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Metaglossia: The Translation World
News about translation, interpreting, intercultural communication, terminology and lexicography - as it happens
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Scholars infuriated by dictionary's use of English- China.org.cn

An editor has come under fire over the inclusion of 239 English words, mostly acronyms or abbreviations, in the latest edition of the Modern Chinese Dictionary.

She was accused of being disrespectful to the Chinese language and causing it "severe damage."

However, Jiang Lansheng, chief editor of the sixth edition published on July 15, said the additions were to make it easier for people to know the meaning of English words in everyday use, yesterday's Beijing Youth Daily reported.

Jiang was responding to a petition signed by more than 100 scholars from across the country saying the editors had damaged the language and might even have broken the law.

They said printing the English words was encouraging readers to replace Chinese words with English ones. "A Chinese dictionary serves as the standard for the use of the Chinese language. Now that the Chinese dictionary collected English words to replace certain Chinese words, it is a serious damage to the Chinese language," Li Minsheng, a researcher with the Chinese Academy of Social Sciences, was quoted by the newspaper as saying.

The scholars also said adding English violated the Law on Standard Spoken and Written Chinese.

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Des intellectuels dénoncent l'illégalité de l'entrée d'anglicismes dans le Dictionnaire du Chinois Contemporain-Le Quotidien du Peuple en ligne

Récemment, une centaine d'intellectuels, dont la plupart sont experts de la langue chinoise, ont fait part de leur mécontentement au sujet de l'introduction d'anglicismes dans le chinois. A tel point qu'ils ont envoyé une lettre de protestation à l'Administration générale de la Presse et de l'Edition et à la Commission nationale de la Langue et de la Littérature, dans laquelle ils dénoncent la 6e édition du Dictionnaire du Chinois Contemporain, nouvellement publiée par Commercial Press, qui contient 239 anglicismes, dont NBA, ce qui constitue une violation de la Loi sur les langues parlées et écrites en usage dans la République populaire de Chine, de la Réglémentation de l'édition décrétée par le Conseil des Affaires de l'Etat et des autres lois.

C'est Fu Zhenguo, journaliste connu du Quotidien du Peuple, qui a eu l'initiative de cette révélation. « Dans la nouvelle édition du Dictionnaire du Chinois Contemporain, de la page 1750 à la page 1755, il y a au total 239 articles qui traitent des mots composés de lettres, a-t-il indiqué. Ils sont présentés comme des articles de mots chinois. Mais en fait, ce sont pour la plupart des sigles en langue anglaise qu'on rencontre souvent, comme NBA, GDP, CPI, WTO, etc. »

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Does “NBA” Belong in Chinese Dictionaries?

More than 100 Chinese scholars have signed a letter of complaint over the inclusion of English words in the new sixth edition of Contemporary Chinese Dictionary.
The scholars believe the inclusion of 239 English words in the dictionary, including NBA and the PM2.5 measurement for air pollution, violates regulations regarding standards for the Chinese language.
The words take up 15 pages in the dictionary, which was published by the Commercial Press this year, the Beijing Evening News reported on Aug 28.
Li Minsheng, a researcher at the Chinese Academy of Social Sciences, said at an academic symposium on Aug 27 that the dictionary plays an important role in setting the standard for the Chinese language.
Li said that if English words replace Chinese characters in the dictionary, it would damage the Chinese language.
I’m a big supporter of languages raping and pillaging. You know, dynamism and all that. English, of course, is an old pro at this sort of thing. A friend of mine, who teaches English Lit in the U.S., has this in his email signature:
English doesn’t borrow from other languages. English follows other languages down dark alleys, knocks them over and rummages through their pockets for loose grammar.
Indeed. So I’m cool with putting foreign words in Chinese dictionaries if they are now part of common usage. However, there must be standards. I have a problem, for example, with “PM 2.5.” Yes, a big topic of conversation, but the thing is, it isn’t a word. How can it be in the dictionary if it isn’t even a damn word?
Similarly, “NBA” isn’t a word either. It’s an acronym. Now, I’m touchy when it comes to acronyms, and I’ve had a long-running battle with young lawyers over the past decade or so who don’t think that it’s a big deal to use acronyms in professional writing. {Sigh} For blogs, fine. For formal stuff, no way, not until you’ve introduced what the acronym stands for to your reader.
Curious, I looked up “NBA” on dictionary.com and was disappointed to see it there. It included several definitions, including the National Basketball Association and National Boxing Association. But I think that proves my point. There are probably a lot of other “NBA”s out there that didn’t make the cut. How fair is that?

Read more: http://www.chinahearsay.com/does-nba-belong-in-chinese-dictionaries/#ixzz24yc24Uun

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Does "NBA" Belong in Chinese Dictionaries?

More than 100 Chinese scholars have signed a letter of complaint over the inclusion of English words in the new sixth edition of Contemporary Chinese Dictionary.

The scholars believe the inclusion of 239 English words in the dictionary, including NBA and the PM2.5 measurement for air pollution, violates regulations regarding standards for the Chinese language.

The words take up 15 pages in the dictionary, which was published by the Commercial Press this year, the Beijing Evening News reported on Aug 28.

Li Minsheng, a researcher at the Chinese Academy of Social Sciences, said at an academic symposium on Aug 27 that the dictionary plays an important role in setting the standard for the Chinese language.

Li said that if English words replace Chinese characters in the dictionary, it would damage the Chinese language.

I’m a big supporter of languages raping and pillaging. You know, dynamism and all that. English, of course, is an old pro at this sort of thing. A friend of mine, who teaches English Lit in the U.S., has this in his email signature:

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Chine : des universitaires contre les sigles en anglais dans le dictionnaire

Les sigles et acronymes en anglais, de plus en plus présents dans la langue de tous les jours en Chine où ils remplacent des idéogrammes, devraient être exclus du principal dictionnaire du pays, ont estimé des universitaires chinois cités mercredi par la presse.

Des expressions comme "NBA" (principale ligue de basket-ball aux Etats-Unis), "WTO" (Organisation mondiale du commerce) ou "CPI" (indice des prix à la consommation) sont largement usitées en Chine, même si des traductions officielles existent avec des caractères chinois.

Plus de cent universitaires ont estimé, dans une lettre ouverte, que l'inclusion de tels sigles et acronymes dans le "Xiandai hanyu cidian" (dictionnaire du chinois moderne) "violait" les règles du chinois académique.

La dernière édition de cet ouvrage, un dictionnaire en un volume très populaire et respecté en Chine, contient 239 termes en lettres latines, contre seulement 39 dans l'édition de 1996, a rapporté le journal Global Times.

"Remplacer des caractères chinois par des lettres dans un tel dictionnaire porte les plus graves atteintes à la langue chinoise depuis un siècle", a dénoncé Li Mingsheng, un des signataires cité par le quotidien.

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Scholars to ban NBA from Chinese dictionary - The Standard

Scholars to ban NBA from Chinese dictionary - The Standard...

A group of Chinese academics has said English-language abbreviations which have become part of everyday life in China should be struck from the country's top dictionary, AFP reports.
A letter signed by more than 100 scholars condemned the inclusion of terms including NBA (National Basketball Association) and WTO (World Trade Organization) in the latest edition of China's most authoritative dictionary, the Global Times daily reported Wednesday.
Acronyms and other abbreviations derived from English are widely used in China, where millions of basketball fans refer to their favourite league as the NBA, rather than Mei Zhi Lan, the official Chinese translation.
English abbreviations for international bodies such as the WTO are also widely used, while PM2.5, a measure of air pollution, has become a familiar term among urban residents, who are increasingly concerned about air quality.
The latest edition of the Contemporary Chinese Dictionary, the country's most authoritative linguistic reference book, included more than 239 terms containing latin letters, up from 39 in 1996, the Global Times reported.
The academics say in their letter that the introduction of English abbreviations threatens the Chinese language, and their presence in the dictionary violates Chinese laws governing language usage.
"Replacing Chinese characters with letters in such a dictionary... deals the most severe damage to the Chinese language in a century,'' Li Mingsheng, a researcher with the Chinese Academy of Social Sciences, told the paper.
"If we don't make standards, more and more English expressions will become part of Chinese,'' Fu Zhenguo, one of the scholars behind the protest letter, told The Beijing News.
China's state broadcaster CCTV triggered a public outcry when it banned English language abbreviations in 2010.

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Wrong Flags, Unpronounceable Names, and Backwards Letters: The Olympics and Cultural Sensitivity

The 2012 games have scarcely begun and they've already started revealing the UK to be less respectful, careful and thoughtful towards other cultures than one would like to think.
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