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Metaglossia: The Translation World
News about translation, interpreting, intercultural communication, terminology and lexicography - as it happens
Curated by Charles Tiayon
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Interview with Alick K. Bwanali, the Chichewa translator of Where There Is No Doctor

Pamene Palibe Dokotala, the Chichewa translation of Where There Is No Doctor was finalized in 2006 in Malawi. 456 translated pages provide practical, heavily illustrated and easy-to-understand heal...
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Interview with the winner of the Harvill Secker Young Translators’ Prize, Phil Hand

Earlier this month ProZ.com member Philip Hand was announced as the winner of The Harvill Secker Young Translators’ Prize for his translation from the Chinese of Han Dong’s story ‘The Wig’.

After reading this news I felt curious to learn more about his opinion about participating and winning the prize so I prepared a few questions which he kindly replied below:

Q: What motivated you to enter the Harvill Secker Young Translators’ Prize? Was this the first time you have ever participated in a translation contest?

A: Yes, this was the first time I’ve entered a competition, though I’ve done an MA in translation studies and studied interpreting, so I’ve had my translations critically appraised many times.

I really just wanted to try something different. Actually, I wanted to take the opportunity to try translating in a different way – to try playing with different voices and styles, then to try editing something together to find the best possible version. But in the end I just didn’t have the time. Work was frantic over the summer, so I ended up just doing a single draft, then revising it. It was great to win, but I didn’t get to try out a new translation practice in the way I’d hoped.

Q: Would you define yourself as a literary translator? Will you add this as your specialty?

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Age of Wulin : Interview de l'équipe de traduction


Interview de l'équipe de traduction
«Tout ça c'est du chinois pour moi»
Gpotato parle de son futur MMORPG Age Of Wulin, mais cette fois-ci c'est un aspect bien particulier qui est mis en avant à savoir le travail de traduction du jeu. Effectivement passer un jeu de l'anglais à un bon français s'avère plus facile que du chinois à une langue de chez nous. La philosophie et le sens des mots ne sont pas les mêmes dans nos cultures.

Compliqué de résumer tout ceci en quelques lignes mais sachez qu'il y a plus de 3.5 millions de caractères chinois alors que notre dictionnaire ne comporte lui que 50.000 noms sans les noms propre (sinon cela monte à 75.000). Les équipes de traductions ont 100 personnes qui travaillent sur ce projet, c'est assez dantesque. Un sujet très intéressant que je vous invite à lire sur le blog officiel. Cela peut aussi vous aider à découvrir un aspect loin d'être anodin dans un jeu.

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Video interview with writer Maria Semple


Maria Semple joined us to talk about books, writing books versus writing for television and why she thinks novelists should stay away from Twitter.
Semple's very funny book "Where'd You Go, Bernadette" came out this summer. Like "Arrested Development" -- she was a consulting producer on the show -- the book layers on small details and unexpected turns to build an increasingly hilarious plot.

Her novel is a little bit warmer than "Arrested Development" -- maybe more like "Mad About You," on which she was a writer and producer. And then there was "Suddenly Susan," which I liked just fine but Semple often leaves off her resume.

Josh Glenn and Mark Frauenfelder on making stuff and kids' stuff

Michael Chabon on 'Telegraph Avenue,' pon farr and other passions

Review: Junot Díaz on fire again in 'This Is How You Lose Her'
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All that Hollywood stuff is behind her now (although she is really looking forward to the next phase of "Arrested Development"). She moved from L.A. to Seattle, where the leaves are green, the sky is full of rain and the streets are not laid out in a logical pattern.

She explains how all of those perceptions of her new city manifested, in heightened, frustrated form, in her novel's character Bernadette. As you might guess from the title, Bernadette has gone missing, and her adolescent daughter sets out to find her.

Semple explains why she decided to use the epistolary form to tell the story, and tells us what some of her favorite epistolary novels are.

She also tells us a little bit about what it's like being an author forced to do bookseller speed dating. (Hint: not that much fun).

Going against the grain, Semple thinks all novelists should get off Twitter. No Tweeting for novelists. Ever. Seriously.

ALSO:

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British writer Hilary Mantel makes history with second Booker Prize : Europe, News - India Today

British writer Hilary Mantel won the prestigious Booker literary prize for a second time Tuesday with her blood-soaked Tudor saga "Bring Up the Bodies," which the head of the judging panel said had "rewritten the book" on historical fiction.

Mantel, who took the 50,000 pound ($82,000) award in 2009 for "Wolf Hall," is the first British author, and the first woman, to achieve a Booker double.

"You wait 20 years for a Booker Prize, and two come along at once," Mantel said as she accepted the award at London's medieval Guildhall. "I regard this as an act of faith and a vote of confidence."

Read more at: http://indiatoday.intoday.in/story/hilary-mantel-wins-booker-prize/1/225060.html

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Q&A: Nobel winner has his say

Mo Yan is one of China's most celebrated and widely translated writers, and on Wednesday he won the Nobel Prize for literature. Born in Shandong province in 1955 into a family of farmers, he enlisted in the People's Liberation Army at 20 and began writing stories. Since then, he has written several novels and collections, including "Red Sorghum" and "Frog." He spoke recently about writing strong women characters, retaining puns in translation and avoiding censorship.

Q Early novels like "Red Sorghum" seem to be more historical or even considered romances, whereas in recent times your novels have moved to more contemporary settings and themes. Is that a conscious choice?

A When I wrote "Red Sorghum," I was less than 30 years old. At that time my life was full of romantic factors when considering my ancestors. I was writing about their lives but didn't know much about them, so I injected many imaginations into those characters. When I wrote "Life and Death Are Wearing Me Out," I was over 40 years old, so I have transformed from a young to a middle-aged man. My life is more current, more contemporary and the cutting throat cruelty of our contemporary times limits the romance I once felt.

Q You often write in the language of the local Laobaixing, and specifically the Shandong dialect, which gives your prose a flinty edge to it. Does it frustrate you that some of the idioms and puns might not make it into an English translation?

A I used quite a substantial amount of local dialect, idioms and puns in my earlier works because at that time I didn't even consider that my work would be translated into other languages. Later on I realized that this kind of language creates a lot of trouble for the translator. But to not use dialect, idioms and puns doesn't work for me because idiomatic language is vivid, expressive and it is also the quintessential part of the signature language of a particular writer.

Q Many of your novels have strong women at their core. Do you consider yourself to be a feminist, or are you simply drawn to write from a female perspective?

A I admire and respect women. I think they are very noble and their life experience and the hardship a woman can endure is always much greater than a man. The strength that this brings is something we can't imagine. In my books I try to put myself in the shoes of women, I try to understand and interpret this world from the perspective of women.

Q Is avoiding censorship a question of subtlety, and to what extent do the avenues opened up by magical realism, as well as more traditional techniques, allow a writer to express their deepest concerns without resorting to polemic?

A Many approaches to literature have political bearings; for example, in our real life there might be some sharp or sensitive issues that they do not wish to touch upon. At such a juncture a writer can inject their own imagination to isolate them from the real world or maybe they can exaggerate the situation -- making sure it is bold, vivid and has the signature of our real world. So actually I believe these limitations or censorship is great for literature creation.

John Freeman is the editor of Granta, which published a longer version of this interview.

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"Found in Translation: How Language Shapes Our Lives and Transforms the World," by Nataly Kelly and Jost Zetzsche

By JEFF GLOR / CBS NEWS/ October 10, 2012, 4:05 PM
"Found in Translation: How Language Shapes Our Lives and Transforms the World," by Nataly Kelly and Jost Zetzsche
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Jeff Glor talks to Nataly Kelly about "Found in Translation: How Language Shapes Our Lives and Transforms the World."
Jeff Glor: What inspired you to write the book?

Nataly Kelly: This book was inspired by the work that interpreters and translators do every day. Because Jost is a working English-to-German translator and I have a background as a Spanish interpreter, we had plenty of our own stories to draw on. However, we were most inspired by our many colleagues who work in other areas of the field - translating everything from machinery repair manuals to love letters and websites.

JG: What surprised you the most during the writing process?

NK: Even though Jost and I were pretty familiar with the diversity of the translation field, we have to admit that even we were surprised at how much translation influences the ways in which we live. Not many people know that even NASA relies on interpreters, that translation helps prevent public health outbreaks, or that the latest fashion trends are heavily influenced by translation. Translation can truly be found in every nook and cranny of our lives.

 

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Home - Meet a UN Translator

brief description of your work as a university MoU focal point, its challenges and rewards

The Faculty of Al-Alsun, Ain Shams University is one of the oldest schools of translation in the whole world. It was founded in 1835 by the great scholar and visionary leader, Refaa At-Tahtawy with the vision that it would instruct a cultured generation, well-versed in Arabic and foreign languages. It was then called the “School of Al-Alsun” (literally, tongues). In 1974, Al-Alsun became part of Ain Shams University, after Arabic became a UN official language. In fact, it was a faculty member of Al-Alsun, Prof. Abdullah Khorshid Al-Berry, who prepared for the UN an evaluation report that was decisive in the approval of Arabic as an official language. Al-Alsun is the home of 21 languages; the UN six official languages included. This plethora of languages helps place the graduates of Al-Alsun in the center of the world acting as communicators and mediators. I am proud to say that Al-Alsun has faculty members who possess experience in translating/interpreting at the UN secretariat as well as in several renowned international organizations all over the world. Hence, you can understand how exciting it is to act as a focal point coordinating efforts between two great institutions. On the one hand, the Faculty of Al-Alsun graduates are the proud masters of Arabic in addition to two other languages, trained to be professional translators from and into Arabic. On the other hand, for the United Nations, anything less than perfection will never become a quality standard. Feeling that you have played a role, no matter how small this role might be, in such a great project, is a reward in itself. So far, challenges have been in trying to compile the information requested by the UN in preparation for the signing of the MoU. As for challenges, I cannot foresee any real hurdles in acting as a focal point between two such great institutions.

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Home - Meet a UN Translators

Mr. Xuesong Ma

"For a language professional, the United Nations is where you contribute to what you believe in by doing what you love."

Before joining the United Nations in 2000, I worked with the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of the People’s Republic of China for 12 years, nine of which as a professional translator/interpreter in the Department of Translation and Interpretation.

Why work for the United Nations?

Working as a professional translator at the United Nations is a job not just for translation aficionados but those who want to watch history in the making at close range and become part of history in the process. The United Nations is the only truly global forum for multilateral diplomacy, where all nations, large and small, come together as equals. Its work touches on every aspect of human life across the whole spectrum of human activities, and it does so with the aid of multilinguism, as represented by the six official languages of the Organization. For a professional translator, this is the place where you not only enjoy all possible opportunities for professional growth, but also where you contribute to a cause larger than yourself, one document at a time.

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« L’Europe méprise la production intellectuelle venant du monde arabe » | La-Croix.com

Entretien avec Ghislaine Glasson Deschaumes, directrice de la revue Transeuropéennes, spécialiste de la circulation des savoirs.

La chercheuse a dirigé un travail collectif sur la réalité des échanges culturels de part et d’autre de la Méditerranée. Un débat public sur « La traduction comme miroir » se tiendra le 26 septembre à Paris.

La Croix : V ous avez dressé un panorama des traductions entre l’arabe, le turc, l’hébreu et les langues européennes depuis vingt à vingt-cinq ans quand cela était possible. Qu’avez-vous appris ?
Ghislaine Glasson Deschaumes : Parmi les pays européens, c’est en France que le plus de livres sont traduits de l’arabe. Or, seuls 60 livres sont traduits chaque année, soit 0,6 % de l’ensemble des livres traduits en français. Dans nombre de pays européens, le ratio n’est que d’un livre traduit de l’arabe pour 1 000 traductions. Si l’on exclut le Coran et Les Mille et Une Nuits, et les deux ou trois titres phares, tels L’Immeuble Yacoubian, d’Alaa Al-Assouani, ou les ouvrages de Naguib Mahfouz, ces livres traduits de l’arabe ont en outre une très faible visibilité dans les médias, les librairies et les bibliothèques. En Israël, les traductions vers l’arabe relèvent de l’infinitésimal et témoignent du blocage des relations, alors que les arabophones représentent 25 % de la population. Le turc est aussi très marginalisé : 0,15 % des traductions en français, 0,06 % en italien, 0,05 % en espagnol. L’hébreu est, lui, proportionnellement moins mal traité dans les traductions européennes.

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Mark Powell: “Translating the Constitutions left me with a greatly increased sense of my belonging to the Order”

Mark Powell: “Translating the Constitutions left me with a greatly increased sense of my belonging to the Order”
Mark Powell: “Translating the Constitutions left me with a greatly increased sense of my belonging to the Order”
2012-09-07 OAR

Mark Powell
Question.– Would you give us your views regarding the previous English translation of the Constitutions? How does it compare to the translation you have just made?
Answer.– My understanding is that the previous English translation of the Constitutions, which has been in use for more than twenty years, was a work carried out in a very short space of time. I would say that it was perhaps a too-literal translation of the Spanish original, so that it sometimes reads as a Spanish text which, although the words have been changed into English, still sounds very Spanish. My impression is of a first draft that was perhaps printed before an appropriate process of revision and editing had been implemented. Nevertheless, we must acknowledge that it has been in use for a considerable time, and whatever may be its failings, it has served us well.

A working session Q.– How did you carry out the task of making the new translation? Did you start from scratch, or did you simply translate the new amendments? How long did it take, and what were the difficulties?
A.– In October 2011 I was asked by the vicar provincial of England to translate the new amendments to the Constitutions, a task which the Prior General had entrusted to our vicariate. At first my plan was simply to incorporate the amendments into the original text, but I soon realized that this was not practical. My style was completely different to that of the earlier version, and I had became aware of certain inaccuracies in it. Because of this, I decided to attempt a completely new translation of everything.

I had finished the draft translation by the end of March this year. As I have pastoral commitments in the parish where I serve, I found periods of time when I could dedicate myself to the job, squeezed in between my everyday duties. The hardest part of the translation was simply finding the time, but as the translation progressed, it gradually became easier.

One difficulty was the question of the use of capital letters for titles and designations within the Order- Vicar Provincial or vicar provincial? Provincial Chapter or provincial chapter? I must admit that I tended to capitalize everything! The problem is that in England we have the habit of using capitals where they are not strictly required. In addition, there are no clear rules concerning this question, which really did become a major concern for me.

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Home - Meet a UN Translators

Ms. Maria Nobrega

My first university degree was in TESOL (Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages), later on I obtained a Translator´s degree and an M.A. in Linguistics (Ohio University, through a Fulbright scholarship). I worked as a university lecturer in Argentina for several years, and in 1986 I joined the Spanish Translation Service at UN Headquarters in New York. I have been a staff member of the Organization for a good part of my adult life, and I would do it all over again. Most of my career has taken place at Headquarters, but I also enjoyed working at other duty stations: Nairobi (in 1994 and 1998) and Geneva, where I was Chief of the Spanish Section between 2003 and 2005. At present I am the Chief of the Spanish Service, and it is very rewarding that my career at the UN will have its culmination where it started, all those years ago.

Why work for the United Nations?

I first learned about the United Nations when I was in high school and my Contemporary History teacher entrusted me with preparing an “exhibition” about the Organization and its work.
I was attracted to the idea of working "for a better world", although at the time I did not know exactly how I would do it. Later on, as I discovered a vocation for translation (and the necessary skills) and found out that there were translation services at the UN, I decided that was what I wanted to do, and
I have been fortunate enough to do it.

Preparing for the United Nations Language Competitive Examination

I did not receive any special training for passing the UN examination, but my background in translation studies and, I suppose, my excellent knowledge of English and French, as well as good writing skills in my own mother tongue, Spanish, helped me pass the competitive examination.

Challenges and rewards of the job

The texts we are called to translate at the UN are as varied as the issues the Organization deals with, and this is both an advantage and a challenge. It is an advantage, or a positive aspect, because there is interest in variety, and surely there will always be some documents that will appeal to our personal preferences and thus be more interesting to translate. For me, those are the reports or resolutions, etc, that refer to important events in the international arena, the issues that make the headlines in the media and are reflected in our documents. It is a challenge, because different types of documents require different approaches, and this entails that the translator must be versatile and capable of adapting to the particular demands of a given text. One document will be highly technical in nature, and accurate terminology is of the utmost importance in this case. Another one will deal with a "politically charged" issue, and the nuances of expression of the original must be respected and reflected in the translation. Other challenges are the need to work under pressure and meet very strict deadlines, while keeping in mind the quality and integrity of our translations. But then, I have always liked challenges, so for me this is a positive trait of my job, rather than the opposite.

Recommendations to potential candidates for the United Nations Competitive Examination for Translators

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« Dans un texte, un traducteur automatique voit des mots; un traducteur humain voit du sens » | Formation et culture numérique - Thot Cursus

Véronique Litet est traductrice depuis huit ans. Elle n'a pas connu l'époque des longues séances en bibliothèque pour consulter les dictionnaires et lexiques hyper-spécialisés, ni le texte rédigé à la main. Pendant ses études, elle utilisait déjà les outils informatiques professionnels. Nous l'avons rencontrée pour qu'elle nous explique la fonction de ces outils et, plus globalement, pour en savoir un peu plus sur l'art de la traduction à l'époque des TIC.

Véronique, tu es traductrice free lance. Comment as-tu commencé dans le métier ?

Après mon bac, j'ai fait une maîtrise de Langues Etrangères Appliquées (LEA) spécialisée affaires et commerce. J'ai effectué mon année de maîtrise (la quatrième année, avant le passage au système LMD) en Italie, dans une école spécialisée en traduction et interprétation. C'est à ce moment que j'ai décidé de m'orienter dans le domaine de la traduction.

J’ai obtenu un DESS (aujourd’hui Master 2) de traduction spécialisée Ensuite, j'ai travaillé comme traductrice pendant trois ans en Angleterre, puis pendant quatre ans en Espagne. Je suis rentrée en France voici quelques mois.

Quelles langues traduis-tu ?

Je traduis l'anglais, l'espagnol et l'italien vers le français. Un traducteur travaille de préférence vers sa langue maternelle, même si certains font des traductions dans les deux sens. Mais on est plus à l'aise vers sa langue maternelle, car on en maîtrise les aspects culturels, historiques, etc. La traduction, ce n'est pas que de la compétence linguistique. Il faut avoir une solide culture générale.

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Emily Dickinson's a Pisser: Talking to Poet-Translator Paul Legault

On his hilarious "English-to-English translation": "I wanted to make lazy high school students’ lives easier. I like lazy high school students.

Paul Legault is the co-founder of the translation press Telephone Books and the author of three books of poetry: The Madeleine Poems (Omnidawn, 2010), The Other Poems (Fence, 2011), and The Emily Dickinson Reader, an "English-to-English translation" of her poems that McSweeney's released last month—and which all summer has been passed around our office by giggling editors, like how teenagers used to share pornography. (Full disclosure: Legault dates a member of our staff.) The book launch is tomorrow evening at powerHouse.
You live in Brooklyn, right?
I live in Crown Heights, moved to Brooklyn three years ago after grad school, started working at the Academy of American Poets when I got here, launched a small Brooklyn press focused on radical translation called Telephone Books. And I like it here.

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Interview with Barry S. Olsen and Katharine Allan of InterpretAmerica

The interpreting profession has really advanced into the limelight this year, to the degree that we were the subject of a decision by the U.S. Supreme Court in the case of Taniguchi vs. Kan Pacific Saipan, Ltd.
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Reminiscing with Translator’s Steve Barton | Tom Lanham | Entertainment | San Francisco Examiner

Steve Barton’s old 1980s outfit Translator might seem to be from San Francisco. Signed to Howie Klein’s classic local imprint 415 Records, the band resided in The City when the hit “Everywhere That I’m Not” broke. But the group originally hails from Los Angeles, and that’s where Barton returned in 1998, a move that proved good for business. There, he re-formed Translator (with a new album, “Big Green Lawn”); launched a new band (Steve Barton and The Oblivion Click); issued solo recordings (like the new lo-fi “Projector,” penned after his father’s passing in 2009); and maintained a day job in music licensing. He plays a career-spanning show in San Francisco tonight.

Read more at the San Francisco Examiner: http://www.sfexaminer.com/entertainment/2012/08/reminiscing-translator-s-steve-barton#ixzz248VZViPi

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Que veut dire traduire ?

Que veut dire traduire ?
Cette pratique a-t-elle une histoire ? De Saint Jérôme à Baudelaire, quelques souvenirs, quelques pistes et quelques réflexions sur cet art délicat de reconstruire un sens dans une langue différente.
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Comment traduire de la littérature?

Comment traduire de la littérature ? Comment interpréter l’injonction de fidélité au texte d’origine que tout traducteur doit respecter ?
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Afrique : saisir les opportunités de « la Francophonie économique » - Afrik.com : l'actualité de l'Afrique noire et du Maghreb - Le quotidien panafricain

L’espace francophone représente 19% du commerce mondial. Dans son dernier ouvrage, La Francophonie économique, horizons des possibles vus d’Afrique, Serge Tchaha souligne les opportunités, notamment pour les pays africains, d’une « Francophonie économique ».

Originaire du Cameroun et titulaire d’un MBA en Gestion internationale de l’entreprise de l’Université Laval (Québec, Canada), Serge Tchaha est chroniqueur économique pour Afrique Expansion Magazine à Montréal et pour le quotidien camerounais L’Actu. Il est également membre du comité scientifique de la Rencontre internationale de la Francophonie économique 2012. Après avoir dirigé l’ouvrage collectif, Nous faisons le rêve que l’Afrique de 2060 sera…, inspiré par le cinquantenaire des indépendances de 17 pays africains, il revient aujourd’hui avec La Francophonie économique, horizons des possibles vus d’Afrique.

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Umberto Eco : traverser, rencontrer, traduire… - Ailleurs - France Culture

A l’occasion de la re-parution (légèrement modifiée) de « Le nom de la rose » (Grasset), un entretien avec le grand sémiologue, romancier, agitateur d’idées, qui évoquera notamment ses « expériences de la traduction », non pas mot à mot mais « monde à monde », formule qui résume l’aventure intellectuelle tous azimuts de ce grand brasseur de signes et d’images.

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The Yaka Translation project in the Central African Republic

An interview with the national Bible Translators working with the Yaka project in the Central African Republic...
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An Interview with Poet, Translator, and Editor Mónica de la Torre

We were happy to discover this interview with Mónica de la Torre over at Zoland Poetry. Mónica talks with ZP “about her approaches to translation, her work as an editor, and her own poetry.” Excitingly, they also discuss the beautiful Four:

ZP: In your newest collection, Four, asides of location, whether physical, temporal or emotional, wind like tree rings through the larger landscape of the book; while on a more immediate level, fragments of other texts, quotes, and cultural references (sometimes marked, sometimes not) are folded into the body of each poem independently. Could you talk a little bit about the structuring of Four, and the poetic dialogue that is created when a work is internally quartered, fragmented, then shattered into such a multitude of layers?

dlT: I like that you call it a collection of poems and not a book. Calling it a book might be a stretch given that it’s four chapbooks (two long poems and two serial poems) saddle-stitched individually and bundled together in a slipcase. With the collection’s format, my aim was to have readers assemble its contents—the booklets can be read in the order of the reader’s choice. Had the poems been bound in a single book, I would have had to order the four different series sequentially, and in doing so, I would have imposed a narrative logic to, and perhaps even a hierarchy on, the collection. I was interested in removing all of that, but I was also in having their structure be consistent with the nature of the poems. All of them are occasional in some way or another—they’re all responding to particular circumstances—so I wanted to respect their autonomy and have their physical manifestation relate to ephemera. Mariposa Negra is an elegy for my friend Aura Estrada, whose life was cut tragically short at age 30. Shift is a site-specific piece written for a performance that was part of a festival of collaborations at the Zinc Bar in New York in 2011. Photos While U Wait is meant to resemble a scrapbook, each poem-cum-snapshot memorializing a particular occasion. Lastly, Poets House commissioned four poets to write something in response to an exhibition of works by Gego, the late German-born artist who relocated to Venezuela, at The Drawing Center in New York—Lines to Undo Linearity, an anti-ekphrastic poem, resulted from that. (I realize that even in describing the chapbooks I can’t help but to assign them an order.)

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An Interpreter in Her Own Words - Corporate - Nissan Online Newsroom

YOKOHAMA, Japan – Yuki Morimoto says she, like every interpreter, is the most attentive person in the room. Just inches from Nissan CEO Carlos Ghosn – as if tethered by invisible cuffs, such proximity could have a similar effect on anyone.

But Morimoto, weighted by a shoulder bag and neatly tucked into a suit of seasonal hues with lipstick to match, is not one to flinch. She exudes an executive's confidence – arguably, that's part of her job.

Now in her 12th year of interpreting and translating for Ghosn, Morimoto is his proxy in the Japanese-speaking world – a legend among Japanese interpreters and a rock star in the eyes of those who aspire to the profession.

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Queries for a Practising Translator : Graham … – Poetry in ...

Tweet. Do you only ever translate from a language you know well? Taken from: Queries for a Practising Translator : Graham … – Poetry in Translation. Share this: Facebook · StumbleUpon; Share. Reddit · Print · Email · Digg ...
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An Interview with Poet, Translator, and Editor Mónica de la Torre

We were happy to discover this interview with Mónica de la Torre over at Zoland Poetry.

We were happy to discover this interview with Mónica de la Torre over at Zoland Poetry. Mónica talks with ZP “about her approaches to translation, her work as an editor, and her own poetry.” Excitingly, they also discuss the beautiful Four:
ZP: In your newest collection, Four, asides of location, whether physical, temporal or emotional, wind like tree rings through the larger landscape of the book; while on a more immediate level, fragments of other texts, quotes, and cultural references (sometimes marked, sometimes not) are folded into the body of each poem independently. Could you talk a little bit about the structuring of Four, and the poetic dialogue that is created when a work is internally quartered, fragmented, then shattered into such a multitude of layers?
dlT: I like that you call it a collection of poems and not a book. Calling it a book might be a stretch given that it’s four chapbooks (two long poems and two serial poems) saddle-stitched individually and bundled together in a slipcase. With the collection’s format, my aim was to have readers assemble its contents—the booklets can be read in the order of the reader’s choice. Had the poems been bound in a single book, I would have had to order the four different series sequentially, and in doing so, I would have imposed a narrative logic to, and perhaps even a hierarchy on, the collection.

Scoop.it!
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