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Managing Multilingual Terminology Like a Pro

Managing Multilingual Terminology Like a Pro | Translation World | Scoop.it
The gold standard of multilingual term management is a multilingual termbase. Here are the steps to build and maintain a multilingual termbase, your critical starting point to multilingual terminology management.

Via Maria Pia Montoro
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The 15 Punctuation Marks in Order of Difficulty - Infographic

The 15 Punctuation Marks in Order of Difficulty - Infographic | Translation World | Scoop.it
Ever wonder why you can't figure out when and where to stick a comma? It's probably because commas, by far, have more rules and applications than any other punctuation mark. But why do so many people use the semicolon incorrectly? Comparatively, it should be one of the easiest punctuation marks to master. And why doesn't anybody seem to use the en dash?

Via Ana Cristina Pratas
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Scott Holcomb's curator insight, June 11, 2014 2:10 PM

I still need this!?!

niftyjock's curator insight, June 16, 2014 1:57 AM

Finally an infographic tool I can use!

Chad C. Rogers's curator insight, June 20, 2014 9:12 AM

Of note. 

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English Translation Fails

English Translation Fails | Translation World | Scoop.it
These English translation fails are so funny! I can't stop laughing! (These Engrish fails will make you LOL. Especially #4! http://t.co/j5zzTA9Hu5)
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Elephants can tell one language from another - CBS News

Elephants can tell one language from another - CBS News | Translation World | Scoop.it

http://www.cbsnews.com/news/elephants-can-tell-one-language-from-another/


Via Babel
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Babel's curator insight, March 12, 2014 6:22 AM

Animal language is also covered in Issue 4 of Babel magazine

Rescooped by Margot Acevedo from Applied Corpus Linguistics to Education
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How to make a Linguistic Career in the Fashion Industry

Translation plays a major role in the global fashion industry. For fashion to transcend globally beyond geographical and cultural borders, hiring professional translators is a must. Fashion houses can hire certified agencies for translation and focus on their core job.

Via Jersus Colmenares
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Rescooped by Margot Acevedo from Translation & Interpreting
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The Lingua File: Is Urban Dictionary Good for the English Language?

The Lingua File: Is Urban Dictionary Good for the English Language? | Translation World | Scoop.it
The Lingua File examines whether or not the crowdsourced slang dictionary, Urban Dictionary, benefits the English language or is a crude blemish on its lexical landscape.

Via Estelblau
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Rescooped by Margot Acevedo from Linguistics and literature
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Why Writers Are the Worst Procrastinators

Why Writers Are the Worst Procrastinators | Translation World | Scoop.it
The psychological origins of waiting (... and waiting, and waiting) to work

Via Runa Svetlikova
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Runa Svetlikova's curator insight, February 14, 2014 7:40 AM

I really like this essay, which ranges from writers over writing, touches psychological differences between women and men, slaps the school system and is above all a perfect ruse for procrastinating! :) 

Rescooped by Margot Acevedo from Translation & Interpreting
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Staycation or bleisure? Travel loves made-up words

Staycation or bleisure? Travel loves made-up words | Translation World | Scoop.it

NEW YORK (AP) — Hotels advertise "bleisure" packages. The Thai Tourism Authority is promoting "honeyteering." And a Mississippi TV anchor told advocates of gay equality to "go on gaycation."

Whatever you're doing on vacation, chances are there's a made-up word to describe it. Combine honeymoon and volunteering, you get honeyteering. Combine business and leisure, you get bleisure. Add glamour to a camping trip with wine, steak and scented candles, and you're glamping.

 

Lexicographers call these blended words portmanteaus. The travel industry doesn't have a monopoly on them — think "brunch."

 

But they do "come in handy in a business sector where there's often a need to come up with clever marketing spin," said Ben Zimmer, executive producer of Vocabulary.com and language columnist for The Wall Street Journal. "It's niche marketing. You're trying to appeal to different sectors of the public: 'Well, we have a special kind of tourism for you and it has a special name.'"


Via Maria Pia Montoro, Estelblau
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Lost in Translation: 9 International Marketing Fails - BusinessNewsDaily

Lost in Translation: 9 International Marketing Fails - BusinessNewsDaily | Translation World | Scoop.it
BusinessNewsDaily
Lost in Translation: 9 International Marketing Fails
BusinessNewsDaily
For U.S. businesses to succeed overseas, they have to appeal to their international consumer base.
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Nappy? Pram? Deciphering Duchess Kate's British English - TODAY.com

Nappy? Pram? Deciphering Duchess Kate's British English - TODAY.com | Translation World | Scoop.it

Via Babel
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Babel's curator insight, July 22, 2013 7:00 AM

Speakers of American English get to grips with the British baby-related terms that are bound to come their way in the wake of the royal birth.

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Why Ice Cream Sounds Fat and Crackers Sound Skinny

Why Ice Cream Sounds Fat and Crackers Sound Skinny | Translation World | Scoop.it
Words carry weight. A linguist explains.

Via Babel
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Babel's curator insight, August 20, 2013 7:19 AM

Fascinating insight into why wordforms are not entirely arbitrary!

Kayeon Yoo's curator insight, January 15, 2014 1:09 PM

An interesting article about what kind of impression is created by different vowels. See if this is true in your first language! 

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Are You a Language Bully? - Slate Magazine

Are You a Language Bully? - Slate Magazine | Translation World | Scoop.it
Slate Magazine
Are You a Language Bully?
Slate Magazine
Can you recite the dictionary definition of peruse from memory?
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The Real Link Between Creativity and Mental Illness | Beautiful Minds, Scientific American Blog Network

The Real Link Between Creativity and Mental Illness | Beautiful Minds, Scientific American Blog Network | Translation World | Scoop.it

Via Runa Svetlikova
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Runa Svetlikova's curator insight, August 13, 2014 5:20 AM

This is a slight correction to the existing theories rather than something alltogether new, but it is still interesting.

Rescooped by Margot Acevedo from Translation & Interpreting
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This Is How the New SAT Will Test Vocabulary | TIME

This Is How the New SAT Will Test Vocabulary | TIME | Translation World | Scoop.it
Emphasis will be put on understanding the many meanings of common words, rather than the single meaning of rarer ones

Via Jersus Colmenares, Estelblau
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Mind your slanguage, and don't be an erk. YOLO

Mind your slanguage, and don't be an erk. YOLO | Translation World | Scoop.it
Gary Nunn: Slang should be celebrated, not condemned. It enriches our language – from bloomers to booze, from cool to ceebs, and from doing a Lohan to LOLZ

Via Babel
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Understanding How the Brain Speaks Two Languages | TIME.com

Understanding How the Brain Speaks Two Languages | TIME.com | Translation World | Scoop.it

Hablas dos idiomas? You should, if you know what's good for you


Via Estelblau
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The Top 5 Ungrammatical Song Lyrics

The Top 5 Ungrammatical Song Lyrics | Translation World | Scoop.it
by Kate Woodford and Dom Glennon Are you annoyed by song lyrics that do not obey the rules of grammar? Do you correct them as you sing along?

Via Pascual Pérez-Paredes
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Are 'grammar Nazis' ruining the English language? - Telegraph

Are 'grammar Nazis' ruining the English language?  - Telegraph | Translation World | Scoop.it
Split infinitives make them shudder and they’d never end a sentence with a preposition. But linguist Geoffrey Pullum has a message for all grammar pedants: you're wrong

Via Babel
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Daniel Kalfas's curator insight, November 13, 2014 9:35 AM

The linguist Geoffrey Pullum has some interesting things to say to 'grammar nazis', and brings up some valid points about the evolution of a language. He points out how English is not a language defined by set rules, but by how the people use it. This point of view makes a lot of sense to me because as a current day English speaker old English spoken in the 18th and 19th century sounds very odd to me. However just because it sounds odd, or the subject verb agreement is a little confusing does not mean that the sentence is wrong.

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Mind your slanguage, and don't be an erk. YOLO

Mind your slanguage, and don't be an erk. YOLO | Translation World | Scoop.it
Gary Nunn: Slang should be celebrated, not condemned. It enriches our language – from bloomers to booze, from cool to ceebs, and from doing a Lohan to LOLZ

Via Babel
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Emotions in More than One Language

Emotions in More than One Language | Translation World | Scoop.it

When bilinguals' childhood lacks of affection, they may prefer to express emotion in their second language.


Via Stacy Drinkwine Hauser
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WalkerKyleForrest's curator insight, March 21, 2014 10:22 AM

Many children are forced to learn a different language from what they grew up with. With this setback, many of their feeling cannot be seen, in a negative way. But as  they accomadate to their languages, they can begin to comprimise and solve problems, live happily ever after.

BandKids13-14's curator insight, April 3, 2014 10:24 AM

I have met people that aren't from America that speak Spanish, and when they get mad or excited then they speak in their native language. I didn't know that some people didn't do that. It's weird that some people switch languages while they are mad or excited. My mind doesn't even work that fast on my first language. It's amazing how the human mind works.

~Jessica 

shamlabeth's curator insight, April 14, 2014 11:35 AM

In some cases when people are able to speak more than one language and they are in pain, in trouble, are sad, or are angry they some times use other languages then the one they grew up learning. Sometimes it is easier expressing yourself using a foreign language. Using a foreign language sometimes  helps expressing yourself easier .~Amanda

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Historical linguistics: Eurasiatic? | The Economist

Historical linguistics: Eurasiatic? | The Economist | Translation World | Scoop.it
THE Washington Post reports today that linguists have discovered a handful of "ultraconserved" words, some 15000 years old. These are said to include "hand",...

Via Babel
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Babel's curator insight, July 5, 2013 8:23 AM

Watch out for a round-up of this story in the next issue of Babel!

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10 Old English Words You Need to Be Using

10 Old English Words You Need to Be Using | Translation World | Scoop.it
If you learn just ten words of Old English this month, let them be these, from Mark Forsyth's The Horologicon: A Day’s Jaunt Through the Lost Words of the English Language.

Via Babel
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Babel's curator insight, October 7, 2013 6:05 AM

The next issue of Babel features a review of The Horologicon

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Does Your Language Shape How You Think?

Does Your Language Shape How You Think? | Translation World | Scoop.it
The idea that your mother tongue shapes your experience of the world may be true after all.

Via Babel
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Babel's curator insight, September 12, 2013 4:30 AM

The Whorf-bashing is a bit extreme, but this is a detailed article on the relationship between thought and the language we speak.

Kayeon Yoo's curator insight, January 15, 2014 1:15 PM

The debate about Sapir-Whorf hypothesis is on-going.