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Judith Sánchez, presidenta de la AEETI

Judith Sánchez, presidenta de la AEETI | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it

Con la constitución de la Asociación Española de Estudiantes de Traducción e Interpretación y la elección de la cordobesa Judith Sánchez Hita, coordinadora de la X edición del Eneti, como presidenta, finalizaron las jornadas del Encuentro Nacional de Estudiantes de Traducción e interpretación (Eneti) en la ciudad de Córdoba, en el que ha destacado tanto el alto número de participantes, como la organización y la gran aceptación de los temas y ponentes integrantes del programa. La asociación trabajará ahora en la redacción de sus Estatutos para, una vez elaborados, proceder a nuevas elecciones y desarrollar normalmente su actividad.

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Metaglossia: The Translation World
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UN Careers - jobs in this network (Translators, Revisers, Editors, etc.)

UN Careers -  jobs in this network (Translators, Revisers, Editors, etc.) | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it

Vacancies in this network: Translators, Revisers, Editors, etc.

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Marketing Tools for Any Self-Publishing Authors

Marketing Tools for Any Self-Publishing Authors | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it
You can achieve success by doing nearly anything that goes with or even against online advice. The “self” in self-publishing means you’ve got the reins.
Charles Tiayon's insight:

Paul Jarvis experiments with words and design. His latest book is called The Good Creative: 18 ways to make better art. 

The advice you see on blogs telling you how to get people to buy your book is all pretty much awful. Guaranteed in five easy steps!

This isn’t because of bad intentions or even some sort of trickery, it’s just that there’s no one-size-fits-all solution to generating sales for your book.

You can achieve success—however you define success—by doing practically anything that goes with or even against current advice online for self-published book marketing. The “self” in self-publishing means you’ve got the reins.

Save the silver bullets for werewolves (especially if you’re writing a book about werewolves). If there was a silver bullet, everyone would be doing that one thing, and it would get so watered down that it would become completely ineffective.

Tactics that game the system also tend to stop being able to game the system fairly quickly. So by the time you’re reading about it, it’s already too late to use it.

And keep in mind, if you simply try every piece of advice out there on marketing your book, you’re going to spread yourself way too thin to be effective.

Marketing your self-published book involves a lot of focused work, typically as much work as it took to write the book in the first place. And there are no guarantees. But without marketing your book, no one beyond your friends and family will read it.

The good news, if you’re still with me (and I hope you are), is that the best person to market your book is you. You know the book inside and out, you know your own story, and you know your audience.

I’ve always approached book marketing as experiments. I try something that may or may not work, and if it does, great! If it doesn’t, then I don’t try it again.

I’ve given away llamas, run contests simply because it was Thursday, launched books in every platform that would have me, and tried so many things even my own head spins a little (you can read about the specifics in this PDF).

I’ve sold, given away, bundled, and sold the foreign rights to my books to the tune of almost 100,000 copies. I’m no Stephenie Meyer (probably because none of my books have werewolves), but for a self-published guy who knew nothing about the industry when I started, I’ve done alright.

For every book I’ve written, I’ve tried at least a handful of new ideas to get it to the right people. Mostly though, I’ve learned that as long as I’m having fun marketing the books I write, and enjoy trying weird and interesting ideas, then I’m happy to keep going.

Base your marketing plan on your intentions

The way you market your book should be based on two things: your values and the intentions for the book. If something feels slimy or inauthentic, don’t do it. You should never let a bit of exposure trump your values. Short-term gains that feel wrong seldom result in long-term growth as an author. They can also decrease your social capital.

The intentions for your book can really be anything—credibility and status in your industry, increased bookings for speaking, consulting or projects, building your brand, further educating your audience with a new point of view on a subject they care about. Your book, your intentions. And however odd—because anyone can write a book now—books are still a strong signal that you’re an expert on a topic or in a field.

If your intention is to sell a million copies or get on a best-seller list, that’s more the result of many things going right, since it’s really out of your control. Plus, most of the time, you’re just going to be disappointed with that for a goal. Only a handful of books sell a million copies or get on the NYT or WSJ lists. And you don’t need either to make money or build credibility (or even to have fun with your book).

A few of my books are “best-sellers” and it was really just a result of trying lots of things that slowly pushed sales higher. It’s a war of attrition on experimenting, failing, learning, and continually pushing for more exposure and connections.

Your intentions also have to match the content and message of your book. For example, if you write a book about American Condors (which are EPIC, seriously), your intention can’t really be to get more gigs speaking on the web design circuit.

Or, if your book is about a super specific topic that relates to a teeny-weeny group of people, it’ll never be a massive best-seller (but can definitely become a phenom in that small group).

It’s them, not you

Once you’ve got an intention, move onto your audience. Who are they? Why will they care? Where do they currently get their information from?

If you don’t know who your audience is, consider this:

  • Why did you write the book?
  • What do you want people to get from it?
  • Why would those people be motivated to get information from your book?

From there, think about what motivations people would have in common who would find that end result of your book valuable.

An audience of “everyone” is typically too big to grasp or connect with. Where does “everyone” get their information? There’s no single source. What motivates “everyone” to learn something? There’s no single motivation. What does “everyone” care about? There’s no single topic.

You get the idea… “Everyone” is not your audience.

Your audience is a specific set of people with specific motivations and values. They’re much easier to reach and connect with than everyone.

Your audience is probably awesome, but they are also self-serving and need to know what’s in it for them (it’s just human nature). What are they going to learn that can’t be found anywhere else? How will they benefit from this knowledge? How can they apply that knowledge to better their lives, careers, or wallets

They’re putting both their money and their time into the book, so they need to be sure it’s worth both. Even free books have a large investment of someone’s time.

Meet your audience where they hang out

Once you have a handle on your audience and what motivates them, you’ve got to go to them. Where are they currently getting their information? Which blogs, podcasts, publications, influencers, media outlets do they consume?

Make a list that includes contacts at each source. Their name, email address, and social media profiles. Then start to follow them, interact with them in a way that fits with you, help if they ask any questions or need assistance. Get on their radars. Keep notes about your interactions.

If it’s a publication that accepts guest posts, start pitching them. If it’s a podcast, ask to be a guest. If it’s a blog that does interviews, ask to be interviewed.

In each instance, lead with what’s in it for them and their audience. Also, keep notes on which people you’ve pitched, and if they accepted or turned you down (so you don’t pitch the same person the same idea twice).

Not many people are going to promote you and your book out of the goodness of their hearts, unless you’ve built strong relationships with them first. It’s better to pitch yourself and your book on how it relates to their audience and how it will benefit their audience. Just like figuring out the motivations of your audience in order to sell books, you’ve got to figure out the motivations of the sources your audience consumes to pitch what’s in it for them to feature you.

Marketing tools

As I said at the start, there’s no single way to market a book that’s guaranteed to fit with your personality and also have massive results. What you can do is align your book with your intentions and values, and constantly work at moving in that direction.

Selling your book and selling what’s in your book is the same. You wrote a book because you wanted to convince people of an idea. Marketing your book is really just convincing people that the idea is worth the purchase price and time to read it.

The tools you use to market aren’t just creative or design decisions, they’re marketing choices that need to align with your intentions and your audience.

These are tools you need to have in place to launch anymarketing plan:

Book title

What are you delivering in the content? Is the title easy to remember? Is it both descriptive and captivating? If necessary to explain the premise more, use a byline to push just a little more information on the cover.

Use it to narrow down your audience (who it’s for, who it’s not for), get more specific or describe the key point.

Book story

What story are you telling with your book in one to two sentences? Use this for pitches to media, your mailing list, or as the call to action on your site.

Why is the story interesting? Test different one-sentence stories on social media (and measure the resulting clicks) or on your newsletter (using A/B tests). Adapt your story based on what performs best. Your story is how you describe your book in writing or in interviews.

Cover

Does it look professional? This is the biggest factor. Because anyone can publish a book, you don’t want your cover to look like you made it yourself (unless you’re a pro book cover designer). It has to look as good or better than the biggest books in your category.

Author bio

You need three of these: one sentence (for things like social media bios), one paragraph (for bylines on guest posts), and one page (for all the details).

Include your relevant accomplishments, relevant credentials, previous books, press mentions (“as seen in X”), and anything interesting that your audience will think is interesting, too. If you have a hard time writing something that balances being criminally egotistical and not boastful enough, ask a friend, editor, or reader to help write it.

Sometimes it’s easier for someone else to talk about you than it is for you to talk about yourself.

Author photo

For self-published books, you want more professional and less Instagram selfie. Use a pro camera or hire a professional to make sure you’ve got a photo that looks as good or better than the top authors, and also matches the style of your writing (if it’s casual writing, wear a t-shirt, if it’s formal, wear a suit or sleek black dress, etc.).

Make sure your face is the biggest part and the focal point of the shot. Save your creativity for your next poetry-slam.

Book description

You also need three of these: one sentence, one paragraph, and one page. This is less a summary of the content and more the sales pitch on why someone needs to read it.

What’s interesting, noteworthy, or newsworthy about it? What’s the most important thing your audience will learn? Why should anyone care that you wrote it? What is the benefit of reading it?

Blurbs

These prove that someone, typically more well-known than you, not only wanted to read it, but liked it enough to publicly endorse it. There are three general types of book blurbs: press mentions from recognized media sources (places where your audience gets their information), key industry influencers (names your audience will immediately know and be impressed with) and clients/customers (who benefitted from reading it).

Landing page

This is the sales page for your book on your own site. Include all of the above, with links to buy the book through your own payment processor (like GumRoad) or Amazon, B&N, iTunes, etc.

Mailing list

Hands down the most useful tool, however you use it, is your mailing list. Start collecting emails before your book is ready (with a coming soon landing page), use it as an announcement list when your book is ready, and use it to consistently communicate with your audience.

There’s no better way for an author to talk to their audience and sell books than a newsletter.

The grand finale

These tools are all opportunities to sell your book using whatever marketing method you feel resonates the most with you and your audience. Your choices on cover, title, blurb, and bio all need to be carefully crafted with your audience in mind.

The key—the absolute key—to marketing a book is to have written a great book that people actually want to read and then talk about.

Write for your audience, not for yourself (even if it’s a memoir). If the quality doesn’t happen within the pages of the book, no amount of marketing is going to help in the long run (even if you pay for it).

Books are sold by word-of-mouth and regular people talking to other regular people about what they read. Press and publicity help, but the best promotion comes from people telling the people they know to read something. Write something worth reading and worth gushing about. Is it difficult to do? Totally. It requires lots of work, revisions, editing and testing. If is it impossible to do? Hell no.

Less convincing and hard selling needs to happen if people can easily grasp your concept and want to get your insight on your chosen topic. So be clear, be useful, and be unique.

Have all of the above in place well before you launch your book. Plan out exactly how you’re going to market your book, using the tools above as laser-focused weapons to slice through the existing noise of everyone else’s self-published book.

Curious for more details on my book marketing strategies? Grab my “Anatomy of a Self-Published Book” PDF here. I break down what I did for marketing each previous book, as well as the exact costs for my latest book.

Read next: The common elements of good storytelling

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New program teaches students to think critically

New program teaches students to think critically | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it
Many Florida students have mastered the art of answering questions on standardized exams. But can they write a lengthy research paper? Can they engage in a debate? Are they open to new perspectives and points of view?
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Many Florida students have mastered the art of answering questions on standardized exams. But can they write a lengthy research paper? Can they engage in a debate? Are they open to new perspectives and points of view?

A new series of courses offered in Broward Countyschools plans to work on the critical thinking skills high school students need to succeed in college.

The courses, created by the College Board, are designed to complement university-level Advanced Placement classes, such as World History, Biology, Environmental Science and Literature, that have become popular among high school students seeking college credit before they graduate.

In the Broward school district, 19,422 students are enrolled in at least one AP course, up from 17,232 in the 2009-10 school year. The most popular classes: English Language, U.S. History, Psychology and Human Geography, which explores world cultures, economies and land uses.

The new classes, called AP Capstone, are a two-year sequence in which students examine topics in depth to develop their writing, evidence-building and public-speaking skills. In the first year, AP Seminar, students learn how to conduct research. In the second year, AP Research, students explore a topic of their choice for a year and write a lengthy final paper, Steve Kotten, executive director of AP Capstone, said in an email.

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Speak freely, but speak plainly

Speak freely, but speak plainly | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it
CAN clear thinking be legislated? At least two lawmakers seem to think so. Sen. Grace Poe and Bohol Rep. Rene Relampagos filed bills last year to require the use of plain writing in all government websites, publications, letters, instructions and forms.
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CAN clear thinking be legislated? At least two lawmakers seem to think so. Sen. Grace Poe and Bohol Rep. Rene Relampagos filed bills last year to require the use of plain writing in all government websites, publications, letters, instructions and forms.

Clearly worded government forms, Relampagos said in House Bill 3494, will prevent the waste of time and money, and help applicants receive government services faster. The bills are inspired by the Plain Writing Act that U.S. President Barack Obama signed in 2010, which required “clear government communication that the public can understand and use.”

A lot of government rules sound like this: “When the process of freeing a vehicle that has been stuck results in ruts or holes, the operator will fill the rut or hole created by such activity before removing the vehicle from the immediate area.” The Plain Language Action and Information Network , a group of federal employees in the United States, recommends this clearer instruction: “If you make a hole while freeing a stuck vehicle, you must fill the hole before you drive away.”

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Examples abound here at home, too. The rules for implementing the Code of Conduct and Ethical Standards for Public Officials and Employees include this: “As a general rule, when a request or petition, whether written or verbal, can be disposed of promptly and expeditiously, the official and employee in charge to whom the same is presented shall do so immediately, without discrimination, and in no case beyond fifteen working days from receipt of the request or petition.”

Would this not work as well? “As a general rule, government officials and employees must respond to requests within 15 working days after receiving them.”

It’s unclear why plain writing has not become more popular in public life, or why jargon and ambiguity have persisted. Perhaps the English journalist and novelist George Orwell was correct, when he wrote that political language was “designed to make lies sound truthful and murder respectable, and to give an appearance of solidity to pure wind.”

Windbags, however, won’t suffer penalties even if House Bill 3494 and Senate Bill 1092 became laws. Both bills mention no penalties. They only require that agencies report what they’ve done to implement plain writing in public services. Senator Poe’s version also proposes an initial appropriation of P10 million for the Civil Service Commission to create a Plain Writing Section, which will draft guidelines for all agencies.

Both bills await approval by congressional committees. And if our experience with the Freedom of Information campaign is any sign, it is unlikely that plain writing in government will be required soon.

Still, plain writing is a challenge journalists must face. Search engines, smartphones and social media continue to make official documents and sources more accessible. But do our news stories and commentaries present information with the clarity and depth that the public needs? Have we informed ourselves enough to explain complex ideas that may save lives? Imagine, for instance, the losses that could have been avoided if those pre-Yolanda warnings about storm surges had been explained better.

Plain writing doesn’t mean avoiding difficult ideas or technical terms. It means taking the time to seek credible sources and to read, until we understand these ideas and terms enough to explain them clearly. Plain writing demands that we give up fashionable phrases that have become meaningless from overuse, like “integrating quality solutions” and “promoting an inclusive society”.

(Both appear as examples of what to avoid in the Plain Language Guidelines, posted on www.plainlanguage.gov. But you’ll probably find them in most management handbooks and government websites.)

Plain writing demands honesty and economy of words. It compels us to avoid dressing up a delay as a “negative slippage,” to inspect rather than “to conduct an ocular inspection” and to simply write rather than “to put things in writing.” The advice Orwell wrote 68 years ago holds true today: Write simply and precisely, and fight “avoidable ugliness.”

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Rotary Club hears program on Bible translations in N. Guinea

Rotary Club hears program on Bible translations in N. Guinea | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it
The Rotary Club of Marshall met at noon, Thursday, Sept. 18, at the Panola-Harrison Electric Cooperative Community Room, 410 East Houston Street in Marshall, for their regular weekly meeting.
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The Rotary Club of Marshall met at noon, Thursday, Sept. 18, at the Panola-Harrison Electric Cooperative Community Room, 410 East Houston Street in Marshall, for their regular weekly meeting.

The meeting was called to order by President April Spears after a meal of salad, coleslaw, catfish filets, French fries, hush puppies, and tea, catered by Catfish Express.

The Pledge of Allegiance to the United States was led by Rachel Myrick, followed by the opening blessing offered by Denzil Vithanage. Bill Marshall brought a banner from a Rotary Club in Italy. Bill had met the man, who is also a Paul Harris Fellow, at his business in Italy.

Craig Vanbiber introduced Juliann and Jacob Bullock who work for Wycliffe Bible Translators. Juliann had started working for Wycliffe in 2006 as a surveyor of languages. She met Jacob in Papua New Guinea and they married in the States in 2010. They are now working with bible translations in that country.

The Bullocks have a 2-year-old daughter and Juliann is expecting another child in about two weeks. Their favorite meat is crocodile because of the flavor and the cost.

The couple showed three short films, and spoke extensively about the benefits of having bibles translated in the native language of those who are reading. There are about 7,000 languages in the world today and 800 of those are in Papua New Ginea. It is a difficult task to translate the bible into a local language.

The goal is to have bibles translated into all languages by 2025. There are about 200 million people, using about 2,000 languages in the world that still do not have access to a bible in their native language.

In 1999 Wycliffe estimated that it would take about 150 more years to complete translations of the bible into the remaining languages. This prompted Wycliffe to use local translators to effect the translations into their own language.

The local translators are being educated to take the bible in its native language and translate it into their native language without using an English translation as a buffer. They translate the Old Testament from Hebrew, and the New Testament from Greek. This produces a faster, more accurate, and more powerful translation, but it is a difficult process. Many of the languages do not have an alphabet and have never been written down before.

There were several questions from members of the audience. Spears advised Mr. and Mrs. Bullock that because literacy is a major focus of this club, a book would be donated in their honor to a local elementary school. Bill Marshall led the members in the 4-way test and the meeting was adjourned by President Spears.

Future presentations will include:

Sept. 25 – Hayden Wolf Texas Honey Queen Program

Oct. 02 – Caroll Greenwalt April Spears Rotary District Governor

Oct. 08 – Col. Tom McCool on Israeli Defense Forces

Oct. 16 – Pat Owens and Joyce Weekly on Prison Ministries

Oct. 23 – Donna Maisel on Rio Ammo Plant and MEDCO

Oct. 30 – Stephen Kennedy and April Spears on Snakeuary

Nov. 06 – L. McDonald on 4-H Projects

Nov. 13 – Kevin Paul Eltife on Texas State Senator

Dec. 04 - Ed Smith and Bill Marshall on I69/I369 corridor

Rotary Club of Marshall is part of Rotary International, which is an international service organization whose purpose is to bring together business and professional leaders in order to provide humanitarian services, to encourage high ethical standards in all vocations, and to help build goodwill and peace in the world. It is a secular organization open to all persons regardless of race, color, creed, religion, gender, or political preference.

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Global data-driven product pinpoints air travel demands and behaviors Launch of ‘Travel ...

Global data-driven product pinpoints air travel demands and behaviors Launch of ‘Travel ... | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it
At Routes in Chicago today, global travel search engine, Skyscanner, announced the launch of Travel Insight. The new product, within the Skyscanner ...
Charles Tiayon's insight:

At Routes in Chicago today, global travel search engine, Skyscanner, announced the launch of Travel Insight. The new product, within the Skyscanner for Business suite, provides airlines and airports with significant real demand traveler data, along with a comprehensive view of the air travel market, as a way to quickly identify business opportunities.

“We are thrilled to be introducing Travel Insight to the industry,” said Hugh Aitken, Director of Business Development at Skyscanner. “This unique product will be invaluable to airports and airlines, giving them key data to understand the behavior and real demand of travelers in order to develop and plan flight routes. Travel Insight is another example of Skyscanner’s commitment to advance data-led products to help power the travel industry.”

Travel Insight gathers data from Skyscanner’s proprietary flight search product and therefore offers a view for the demand of an entire market. Data is collected from the millions of searches done globally on Skyscanner each month, from over 25 million unique visitors looking at the hundreds of airlines, online travel agents, low cost carriers and charter flights that consumers search for on Skyscanner’s website and app.

The product gives airlines and airports the visibility into passenger inclinations – popular flight routes, preferred travel days and times, using the geo-tagging feature identifying where travelers are searching from and to, as well as providing an understanding of booking behavior, including how far ahead passengers are searching for and booking flights.

Skyscanner has developed its new Travel Insight product to be delivered through various visualized graphs and charts to enable airlines and airports to easily make useful business decisions based on the data requests they can make.

Over the last 18 months, Skyscanner for Business has been developing its product suite, which along with Travel Insight includes API and white label products, as well as widgets, which power hundreds of global companies including Lonely Planet, DealScoopr, Secret Escapes and JALAN. Additionally, Skyscanner for Business recently launched a Travel Rankings tool, which has been designed to provide real time pricing information to already established airline and online travel agent partners. This product gives insight into how competitive industry fares are, where margins are strongest and where airlines and OTAs can boost performance on Skyscanner.

• Skyscanner is a leading global travel search engine offering a truly comprehensive, free flight, hotels and car rental search service.
• Founded in 2003, Skyscanner receives over 25 million unique visitors each month.
• Skyscanner is optimized worldwide and is available in 30 languages.
• Skyscanner’s highly-rated free mobile apps are available on iPhone, iPad, Android, Windows Phone, BlackBerry and Windows 8 devices and have been downloaded over 30 million times.
• The privately-owned company employs over 500 staff and has its global headquarters in Edinburgh with offices in Glasgow, Singapore, Beijing, Barcelona, Shenzhen and Miami. For more information visit www.skyscanner.com

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Israeli courts bar search engines from including court decisions - National

Israeli courts bar search engines from including court decisions - National | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it
The Court Administration cites a right to privacy; petitioners cite the right to open legal proceedings.
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The courts have ordered databases — including Google — to prevent search engines from accessing court rulings, out of the desire to “protect the privacy of litigants where private information about them is exposed broadly on the Internet available to anyone.”

Legal-database company Takdin has petitioned the High Court of Justice against the decision, which was made without public debate or legislation and was issued on August 18.

Legal databases will have to declare that “providing access to the information they have through the use of open search engines such as Google could be a violation of privacy or illegal publication.” They will have to take all steps necessary to prevent the indexing of decisions they receive from the Courts Administration.

Takdin says the administration does not have the authority to make such an important decision on the balance between conflicting rights.

It says the decision violates the principle of open legal proceedings as enshrined in the Basic Law on the Judiciary, and that the ruling discriminates because paying subscribers — most of them lawyers — will still have access to all rulings in databases while everyone else will not.

The Basic Law on the Judiciary favors open legal proceedings but allows exceptions when a serious violation of privacy is in question. The 1984 law does not discuss the Internet, of course, but refers to the right to open court proceedings.

The question of publishing personal details in court rulings is also being discussed  by a committee headed by a former Supreme Court justice, Yitzhak Engelhard.

The database companies had been negotiating the wording of the agreement for more than a year. Not all legal databases have let search engines index their data, but some such as Takdin have.

Only some court decisions have been open to the public; others could be viewed for a fee. Takdin, for its part, says it seeks to “make the legal system accessible to the public that does not work in the legal profession.”

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Weighing On Your Mind? Obesity, Cognition and Dementia | Brain Blogger

Weighing On Your Mind? Obesity, Cognition and Dementia | Brain Blogger | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it

Obesity in mid-life is associated with a higher risk of dementia- including Alzheimer’s disease (AD) – later in life. Though age is still the primary risk factor for dementia, lifestyle factors such as nutrition and physical activity may play an important role in the onset of cognitive impairment and dementia. Now, weight loss surgery is showing benefits in cognitive decline.

Evidence has connected obesity, high blood pressure, elevated cholesterol, and increased blood glucose levels – collectively known as metabolic syndrome – to the onset of dementia even decades down the road. The connection is complicated and still unclear, but there is hope that shared signaling pathways may be a therapeutic target for metabolic syndrome and certain types of dementia. Diabetes mellitus, smoking, and a sedentary lifestyle are also associated with an increased risk of dementia.

Recently, several studies linked weight loss after bariatric surgery to improved cognitive function; the results are being extrapolated to offer hope for dementia prevention and treatment.

One study evaluated the brain functions of 17 obese women before and 24 weeks after gastric bypass surgery. The brain functions of 16 normal-weight women were also evaluated as controls. Before surgery, the obese women showed higher metabolic activity in the posterior cingulate gyrus – an area of the brain already implicated in the pathology of dementia. This extra metabolic activity was not present after surgery and the post-surgery levels of activity were not different than those of the lean women. After surgery, the obese women also showed improvements in executive functions such as planning, organizing, and strategizing. The authors claim that the evidence suggests that, in obesity, the brain must work harder to achieve the same level of cognition as in an individual of healthy weight.

Another study evaluated 78 patients who underwent bariatric surgery. One year after surgery, cognitive function was markedly improved. This improved cognition was associated with improved liver function, as well, suggesting that liver function impacts cognition in obese patients. A similar study of 50 post-bariatric surgery patients revealed that cognitive improvements were maintained 3 years after surgery.

The impacts of weight loss without surgery on dementia are not as clear. In several cases, low body mass index or weight loss in the early stages of cognitive impairment actually led to worse outcomes and faster disease progression.

Approximately 66 million people are expected to have dementia by 2030 and the condition will continue to impose social, psychological, and financial burdens on families and society. But, together, these new findings are offering glimpses into the pathways of disease progression and future therapeutic targets for dementia. For now, we can just add cognitive decline and dementia to the already long list of complications associated with poor lifestyle choices.

Maintaining a healthy body weight as young as 30 years old may offer the best protection against cognitive decline, but, for those who are obese at the onset of cognitive decline, weight loss surgery may offer cognitive improvement in addition to the obvious physical improvements.

References

Alosco ML, Galioto R, Spitznagel MB, Strain G, Devlin M, Cohen R, Crosby RD, Mitchell JE, & Gunstad J (2014). Cognitive function after bariatric surgery: evidence for improvement 3 years after surgery.American journal of surgery, 207 (6), 870-6 PMID: 24119892

Alosco ML, Spitznagel MB, Strain G, Devlin M, Cohen R, Crosby RD, Mitchell JE, & Gunstad J (2014). The effects of cystatin C and alkaline phosphatase changes on cognitive function 12-months after bariatric surgery. Journal of the neurological sciences PMID: 25073570

Anstey KJ, Kingston A, Kiely KM, Luszcz MA, Mitchell P, & Jagger C (2014). The influence of smoking, sedentary lifestyle and obesity on cognitive impairment-free life expectancy. International journal of epidemiology PMID: 25150976

Besser LM, Gill DP, Monsell SE, Brenowitz W, Meranus DH, Kukull W, & Gustafson DR (2014). Body mass index, weight change, and clinical progression in mild cognitive impairment and Alzheimer disease. Alzheimer disease and associated disorders, 28 (1), 36-43 PMID: 24126214

Emmerzaal TL, Kiliaan AJ, & Gustafson DR (2014). 2003-2013: A Decade of Body Mass Index, Alzheimer’s Disease, and Dementia. Journal of Alzheimer’s disease : JAD PMID: 25147111

Marques EL, Halpern A, Corrêa Mancini M, de Melo ME, Horie NC, Buchpiguel CA, Martins Novaes Coutinho A, Ono CR, Prando S, Santo MA, Cunha-Neto E, Fuentes D, & Cercato C (2014). Changes in Neuropsychological Tests and Brain Metabolism After Bariatric Surgery. The Journal of clinical endocrinology and metabolism PMID: 25157409

Meng XF, Yu JT, Wang HF, Tan MS, Wang C, Tan CC, & Tan L (2014). Midlife Vascular Risk Factors and the Risk of Alzheimer’s Disease: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis. Journal of Alzheimer’s disease : JAD PMID: 25024338

Ríos JA, Cisternas P, Arrese M, Barja S, & Inestrosa NC (2014). Is Alzheimer’s disease related to metabolic syndrome? A Wnt signaling conundrum. Progress in neurobiology PMID: 25084549

Rizzi L, Rosset I, & Roriz-Cruz M (2014). Global epidemiology of dementia: Alzheimer’s and vascular types. BioMed research international, 2014 PMID: 25089278

Wotton CJ, & Goldacre MJ (2014). Age at obesity and association with subsequent dementia: record linkage study. Postgraduate medical journal PMID: 25143590

Image via Suzanne Tucker / Shutterstock.


Charles Tiayon's insight:

Obesity in mid-life is associated with a higher risk of dementia- including Alzheimer’s disease (AD) – later in life. Though age is still the primary risk factor for dementia, lifestyle factors such as nutrition and physical activity may play an important role in the onset of cognitive impairment and dementia. Now, weight loss surgery is showing benefits in cognitive decline.

Evidence has connected obesity, high blood pressure, elevated cholesterol, and increased blood glucose levels – collectively known as metabolic syndrome – to the onset of dementia even decades down the road. The connection is complicated and still unclear, but there is hope that shared signaling pathways may be a therapeutic target for metabolic syndrome and certain types of dementia. Diabetes mellitus, smoking, and a sedentary lifestyle are also associated with an increased risk of dementia.

Recently, several studies linked weight loss after bariatric surgery to improved cognitive function; the results are being extrapolated to offer hope for dementia prevention and treatment.

One study evaluated the brain functions of 17 obese women before and 24 weeks after gastric bypass surgery. The brain functions of 16 normal-weight women were also evaluated as controls. Before surgery, the obese women showed higher metabolic activity in the posterior cingulate gyrus – an area of the brain already implicated in the pathology of dementia. This extra metabolic activity was not present after surgery and the post-surgery levels of activity were not different than those of the lean women. After surgery, the obese women also showed improvements in executive functions such as planning, organizing, and strategizing. The authors claim that the evidence suggests that, in obesity, the brain must work harder to achieve the same level of cognition as in an individual of healthy weight.

Another study evaluated 78 patients who underwent bariatric surgery. One year after surgery, cognitive function was markedly improved. This improved cognition was associated with improved liver function, as well, suggesting that liver function impacts cognition in obese patients. A similar study of 50 post-bariatric surgery patients revealed that cognitive improvements were maintained 3 years after surgery.

The impacts of weight loss without surgery on dementia are not as clear. In several cases, low body mass index or weight loss in the early stages of cognitive impairment actually led to worse outcomes and faster disease progression.

Approximately 66 million people are expected to have dementia by 2030 and the condition will continue to impose social, psychological, and financial burdens on families and society. But, together, these new findings are offering glimpses into the pathways of disease progression and future therapeutic targets for dementia. For now, we can just add cognitive decline and dementia to the already long list of complications associated with poor lifestyle choices.

Maintaining a healthy body weight as young as 30 years old may offer the best protection against cognitive decline, but, for those who are obese at the onset of cognitive decline, weight loss surgery may offer cognitive improvement in addition to the obvious physical improvements.

References

Alosco ML, Galioto R, Spitznagel MB, Strain G, Devlin M, Cohen R, Crosby RD, Mitchell JE, & Gunstad J (2014). Cognitive function after bariatric surgery: evidence for improvement 3 years after surgery.American journal of surgery, 207 (6), 870-6 PMID: 24119892

Alosco ML, Spitznagel MB, Strain G, Devlin M, Cohen R, Crosby RD, Mitchell JE, & Gunstad J (2014). The effects of cystatin C and alkaline phosphatase changes on cognitive function 12-months after bariatric surgery. Journal of the neurological sciences PMID: 25073570

Anstey KJ, Kingston A, Kiely KM, Luszcz MA, Mitchell P, & Jagger C (2014). The influence of smoking, sedentary lifestyle and obesity on cognitive impairment-free life expectancy. International journal of epidemiology PMID: 25150976

Besser LM, Gill DP, Monsell SE, Brenowitz W, Meranus DH, Kukull W, & Gustafson DR (2014). Body mass index, weight change, and clinical progression in mild cognitive impairment and Alzheimer disease. Alzheimer disease and associated disorders, 28 (1), 36-43 PMID: 24126214

Emmerzaal TL, Kiliaan AJ, & Gustafson DR (2014). 2003-2013: A Decade of Body Mass Index, Alzheimer’s Disease, and Dementia. Journal of Alzheimer’s disease : JAD PMID: 25147111

Marques EL, Halpern A, Corrêa Mancini M, de Melo ME, Horie NC, Buchpiguel CA, Martins Novaes Coutinho A, Ono CR, Prando S, Santo MA, Cunha-Neto E, Fuentes D, & Cercato C (2014). Changes in Neuropsychological Tests and Brain Metabolism After Bariatric Surgery. The Journal of clinical endocrinology and metabolism PMID: 25157409

Meng XF, Yu JT, Wang HF, Tan MS, Wang C, Tan CC, & Tan L (2014). Midlife Vascular Risk Factors and the Risk of Alzheimer’s Disease: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis. Journal of Alzheimer’s disease : JAD PMID: 25024338

Ríos JA, Cisternas P, Arrese M, Barja S, & Inestrosa NC (2014). Is Alzheimer’s disease related to metabolic syndrome? A Wnt signaling conundrum. Progress in neurobiology PMID: 25084549

Rizzi L, Rosset I, & Roriz-Cruz M (2014). Global epidemiology of dementia: Alzheimer’s and vascular types. BioMed research international, 2014 PMID: 25089278

Wotton CJ, & Goldacre MJ (2014). Age at obesity and association with subsequent dementia: record linkage study. Postgraduate medical journal PMID: 25143590

Image via Suzanne Tucker / Shutterstock.


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The business case for terminology management in a corporate translation environment | SDL

The business case for terminology management in a corporate translation environment | SDL | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it
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Excavating your Emotions in your Writing

Excavating your Emotions in your Writing | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it
I recently read an article on....What will be the 100 most important objects of the next 100 years? For some reason it made me wonder what someone would make of my life should I or rather the remai...
Charles Tiayon's insight:

I recently read an article on….What will be the 100 most important objects of the next 100 years? For some reason it made me wonder what someone would make of my life should I or rather the remains of my house be excavated in 100 years time. What would these futuristic people make of me? Of how I lived?

They certainly would know nothing of my hopes or my dreams. My grief. My happiness. My despair. My contentment with the little things in life. The beauty I found in nature.

How I worried over my children as I watched them grow and reach adulthood. How I hoped they would find their happiness within themselves as strong and fulfilled adults. How I looked at my bank balance or rather my mortgage and wanted to tear out my hair!

They wouldn’t hear the laughter shared within these walls; or the tears. They wouldn’t know the friends who had filled my life with their love and support. Or the four-legged members of my family with their mischief and companionship.

All that would be left would be a shell. And probably a broken shell at that.

Perhaps remnants of my books would remain and they would shake their heads over the wide variety of my taste in reading. Perhaps they’d stare at the numbers of broken crockery and attempt to piece together my collection of china teacups and saucers. There certainly won’t be an insane shoe collection for my shoe shopping is always kept to the bare minimum. And…what would they think of my love of crime shows and mysteries?

Would they unearth on what will be then, antiquated USB sticks, my notes on unfinished stories, the countless reams of research I’ve saved and filed away – just in case. What will they make of these stories? Will they hear my voice within those words? What if in each book I write and finish, I can capture just a little bit of myself and preserve it for all time?

I never thought before that when I write a story perhaps I’m revealing – me. But when I sat down and considered what I’ve already written I’ve come to the conclusion; yes I do.

In Legend Beyond the Stars I knowingly explored the lengths a race would go to survive; even at the cost of others’ lives. But in that book, the next one, Star Pirate’s Justice and also in my next release, When Stars Collide, I also explored the effects on the survivors. How they reacted at the time. How they coped. How their past shaped their actions in the future. Whether they grew stronger from their experiences or whether it scarred them so badly they gave into despair or the hunger for revenge.

I guess I like probing at the darkness within a person’s soul, seeing what makes them tick, examining the twists and turns of personality. But in all of my books, there is one common thread; my main characters find either happiness or peace.

And they all learn to hope.

So tell me – what would the people of the future learn about your past? What would you like people to learn or take from your stories?

 

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"¿Cuántas palabras traduces al día?" | Traducir&Co

"¿Cuántas palabras traduces al día?" | Traducir&Co | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it

El número de palabras que un traductor profesional traduce al día varía en función de muchos factores que, a menudo, no se tienen en cuenta cuando uno se aventura a realizar una estimación. Para responder a esta pregunta, a mí me gusta hablar de las palabras "netas" (las que quedan listas para entregar), no las "brutas" (las traducidas pero no revisadas). Es decir, que si afirmas hacer 3000, puedas entregar el proyecto al cliente en ocho horas (o lo que dure tu jornada) y garantizar un buen resultado, no que ya has hecho 3000 y "solo" falte pasarle el corrector (luego hablaré de por qué esas comillas). En mi opinión, los principales factores que determinan el número de palabras que uno puede traducir al día son los siguientes:

  • El nivel de dificultad del texto. No es lo mismo un texto médico especializado lleno de cifras, acrónimos y términos específicos que un texto corrido que prácticamente se puede ir traduciendo mientras se lee o con el que tienes mucha pericia. El proceso de documentación suele ser lo que más retrasa el proceso de traducción. De hecho, aunque tengamos en nuestra barra de herramientas enlaces directos a la RAE, el DPD, WR, IATE, Linguee o Google Books, casi siempre acabas buscando más...


  • El par de idiomas. Ya sabemos todos que "lo suyo" es hacer traducciones directas de tu lengua B o C (como yo las inversas no las contemplo, no entro en opinar sobre el ritmo de palabras que se alcanza en ese supuesto). Se suele tardar más en traducir de la lengua C por una razón muy sencilla:no solemos manejar la referencia ni la documentación con tanta soltura como en nuestra primera lengua (diccionarios, webs, glosarios, etc.) y hay que releer más veces el original para asegurarnos de haberlo entendido.


  • La herramienta utilizada. Desde luego que traducir directamente en Word no es lo mismo que usar una herramienta TAO que te propague las traducciones, te muestre resultados de la memoria o incluso te autocomplete las palabras (como AutoSuggest).


  • Tu nivel de concentración. Creo que, junto al nivel de dificultad del texto, la concentración es el factor más importante a la hora de estimar una cantidad de palabras traducidas al día. Cuando es máxima, a menudo las palabras parecen escribirse solas y te vienen los términos a la mente con una rapidez pasmosa.


  • Los procesos posteriores a la traducción. El paso posterior a la traducción suele ser largo y, a menudo, tedioso. El proceso que se sigue para garantizar la calidad es tan importante como la traducción en sí; si el resultado es pésimo, de nada sirve las palabras que hayas traducido. Estos son algunos de los pasos posteriores a la traducción: 
    • Autorrevisar.
    • Pasar el corrector de Word (básico pero fundamental).
    • Pasar los programas de control de calidad pertinentes para garantizar la coherencia, comprobar dobles espacios y la correspondencia de las cifras, etc.
    • Comprobar las etiquetas (y los espacios previos y posteriores).
    • Asegurarse de que se ha seguido la guía de estilo específica del cliente o se han utilizado los términos que pedía.
    • Asegurarse de que se ha sido coherente con el trato tú/usted.
    • Volver a pasar el corrector de Word. Sí, otra vez. Después de todos los cambios y comprobaciones que quizá hayas hecho, merece la pena dedicar unos minutos más a asegurarte de que no hay errores básicos. Pocas cosas hay que den tanta rabia como encontrar errores que se detectan con el corrector...


A esto habría que sumarle posibles problemas que se tengan con el ordenador o el programa. Con reiniciar, que tarde en guardar el archivo por lo que ocupa, etc., ya estamos dedicando más tiempo del previsto. En definitiva, resulta muy difícil especificar cuántas palabras se traducen al día y, sobre todo, hay que tener en cuenta que los recuentos de palabras distinguen entre fuzzies, 100 %, no matches, etc. Si nos limitamos a mirar cuánto hemos traducido sin fijarnos en nada más, podemos hacernos una idea muy equivocada.

En cualquier caso, el número de palabras que cada uno puede traducir al día es un asunto delicado y personal en el que muchos prefieren ser cautos y otros... no tanto. Lo importante es que cada uno tenga la conciencia tranquila, sepa que está entregando un trabajo profesional y, sobre todo, que te vuelvan a llamar. Mientras eso se cumpla, lo demás importa poco. Como dijo Ivars Barzdevicstraductor de Dragon Ball, el año pasado en el Mangafest de Sevilla, "traduce como si cada proyecto fuera el proyecto de tu vida" :-).

Charles Tiayon's insight:

El número de palabras que un traductor profesional traduce al día varía en función de muchos factores que, a menudo, no se tienen en cuenta cuando uno se aventura a realizar una estimación. Para responder a esta pregunta, a mí me gusta hablar de las palabras "netas" (las que quedan listas para entregar), no las "brutas" (las traducidas pero no revisadas). Es decir, que si afirmas hacer 3000, puedas entregar el proyecto al cliente en ocho horas (o lo que dure tu jornada) y garantizar un buen resultado, no que ya has hecho 3000 y "solo" falte pasarle el corrector (luego hablaré de por qué esas comillas). En mi opinión, los principales factores que determinan el número de palabras que uno puede traducir al día son los siguientes:

  • El nivel de dificultad del texto. No es lo mismo un texto médico especializado lleno de cifras, acrónimos y términos específicos que un texto corrido que prácticamente se puede ir traduciendo mientras se lee o con el que tienes mucha pericia. El proceso de documentación suele ser lo que más retrasa el proceso de traducción. De hecho, aunque tengamos en nuestra barra de herramientas enlaces directos a la RAE, el DPD, WR, IATE, Linguee o Google Books, casi siempre acabas buscando más...


  • El par de idiomas. Ya sabemos todos que "lo suyo" es hacer traducciones directas de tu lengua B o C (como yo las inversas no las contemplo, no entro en opinar sobre el ritmo de palabras que se alcanza en ese supuesto). Se suele tardar más en traducir de la lengua C por una razón muy sencilla:no solemos manejar la referencia ni la documentación con tanta soltura como en nuestra primera lengua (diccionarios, webs, glosarios, etc.) y hay que releer más veces el original para asegurarnos de haberlo entendido.


  • La herramienta utilizada. Desde luego que traducir directamente en Word no es lo mismo que usar una herramienta TAO que te propague las traducciones, te muestre resultados de la memoria o incluso te autocomplete las palabras (como AutoSuggest).


  • Tu nivel de concentración. Creo que, junto al nivel de dificultad del texto, la concentración es el factor más importante a la hora de estimar una cantidad de palabras traducidas al día. Cuando es máxima, a menudo las palabras parecen escribirse solas y te vienen los términos a la mente con una rapidez pasmosa.


  • Los procesos posteriores a la traducción. El paso posterior a la traducción suele ser largo y, a menudo, tedioso. El proceso que se sigue para garantizar la calidad es tan importante como la traducción en sí; si el resultado es pésimo, de nada sirve las palabras que hayas traducido. Estos son algunos de los pasos posteriores a la traducción: 
    • Autorrevisar.
    • Pasar el corrector de Word (básico pero fundamental).
    • Pasar los programas de control de calidad pertinentes para garantizar la coherencia, comprobar dobles espacios y la correspondencia de las cifras, etc.
    • Comprobar las etiquetas (y los espacios previos y posteriores).
    • Asegurarse de que se ha seguido la guía de estilo específica del cliente o se han utilizado los términos que pedía.
    • Asegurarse de que se ha sido coherente con el trato tú/usted.
    • Volver a pasar el corrector de Word. Sí, otra vez. Después de todos los cambios y comprobaciones que quizá hayas hecho, merece la pena dedicar unos minutos más a asegurarte de que no hay errores básicos. Pocas cosas hay que den tanta rabia como encontrar errores que se detectan con el corrector...


A esto habría que sumarle posibles problemas que se tengan con el ordenador o el programa. Con reiniciar, que tarde en guardar el archivo por lo que ocupa, etc., ya estamos dedicando más tiempo del previsto. En definitiva, resulta muy difícil especificar cuántas palabras se traducen al día y, sobre todo, hay que tener en cuenta que los recuentos de palabras distinguen entre fuzzies, 100 %, no matches, etc. Si nos limitamos a mirar cuánto hemos traducido sin fijarnos en nada más, podemos hacernos una idea muy equivocada.

En cualquier caso, el número de palabras que cada uno puede traducir al día es un asunto delicado y personal en el que muchos prefieren ser cautos y otros... no tanto. Lo importante es que cada uno tenga la conciencia tranquila, sepa que está entregando un trabajo profesional y, sobre todo, que te vuelvan a llamar. Mientras eso se cumpla, lo demás importa poco. Como dijo Ivars Barzdevicstraductor de Dragon Ball, el año pasado en el Mangafest de Sevilla, "traduce como si cada proyecto fuera el proyecto de tu vida" :-).

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50 teams to take part in ESO public speaking competition - Oman

Muscat, As many as 50 teams from 30 colleges and universities will take part in the third edition of Inter-College Environmental Public Speaking Competition (ICPSC) on October 28 and 29. Twenty-two teams participated in 2013 while ten took part in the inaugural year.
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qTerm | Kilgray Translation Technologies

Although the memoQ server has a built-in terminology module, it has a fixed entry structure and you can only reach it from a memoQ client.

qTerm is a full-fledged browser-based terminology management system that connects directly to the memoQ server. Using qTerm, companies and organizations can turn their terminology into a corporate asset that facilitates internal and external communication, increases brand awareness, improves the quality of technical communication and cuts the costs of misunderstanding.

qTerm allows companies and institutions to provide a single point of access to any terminology in the organization, and allows their translation providers to have immediate access to the most up-to-date terminology. This way the organization that creates terminology is the organization that controls the terminology and its multilingual aspects.

Using qTerm, language service providers can differentiate themselves from the competition by providing managed terminology services to their customers and allowing expert and customer reviewers to contribute to terminology without installing or licensing a translation tool.

You probably need qTerm if:

  • You would like to centralize terminology management and you would like to extend the use of corporate terminology to people who are not involved in translation.
  • You would like to provide access to terminology for people who cannot or don't want to install memoQ.
  • The structure of your business or field of activity requires you to store specific information - such as the name of the department creating the term, reference to your product line, etc. - together with your terms.

With qTerm, everybody in the organization can access your term bases through Internet Explorer 8+, Firefox 4+, and Chrome (experimental). Terms can have a customizable entry structure, you can store custom information.

Charles Tiayon's insight:

Although the memoQ server has a built-in terminology module, it has a fixed entry structure and you can only reach it from a memoQ client.

qTerm is a full-fledged browser-based terminology management system that connects directly to the memoQ server. Using qTerm, companies and organizations can turn their terminology into a corporate asset that facilitates internal and external communication, increases brand awareness, improves the quality of technical communication and cuts the costs of misunderstanding.

qTerm allows companies and institutions to provide a single point of access to any terminology in the organization, and allows their translation providers to have immediate access to the most up-to-date terminology. This way the organization that creates terminology is the organization that controls the terminology and its multilingual aspects.

Using qTerm, language service providers can differentiate themselves from the competition by providing managed terminology services to their customers and allowing expert and customer reviewers to contribute to terminology without installing or licensing a translation tool.

You probably need qTerm if:

  • You would like to centralize terminology management and you would like to extend the use of corporate terminology to people who are not involved in translation.
  • You would like to provide access to terminology for people who cannot or don't want to install memoQ.
  • The structure of your business or field of activity requires you to store specific information - such as the name of the department creating the term, reference to your product line, etc. - together with your terms.

With qTerm, everybody in the organization can access your term bases through Internet Explorer 8+, Firefox 4+, and Chrome (experimental). Terms can have a customizable entry structure, you can store custom information.

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Why Literature and Writing is the best major

Why Literature and Writing is the best major | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it
By Caleb Hogland  Staff Writer  Have you chosen a major yet? It’s kind of important. When we were preparing to leave high school, we were all told to think about a career. We were supposed to know what career we would want for the rest of our lives. But the first step in getting to […]
Charles Tiayon's insight:

Literature and Writing is called literary arts because it is in fact an art. People often think of art as paintings and music and forget that writing is one also. It is quite possibly the most powerful and moving art form of all. Writing is an art where anyone can learn how to express themselves.

Not only is it a form of expression, but it is just as importantly a technique of exploration. Exploration through writing brings forth all your thoughts, subconscious and conscious, into one profound moment of expression and meaning. We all have beliefs, but how do you truly know and understand what you believe unless you have thoroughly thought it out?

Writing will help you explore not just who you are, but why you are. Through writing you can better understand all topics that present themselves. Issues of ethics, beauty, economics, government, war, religion and politics can all be understood once you have written about them.

The next time you think about saying “I don’t know” to a tough question about something going on in the world, go write about it. You will find out that you actually do know more than you think.

If it turns out you really just want a good, well-paying job, and who doesn’t, a major focused on writing is still the way to go. I once heard a CEO say, “Give me someone who can write and I can work with them. Give me someone who can effectively communicate complicated ideas and I will give you someone who will get promoted.”

Even one of our very own CSUSM professors said that “when you turn in your resume with your cover letter, they do not see you. They only see your writing.”

If you’re still doubting the relevance of writing, consider this: Last year Forbes, one of the leading magazines and websites on information about the world’s business leaders, did a study on the top ten most desirable skills that would get you hired. Of that ten, the top four are closely tied to writing. Forbes did say the major that’s “most worth your tuition” is biomedical engineering. But if that’s not what you’re into, and you still don’t know what you’re doing at CSUSM, I would suggest Literature and Writing.

Plus, if the economy goes downhill you can always travel anywhere in the world and teach English. So what major are you working on for this chunk of your life? Consider Literature and Writing.

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Six Tips For Writing Poetry About Difficult Subjects - PoeWar

Every horrible subject you can imagine has already been written about. There’s some brutal, brutal stuff out there. Writing about painful subjects is a great way to deal with that pain. Don’t be embarrassed about having problems or faults, everyone does. Don’t judge the importance of what happened to you by the quality of your …
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Life, Language and E-Verything: Academic Writing - or: Die, paper, die!

Life, Language and E-Verything: Academic Writing - or: Die, paper, die! | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it

Academic writing is a practice that requires a lot of delayed gratification. Depending on your writing speed, the number of projects you are working on in parallel and the turnaround times of the journals you submit to, what you are writing right now may be published in a year. 
Fortunately, there are ways to engineer some short-term satisfaction into the writing process, most of which probably boil down into some form of "x words = y cookies". Now, I won't say anything negative about cookies - but sometimes a piece of crumbly goodness may just not be enough. Sometimes, it's not our sweet tooth that requires satisfaction, but our sense of adventure! We don't want chocolate chips then, we want glory!
Well, there's a solution for this, too: at HabitRPG, you can turn a paragraph written into a dragon egg found, or into some powerful sword blows dealt against a dangerous enemy. You don't just proofread you paper, no, you earn precious mana points that you can use to cast a spell that saves your life from too-many incomplete to dos... 
Does this sound a bit silly? Of course! But I don't mind how silly it sounds, as long as it gets me to write. After all, I need to earn some pink cotton candy to feed my baby dragon!
If you need more adventure in your life, try it - there are a couple of guilds focusing on writing and on different stages in the academic career, as well as a Academic Writing Challenge.

Charles Tiayon's insight:

Academic writing is a practice that requires a lot of delayed gratification. Depending on your writing speed, the number of projects you are working on in parallel and the turnaround times of the journals you submit to, what you are writing right now may be published in a year. 
Fortunately, there are ways to engineer some short-term satisfaction into the writing process, most of which probably boil down into some form of "x words = y cookies". Now, I won't say anything negative about cookies - but sometimes a piece of crumbly goodness may just not be enough. Sometimes, it's not our sweet tooth that requires satisfaction, but our sense of adventure! We don't want chocolate chips then, we want glory!
Well, there's a solution for this, too: at HabitRPG, you can turn a paragraph written into a dragon egg found, or into some powerful sword blows dealt against a dangerous enemy. You don't just proofread you paper, no, you earn precious mana points that you can use to cast a spell that saves your life from too-many incomplete to dos... 
Does this sound a bit silly? Of course! But I don't mind how silly it sounds, as long as it gets me to write. After all, I need to earn some pink cotton candy to feed my baby dragon!
If you need more adventure in your life, try it - there are a couple of guilds focusing on writing and on different stages in the academic career, as well as a Academic Writing Challenge.

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Langues: Anne-Catherine Lyon veut éviter un vote populaire

La conseillère d'Etat vaudoise Anne-Catherine Lyon veut éviter un vote sur la question de l'enseignement des deux langues étrangères en primaire. Elle craint que ce thème n'entraîne la Suisse sur la pente de la "belgisation".


"Nous devons nous les cantons trouver une solution", a déclaré Mme Lyon, également présidente de la Conférence intercantonale de l'instruction publique de la Suisse romande et du Tessin dans une interview publiée dans la "NZZ am Sonntag". "Nous nous trouvons à un moment-charnière, où il faut éteindre l'incendie".

 




Ce sont les initiatives contre l'enseignement du français à l'école primaire dans les cantons de Thurgovie, Nidwald, Lucerne et des Grisons que la présidente de la Conférence universitaire suisse compare à un début d'incendie. "Il s'agit bien plus qu'une question relevant de l'école, il en va de la cohésion nationale".


Les cantons en première ligne
La ministre vaudoise de la formation préférerait de loin que ce débat trouve une issue au niveau des cantons, car elle veut éviter un référendum au plan fédéral. "Nous, les Romands, sommes une minorité et faisons face à une forte majorité d'Alémaniques. Et nous avons peur de perdre ce scrutin".


Même si le pire n'est pas certain, Anne-Catherine Lyon ne tient pas à voir la Suisse pratiquement coupée en deux comme après le vote sur l'EEE. "Et avec les langues, cela va encore plus loin. Il en va de notre culture, de notre essence."


Lignes de fracture
"On ne devrait pas jouer avec des sujets qui risquent de déchirer la Suisse. Sinon, nous pourrions connaître les divisions à la belge. Cela créerait des lignes de fracture qui traverseront les partis, les cantons et les familles", craint la ministre vaudoise.


Pour la ministre, parler de surcharge scolaire des enfants quand ils apprennent deux langues étrangères au primaire est d'abord un problème alémanique. Les enfants outre-Sarine sont de fait confronter à quatre langues: le dialecte alémanique, le bon allemand, puis deux autres langues.


Charles Tiayon's insight:

La conseillère d'Etat vaudoise Anne-Catherine Lyon veut éviter un vote sur la question de l'enseignement des deux langues étrangères en primaire. Elle craint que ce thème n'entraîne la Suisse sur la pente de la "belgisation".


"Nous devons nous les cantons trouver une solution", a déclaré Mme Lyon, également présidente de la Conférence intercantonale de l'instruction publique de la Suisse romande et du Tessin dans une interview publiée dans la "NZZ am Sonntag". "Nous nous trouvons à un moment-charnière, où il faut éteindre l'incendie".

 




Ce sont les initiatives contre l'enseignement du français à l'école primaire dans les cantons de Thurgovie, Nidwald, Lucerne et des Grisons que la présidente de la Conférence universitaire suisse compare à un début d'incendie. "Il s'agit bien plus qu'une question relevant de l'école, il en va de la cohésion nationale".


Les cantons en première ligne
La ministre vaudoise de la formation préférerait de loin que ce débat trouve une issue au niveau des cantons, car elle veut éviter un référendum au plan fédéral. "Nous, les Romands, sommes une minorité et faisons face à une forte majorité d'Alémaniques. Et nous avons peur de perdre ce scrutin".


Même si le pire n'est pas certain, Anne-Catherine Lyon ne tient pas à voir la Suisse pratiquement coupée en deux comme après le vote sur l'EEE. "Et avec les langues, cela va encore plus loin. Il en va de notre culture, de notre essence."


Lignes de fracture
"On ne devrait pas jouer avec des sujets qui risquent de déchirer la Suisse. Sinon, nous pourrions connaître les divisions à la belge. Cela créerait des lignes de fracture qui traverseront les partis, les cantons et les familles", craint la ministre vaudoise.


Pour la ministre, parler de surcharge scolaire des enfants quand ils apprennent deux langues étrangères au primaire est d'abord un problème alémanique. Les enfants outre-Sarine sont de fait confronter à quatre langues: le dialecte alémanique, le bon allemand, puis deux autres langues.

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Would Google Search Be Better If Results Were Not Divided Into Pages?

Would Google Search Be Better If Results Were Not Divided Into Pages? | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it
Why does Google organize your search results into pages? Same with Yahoo and Bing. Considering that page 1 results garner 92 percent of all traffic from the average search (according to a study by Ch…
Charles Tiayon's insight:

Why does Google organize your search results into pages? Same with Yahoo and Bing. Considering that page 1 results garner 92 percent of all traffic from the average search (according to a study by Chitika), why stop at showing 10 to 12 search results and then make users click over to page 2 to see more (especially if only 5% of people do this)?

Having results divided into pages seems to be restrictive to the user. Why not just have the search results keep flowing so technically everyone makes the first page? Considering the growth of mobile, where scrolling down to see more is the typical user action, why haven’t the search engines moved in this direction?

Why No-Page Search Results May be the Way to Go

If you go over to Pinterest, there are no pages, you can just keep scrolling down forever. Maybe that is why it has increased in popularity as a search engine. Instagram is pretty good too, giving you the “LOAD MORE…” option (something Pinterest use to do, but now it is automatic).

A lot of ecommerce stores also have search results that work this way. Old Navy will automatically show you all items in any category you select, and not divide them up into pages. Maybe they have figured out that visitors are less likely to click over to page 2.

Related Resources from B2C
» Free Webcast: Blogging in the Age of Modern Marketers

And if an online store doesn’t automatically do it for you, they at least give you the option to see all results on one page, as seen below at Sephora.

The Benefits of “Show All” Search Results

Think about it. How often do you select the option “Show All” when given it? I know I do. Why do I do it? Because I like the idea of seeing everything in one shot. To me it is more convenient and time saving. It is also a usability issue. The thought of clicking on an arrow or “page 2″ seems tiresome and slower. I would rather hit “Show All” once, than to have to keep hitting page 2, page 3, page 4, etc. Also, if I saw something I liked, what if I can’t remember if I saw it on page 1 or page 5. So then I have to go back through all the pages. I probably won’t bother. If everything is on a continual page, I know I just have to scroll back up to find it.

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Resize the Google Keyboard on Any Android

Resize the Google Keyboard on Any Android | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it
Google Keyboard, which comes pre-installed on Nexus devices (and is available for all others from the Play Store), is one of the most functional keyboards currently available for Android. With features like gesture-based typing, next-word prediction, and even text expansion macros, it's a very capable form of text input. The only category that the Google Keyboard can be said to be lacking in is form, not functionality. While some custom themes are available, there aren't really any other way of
Charles Tiayon's insight:

Google Keyboard, which comes pre-installed on Nexus devices (and is available for all others from the Play Store), is one of the most functional keyboards currently available for Android. With features like gesture-based typing, next-word prediction, and even text expansion macros, it's a very capable form of text input.

The only category that the Google Keyboard can be said to be lacking in isform, not functionality. While some custom themes are available, there aren't really any other way of customizing the style of the keyboard, so Android users have to look to third-party developers if they want to spruce up the defaults.

This is where developer Amit Bagaria and his Xposed module XCoolDroidcome into play. With a simple-to-use interface, this module allows you to resize the Google Keyboard and even the spacing of the keys, all without sacrificing any functionality.

RequirementsStep 1: Install XCoolDroid

From your Xposed Installer app, head to the Download section and searchXCoolDroid, then tap the top result.

XCoolDroid is still in its beta phase, so you'll have to change one option here to download it. To do this, swipe over to the Settings tab and tap Versions to be shown, then select Beta.

Next, swipe back over to the Versions tab and tap the Download button next to the most recent entry. Alternatively, you can grab the latest APK directly from the Xposed Repository online.

Android's installer interface should come up after a few seconds, so tapInstall on the next screen.

When that's finished, you'll get a notification from Xposed telling you that the module isn't activated yet and that a reboot is in order. Just tap theActivate and reboot button here, and Xposed will take care of the rest automatically.

Step 2: Adjust the Keyboard's Height & Spacing

When your phone finishes booting back up, go ahead and open XCoolDroidfrom your app drawer. The XExternalSD option allows apps to save data on an external SD card in KitKat, which is a nice bonus. But the main feature here is under the Google Keyboard entry. Tap that menu item to explore the options.

From here, use the Keyboard Height slider to adjust the overall height of the Google Keyboard. Then, use the Vertical Gap slider to change the spacing between the individual keys. The developer's default settings of 75% height and 50% spacing are great starting points.

Step 3: Apply Your Settings

When you're ready to try out your keyboard tweaks, tap the Force Stop Google Keyboard button. At this point, XCoolDroid will ask for root access, so tap Grant on the popup.

Now, just tap any text field to view your changes. As I mentioned earlier, the keyboard retains all of its existing functionality even after you've slimmed it down, so gesture typing still works flawlessly.

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Pourquoi traduire les titres de films anglais... en anglais?

Pourquoi traduire les titres de films anglais... en anglais? | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it

Cette pratique un peu stupide repose sur pas grand-chose.

Pardon my french but ça devient le big n'importe quoi. Depuis quelques mois, tout fout le camp. Surtout les titres de films. Non qu'il faille absolument défendre la langue de Molière du matin jusqu'au soir, surtout au moment d'avaler un hot-dog et pas un chien-chaud. Il est même possible de s'amuser quand Fastlife s'annonce comme un film français. Ou Near Death ExperienceParty Girl et The Search. Mais un sourire peut cacher une forêt de bêtises. 

The Babadook est devenu Mister Babadook

DR

Cet été, plusieurs films américains sont sortis, en France, avec des titres traduits... en anglais. The Babadook est ainsi devenuMister Babadook.Admettons. Black Storm est, lui, le titre français d'Into the Storm. Ça se corse encore avec The Purge 2, devenuAmerican Nightmare 2. Et voilà le pompon : Begin Again rebaptisé New York Melody en France, s'intituleCan a Song Save Your Life,dans la version internationale. De quoi choper un mal de crâne si on regarde les films dans un avion. 

Faire amerloque tout en se faisant comprendre

Les raisons sont diverses. Mais elles sentent toutes le marketing, voire l'attrape-zozo. Tout d'abord, il serait tendance, en ce moment, de sortir des films avec un titre en anglais. Être tendance, c'est bien, se faire comprendre, c'est mieux. D'où ces titres compréhensibles pour les spectateurs n'ayant pas forcément pris anglais première langue. On fait amerloque, mais on s'assure que le message passe. En douce. C'est sans doute pourquoi les distributeurs concernés ne "se sentaient" pas de répondre à la question. 

Le cinéma français a toujours eu du mal avec les films américains. Dans les années 80, la mode était de traduire (quasi) systématiquement les titres anglais. Ce qui donnait parfois des choses croquignolettes : City Slickers devenant La vie, l'amour... les vaches ; Home Alone s'affichant Maman, j'ai raté l'avion. Sans oublier le mythique Star Wars dont la traduction induit quand même le plus beau des contresens. Car, jusqu'à preuve du contraire, entre "La guerre des étoiles" et "Les guerres de l'étoile", y a comme une petite différence de sens, non? 

Black Storm, titre français d'Into the Storm

DR

Depuis le début des années 2000, mondialisation oblige, les titres traduits avaient presque disparu des affiches. Jusqu'à cette année. Mais faire simple n'est pourtant pas très compliqué. Guardians of the Galaxy se traduit parfaitement en Gardiens de la galaxie, pas en "The rigolos of the universe". 

On peut aussi faire sobre :The Expendables devenuExpendables, c'est intelligent. À la limite, il aurait pu devenir "Ça canarde aux Hespérides", mais là, on était davantage chez Bernard Borderie, cette blague étant destinée aux plus vieux. 


En savoir plus sur http://www.lexpress.fr/culture/cinema/pourquoi-traduire-les-titres-de-films-anglais-en-anglais_1575343.html#h2dCBvlcT2e4ciCL.99

Charles Tiayon's insight:

Pardon my french but ça devient le big n'importe quoi. Depuis quelques mois, tout fout le camp. Surtout les titres de films. Non qu'il faille absolument défendre la langue de Molière du matin jusqu'au soir, surtout au moment d'avaler un hot-dog et pas un chien-chaud. Il est même possible de s'amuser quand Fastlife s'annonce comme un film français. Ou Near Death ExperienceParty Girl et The Search. Mais un sourire peut cacher une forêt de bêtises. 

The Babadook est devenu Mister Babadook

DR

Cet été, plusieurs films américains sont sortis, en France, avec des titres traduits... en anglais. The Babadook est ainsi devenuMister Babadook.Admettons. Black Storm est, lui, le titre français d'Into the Storm. Ça se corse encore avec The Purge 2, devenuAmerican Nightmare 2. Et voilà le pompon : Begin Again rebaptisé New York Melody en France, s'intituleCan a Song Save Your Life,dans la version internationale. De quoi choper un mal de crâne si on regarde les films dans un avion. 

Faire amerloque tout en se faisant comprendre

Les raisons sont diverses. Mais elles sentent toutes le marketing, voire l'attrape-zozo. Tout d'abord, il serait tendance, en ce moment, de sortir des films avec un titre en anglais. Être tendance, c'est bien, se faire comprendre, c'est mieux. D'où ces titres compréhensibles pour les spectateurs n'ayant pas forcément pris anglais première langue. On fait amerloque, mais on s'assure que le message passe. En douce. C'est sans doute pourquoi les distributeurs concernés ne "se sentaient" pas de répondre à la question. 

Le cinéma français a toujours eu du mal avec les films américains. Dans les années 80, la mode était de traduire (quasi) systématiquement les titres anglais. Ce qui donnait parfois des choses croquignolettes : City Slickers devenant La vie, l'amour... les vaches ; Home Alone s'affichant Maman, j'ai raté l'avion. Sans oublier le mythique Star Wars dont la traduction induit quand même le plus beau des contresens. Car, jusqu'à preuve du contraire, entre "La guerre des étoiles" et "Les guerres de l'étoile", y a comme une petite différence de sens, non? 

Black Storm, titre français d'Into the Storm

DR

Depuis le début des années 2000, mondialisation oblige, les titres traduits avaient presque disparu des affiches. Jusqu'à cette année. Mais faire simple n'est pourtant pas très compliqué. Guardians of the Galaxy se traduit parfaitement en Gardiens de la galaxie, pas en "The rigolos of the universe". 

On peut aussi faire sobre :The Expendables devenuExpendables, c'est intelligent. À la limite, il aurait pu devenir "Ça canarde aux Hespérides", mais là, on était davantage chez Bernard Borderie, cette blague étant destinée aux plus vieux. 


En savoir plus sur http://www.lexpress.fr/culture/cinema/pourquoi-traduire-les-titres-de-films-anglais-en-anglais_1575343.html#h2dCBvlcT2e4ciCL.99

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The Indigenous Language Challenge

The Indigenous Language Challenge | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it
 People are posting videos where they take on dramatic challenges and tag others to join in. It's an energetic effort to raise awareness ... to use Native American languages....
Charles Tiayon's insight:

People are posting videos where they take on dramatic challenges and tag others to join in. It's an energetic effort to raise awareness...to use Native American languages. The 2014 Indigenous Language Challenge is on. Comedian Tonia Jo Hall, a Lakota teacher in training, posted a video of her young daughter singing in Lakota. "Whatever your native language is, we challenge you to post a 10-15 sec video no matter what it is as long as you're speaking your language," Hall wrote. She's not the only Native American language activist, learner, or teacher to promote indigenous language use via social media video challenges.

Many of these videos come from adults who are second language learners. For many years, government-run boarding schools in both the U.S. and Canada took children from Native families. This had an immense effect on Native language acquisition. Children lost priceless years of daily home environments with parents and grandparents communicating to them in their language. Home is where children's language development thrives and grows, and where children acquire the many different speech forms that express the human experience. What gets lost? So much, from the everyday language of instructions, telling jokes, or a recipe, to the ritual language of prayers, ceremonial speeches, or sharing stories of the ancestors. For too many families, the home language shifted to English, to the detriment of Native American language and culture. Educational policies were one of the factors that accelerated shift to English, resulting in Native languages becoming endangered languages. 

Now educational policies include a different model. To revitalize Native language and culture, communities like the Navajo, the Cherokee, and others have transformed the learning environments for Native youth by adopting immersion schools. Immersion schools use the Native language as the primary language for delivering instruction - in all subject areas - for students. Proposed legislation in Congress increases financial support and the federal commitment to Native American languages, especially in schools: the Native American Languages Reauthorization Act of 2014 (H.R.726/S.2299) and the Native Language Immersion Student Achievement Act (HR.4214/S.1948). If passed, the latter would create a stream of grant funding for immersion schools. 

Significant research exists showing that immersion schools positively impact the success of Native students. UCLA professor Teresa McCarty wrote recently about educational studies that demonstrate the following benefits, among others:

Hawaiian language immersion provides the most dramatic example of the success of such a program. From a situation in the early 1980s in which fewer than 50 children spoke Hawaiian, Hawaiian-medium schooling has produced 4,000 children assessed as fluent speakers of Hawaiian. These changes have come in tandem with impressive academic gains for historically underserved Native Hawaiian students. .. a 100 percent high school graduation and 80 percent college attendance rate. Although English is not introduced until grade 5, Nāwahī produces graduates who are college-, career-, and civic life-ready for English-dominant settings.

A challenge that is perhaps the better known challenge these days is circulating on Facebook and elsewhere: the Ice Bucket Challenge. It isn't just about dumping ice on yourself. Rather, it raises awareness and funds for research on ALS, Lou Gehrig's disease. According to the ALS Association website, people have donated over $100 million. Activism and money talk.

Be an activist for indigenous languages. For you who speak or are learning Native languages, keep on sharing those videos in the 2014 Indigenous Language Challenge. These videos celebrate your languages and inspire others to do the same. Keep on speaking, keep on learning, and most of all, keep on using your Native languages.

What is more, everyone can advocate for Native American languages and to advance this important legislation.

Champion the cause of these two bills, HR.4214/S.1948 and H.R.726/S.2299.

Change the legacy of boarding schools.

Promote secure funding and the future of Native American languages. It's the indigenous language challenge that we can all embrace.

***********
How can you get involved and do more for Native American languages?

To learn how to advocate for these bills supporting Native American languages and immersion, visit the National Indian Education Association.

To write your elected officials visit this link set up by the Linguistic Society of America, its Committee on Endangered Languages and their Preservation (CELP) and allied organizations in support of this legislation.

MO
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Lewisboro Library holds fiction writing workshop | Lewisboro Ledger

Lewisboro Library holds fiction writing workshop | Lewisboro Ledger | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it
The popular “Fiction Writing Workshop” for adults begins Tuesday, Sept. 23, and meets every Tuesday evening from 7 to 8:30 through Oct. 21.
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Registration

Registration | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it

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Creating a termbase - the data model, data categories and what to include | SDL

Creating a termbase - the data model, data categories and what to include | SDL | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it
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The fundamentals of terminology management - basic concepts and methods | SDL

The fundamentals of terminology management - basic concepts and methods | SDL | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it
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Writing Using Third Person Limited Point of View: I hope I chose wisely.

Writing Using Third Person Limited Point of View: I hope I chose wisely. | Metaglossia: The Translation World | Scoop.it
I'm in the home stretch of writing my fourth novel. I'm excited about the possibilities that this novel has. It's unique and interesting, and, believe it or not, it's my first novel ever that I at ...
Charles Tiayon's insight:

This is very much a novel about one character’s journey in a country with a corrupt government. When I started writing it, I knew I didn’t want to write in the first person. I, the writer’s voice from the ethereal writing realm above my character’s head, did know that I wanted to be close to this character and follow his story, and so I decided to go with the third person limited point of view.

Third person limited is unique. It only allows the writer into the head of the main character, but everyone else is only viewed through the character’s eyes. It’s a great way to follow along on the journey with someone because you can go deep within himself, but it doesn’t allow you to know what’s going on behind closed doors in the other room. Therefore, the reactions, emotions, movements, actions of the other characters must tell the story of what has already happened elsewhere. It’s a very interesting dynamic. But it does leave a lot to the imagination.

Example. We have the country’s dictator, Antoine, as an aloof figure we hear about and only see from a distance. If I was writing in third person omnipresence, I would cut to scenes inside the presidential palace where Antoine is plotting and scheming his responses to what’s happening in his country. There was a lot of gripping dialogue and intrigue that I left on the table because of my choice of narration style.

So I do hope that my readers will buy into what I’m trying to do!

I felt, however, that the consistent focus on the main character and his trials and circumstances would tell the story in a singular, linear way that will be both gripping and powerful.

I hope I am correct. I’m currently working on the book’s final chapter and then the first draft will be finished. At that point I’ll be ready to share it with my first reader for feedback.

Exciting, indeed!

I’ve really enjoyed writing in third person limited.

So now I have one first person, two third person omniscient, and one third person limited under my belt. What should I try for novel five?

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