labor of love. We didn’t try to do this to make any profit.”

César Del Solar, a programmer for the anagramming website Aerolith

Competitive Scrabblers see Hasbro’s action as restricting, not democratizing. No one disputes that the company is entitled to protect and control what it considers its intellectual property, especially against commercial challenges. But for decades, players, not Hasbro, created the physical and intellectual stuff—word lists, tournaments, ratings systems, study aides, equipment—that turned the company’s trademarked game, invented by an out-of-work architect in the 1930s, into a sophisticated and media-friendly subculture. (I wrote a bookabout it.) “We’ve done it as a labor of love,” César Del Solar, who developed the anagramming website Aerolith, told me. “We didn’t try to do this to make any profit. We did it to help ourselves get better and help other players get better, to have a community.” 

A nonprofit managed by players and financed mostly by dues and participation fees from 2,300 members, NASPA is trying to keep that community together—without antagonizing its corporate overlord. The group has and wants to keep a license to use the word “Scrabble” in its name and activities, and it’s trying to rekindle Hasbro’s interest in bankrolling tournament play. (For almost two decades, Hasbro spent as much as $700,000 or $800,000 a year on competitive Scrabble but eliminated nearly all support for clubs and tournaments in 2008.) “As a result, this did not seem like a hill to die on,” a NASPA executive wrote on Facebook during a recent discussion of the word list and licensing plans.

Take out the lawyers-and-money imbalance between the two sides, though, and it would be a tempting hill to storm. While there’s no doubt that dictionaries are protected under U.S. copyright law, the copyrightability of a list of words isn’t as cut and dried. 

Dictionaries enjoy copyright protection for two main reasons: Their creators make judgments about what words to include, and entries feature definitions and other original material. (Just last week, a federal court in Massachusetts ruled against a plaintiff who wanted to copy and repurpose the bulk of Merriam-Webster’s Collegiate, including definitions, for his own dictionary.) But in 1991, in Feist Publications Inc. v. Rural Telephone Service Co., the Supreme Court decided that a phone company wasn’t entitled to a copyright on its white pages. That’s because the list of names and numbers lacked an important requirement: originality.

The definition-free OWL and a words-only version of the OSPD might be said to resemble the phone book. The facts in them—the individual words themselves—wouldn’t be considered “original” and likely couldn’t be copyrighted. But the lists might represent “an original selection or arrangement of facts,” as Justice Sandra Day O’Connor wrote in Feist. “These choices as to selection and arrangement, so long as they are made independently by the compiler and entail a minimal degree of creativity,” she wrote, “are sufficiently original that Congress may protect such compilations through the copyright laws.”

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Alistan XXIII Encuentro Internacional de Traductores Literarios - Cultura

Alistan XXIII Encuentro Internacional de Traductores Literarios - Cultura | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it
Cultura - Con la conferencia “La transgresión al traducir literatura infantil y juvenil”, de Carlos Fortea Gil, arrancará este miércoles aquí el XXIII.
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New Releases: 14 Arabic Translations to Watch for this Fall

New Releases: 14 Arabic Translations to Watch for this Fall | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it

Fourteen books that give you something to curl up with as the nights grow shorter. The best and most interesting of what’s coming out this fall:

September

Women of Karantina, Nael Eltoukhy, trans. Robin Moger (AUC Press)

A favorite of several prize-winning Egyptian authors, novelist and short-story writer Mohammad Abdelnaby says the book has “an epic tone that laughs at everything, an unusual lightness of spirit, and a surprisingly fresh treatment of old motifs such as violence or succession, al-Toukhy creates something unprecedented in the history of the Arabic novel, and in a language that does a very special dance between simple Modern Standard Arabic and an Egyptian Arabic that is colorful and perhaps obscene.”

Beirut, Beirut, Sonallah Ibrahim, trans. Chip Rossetti (BQFP)

Set during Lebanon’s civil war, the novel follows the misadventures of an Egyptian writer who goes to Beirut in an attempt to find a publisher for his work.

Revolution is My Name, Mona Prince, trans. Samia Mehrez (AUC Press)

You can read an excerpt on the AUC website, and more about the book on Jadaliyya. 

Chronicles of Majnun Layla and Selected Poems, Qassim Haddad, trans. Ferial Ghazoul and John Verlenden (Syracuse University Press)

Ghazoul and Verlenden won the University of Arkansas Arabic Translation Award for this book in addition to the $100,000 translation grant the pair received from the National Endowment for the Humanities to “create a comprehensive edition of Haddad’s work in English.” Read some of Haddad’s poems. Read an excerpt here.

October

Oh, Salaam!, Najwa Barakat, trans. Luke Leafgren (Interlink Books)

Luqman, the novel’s protagonist, is a young former militiaman, trying to make a living in a post-war Lebanon. While you’re waiting on Oh, Salaam!, read an excerpt from another of Barakat’s novels, also trans. Leafgren: “The Bus.”

Arabs and the Art of Storytelling: A Strange Familiarity, by Abdelfattah Kilito, trans. Eric Sellin and Mbarek Sryfi (Syracuse University Press)

Read a charming recent interview with Kilito. Note: This is actually a translation from the French, but about Arabic literature, so.

Monarch of the Square An Anthology of Muhammad Zafzaf’s Short Storiestrans. Mbarek Sryfi and Roger Allen (Syracuse University Press)

A wide-ranging collection that looks at Zafzaf’s stories from all eras of his long writing career. Many wonderful, visceral shorts examining the lives of Moroccans. Interview with Sryfi forthcoming on ArabLit, insha’allah.

November

The Book of the Sultan’s Seal, Youssef Rakha, trans. Paul Starkey (Clockroot Books)

A game-changing novel for Egyptian literature, you can read about the novel here.

Crocodiles, Youssef Rakha, trans. Robin Moger (Seven Stories Press)

You can read two excerpts on Moger’s website: “In the Evening I Think on the Moon” and “The Oblivious Body.”

Lanterns of the King of GallileeIbrahim Nasrallah, trans. Nancy Roberts (AUC Press)

Another in the series that includes The Time of White Horses, this is a book of eighteenth-century Palestine.

December

French PerfumeAmir Tag El Sir, trans. William Hutchins (ANTIBOOKCLUB)

A hilarious, fast-paced novel that is very different from the East-West novel by El Sir’s famous uncle, Tayeb Salih, but nonetheless interrogates the same relationship.

The Penguin’s SongHassan Daoud, trans. Marilyn Booth (City Lights)

This was a labor of love for translator Marilyn Booth, and you can read excerpts here and here.

Iraq + 100ed. Hassan Blasim, various translators (Comma Press)

Stories set in Iraq 100 years into the future, including work by celebrated Iraqi novelist Ali Bader.

Unspecified

The Revolt of the Young: Essays by Tawfiq al-Hakimtrans. Mona Radwan

Essays by one of Arabic literature’s all-time leading lights.


Also, as to the question of “where are the women in translated books?


Yes, only two of these authors are women: Mona Prince and Najwa Barakat. Earlier this year, two of Radwa Ashour’s excellent novels came out in translation (Blue Lorries and The Woman of Tantoura), Iman Humaydan Younes’s wonderful Other Lives, Hala el Badry’s Rain over Baghdad, and Dunya Mikhail’s latest poetry collection, The Iraqi Nights.

This makes for seven out of between 35-40 titles; let’s say around 18-20 percent, in line with literature translated from other languages. Over at love german books, Katy Derbyshire suggests moving in a different direction in, “A Woman’s Prize for Translated Books.” She writes:

What I want is a women’s prize for translated fiction; a little sister to the Bailey’s Prize, for instance. It would raise awareness for great women’s writing from the non-Anglophone world rather than for great non-Anglophone writing by women. I know that’s a subtle distinction but I think it’s an important one.

Yes, this is an issue we’ve discussed before. However, the “twenty percent” figure may only be part of it. As Derbyshire notes, a woman has never yet won the Independent Foreign Fiction Prize (IFFP), and many women’s titles appear on the scene without getting much public traction. Even Blue Lorries and Woman from Tantoura, which really AUCP and BQFP should’ve pushed together.

Gender breakdown is also a recurring issue/debate on the International Prize for Arabic Fiction (IPAF) shortlist, to an extent that the new, competing Qatari Katara prize has repeataedly announced the percentage of submissions they’ve been getting of work by women. Without women on the key Arabic book prize shortlists, well, it doesn’t really help get out more women’s works in translation.

If there was a concerted effort to publish more great women’s books in translation?

Click HERE to read more

Charles Tiayon's insight:

Fourteen books that give you something to curl up with as the nights grow shorter. The best and most interesting of what’s coming out this fall:

September

Women of Karantina, Nael Eltoukhy, trans. Robin Moger (AUC Press)

A favorite of several prize-winning Egyptian authors, novelist and short-story writer Mohammad Abdelnaby says the book has “an epic tone that laughs at everything, an unusual lightness of spirit, and a surprisingly fresh treatment of old motifs such as violence or succession, al-Toukhy creates something unprecedented in the history of the Arabic novel, and in a language that does a very special dance between simple Modern Standard Arabic and an Egyptian Arabic that is colorful and perhaps obscene.”

Beirut, Beirut, Sonallah Ibrahim, trans. Chip Rossetti (BQFP)

Set during Lebanon’s civil war, the novel follows the misadventures of an Egyptian writer who goes to Beirut in an attempt to find a publisher for his work.

Revolution is My Name, Mona Prince, trans. Samia Mehrez (AUC Press)

You can read an excerpt on the AUC website, and more about the book on Jadaliyya. 

Chronicles of Majnun Layla and Selected Poems, Qassim Haddad, trans. Ferial Ghazoul and John Verlenden (Syracuse University Press)

Ghazoul and Verlenden won the University of Arkansas Arabic Translation Award for this book in addition to the $100,000 translation grant the pair received from the National Endowment for the Humanities to “create a comprehensive edition of Haddad’s work in English.” Read some of Haddad’s poems. Read an excerpt here.

October

Oh, Salaam!, Najwa Barakat, trans. Luke Leafgren (Interlink Books)

Luqman, the novel’s protagonist, is a young former militiaman, trying to make a living in a post-war Lebanon. While you’re waiting on Oh, Salaam!, read an excerpt from another of Barakat’s novels, also trans. Leafgren: “The Bus.”

Arabs and the Art of Storytelling: A Strange Familiarity, by Abdelfattah Kilito, trans. Eric Sellin and Mbarek Sryfi (Syracuse University Press)

Read a charming recent interview with Kilito. Note: This is actually a translation from the French, but about Arabic literature, so.

Monarch of the Square An Anthology of Muhammad Zafzaf’s Short Storiestrans. Mbarek Sryfi and Roger Allen (Syracuse University Press)

A wide-ranging collection that looks at Zafzaf’s stories from all eras of his long writing career. Many wonderful, visceral shorts examining the lives of Moroccans. Interview with Sryfi forthcoming on ArabLit, insha’allah.

November

The Book of the Sultan’s Seal, Youssef Rakha, trans. Paul Starkey (Clockroot Books)

A game-changing novel for Egyptian literature, you can read about the novel here.

Crocodiles, Youssef Rakha, trans. Robin Moger (Seven Stories Press)

You can read two excerpts on Moger’s website: “In the Evening I Think on the Moon” and “The Oblivious Body.”

Lanterns of the King of GallileeIbrahim Nasrallah, trans. Nancy Roberts (AUC Press)

Another in the series that includes The Time of White Horses, this is a book of eighteenth-century Palestine.

December

French PerfumeAmir Tag El Sir, trans. William Hutchins (ANTIBOOKCLUB)

A hilarious, fast-paced novel that is very different from the East-West novel by El Sir’s famous uncle, Tayeb Salih, but nonetheless interrogates the same relationship.

The Penguin’s SongHassan Daoud, trans. Marilyn Booth (City Lights)

This was a labor of love for translator Marilyn Booth, and you can read excerpts here and here.

Iraq + 100ed. Hassan Blasim, various translators (Comma Press)

Stories set in Iraq 100 years into the future, including work by celebrated Iraqi novelist Ali Bader.

Unspecified

The Revolt of the Young: Essays by Tawfiq al-Hakimtrans. Mona Radwan

Essays by one of Arabic literature’s all-time leading lights.


Also, as to the question of “where are the women in translated books?


Yes, only two of these authors are women: Mona Prince and Najwa Barakat. Earlier this year, two of Radwa Ashour’s excellent novels came out in translation (Blue Lorries and The Woman of Tantoura), Iman Humaydan Younes’s wonderful Other Lives, Hala el Badry’s Rain over Baghdad, and Dunya Mikhail’s latest poetry collection, The Iraqi Nights.

This makes for seven out of between 35-40 titles; let’s say around 18-20 percent, in line with literature translated from other languages. Over at love german books, Katy Derbyshire suggests moving in a different direction in, “A Woman’s Prize for Translated Books.” She writes:

What I want is a women’s prize for translated fiction; a little sister to the Bailey’s Prize, for instance. It would raise awareness for great women’s writing from the non-Anglophone world rather than for great non-Anglophone writing by women. I know that’s a subtle distinction but I think it’s an important one.

Yes, this is an issue we’ve discussed before. However, the “twenty percent” figure may only be part of it. As Derbyshire notes, a woman has never yet won the Independent Foreign Fiction Prize (IFFP), and many women’s titles appear on the scene without getting much public traction. Even Blue Lorries and Woman from Tantoura, which really AUCP and BQFP should’ve pushed together.

Gender breakdown is also a recurring issue/debate on the International Prize for Arabic Fiction (IPAF) shortlist, to an extent that the new, competing Qatari Katara prize has repeataedly announced the percentage of submissions they’ve been getting of work by women. Without women on the key Arabic book prize shortlists, well, it doesn’t really help get out more women’s works in translation.

If there was a concerted effort to publish more great women’s books in translation?

Click HERE to read more

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Madison expo interpreters welcome foreign visitors

Madison expo interpreters welcome foreign visitors | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it
The interpreters greet the international guests in their native languages as they arrive in the lobby of the expo.
Charles Tiayon's insight:

MADISON (AP) – The World Dairy Expo offers interpreters to help hundreds of international visitors feel at home in Madison.

Ron Eustice, an interpreter who speaks six languages, told the Wisconsin State Journal that his fellow volunteers try to make the expo’s foreign attendees feel more comfortable by using a language they understand with a dose of Wisconsin hospitality. The interpreters greet the international guests in their native languages as they arrive in the lobby of the expo.

“We want them to know they have a home here, they have a place they can come to for help,” Eustice said.

The expo interpreters also help guests through the registration process, make themselves available for questions, hand them a bag of souvenirs and ask if they would like to sing their county’s national anthem.

“We have them sing just for fun, to get them smiling,” said Carl Rainey, a volunteer who works in the expo’s international registration center. “We have lots of fun with the Canadians who sing their national anthem in English. When they’re done, we tell them they have to sing it again in French.”

The expo opened Tuesday with 639 foreign attendees registered by mid-afternoon. Interpreters who speak Spanish, Russian and Portuguese were most in demand, according to the expo’s lead interpreter Pierre Schmidt.

Visitors from China and Japan often bring their own interpreters, so expo volunteers who speak the nations’ languages won’t be needed as much, said Andrey Kutuzov, an interpreter who speaks Russian. Many attendees representing foreign businesses also don’t require interpreters, he said.

“We don’t have interpreters who speak the language of every country represented here, but most visitors understand a language that at least one of our interpreters speak,” Kutuzov said.

Most of the interpreters are from Madison and take a week off from their regular jobs to work at the expo, said Schmidt, who owns a landscape business. One Russian-speaking interpreter is a scientist in the School of Medicine and Public Health at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, while the volunteer supervisor works at the Dane County District Attorney’s office.

Schmidt said the volunteers know they’re doing a good job when guests come back to see them every year or drop by for recommendations.

“We act as ambassadors, not just for World Dairy Expo, but for Madison,” he said.

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Ervolino: Why 'literal' is no longer taken literally - Family - NorthJersey.com

Ervolino: Why 'literal' is no longer taken literally - Family - NorthJersey.com | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it
During the last year, several major dictionaries, including those produced by Merriam-Webster, Oxford, Macmillan and Cambridge have, literally, altered the definition of the word.
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Robert Cushman: No, the feminists didn’t ruin English

Robert Cushman: No, the feminists didn’t ruin English | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it
For Galernter, as for others, feminism is a word applied to anything that its employer dislikes or feels threatened by — a sort of all-purpose Bogeyman … or should that be Bogeywoman?
Charles Tiayon's insight:

The word “infamous” does not mean “very famous.” It means “famous for discreditable reasons.” That makes it almost the opposite of “famous,” fame being taken to be a good thing, or at the least a morally neutral one.

But a change has come about. I’m not sure when it started, but “infamous” increasingly has been used either as a synonym for “famous” or as a superlative of it. Somebody or something is described, in print or online, as being infamous, and you wonder — or at least I do, old-fashioned thing that I am — just what has been done to merit such condemnation. And then it turns out that the word was actually meant as high praise. It’s very confusing.

Then there’s the question of “begging the question.” The phrase now is used, almost universally, to mean “raising the question.” But “raising the question” is already a perfectly good and economical phrase in itself; we don’t need an alternative for it, especially one that actually means the reverse. “Begging the question” means avoiding the question — or, more precisely, leaving a question hanging in the air unanswered. That’s quite a mouthful, so it’s good to have the shorter, more suggestive phrase available. Or it would be if anybody knew how to use it.

I would like to hate people who think that “media” and “criteria” are singular nouns. But I can’t, because if I did I would have to hate everybody.

Language changes; we all know that. Words are invented to fit new phenomena. Others fall into disuse, or their agreed meanings subtly alter. “Presently” in Shakespeare’s time meant ”now”; these days, it means “soon.” The old meaning was probably more logical, given what “present” itself means, but the alteration was a gradual process and is hardly worth shedding tears over.

Language also loosens; the slang of one generation becomes the standard speech of the next, and language is usually the livelier for it. Rules get relaxed; I was taught at school that you shouldn’t ever use elisions in written work — like, for example, “shouldn’t.” Now I use them with abandon, as this and the preceding paragraphs bear witness; in the last one, I’ve even ended a sentence with a preposition. I have no regrets. Grammatical rules can be arbitrary.

Grammatical logic, however, isn’t. That’s why some of us still grind our teeth over “hopefully.” “Media” and “criteria” are plural, which is why they end as they do, and they have singular counterparts to prove it. Both we and the language are the poorer when words and phrases are misused through ignorance, as with “begging the question,” or through ignorance joined to pretentiousness, as with “infamous” (it’s thought to be the same as “famous” only more impressive, because of the extra syllable).

There was a time when I would have accepted the gender-neutrality of “he” without a second thought. Now, I wouldn’t. But I think the change is for the better

You might think that, holding such opinions, I would be in agreement with David Gelernter’s recent diatribe, published in the National Post (‘Why You Should Never Say “He Or She,” Sept. 19), in which he claims that the clarity of the English language has been ruined by people he calls “arrogant ideologues,” and especially by what he refers to as “the New Feminist state.” But I don’t agree, or at least not much. I do share his abhorrence of the “s/he” formation. It’s an abomination, violating what both Professor Gelernter and I would regard as the first principle of good writing: that what is written should be capable of being spoken. But then, I can’t remember encountering it recently; maybe it died of shame. Gelernter uses it as an extreme example of what he regards as the havoc that’s been wrought by changing attitudes to words denoting gender. Or that might be thought to denote gender. Once, he writes, an author making a general statement about people could use the word “he” knowing that the reader would understand it to include women as well as men. Now it’s taken to be male only.

Well, he’s right about that. There was a time when I would have accepted the gender-neutrality of “he” without a second thought. Now, I wouldn’t. But I think the change is for the better. It’s more precise, which I assume is something we all want language to be. The actual example Gelernter cites is very strange: “The driver turns on his headlights.” It’s hard to assess the worth of a sentence without knowing its context, but just what situation are we talking about here? Is the driver male? Then “his” is the right word. If the driver is female, then the right word would be “hers”. If it’s too dark to make out the driver’s gender, even after the headlights are on, or if you’re making a general statement about drivers and their headlights (I find it hard to imagine an occasion on which anyone would want to, but let’s assume), then what’s wrong with saying “his or her?” It wouldn’t clutter up the sentence nearly as much as Gelernter thinks it would. You wouldn’t want to write “his or her” — or “he or she” — too often in a single piece of work, but then you wouldn’t want to repeat yourself in other ways either.

Gelernter is right that, when a statement could refer to either gender, using “she” instead of “he” is no solution; it merely deflects attention from what the writer is saying to (careful, now) his or her compulsion to flourish credentials. But there is another way out; you can simply put the whole thing in the plural — which, if you’re writing about a plurality, makes obvious sense.

That, to come clean, is what I usually do when the issue arises. Gelernter probably wouldn’t approve. He quotes E. B. White’s invaluable The Elements of Style: “Put all controversial nouns in the plural and avoid the choice of sex altogether, and you may find your prose sounding general and diffuse as a result.” Well, you may; I’d like some examples. And how about controversial pronouns?

I, too, admire E. B. White, though I think he would have shuddered at Gelernter’s gushing description of him as “our greatest source of the purest, freshest, clearing, most bracing English, straight from a magic spring that bubbled for him alone.” If it bubbled only for him, then it seems pointless for the rest of us to try to drink from it — which is ridiculous, given that his book was meant as a manual from which others could learn, and as a summation of what good writers habitually did.

George Orwell, another model author, once compiled his own list of rules for good clear writing; it culminated in the admonition to break any of his preceding instructions “rather than write something outright barbarous.” Which means that these things have to be approached case by case, to be judged by the eye and especially the ear.

Feminism is a word applied to anything that its employer dislikes or feels threatened by, a sort of all-purpose Bogeyman. (Or should that be Bogeywoman?)

I can’t understand, for example, why Gelernter should object to “firefighter” replacing “fireman”; it may have an extra syllable, but it’s still a more active and descriptive word.

Well, no, I can understand; he thinks that the change is the result of caving in to those New Feminists. For him, as for others, feminism is a word applied to anything that its employer dislikes or feels threatened by, a sort of all-purpose Bogeyman. (Or should that be Bogeywoman? The professor certainly wouldn’t countenance Bogeyperson; and neither, for the record, would I.) I can’t see why a female member of a fire brigade should put up with being referred to as a fire man. And neither side would welcome ”firewoman,” which just sounds silly (though “policewoman,” for whatever reason, doesn’t).

On the other hand, and on my own turf of theatre criticism, I refuse to relinquish the word “actress.” A Broadway producer once said that the secret of success in the theatre was letting the audience know in the first 10 minutes whom in the cast it wanted to have sex with (he used a slightly more forceful expression) and I think he had a point. Drama is a very sexual medium (singular), so gender is important.

By the way, I’ve noticed that people working in the theatre, however correct their politics, invariably say “actress” in conversation. “Female actor” doesn’t exactly roll off the tongue, which is a good reason for not using it in print. Good writing is writing that demands to be read aloud. That doesn’t mean it has to be simple. Complex sentences can be richly speakable, though they may demand a bit more rehearsal.

It’s likely true that students today enter university less equipped to write well than were their predecessors. But that isn’t the fault of feminism. It’s because both English language and English literature are taught less, and possibly less well, than they used to be; and because of the pervasive sloppiness of communication that underlies the abuses I noted in my opening paragraphs, none of which have anything to do with gender.

Gelernter puts it all down to “ideology,” another of those words that merely means something that its user disagrees with. It’s like “elite,” a term that the Left used to hurl at the Right, that the Right now throws at the Left, and that is equally meaningless either way. He begins his article by inveighing against the words “chairperson” and “humankind.” I think that the first is an abomination and the second quite unobjectionable, and my reasons in both cases are aesthetic, not ideological.

It’s true, as Gelernter says, that what any writer agonizes over while actually writing is where the next word is coming from. But those words aren’t chosen in a vacuum; they’re the expression of whatever idea the writer is trying to convey: of, if you insist, his ideology.

Yes, I said his ideology. Because, judging from this article, Professor Gelernter is quite the ideologue himself.

National Post

robert.cushman@hotmail.com

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Algunas desopilantes traducciones que hacen en España de los títulos de películas

Algunas desopilantes traducciones que hacen en España de los títulos de películas | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it
Sí, ya sabemos. Para Latinoamérica tampoco coinciden literalmente las traducciones y a veces hasta se supera el título original. Pero estos casos que recoge el Huffington Post de España bordean lo absurdo. Imperdible.
Charles Tiayon's insight:

Los traductores estuvieron de fiesta hace poco ¿Subieron las tarifas de traducción? ¿Bajó el precio de la matrícula en las Escuelas Oficiales de Idiomas? se pregunta el Huffington Post de España.

No, nada de eso. Fue su día el pasado 30 de septiembre y lo "celebraron" en aquel medio con algunos casos desopilantes de traducciones de los títulos de las películas para España.

Sí, ya sabemos. Para Latinoamérica tampoco coinciden literalmente las traducciones aunque a veces hasta se supera el título original, como también ha pasado con los títulos para España.

Pero estos casos que recoge el diario español bordean lo absurdo. Sí, son algunos hasta totalmente diferentes al original e incluso en aquellas tierras se burlan de la "interpretación" que se hace.

Y lo hicieron nada más ni nada menos que el 30 de septiembre, cuando ese gremio celebra de manera internacional su patrón conmemorando la figura de Jerónimo de Estridón, que tradujo la Biblia al latín allá por el siglo IV.

Un divertido "homenaje".

Fuente: HuffingtonPost.es

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Los 'Mediodías poéticos' se abren este jueves con un debate sobre traducción - 20minutos.es

Los 'Mediodías poéticos' se abren este jueves con un debate sobre traducción - 20minutos.es | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it
El Círculo de la Amistad de Córdoba acoge desde este jueves y hasta el sábado un ciclo de jornadas de trabajo que se celebrará en el marco del festival internacional de poesía 'Cosmopoética', organizado por la Delegación de Cultura del Ayuntamiento cordobés.
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Learning Disabilities and Disorders: Types of Learning Disorders and Their Signs

Learning Disabilities and Disorders: Types of Learning Disorders and Their Signs | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it
Does your child have a learning disorder? Learn the common warning signs and how to get help.
Charles Tiayon's insight:

Learning disabilities, or learning disorders, are an umbrella term for a wide variety of learning problems. A learning disability is not a problem with intelligence or motivation. Kids with learning disabilities aren’t lazy or dumb. In fact, most are just as smart as everyone else. Their brains are simply wired differently. This difference affects how they receive and process information.

Simply put, children and adults with learning disabilities see, hear, and understand things differently. This can lead to trouble with learning new information and skills, and putting them to use. The most common types of learning disabilities involve problems with reading, writing, math, reasoning, listening, and speaking.

Children with learning disabilities can, and do, succeed

It can be tough to face the possibility that your child has a learning disorder. No parents want to see their children suffer. You may wonder what it could mean for your child’s future, or worry about how your kid will make it through school. Perhaps you’re concerned that by calling attention to your child's learning problems he or she might be labeled "slow" or assigned to a less challenging class.

But the important thing to remember is that most kids with learning disabilities are just as smart as everyone else. They just need to be taught in ways that are tailored to their unique learning styles. By learning more about learning disabilities in general, and your child’s learning difficulties in particular, you can help pave the way for success at school and beyond.

Signs and symptoms of learning disabilities and disorders
If you're worried, don't wait

If you suspect that your child's learning difficulties may require special assistance, please do not delay in finding support. The sooner you move forward, the better your child's chances for reaching his or her full potential.

Learning disabilities look very different from one child to another. One child may struggle with reading and spelling, while another loves books but can’t understand math. Still another child may have difficulty understanding what others are saying or communicating out loud. The problems are very different, but they are all learning disorders.

It’s not always easy to identify learning disabilities. Because of the wide variations, there is no single symptom or profile that you can look to as proof of a problem. However, some warning signs are more common than others at different ages. If you’re aware of what they are, you’ll be able to catch a learning disorder early and quickly take steps to get your child help.

The following checklist lists some common red flags for learning disorders. Remember that children who don’t have learning disabilities may still experience some of these difficulties at various times. The time for concern is when there is a consistent unevenness in your child’s ability to master certain skills.

Preschool signs and symptoms of learning disabilities
  • Problems pronouncing words
  • Trouble finding the right word
  • Difficulty rhyming
  • Trouble learning the alphabet, numbers, colors, shapes, days of the week
  • Difficulty following directions or learning routines
  • Difficulty controlling crayons, pencils, and scissors or coloring within the lines
  • Trouble with buttons, zippers, snaps, learning to tie shoes
Ages 5-9 signs and symptoms of learning disabilities
  • Trouble learning the connection between letters and sounds
  • Unable to blend sounds to make words
  • Confuses basic words when reading
  • Consistently misspells words and makes frequent reading errors
  • Trouble learning basic math concepts
  • Difficulty telling time and remembering sequences
  • Slow to learn new skills
Ages 10-13 signs and symptoms of learning disabilities
  • Difficulty with reading comprehension or math skills
  • Trouble with open-ended test questions and word problems
  • Dislikes reading and writing; avoids reading aloud
  • Spells the same word differently in a single document
  • Poor organizational skills (bedroom, homework, desk is messy and disorganized)
  • Trouble following classroom discussions and expressing thoughts aloud
  • Poor handwriting
Paying attention to developmental milestones can help you identify learning disorders

Paying attention to normal developmental milestones for toddlers and preschoolers is very important. Early detection of developmental differences may be an early signal of a learning disability and problems that are spotted early can be easier to correct.

A developmental lag might not be considered a symptom of a learning disability until your child is older, but if you recognize it when your child is young, you can intervene early. You know your child better than anyone else does, so if you think there is a problem, it doesn't hurt to get an evaluation. You can also ask your pediatrician for a developmental milestones chart.

Problems with reading, writing, and math

Learning disabilities are often grouped by school-area skill set. If your child is in school, the types of learning disorders that are most conspicuous usually revolve around reading, writing, or math.

Learning disabilities in reading (dyslexia)

There are two types of learning disabilities in reading. Basic reading problems occur when there is difficulty understanding the relationship between sounds, letters and words. Reading comprehension problems occur when there is an inability to grasp the meaning of words, phrases, and paragraphs.

Signs of reading difficulty include problems with:

  • letter and word recognition
  • understanding words and ideas
  • reading speed and fluency
  • general vocabulary skills
Learning disabilities in math (dyscalculia)

Learning disabilities in math vary greatly depending on the child’s other strengths and weaknesses. A child’s ability to do math will be affected differently by a language learning disability, or a visual disorder or a difficulty with sequencing, memory or organization.

A child with a math–based learning disorder may struggle with memorization and organization of numbers, operation signs, and number “facts” (like 5+5=10 or 5x5=25). Children with math learning disorders might also have trouble with counting principles (such as counting by 2s or counting by 5s) or have difficulty telling time.

Learning disabilities in writing (dysgraphia)

Learning disabilities in writing can involve the physical act of writing or the mental activity of comprehending and synthesizing information. Basic writing disorder refers to physical difficulty forming words and letters. Expressive writing disability indicates a struggle to organize thoughts on paper.

Symptoms of a written language learning disability revolve around the act of writing. They include problems with:

  • neatness and consistency of writing
  • accurately copying letters and words
  • spelling consistency
  • writing organization and coherence
Other types of learning disabilities and disorders

Reading, writing, and math aren’t the only skills impacted by learning disorders. Other types of learning disabilities involve difficulties with motor skills (movement and coordination), understanding spoken language, distinguishing between sounds, and interpreting visual information.

Learning disabilities in motor skills (dyspraxia)

Motor difficulty refers to problems with movement and coordination whether it is with fine motor skills (cutting, writing) or gross motor skills (running, jumping). A motor disability is sometimes referred to as an “output” activity meaning that it relates to the output of information from the brain. In order to run, jump, write or cut something, the brain must be able to communicate with the necessary limbs to complete the action.

Signs that your child might have a motor coordination disability include problems with physical abilities that require hand-eye coordination, like holding a pencil or buttoning a shirt.

Learning disabilities in language (aphasia/dysphasia)

Language and communication learning disabilities involve the ability to understand or produce spoken language. Language is also considered an output activity because it requires organizing thoughts in the brain and calling upon the right words to verbally explain something or communicate with someone else.

Signs of a language-based learning disorder involve problems with verbal language skills, such as the ability to retell a story and the fluency of speech, as well as the ability to understand the meaning of words, parts of speech, directions, etc.

Auditory and visual processing problems: the importance of the ears and eyes

The eyes and the ears are the primary means of delivering information to the brain, a process sometimes called “input.” If either the eyes or the ears aren’t working properly, learning can suffer.

  • Auditory processing disorder – Professionals may refer to the ability to hear well as “auditory processing skills” or “receptive language.” The ability to hear things correctly greatly impacts the ability to read, write and spell. An inability to distinguish subtle differences in sound, or hearing sounds at the wrong speed make it difficult to sound out words and understand the basic concepts of reading and writing.
  • Visual processing disorder – Problems in visual perception include missing subtle differences in shapes, reversing letters or numbers, skipping words, skipping lines, misperceiving depth or distance, or having problems with eye–hand coordination. Professionals may refer to the work of the eyes as “visual processing.” Visual perception can affect gross and fine motor skills, reading comprehension, and math.
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World Dairy Expo interpreters welcome foreign visitors to Madison by using native language

World Dairy Expo interpreters welcome foreign visitors to Madison by using native language | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it

MADISON, Wis. — The World Dairy Expo offers interpreters to help hundreds of international visitors feel at home in Madison.

Ron Eustice, an interpreter who speaks six languages, told the Wisconsin State Journal (http://bit.ly/1pqcdIu ) that his fellow volunteers try to make the expo's foreign attendees feel more comfortable by using a language they understand with a dose of Wisconsin hospitality. The interpreters greet the international guests in their native languages as they arrive in the lobby of the expo.

"We want them to know they have a home here, they have a place they can come to for help," Eustice said.

The expo interpreters also help guests through the registration process, make themselves available for questions, hand them a bag of souvenirs and ask if they would like to sing their county's national anthem.

"We have them sing just for fun, to get them smiling," said Carl Rainey, a volunteer who works in the expo's international registration center. "We have lots of fun with the Canadians who sing their national anthem in English. When they're done, we tell them they have to sing it again in French."

The expo opened Tuesday with 639 foreign attendees registered by mid-afternoon. Interpreters who speak Spanish, Russian and Portuguese were most in demand, according to the expo's lead interpreter Pierre Schmidt.

Visitors from China and Japan often bring their own interpreters, so expo volunteers who speak the nations' languages won't be needed as much, said Andrey Kutuzov, an interpreter who speaks Russian. Many attendees representing foreign businesses also don't require interpreters, he said.

"We don't have interpreters who speak the language of every country represented here, but most visitors understand a language that at least one of our interpreters speak," Kutuzov said.

Most of the interpreters are from Madison and take a week off from their regular jobs to work at the expo, said Schmidt, who owns a landscape business. One Russian-speaking interpreter is a scientist in the School of Medicine and Public Health at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, while the volunteer supervisor works at the Dane County District Attorney's office.

Schmidt said the volunteers know they're doing a good job when guests come back to see them every year or drop by for recommendations.

"We act as ambassadors, not just for World Dairy Expo, but for Madison," he said.

Charles Tiayon's insight:

MADISON, Wis. — The World Dairy Expo offers interpreters to help hundreds of international visitors feel at home in Madison.

Ron Eustice, an interpreter who speaks six languages, told the Wisconsin State Journal (http://bit.ly/1pqcdIu ) that his fellow volunteers try to make the expo's foreign attendees feel more comfortable by using a language they understand with a dose of Wisconsin hospitality. The interpreters greet the international guests in their native languages as they arrive in the lobby of the expo.

"We want them to know they have a home here, they have a place they can come to for help," Eustice said.

The expo interpreters also help guests through the registration process, make themselves available for questions, hand them a bag of souvenirs and ask if they would like to sing their county's national anthem.

"We have them sing just for fun, to get them smiling," said Carl Rainey, a volunteer who works in the expo's international registration center. "We have lots of fun with the Canadians who sing their national anthem in English. When they're done, we tell them they have to sing it again in French."

The expo opened Tuesday with 639 foreign attendees registered by mid-afternoon. Interpreters who speak Spanish, Russian and Portuguese were most in demand, according to the expo's lead interpreter Pierre Schmidt.

Visitors from China and Japan often bring their own interpreters, so expo volunteers who speak the nations' languages won't be needed as much, said Andrey Kutuzov, an interpreter who speaks Russian. Many attendees representing foreign businesses also don't require interpreters, he said.

"We don't have interpreters who speak the language of every country represented here, but most visitors understand a language that at least one of our interpreters speak," Kutuzov said.

Most of the interpreters are from Madison and take a week off from their regular jobs to work at the expo, said Schmidt, who owns a landscape business. One Russian-speaking interpreter is a scientist in the School of Medicine and Public Health at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, while the volunteer supervisor works at the Dane County District Attorney's office.

Schmidt said the volunteers know they're doing a good job when guests come back to see them every year or drop by for recommendations.

"We act as ambassadors, not just for World Dairy Expo, but for Madison," he said.

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Intl Translation Day observed : 01st oct14 ~ E-Pao! Headlines

The observance of International Translation Day cum presentation of Sarda Translation Award was organized by Sahitya Thoupang Lup (SATHOU Lup) at Manipur Press Club, Majorkhul here today.

The observance was attended by former Director of Song & Drama Division, Government of India N Nabachandra as Chief Guest and Director of JN Manipuri Dance Academy L Upendro Sharma as President.

Sarda Translation Award-2014 was presented to Tayenjam Bijoykumar.

The award carries a citation and a cash prize of Rs.5000 .

Charles Tiayon's insight:

The observance of International Translation Day cum presentation of Sarda Translation Award was organized by Sahitya Thoupang Lup (SATHOU Lup) at Manipur Press Club, Majorkhul here today.

The observance was attended by former Director of Song & Drama Division, Government of India N Nabachandra as Chief Guest and Director of JN Manipuri Dance Academy L Upendro Sharma as President.

Sarda Translation Award-2014 was presented to Tayenjam Bijoykumar.

The award carries a citation and a cash prize of Rs.5000 .

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