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Metaglossia: The Translation World
News about translation, interpreting, intercultural communication, terminology and lexicography - as it happens
Curated by Charles Tiayon
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UN Careers - jobs in this network (Translators, Revisers, Editors, etc.)

Vacancies in this network: Translators, Revisers, Editors, etc.

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Multi-language commentary emerging as a new trend in sports - The Economic Times

COIMBATORE: With multi language commentary emerging as a new trend, the new sports channel, SONY KIX, has decided to telecast more sports events in regional languages, as it began in Tamil, Telugu and Bengali, for the ongoing Pepsi IPL, a top company official said today.The viewership of sports channels has increased in recent times following shift in the commentary to Hindi in India, which was only in .. Read more at:http://economictimes.indiatimes.com/articleshow/46957621.cms?utm_source=contentofinterest&utm_medium=text&utm_campaign=cppst
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Fearing language extinction, Unimas documents languages used in Sarawak - The Rakyat Post

The United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (Unesco) estimates 43% of the estimated 6,000 languages spoken in the world are endangered and four of them are found in Malaysia Borneo.
Due to this threat, Universiti Malaysia Sarawak (Unimas) Computer Science and Information Technology Associate Professor Dr Ranaivo Malancon and her team are working towards documenting common languages used in the state, such as those spoken by the Sarawak Malay, Melanau, Iban and Bidayuh.
“Most of these language have its similarities, but sadly, these languages have never been documented before. What we fear is the extinction of these languages,” said Malancon to The Rakyat Post after presenting a public talk on “Preserving Sarawak Languages and History through Language Processing” at the Sarawak Development Institute here.

Currently, the Unimas Sarawak Language Technology team has documented 10 hours of common languages spoken in the state.
“Like the Malay language, the only thing that puts them apart is the dialects, and these goes the same with the rest of the main ethnic language,” Malancon added.
Though most Sarawakians can speak more than one language and would likely mix the languages they speak when conversing with others, Malancon said this was not a threat but an evolution of language.
“This happens when there is diversity, and it also happens in France, where Parisienne have their own way of speaking French compared to where I am from,” said Malancon, who is from Madagascar.
Malancon describes language mix by the new generation as part of human evolution and something that could not be detered.
“Language evolution also brings continuity in the language as it is spoken daily. But if the language becomes exclusive just to one particular group, that is how languages becomes extinct as it is not passed down to the next generation,” said Malancon.
The team have identified ethnic languages found only in Sarawak, Punan Batu, with only 30 known speakers, Sian (50), Kanowit (100) and Abai Sungai in Sabah with only 400 known speakers, classified between critically endangered and definitely endangered.
The team also discovered two extinct ethnic languages in Sarawak, known as Seru and Lelak.
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Language Access Is a Consumer Protection Issue

PROJECTS EXPERTS EVENTS REPORTS ABOUT US PRESS DONATEIssues » HousingLanguage Access Is a Consumer Protection IssueEl CentroSOURCE: AP/Todd FeebackMaria Carrillo, a financial consultant at El Centro in Kansas City, Kansas, consults with a client about her progress on buying a house, March 2006.By Michela Zonta & Joe Valenti | Friday, April 17, 2015PRINT: print icon SHARE: Facebook icon Twitter icon Share on Google+ Email iconThe Center for American Progress recently submitted comments to the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, or CFPB, regarding its proposed Language Access Plan. Read the full comment letter here.The CFPB recently proposed a Language Access Plan to demonstrate its commitment to provide people with limited English proficiency, or LEP individuals, much-needed access to its programs, information, and services in their native languages. The proposed plan is a critical step toward ensuring that LEP people can exercise their right to fair and transparent consumer financial products and services.This plan is especially important due to growing linguistic diversity: 77 percent of Asian Americans, 75 percent of Latinos, 43 percent of Native Hawaiians and Pacific Islanders, and 28 percent of American Indians and Alaska Natives all speak a language other than English at home. More than 40 million foreign-born people reside in the United States, representing 13 percent of the total population. In 1980, 70 percent of foreign-born residents spoke a language other than English at home; by 2012, this number rose to 85 percent.Language and cultural barriers leave households with members who speak English as a second language, or who cannot read English, particularly vulnerable to fraud and predatory practices. Language and cultural barriers may also lead to financial isolation as households find it difficult to participate in the mainstream banking system. The most recent data on banking status by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation show that about 35 percent of households where Spanish is the only language spoken at home currently lack bank accounts—five times the rate for other households—and that 84 percent of these unbanked households have never had accounts.The CFPB’s commitment to LEP individuals and communities is an important step toward social and financial inclusion. Two steps mentioned in the Language Access Plan will help achieve that goal. First, the implementation of a Language Access Task Force will best identify and address language barriers. This task force should rely on individuals who have a deep knowledge of the community—such as community-based organizations, faith-based organizations, local businesses, schools, and social and health service providers—to locate and gather information to help understand and address language barriers. Second, promoting materials that are in consumers’ native languages will help inform and educate LEP consumers; these educational materials should be distributed digitally and via social media, not just through traditional means. And the CFPB should incorporate a language preference option into its complaint database by including a language preference field on the complaint form.Two additional steps would also expand language access. The CFPB should recruit and hire multilingual staff who possess language skills, consumer finance expertise, and cultural competency. Staff who bring all of these skills are best able to respond to the challenges of both a complicated financial marketplace and a diverse consumer base. The CFPB should also focus outreach activities on communities with limited English proficiency. In emerging immigrant communities, the lack of extensive social networks and community resources may make it more difficult to reach consumers with information related to financial services. In many of these communities, faith-based organizations may be a valuable focal point.These steps will help expand and continue the CFPB’s effort to make access to consumer financial products and services more inclusive and transparent for households with limited English proficiency.Michela Zonta is a Senior Policy Analyst for the Housing Finance and Policy team at the Center for American Progress. Joe Valenti is the Director of Consumer Finance at the Center.To speak with our experts on this topic, please contact:Print: Liz Bartolomeo (poverty, health care) 202.481.8151 or lbartolomeo@americanprogress.orgPrint: Tom Caiazza (foreign policy, energy and environment, LGBT issues, gun-violence prevention) 202.481.7141 or tcaiazza@americanprogress.orgPrint: Allison Preiss (economy, education) 202.478.6331 or apreiss@americanprogress.orgPrint: Tanya Arditi (immigration, Progress 2050, race issues, demographics, criminal justice) 202.741.6258 or tarditi@americanprogress.orgPrint: Chelsea Kiene (women's issues, Talk Poverty, faith) 202.478.5328 or ckiene@americanprogress.orgPrint: Elise Shulman (oceans) 202.796.9705 or eshulman@americanprogress.orgPrint: Katie Murphy (Legal Progress) 202.495.3682 or kmurphy@americanprogress.orgSpanish-language and ethnic media: Jennifer Molina 202.796.9706 or jmolina@americanprogress.orgTV: Rachel Rosen 202.483.2675 or rrosen@americanprogress.orgRadio: Chelsea Kiene 202.478.5328 or ckiene@americanprogress.org
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Let's leave the pros and cons of bilingualism out of politics

Whichever language you speak, you are welcome. Welcome via ivosar/www.shutterstock.comThis election, we have been repeatedly told our nation is just like a household that must balance its books. We must count up pounds and pence, establish the economic value of all things. And that most human asset – language – has not escaped this cost-checking culture. The pros and cons of British bilingualism are being weighed with a shrewd bursar’s eye.Language is a wonder of the natural world. Anthropologist Wade Davis poetically calls it “the flash of the human spirit, a vehicle through which the soul of each particular culture comes into the material world”. Our ability to process language, whether we speak one language or five, is a mind-boggling feat of complexity. From minute to minute, without a second thought, we make well-formed utterances, plucking words from among the 30,000 or so in our minds in milliseconds.Yet, positive or negative, this most unquantifiable of riches is rarely discussed except in instrumentalist terms, for its costs and its profits. Whether it is Boris Johnson’s railing at taxi drivers, Nigel Farage’s rants against the workers upon whom the NHS relies, or even media reports that bilingual people are cognitive superheroes, the frame of the discussion is the same.Muddled messagesThe data behind such cost-checking claims is often poorly equipped for task. Our schools are said to be weighed down by the burden of children who speak English as a second language, the number of such children having “soared” to more than 1.1m.But figures on children with English as a second language are usually taken from the Department for Education’s school census, which does not collect information on the order in which children learn their languages. The census instead uses “exposure” to other languages as a proxy for having English as a second (by implication weaker) language. On this basis all bilingual children, even those for whom English is the stronger language, are bundled up under the same heading. A more fitting statistic for the cost-checking argument might be the proportion of children needing some level of interpreting to make sense of the class, but this is not part of the school census.A poster at a council office in Peterborough. Chris Radburn/PA ArchiveLanguage learning is also sold to us in instrumentalist terms, with a focus on the benefits to business earnings and boosts to our brain power. Though linguistic researchers have long been convinced that bilingualism is inherently valuable in its own right, recent research advances on the relationship between bilingualism and cognitive function cause particular excitement. The former secretary of state for education, Michael Gove, has confidently proclaimed that learning a language makes you smarter. The Conservative manifesto promises to make a language GCSE compulsory for all – though Labour has criticised recent plans for exam boards to reduce the range of languages available.However, we must be cautious. Researchers are still disentangling the complexities behind headlines about a bilingual cognitive advantage. If “cleverness” or “employability” are the only benefits of bilingualism’s worth that we focus on, the focus is still one of cost checking.In the 1920s, bilingual children were thought to be “behind in school, retarded in measured intelligence, and socially adrift”. American psychologist Raymond Klein cautions that the pendulum of opinion about bilingual benefits to cognition, once firmly positioned against the value of speaking many languages, might best be parked in neutral for a while.Different view of the worldWhile the pendulum swings and election campaigning builds to a frenzy, it’s important not to lose sight of more inherent value. As much as an insurance policy against cognitive decline in old age or a slightly larger salary appeal to me, I envy those who have grown up speaking several languages for more fundamental reasons than this.Their view of the world is wider than mine. They tell me words for the same things “taste” different in their mouths, like the English soul “mate” that becomes a “sister” soul in French (ame soeur), the deeper satisfaction of switching into Punjabi to swear with gusto, or the ability of some languages to carry lyricism without becoming saccharine. And anyone who uses another variety of English such as that in the Black Country or Newcastle – considered by some a cognitive mirror of bilingualism on a smaller scale – knows that the flavour of an expression simply gets lost sometimes when it is translated into standard English.These reasons, and more, will remain compelling whatever the twists and turns of our understanding of language in the brain, or the latest pre-election scare story about language and immigration.All this relentless coalition stock-taking, this fretting by the political class over whether taxi drivers are linguistically equipped to serve them, or whether children with rich language repertoires are a worrisome burden, means we risk missing the riches that are right in front of us.Next read: Theresa May’s hidden British value – monolingualism
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Language barrier hampers HIV/Aids control - NewsDay Zimbabwe

Language barrier is hampering effective HIV/Aids communication in areas like Chiredzi where people speak different indigenous languages.BY VENERANDA LANGAThis was revealed by Masvingo Senator Otilia Maluleke when she contributed to debate in Senate on the first report of the thematic committee on HIV and Aids on the anti-retroviral therapy (ART) rollout programme.The report was presented in Senate before it adjourned in March.“Chiredzi is close to the South African and Mozambican borders and most people there think HIV and Aids is caused by witchcraft because they do not have information about the virus,” Maluleke said.“It is difficult to communicate because some people understand Ndebele, Ndau, Shona, Venda and Shangani it is a mixed bag.”She said as a result there were many child-headed families resulting in children facing challenges.“When the orphaned children realise the challenges overcoming them, they dump the younger children. Some children end up being picked at the railway station, while others are just dumped anywhere,” she said.Maluleke said polygamy was another challenge fuelling the spread of HIV in Chiredzi.
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MLSListings Accelerates Industry Standardization

MLSListings Accelerates Industry Standardization
Silicon Valley's MLS Promotes Coast-to-Coast Real Estate Language
SUNNYVALE, CA--(Marketwired - April 15, 2015) - As an industry leader in the push to adopt uniform real estate data standards, MLSListings Inc. has become one of the first multiple listing services (MLSs) to have earned the Real Estate Standards Organization's (RESO's) Data Dictionary Certification. MLSListings is the only MLS in the nation to have earned both RESO server certifications combined with the data dictionary certification for data distribution, becoming the example of the standard for which MLSs are striving.
RESO is an organization that focuses on the validity and implementation of national real estate standards, and the Data Dictionary Certification is the latest in RESO efforts to bring a uniformed data set to real estate.
"Consistent national data saves time and money," says Bob Gottesman, executive director at RESO, "because it makes it easier for MLSs, vendors, and other third parties to develop new, data-driven applications and services that can serve all REALTORS®, agents, and consumers in North America."
MLSListings has played an integral part in various RESO committees and standards meetings, as well as the creation of the Data Dictionary.
"Implementing national data standards is paramount for our brokers and agents, as well as those across the country, to create products using their data for marketing, statistics, and new products," says Jim Harrison, RCE, CAE, president and CEO of MLSListings Inc. "I am proud that we've had a hand in the creation of these new standards since their inception."
MLSListings is a charter member of RESO, and MLSListings Chief Operating Officer Jeremy Crawford is serving a second term on the RESO board of directors. MLSListings engineers are also members and leaders for several RESO committees, including the Data Dictionary, Property Unique Identifier, and Transport workgroups
About MLSListings Inc.
MLSListings Inc. is recognized as a premiere multiple listing service in the nation. Based in the heart of Silicon Valley and specializing in Monterey, San Benito, Santa Clara, Santa Cruz, and San Mateo counties, MLSListings enables real estate professionals to conduct business using leading technology solutions and services. Facilitating more than $70 billion in annual real estate transactions, the MLSListings database is the lifeblood of real estate in Silicon Valley, providing real estate professionals, as well as consumers, with data that is updated every five minutes.
CONTACT INFORMATION
Media Contact:
Myra Jolivet
mjolivet@mlslistings.com
408-874-0243

Shawn Camilleri 
scamilleri@mlslistings.com
408-874-0274
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Elizabeth Colón of Metaphrasis on the demand for face-to-face dialogue

Why Metaphrasis Language & Cultural Solutions doesn't offer remote interpreting
Elizabeth Colón will receive Nawbo Chicago’s 2015 Woman Business Owner of the Year award on April 27. Colón, president and founder of Metaphrasis Language & Cultural Solutions, has won similar honors from the Small Business Administration, Enterprising Women magazine and the La Raza Spanish-language newspaper. Although a tiny player in the $37 billion interpretation industry, the Chicago-based company exceeded $2 million in revenue in 2014. Colón explains how customer feedback swayed her to buck high-tech translation.


Elizabeth Colón, president and founder of Metaphrasis Language
Q. How does it feel to win these awards?

A. It’s an amazing feeling coming from my humble roots. My parents are from Puerto Rico, and my mother raised six children as a single parent. We grew up on public aid. My mother instilled values that are important for everyday living like education, being honest and working hard.


It’s not about the revenue and how fast we’re growing but that we stay true to who we are as a company and we’re making an impact and giving back to the community.

Q. What is your annual revenue and growth?

A. In 2012 we were at $1.8 million, 2013 was $2 million and 2014 was $2.1 million. We have six full-time employees. The interpreters we use in the Chicagoland area is 160, but nationally we work with over 600. There are also translators in there, too, and that's a hot area. An interpreter renders information orally and a translator does it on paper.

Q. Do you plan to offer remote interpreting?


Microsoft shows off real-time Skype translator
A. We decided not to do it. The feedback we’ve received from our clients is that they really like us for the traditional, face-to-face model. We test every interpreter in their target language to make sure they’re at the level and quality we want them to be.

Q. How does the boom in translation apps affect you?

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A. I don't think it has hindered our ability to grow at any capacity. There is a human element that’s missing in machine translations. If you want to know “door” in Spanish through Google or Babelfish, you’ll get your answer. But you’re not ever going to get the true meaning of a sentence or paragraph through those machines. So when I look at the liability factor, I don’t foresee that we will use it.

Q. How has your business evolved?


A. When we started in 2007, there was a huge need for education because there are standards of practice, a code of ethics and certain techniques that we follow. In 2010, we opened the Chicago office with a training facility where companies send their employees for training and prescreening to be sure they’re bilingual enough to be hired. We created courses for healthcare interpreters where they can get continuing education credits. Now there is movement to become certified as a legal interpreter in the court setting. I hired someone to create and teach a curriculum on legal interpreting.

We’re opening the Language Learners Academy in Frankfort (southwest of Chicago). We brought in Edwin Rivera as CEO (of the Language Learners Academy) to create and oversee this academy where we’ll teach kindergarten through 5th grade-level Spanish, Mandarin and French.

Q. How are you diversifying your industry expertise?

A. If event-planning companies have clients from different countries that come to Chicago, why can’t we provide interpreter services that they outsource to us? Some event planning we did two years ago was very profitable. Another area is advertising and marketing.

Q&As are edited for length and clarity.

MacArthur is a freelance writer for Blue Sky.

CORRECTION: This version reflects that Edwin Rivera is CEO of Language Learners Academy, not of Metaphrasis Language & Cultural Solutions.

Copyright © 2015, Chicago Tribune
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American Sign Language Day celebrated at Quincy University

QUINCY, Ill. (WGEM) -
National Sign Language Day and the Quincy University Sign Interpreter's Association celebrated by hosting a lunch on campus.

The lunch was held for the deaf community in the main dining room at the QU main campus. Theater students put on a short play that was translated in American Sign Language. ASL began on this day in 1817.

"We are raising recognition because we really cherish our language. 195 years ago, 198 years ago, excuse me," sign language instructor Dr. Paul Kiel said. "198 years ago, the first school for the deaf was opened and we really just want to raise awareness because that started our deaf culture."

A movie night is also being held on campus to celebrate national ASL day.
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Video Remote Interpreting Removes Language Barriers at Catholic Health | Virtual-Strategy Magazine

The health care facility implemented immediate access to certified medical interpreters throughout its hospitals and facilities

SEATTLE, April 15, 2015 /PRNewswire/ -- InDemand Interpreting, a leading provider of Video Remote Interpreting (VRI) within healthcare, is pleased to announce that Catholic Health has taken an important step in removing language barriers in its hospitals with the addition of video remote interpreting (VRI) services at Sisters of Charity Hospital, Mercy Hospital, Kenmore Mercy Hospital and Sisters' St. Joseph Campus.

"America's ever-growing cultural melting pot makes it difficult for hospitals to communicate with each patient in their native language," said Kathy Kanaley, the patient care representative at Kenmore Mercy Hospital. "The evolving field of virtual interpreters is supporting hospitals to ensure that  medical conversations are easier and patients receive the highest quality care regardless of language barriers, cultural backgrounds or disabilities."

InDemand Interpreting, the system used throughout Catholic Health, offers VRI services on PC or iPad devices available on portable carts that can be wheeled into the patient's room. VRI allows hospital staff to use interpreters via a live, web-based video conference with medically trained and certified interpreters. The system provides the hospital with access to interpreters, 24 hours a day, in more than 200 languages, including American Sign Language.

VRI carts are available in a number of areas at all Catholic Health hospitals. At the click of an icon, a healthcare provider is connected to a medically-trained interpreter. The interpreter appears on the monitor - similar to Skype - and begins interpretation between the provider and the patient. Previously, the hospitals used phone interpreting services and on-call Spanish interpreters, which often required long wait times and ultimately slowed down patient care.

"To ensure the best possible patient care, a medically trained interpreter is the best way to communicate healthcare information properly," said Kanaley. "If there is not effective communication between the patient and the provider, it can delay care, which can be critical during an emergency. With video remote interpreting, we can offer our patients prompt, professional interpreting services any time of day."

Hospitals that use VRI systems note improvements in patients' satisfaction when they are able to communicate with a live person who can speak their native language. According to Kanaley, the video interpreting system enhances patient care and response time.

About InDemand Interpreting

InDemand Interpreting was founded in 2007 with the vision of ensuring that every patient receives the highest quality healthcare, regardless of language, cultural background or disability. By delivering the most experienced medical interpreters and highest quality video technology InDemand Interpreting provides doctors, nurses and clinicians the language access they need to provide the best possible care. Visit InDemand at http://www.indemandinterpreting.com.

About Catholic Health

Formed in 1998 under four religious sponsors, Catholic Health in Buffalo, NY is a non-profit healthcare system that provides care to Western New Yorkers across a network of hospitals, primary care centers, imaging centers, and several other community ministries. In recognition of its superior service, Catholic Health has been named as among the top 100 integrated healthcare systems by SDI. Visit Catholic Health at: http://www.chsbuffalo.org/.

To view the original version on PR Newswire, visit:http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/video-remote-interpreting-removes-language-barriers-at-catholic-health-300066437.html

SOURCE InDemand Interpreting


Copyright (2015) PR Newswire. All Rights Reserved
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Google search engine now lets you find your phone

Google now lets you find your Android phone from a regular web search.

All you need to do to activate this handy feature is go to Google and type in - you guessed it - 'find my phone.'

The top search result will now show up as a map pinpointing exactly where your phone is. You may need to sign in again, for security purposes.

Of course, that's only good for pinpointing where your handset is within 20 metres or so. For a more pinpoint location, there's an option to have Google ring your phone immediately behind that map.

If you have multiple Android phones, meanwhile, you'll be able to flick between them with a handy drop-down menu to the top right of the map.

As Google notes in its Google+ post on the matter, you'll need to make sure you have the latest version of the Google app on your phone. That said, the feature should work for you right now.


Read More: Best Android phones 2015

For more advanced features like remotely locking and even wiping your Android phone, you'll still need to download the Android Device Manager software - which was the main way to find your misplaced phone prior to this handy in-browser solution.

Last month, Google added the ability to do this through your Android Wear smartwatch, though you have to be in fairly close proximity to your phone for it to work.
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EU accuses Google of hurting consumers, competitors in Web search case

(Reuters) - The European Union accused Google Inc on Wednesday of cheating consumers and competitors by distorting Web search results to favor its own shopping service, after a five-year investigation that could change the rules for business online.

It also started another antitrust investigation into the Android mobile operating system, a key element in Google's strategy to maintain revenues from online advertising as people switch from Web browser searches to smartphone apps.

EU Competition Commissioner Margrethe Vestager said the U.S. company, which dominates Internet search engine markets worldwide, had been sent a Statement of Objections - effectively a charge sheet - to which it has 10 weeks to respond.

Investigations into Google's business practices in other areas would continue. The shopping case, on which the EU has had the most complaints dating back the longest time, could potentially set a precedent for concerns over Google's search products for hotels, flights and other services.

Vestager, a Dane who took over the politically charged case in November, announced the moves on the eve of a high-profile visit to the United States. Her findings follow nearly five years of investigation and abortive efforts by her Spanish predecessor, Joaquin Almunia, to strike deals with Google.

"I am concerned that the company has given an unfair advantage to its own comparison shopping service, in breach of EU antitrust rules," she said. Google could face fines, she warned, if the Commission proves its case that it has used its "near monopoly" in Europe to push Google Shopping ahead of rivals for the past seven years.

Google rejected the charges. Its shares closed up 0.40 percent on Wednesday after earlier losing 1 percent.

Meanwhile, Google's rivals are pushing U.S. antitrust enforcers to investigate the use of Android, two people with knowledge of the matter said.

RELATED COVERAGE
› Google faces fight or flight choice against EU regulators
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› Past EU antitrust probes show Google stock may languish
› EU case against Google centers on value of price comparison sites
Analysts said the EU charges were unlikely to hurt Google's evaluation because it reflected the regulatory risk. If recent history of EU probes into tech companies is an indicator, however, Google shares may have trouble moving forward until the issue is resolved.

In its first reaction, the Mountain View, California-based company said in a blog post that it strongly disagreed with the EU's statement of objections and would make the case that its products have fostered competition and benefited consumers.

"Android has been a key player in spurring this competition and choice, lowering prices and increasing choice for everyone (there are over 18,000 different devices available today)," it said of its free operating system for mobile devices.

The Commission, whose control of antitrust matters across the wealthy 28-nation bloc gives it a major say in the fate of global corporations, can fine firms up to 10 percent of their annual sales, in Google's case up to 6.2 billion euros.

If it finds that companies are abusing a dominant market position, the EU regulator can also demand sweeping changes to their business practices, as it did with U.S. software giant Microsoft in 2004 and chip-maker Intel in 2009. Its record antitrust fine was 1.09 billion euros on Intel.

Competition lawyer Bertold Baer-Bouyssiere at DLA Piper in Brussels said: "Even more than Microsoft, this case will shape the landscape for the digital sectors in the years to come."

"NOT ANTI-AMERICAN"

Rejecting suggestions - recently from President Barack Obama himself - that the EU was pursuing an anti-American, protectionist policy, Vestager, a liberal former economy minister, said about a quarter of the firms which had complained to the EU authorities about Google were themselves U.S.-owned.

She insisted that political pressure had played no part in her decision to accuse Google. Nationality or successful market domination were not issues for her, only the abuse of market power.

In a mark of the emotion U.S. tech hegemony evokes among Europeans who fear economic eclipse, the EU parliament last year voted a non-binding resolution urging the Commission to consider breaking up Google. The EU action so far is unlikely to have such a dramatic effect, though it could crimp future business.

Google now had a chance to explain itself, Vestager said, and the case might be settled by it making further commitments to change its products. She wanted a change in the "principle" underlying searches rather than a redesign of current Web pages or tweaks to algorithms by which Google ranks results. That way, any remedy would be "future-proof" against technological change.

Of the investigation into Android, which analysts said could prove a bigger threat to Google's future profitability, Vestager said: "I want to make sure the markets in this area can flourish without anticompetitive constraints imposed by any company."

The focus on the ranking of searches for shopping sites did not address all complaints lodged with the Commission. Vestager stressed her antitrust staff would continue to investigate other areas of concern, including alleged "web scraping" to copy rivals' content, and restrictive practices on advertising.

A final resolution - quite possibly involving court action if Google does not choose to settle - is likely to take many months and probably years, legal experts said.

CRITICS WELCOME

Google's critics welcomed the decision to pursue the U.S. giant, though many industry experts believe the action is unlikely to markedly shift existing business their way. Rather, by firing a shot across Google's bows, it may favor competitors in new areas as technology develops, a priority for the new European Commission led by Jean-Claude Juncker, which wants to foster home-grown enterprise.

Michael Weber of German online mapping service Hot-Map.com told Reuters: "After so many years with everyone thinking that we were crazy, it's good to see something happening. The sun is shining today."

Vestager's action won cross-party endorsement in the European Parliament. In a statement headlined "Even Uncle Google must play fair", German lawmaker Manfred Weber, floor leader of the largest conservative group, said: "Internet is not the Wild West - there are rules on the web that must also be respected."

French Socialists Pervenche Beres and Virginie Roziere applauded the Commission for "at long last" taking action against "the threat posed to the European economy" and renewed their call for the breakup of Google.

American domination of the Internet and other new technology sectors has prompted a mixture of admiration and anxiety in Europe.

U.S. authorities that looked at Google's business have taken no action. Vestager said she was not concerned that that difference in approach weakened her case: "It's a different market," she told Reuters. While Google has over 90 percent of the EU search market, it has only two thirds of its home market.

The Initiative for a Competitive Online Marketplace, an alliance of businesses, applauded the Commission for taking what it called "decisive action to end Google’s years of abusive behavior in its long-running antitrust case".

German Economy Minister Sigmar Gabriel welcomed Vestager's action. Germany, backed by major companies in the EU's biggest economy, has been particularly vocal in pressing the Commission to act against Google.

Axel Springer chief Mathias Doepfner told the German media group's shareholders in Berlin on Tuesday that Vestager's predecessor Almunia's efforts to negotiate a deal with Google would have been a "shoddy compromise" and praised Vestager for being "more determined, quicker and more true to the facts".

(Additional reporting by Francesco Guarascio, Tom Koerkemeier, Robert-Jan Bartunek, Robin Emmott and Paul Taylor in Brussels, Klaus Lauer and Caroline Copley in Berlin, Eric Auchard in Frankfurt and Foo Yun Chee; Writing by Paul Taylor and Alastair Macdonald; Editing by Peter Graff and Grant McCool)
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The First Electronic Database of Translated Georgian Books in the Works : Beqa Kirtava : Georgia Today on the Web

Although the inventor of the very first e-book is not generally agreed on, one thing is for sure: people have been trying to create an electronic alternative of a book since the 1940s. The reason behind mankind’s urge for creating an e-book is its many advantages, including environmental savings (according to the New York Times, three times more raw materials and 78 times more water is needed to produce a printed book), space and weight decrease, multimedia benefits, etc. Although initially the aforementioned phenomenon was met with skepticism in Georgia, local book lovers have grown fonder of it and today lots of Georgians enjoy reading their favorite works of literature on electronic devices.

On April 7, 2015, the Georgian National Book Center (GNBC) signed a memorandum of collaboration with the National Library of Georgian Parliament, which means that quite soon an electronic database of translated Georgian works of literature will be created.

“We have a lack of information regarding translations published in the recent years, so we needed to have the real picture about all these resources. The bases will also help beginner translators to avoid double translations. The Project is based on the experience of other countries, which are very active and successful in promoting their literature heritage. We will cover all languages Georgian titles are translated into, but firstly, we are focused on the big European languages,” stated Head of GNBC, Dea Metreveli, in an exclusive interview with Georgia Today. “For me the project is really a challenge, because on such initiatives and activities depends the success of the literary translation process in Georgia and the Guest of Honor Project at the Frankfurt Book Fair 2018.”

The idea of creating a fully improved and comprehensive electronic database of Georgian Literature in translations is initiated and supported by the Georgian National Book Center and the Ministry of Culture and Monument Protection of Georgia. According to the GNBC, the database will be finalised in August, 2015 and will be updated on a permanent basis. The importance of the aforementioned project is truly tremendous, with no exaggeration, because as Dea Metreveli said herself, the main goal of the database is “sharing the rich Georgian historical-cultural experience with countries of different cultures in order to enhance the intercultural dialogue.”

For a small country like Georgia, cultural expansion is an undeniably vital task. The translation of foreign works (James Dashers’ 2nd part of The Maze Runner trilogy and Katie Ruth Davies’ 3rd book of the Blood Omen saga are just two of the array of foreign literature works which are high in demand and as yet unavailable in Georgian) plays an equally important role in strengthening international connections. If Georgia strives to further develop its education system and to claim higher spots on the NOP World Culture Score Index, all material should be equally accessible to everyone, therefore, it is crucial that both governmental and non-governmental organizations launch projects such as this.

Beqa Kirtava
16.04.2015
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OpEdNews Article: Article: A Reply to Pope Francis' Latest Critique of Gender Theory

Duluth, Minnesota (OpEdNews) April 15, 2015: In his prepared speech on Wednesday, April 15, 2015, in St. Peter's Square, Pope Francis, the charismatic sweet-talker from Latin America, once again lashed out at gender theory in favor of his church's own preferred sexist theory.

Carol Glatz of the Catholic New Service reports what he said in the article "Pope Francis: Gender theory is the problem, not the solution" published online at the website of the National Catholic Reporter. She reports that the pope's talk is the first of two talks he plans to give on gender theory.

Arguably the Roman Catholic Church embodies institutionalized male sexism.

But gender theory challenges male sexism, not only in the church but also in other institutions as well.

Therefore gender theory represents a threat to the institutionalized male sexism of the Roman Catholic Church.

Now, in theory, many things in the Roman Catholic Church could be changed. However, as everybody knows, the bishops are too conservative and too stubborn to make any significant changes.

But the male sexists in the church's hierarchy do not want to change the lifestyle they have grown accustomed to.

As the chief male sexist in the church's hierarchy, the charismatic sweet-talking Pope Francis prefers to resist making any significant changes in the sexist customs of the Roman Catholic Church.

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My, oh my, is he ever a sweet-talker!

In the book TOUGH, SWEET, AND STUFFY: AN ESSAY ON MODERN AMERICAN PROSE STYLES (1966), Walker Gibson in English at New York University called our attention to sweet-talkers.

But I'm not a sweet-talker like Pope Francis.

Instead, in Walker Gibson's terminology, I am characteristically a stuffy-talker.

Aristotle long ago pointed out that the civic orator characteristically employs the ways of appealing to the audience: (1) logos, (2) pathos, and (3) ethos.

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By virtue of being pope, Pope Francis deploys ethos.

I obviously cannot match his ethos. Despite my handicap in this respect, I want to construct a way to think about the debate he is engaging in.

In Aristotle's terminology, I will rely on logos to construct my argument.

 1  |  2  |  3  |  4

 

Take action -- click here to contact your local newspaper or congress people:
Tell Americans to watch out for the sweet-talking Pope Francis!

Click here to see the most recent messages sent to congressional reps and local newspapers

www.d.umn.edu/~tfarrell

Thomas James Farrell is professor emeritus of writing studies at the University of Minnesota Duluth (UMD). He started teaching at UMD in Fall 1987, and he retired from UMD at the end of May 2009. He was born in 1944. He holds three degrees from Saint Louis University (SLU): B.A. in English, 1966; M.A.(T) in English 1968; Ph.D.in higher education, 1974. On May 16, 1969, the editors of the SLU student newspaper named him Man of the Year, an honor customarily conferred on an administrator or a faculty member, not on a graduate student -- nor on a woman up to that time. He is the proud author of the book (more...)
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MPs okay bid to translate all laws into Kiswahili

All laws will be translated into Kiswahili if a Bill currently before Parliament is passed.

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MPs yesterday unanimously adopted a motion by Taita Taveta women representative Joyce Lay urging the National Council for Law Reporting to progressively translate the Constitution and laws of Kenya into Kiswahili.

Ms Lay said the move will see Kenyan courts give judgment to parties in a case in Kiswahili.

It is estimated that 70 per cent of Kenyans understand Kiswahili more than English.

Members of Parliament agreed that there was need for citizens to understand the Bill of Rights in the Supreme law in order to make justice understandable by a majority of Kenyans.

“Translation of the Constitution and laws will cater for justice for all, the Constitution (is) the single most important document,” said Saku MP Ali Rasso, adding that the translation should include audio for broadcast to breach all barriers of communication.

Those who contributed to the private members motion argued that translating laws into Kiswahili would encourage public participation in governance.

Nominated MP Sunjeev Birdi said Kiswahili will help the majority of Kenyans in the marginalised regions to understand issues likely to affect them.

“Most Kenyans speak Kiswahili more than English, they should not be restricted to participate in national affairs when seeking employment in offices because of language hurdles,” she said.

Kiswahili is the official language in the East African Community partner-states of Kenya, Uganda and Tanzania — and the Democratic Republic of Congo.

This could see documents of EAC written in both English and Kiswahili. Kiswahili is a language spoken by more than 100 million people in Africa, Eastern Africa being the hub.
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Stratus Video Interpreting Highlights Growing Language Gap Between Doctors And Spanish-Speaking Patients

Stratus Video Interpreting Highlights Growing Language Gap Between Doctors And Spanish-Speaking Patients

While the U.S. Spanish-speaking population has continued to rise, the proportion of Latino doctors has fallen; Stratus proposes video remote interpretation services to bridge the language gap for Hispanic patients with limited English proficiency (LEP).

According to U.S. Census Bureau statistics, the U.S. Hispanic population increased by 243% from 1980 to 2010—climbing to nearly 51 million (1)—with over 37.5 million of those Latinos speaking Spanish at home. (2) Meanwhile, the proportion of Latino physicians dropped by 22% over the same period; (1) and with a projected shortage of up to 90,000 physicians within the next 10 years, (3) patients with limited English proficiency (LEP) are likely to face a growing language gap. Until the number of Latino doctors catches up with the burgeoning Hispanic population, Stratus Video Interpreting (http://www.stratusvideo.com/) advises healthcare facilities to explore video remote interpreting services as a way to overcome language barriers.

Researchers at the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) found that while the proportion of non-Hispanic white (NHW) physicians per 100,000 NHW population rose from 211 to 315 between 1980 and 2010, the proportion of Latino physicians per 100,000 Hispanics dropped from 135 to 105 during that time. The gap is even more pronounced in certain states with large Hispanic populations; Texas has only 78 Latino doctors per 100,000 Hispanics, while California has just 50—a figure that is 87% lower than the state’s NHW physician rate. (1) At the same time, U.S. doctor shortages are resulting in longer wait times, with patients in many cities having to wait two weeks or more for an appointment with a family physician. (4)

“The growing doctor shortage and relatively low proportion of Latino physicians have made it increasingly difficult for LEP patients to obtain treatment from healthcare providers who speak their language,” said David Fetterolf, President of Stratus Video Interpreting. “They may have to wait weeks for an appointment with a Spanish-speaking doctor; so in time-sensitive cases, they often receive treatment from someone who doesn’t speak their language. This has the potential of creating confusion or miscommunication between doctors and patients, which can have serious repercussions on patients’ health and safety.”

As reported in the Los Angeles Times, a 2009 focus group study found that “most Spanish-speaking patients at Kaiser Permanente Southern California said that they had English-speaking doctors and that they understood ‘approximately half’ of what their doctors told them. Many worried about misinterpreting physician instructions.” (5) Dr. Gloria Sánchez—physician, professor and lead author of the UCLA report—said that she often sees patients who don’t seem to have understood what English-speaking healthcare providers have told them: “They’ve been to the emergency room multiple times. Whatever was said, it’s not getting across.” (5)

While the UCLA study underscores the critical need for more Spanish-speaking physicians—a problem that is likely to escalate in coming years—Hispanic LEP patients face the ongoing challenge of obtaining healthcare treatment in their native language. To help healthcare providers overcome these communication barriers, Stratus offers on‑demand video remote interpreting services that healthcare facilities can use to supplement their in‑house medical interpreters and bilingual staff.

“Even if patients say they understand ‘some’ English, it’s important for medical discussions and post-visit care instructions to be conducted in the patient’s native language; otherwise, there is too great a potential for misunderstanding and errors,” said Fetterolf. “Our healthcare interpretation services (http://www.stratusvideo.com/healthcare-interpreter-services-overview/) allow physicians and other staff to connect to a highly trained, certified medical interpreter within 30 seconds. This enables Spanish-speaking patients to receive care from the first available physician regardless of language, and it’s an ideal solution for emergency cases when time is of the essence. Until more Spanish-speaking doctors are available to treat the Latino population, video remote interpreting remains the best option to ensure a high standard of care for LEP patients.”

For more information on Stratus and its on‑demand video interpreting services, including medical interpretation for Spanish-speaking patients and others with limited English proficiency, visit www.stratusvideo.com.

About Stratus Video Interpreting
Stratus Video Interpreting provides on‑demand interpreter services by using technology to connect clients with interpreters in over 175 spoken and signed languages in under 30 seconds. Stratus’ cloud-based video solution delivers an array of unique features to virtually any Internet-enabled PC, Mac, smartphone or tablet. Stratus clients use the technology to connect with their own staff interpreters, as well as with Stratus interpreters who have years of healthcare and courtroom experience and hold multiple certifications. With Stratus, state-of-the-art video remote interpreting is made available with virtually no capital investment. Stratus averages 65,000 video calls a day, up from 40,000 in mid-2013. Stratus Video is the sister company of The Z (CSDVRS, LLC, dba ZVRS), which was established in 2006 and developed by and for deaf and hard-of-hearing individuals, setting the industry standard as the nation’s premier Video Relay Service Provider and the first VRS Provider to receive a five-year certification from the FCC. In 2014, Stratus was recognized as one of the fastest-growing privately held companies, ranking #3,827 on Inc. magazine’s Inc. 5000 list. For more information, visit www.stratusvideo.com.

1. Sánchez, Gloria; Theresa Nevarez; et al. “Latino Physicians in the United States, 1980–2010: A Thirty-Year Overview From the Censuses”; Academic Medicine; July 1, 2009; published online ahead of print: January 27, 2015. journals.lww.com/academicmedicine/‌Citation/‌publishahead/Latino_Physicians_in_the_United_States,_1980_2010_.98866.aspx.

2. Ryan, Camille and U.S. Census Bureau. Language Use in the United States: 2011; August 2013. census.gov/prod/2013pubs/acs-22.pdf.

3. AAMC (Association of American Medical Colleges). “New Physician Workforce Projections Show the Doctor Shortage Remains Significant”; press release issued March 3, 2015. aamc.org/‌newsroom/‌newsreleases/426166/20150303.html.

4. Bernstein, Lenny. “U.S. Faces 90,000 Doctor Shortage by 2025, Medical School Association Warns”; The Washington Post; March 3, 2015. washingtonpost.com/news/to-your-health/‌wp/‌2015/03/03/u-s-faces-90000-doctor-shortage-by-2025-medical-school-association-warns/.

5. Brown, Eryn. “Number of Latino Doctors Isn’t Keeping Pace With Population, Study Says”; LA Times; February 19, 2015. latimes.com/local/california/la-me-latino-doctors-20150220-story.html.

SOURCE: Stratus Video Interpreting
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U.S. Facing 90,000 Doctor Shortage: Stratus Video Interpreting Highlights Growing Language Gap Between Doctors and Spanish-Speaking Patients | Virtual-Strategy Magazine

While the U.S. Spanish-speaking population has continued to rise, the proportion of Latino doctors has fallen; Stratus proposes video remote interpretation services to bridge the language gap for Hispanic patients with limited English proficiency (LEP).

Clearwater, FL (PRWEB) April 16, 2015

According to U.S. Census Bureau statistics, the U.S. Hispanic population increased by 243% from 1980 to 2010—climbing to nearly 51 million (1)—with over 37.5 million of those Latinos speaking Spanish at home. (2) Meanwhile, the proportion of Latino physicians dropped by 22% over the same period; (1) and with a projected shortage of up to 90,000 physicians within the next 10 years, (3) patients with limited English proficiency (LEP) are likely to face a growing language gap. Until the number of Latino doctors catches up with the burgeoning Hispanic population, Stratus Video Interpreting advises healthcare facilities to explore video remote interpreting services as a way to overcome language barriers.

Researchers at the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) found that while the proportion of non-Hispanic white (NHW) physicians per 100,000 NHW population rose from 211 to 315 between 1980 and 2010, the proportion of Latino physicians per 100,000 Hispanics dropped from 135 to 105 during that time. The gap is even more pronounced in certain states with large Hispanic populations; Texas has only 78 Latino doctors per 100,000 Hispanics, while California has just 50—a figure that is 87% lower than the state’s NHW physician rate. (1) At the same time, U.S. doctor shortages are resulting in longer wait times, with patients in many cities having to wait two weeks or more for an appointment with a family physician. (4)

“The growing doctor shortage and relatively low proportion of Latino physicians have made it increasingly difficult for LEP patients to obtain treatment from healthcare providers who speak their language,” said David Fetterolf, President of Stratus Video Interpreting. “They may have to wait weeks for an appointment with a Spanish-speaking doctor; so in time-sensitive cases, they often receive treatment from someone who doesn’t speak their language. This has the potential of creating confusion or miscommunication between doctors and patients, which can have serious repercussions on patients’ health and safety.”

As reported in the Los Angeles Times, a 2009 focus group study found that “most Spanish-speaking patients at Kaiser Permanente Southern California said that they had English-speaking doctors and that they understood ‘approximately half’ of what their doctors told them. Many worried about misinterpreting physician instructions.” (5) Dr. Gloria Sánchez—physician, professor and lead author of the UCLA report—said that she often sees patients who don’t seem to have understood what English-speaking healthcare providers have told them: “They’ve been to the emergency room multiple times. Whatever was said, it’s not getting across.” (5)

While the UCLA study underscores the critical need for more Spanish-speaking physicians—a problem that is likely to escalate in coming years—Hispanic LEP patients face the ongoing challenge of obtaining healthcare treatment in their native language. To help healthcare providers overcome these communication barriers, Stratus offers on demand video remote interpreting services that healthcare facilities can use to supplement their in house medical interpreters and bilingual staff.

“Even if patients say they understand ‘some’ English, it’s important for medical discussions and post-visit care instructions to be conducted in the patient’s native language; otherwise, there is too great a potential for misunderstanding and errors,” said Fetterolf. “Our healthcare interpretation services allow physicians and other staff to connect to a highly trained, certified medical interpreter within 30 seconds. This enables Spanish-speaking patients to receive care from the first available physician regardless of language, and it’s an ideal solution for emergency cases when time is of the essence. Until more Spanish-speaking doctors are available to treat the Latino population, video remote interpreting remains the best option to ensure a high standard of care for LEP patients.”

For more information on Stratus and its on demand video interpreting services, including medical interpretation for Spanish-speaking patients and others with limited English proficiency, visit http://www.stratusvideo.com.

About Stratus Video Interpreting:
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Mapping language in the brain

This voxel-lesion symptom map shows supra-threshold voxels for the Speech Production factor (blue-green) and the Speech Recognition factor (red-yellow) with direct total lesion volume control.
Credit: Mirman et al., Nature Communications
[Click to enlarge image]
The exchange of words, speaking and listening in conversation, may seem unremarkable for most people, but communicating with others is a challenge for people who have aphasia, an impairment of language that often happens after stroke or other brain injury. Aphasia affects about 1 in 250 people, making it more common than Parkinson's Disease or cerebral palsy, and can make it difficult to return to work and to maintain social relationships. A new study published in the journal Nature Communications provides a detailed brain map of language impairments in aphasia following stroke.
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"By studying language in people with aphasia, we can try to accomplish two goals at once: we can improve our clinical understanding of aphasia and get new insights into how language is organized in the mind and brain," said Daniel Mirman, PhD, an assistant professor in Drexel University's College of Arts and Sciences who was lead author of the study.
The study is part of a larger multi-site research project funded by grants from the National Institutes of Health and led by senior author Myrna Schwartz, PhD of the Moss Rehabilitation Research Institute. The researchers examined data from 99 people who had persistent language impairments after a left-hemisphere stroke. In the first part of the study, the researchers collected 17 measures of cognitive and language performance and used a statistical technique to find the common elements that underlie performance on multiple measures.
They found that spoken language impairments vary along four dimensions or factors:
Semantic Recognition: difficulty recognizing the meaning or relationship of concepts, such as matching related pictures or matching words to associated pictures.
Speech Recognition: difficulty with fine-grained speech perception, such as telling "ba" and "da" apart or determining whether two words rhyme.
Speech Production: difficulty planning and executing speech actions, such as repeating real and made-up words or the tendency to make speech errors like saying "girappe" for "giraffe."
Semantic Errors: making semantic speech errors, such as saying "zebra" instead of "giraffe," regardless of performance on other tasks that involved processing meaning.
Mapping the Four Factors in the Brain
Next, the researchers determined how individual performance differences for each of these factors were associated with the locations in the brain damaged by stroke. This procedure created a four-factor lesion-symptom map of hotspots the language-specialized left hemisphere where damage from a stroke tended to cause deficits for each specific type of language impairment. One key area was the left Sylvian fissure: speech production and speech recognition were organized as a kind of two-lane, two-way highway around the Sylvian fissure. Damage above the Sylvian fissure, in the parietal and frontal lobes, tended to cause speech production deficits; damage below the Sylvian fissure, in the temporal lobe, tended to cause speech recognition deficits. These results provide new evidence that the cortex around the Sylvian fissure houses separable neural specializations for speech recognition and production.
Semantic errors were most strongly associated with lesions in the left anterior temporal lobe, a location consistent with previous research findings from these researchers and several other research groups. This finding also made an important comparison point for its opposite factor -- semantic recognition, which many researchers have argued critically depends on the anterior temporal lobes. Instead, Mirman and colleagues found that semantic recognition deficits were associated with damage to an area they call a "white matter bottleneck" -- a region of convergence between multiple tracts of white matter that connect brain regions required for knowing the meanings of words, objects, actions and events.
"Semantic memory almost certainly involves a widely distributed neural system because meaning involves so many different kinds of information," said Mirman. "We think the white matter bottleneck looks important because it is a point of convergence among multiple pathways in the brain, making this area a vulnerable spot where a small amount of damage can have large functional consequences for semantic processing."
In a follow-up article soon to be published in the journal Neuropsychologia, Mirman, Schwartz and their colleagues also confirmed these findings with a re-analysis using a new and more sophisticated statistical technique for lesion-symptom mapping.
These studies provide a new perspective on diagnosing different kinds of aphasia, which can have a big impact on how clinicians think about the condition and how they approach developing treatment strategies. The research team at the Moss Rehabilitation Research Institute works closely with its clinical affiliate, the MossRehab Aphasia Center, to develop and test approaches to aphasia rehabilitation that meet the individualized, long-term goals of the patients and are informed by scientific evidence.
According to Schwartz, "A major challenge facing speech-language therapists is the wide diversity of symptoms that one sees in stroke aphasia. With this study, we took a major step towards explaining the symptom diversity in relation to a few primary underlying processes and their mosaic-like representation in the brain. These can serve as targets for new diagnostic assessments and treatment interventions."
Studying the association between patterns of brain injury and cognitive deficits is a classic approach, with roots in 19th century neurology, at the dawn of cognitive neuroscience. Mirman, Schwartz and their colleagues have scaled up this approach, both in terms of the number of participants and the number of performance measures, and combined it with 21st century brain imaging and statistical techniques. A single study may not be able to fully reveal a system as complex as language and brain, but the more we learn, the closer we get to translating basic cognitive neuroscience into effective rehabilitation strategies.
Story Source:
The above story is based on materials provided by Drexel University. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.
Journal Reference:
Daniel Mirman, Qi Chen, Yongsheng Zhang, Ze Wang, Olufunsho K. Faseyitan, H. Branch Coslett, Myrna F. Schwartz. Neural organization of spoken language revealed by lesion–symptom mapping. Nature Communications, 2015; 6: 6762 DOI: 10.1038/ncomms7762
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Language of poets, but not of globalised markets? | Latest News & Updates at Daily News & Analysis

Adding to the debate about whether regional languages are relevant for getting ahead in today's globalised world, a research paper from the Tata Institute of Social Sciences has said that most Urdu-medium students lose out on job opportunities because they lack proficiency in English and Marathi. The paper, however, says that this is because "Urdu has not been linked with employment opportunities by the government."

The paper says, "Most of the state-run competitive examinations are conducted in Marathi and English. This shuts the doors for Urdu-medium students for larger job opportunities. In such a scenario, the maximum an Urdu-educated student can expect is the job of an Urdu teacher in Urdu schools and Madrassas."


This is significant because there are presently 4,900 Urdu medium schools in the state, catering to about 13 lakh students- 5.9% of the total schoolgoing children, as per the school education department.

The state supports the Urdu-medium schools under the constitutional obligation of providing primary education in one's mother tongue.

Maharashtra has the largest number of Urdu-medium schools supported by any Indian state, but Urdu is still to get the status of second language of the state. This is in contrast with Uttar Pradesh, Bihar, Delhi and Bengal, and erstwhile Andhra Pradesh.

The paper says that to make matters worse, Urdu medium education in Maharashtra is available only up to the HSC level. After that students have to opt for English or regional languages.

Pointing out this major issue, the paper reveals, "Most of the Muslim students will not reach college and university level by sticking to Urdu-medium schools, as competitive examination for admission in universities and colleges is conducted in English and Marathi mediums."

"Given that about 95% of the students in Urdu schools are related to a deprived religious minority community, it also adversely impacts their overall representation in public and private sector employment," states the paper.
Authored by Prof Abdul Shaban, head of the Tuljapur campus of TISS, the paper is titled 'Urdu and Urdu Medium Schools in Maharashtra in fast Changing Social and Economic Contexts'. The paper is based on the study of Urdu medium schools in Maharashtra. It also critically analyses the state's policy, language politics and socio-economic status of the Muslim community.

Only poor and middle-class Muslims of Maharashtra, and those who are not able to get their children admitted to English-medium schools, are sending students to Urdu schools.

"However, a massive chasm is seen with regard to opportunities of employment of those educated in Urdu and other mediums of education as Urdu has not got embedded in the capitalist system. The embedding in capitalist system and becoming a language of commercial activities are important to remaining relevant and surviving in this market-dominated society," adds the paper.

The paper also points out that inability of Urdu to adapt technical terms of science, technology and even social sciences. Hence, Urdu language students find it difficult to perform well in college and university, and finally drop out.

Abhay Pethe, Professor of economics with Mumbai University, insists that other regional languages, too are facing a similar situation. "Languages need to evolve as per the need of the globalised and advanced world.

Unfortunately, Urdu, Marathi and other languages are yet to develop convenient vocabulary for science and technology. Then English becomes a natural option."

Prof Shaban says, "Promotion of Urdu as the second language of the state and conducting competitive examinations in Urdu can help in ameliorating the situation of both Urdu and millions of Urdu-educated youths in the state."

But Prof Pethe is sceptical about policy intervention. "I don't think it will work. All regional languages have their essence and will be able to survive through art, culture and cinema. But we must accept the need of the globalised world rather than playing language politics. Let's not become islands."

Knowing the reality, educated upper and middle class Muslims have started sending their children to English medium schools. Many of them arrange Urdu classes for kids at home to facilitate the reading of religious texts, says the principal of an Urdu school in south Mumbai.

"Even clerics and politicians who talk about promoting Urdu schools send their kids to English medium schools," says Shabbir Ansari, head of the Muslim OBC organization. Ansari adds, "Urdu schools need to be upgraded so that poor kids get good education in their mother tongue. English medium education can be initiated from the upper primary level."
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MSM plans to air sports commentary in regional languages

COIMBATORE, APRIL 14:  
Leading television network Multi-Screen Media Pvt Ltd (MSM) is looking to capitalise on the current trend by airing sports commentary in different regional languages very soon.

“Until last year, sports lovers got to hear the commentary of cricket matches only in English and Hindi. We relayed the FIFA (Federation of International Football Association) world cup commentary in Bengali and realised that the viewership rose to a different level when the commentary was aired in a language familiar to the people of of Bengal. We took cue from this experiment and prepared ourselves to air the commentary in Telugu and Tamil this IPL season. This will add to the telecast range currently offered in English, Hindi and Bengali. Going forward, we want to make the offering in many more regional languages,” Prasanna Krishnan, Business Head, Sony Six and Sony Kix, said.

Addressing a press conference, Krishnan said that Sony Kix would not only be an extension of MSM's sports portfolio but help expand sports viewership in the country. “Tamil Nadu has been an important market for us in terms of viewership, rating and size, ranking among the top five in the country. We want to leverage our strength in this market,” he said.

For the commentary in Tamil, Sony has roped in Sadagopan Ramesh, Hemang Badani and BB Chandrasekhar and specialist commentators like Pattabhiraman and Seshadri Srinivasan.

On an additional note, he said with the kick off of the 8th season of Pepsi IPL, the BCCI, Sony MAX, SIX, KIX and Pepsi had come together to create a stadium-like experience for cricket fans through the “Pepsi IPL Fan Park” initiative.

Coimbatore incidentally is the only destination in TN identified for the IPL Fan Park initiative. The other places include Agra, Nagpur, Ludhiana, Guntur, Surat, Warangal, Udaipur, Belgavi, Kanpur, Indore, Allahabad and Bhopal.

The organisers are planning to provide a stadium-like experience in each of the cities on the weekends throughout the tournament, (weekend starting April 11) by relaying the matches on giant screens at the venue with a capacity to accommodate 10000+ fans, with access to food and beverage stalls and special areas earmarked for women and children.

Entry is free, but on a first-come-first serve basis.

Two Pepsi IPL matches would be screened this weekend (April 18 and 19) at SNR College grounds, Avarampalayam, Ganapathy Post between 4 pm and 8 pm, Krishnan said.

(This article was published on April 17, 2015)
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Yahoo-Bing Reach New Search Deal; Yahoo Gains Right To Serve Search Ads On The PC

This morning Yahoo and Microsoft announced an amended search relationship. While it keeps the basic framework of the original deal in place it gives both companies, most notably Yahoo, more autonomy.

Under the old deal, Yahoo had to carry Microsoft’s Bing’ ads on desktop. On mobile, Yahoo had flexibility to sell as it likes. Over the past year, Yahoo has made great use of this by launching its Yahoo Gemini platform that allows a single place for advertisers to buy mobile search and native ads.

Now Yahoo has more flexibility on desktop. Under the new deal, 51% of its desktop search traffic has to carry Bing ads. The rest can carry ads however Yahoo likes — either from its own Gemini system or other partners.

The biggest likely external partner would be Google, which has expressed interest in the past. Google originally wanted to be Yahoo’s partner before a deal with Microsoft was put into place, but that idea came to a halt in 2008 after the US Justice department threatened antitrust action.

Yahoo told Search Engine Land that it is looking to likely extend Gemini to handle desktop search ads. As for partnering with Google, it’s possible but not something it wanted to speculate on.

There’s lots of “win-win” language in the Yahoo-Microsoft press release. However, Mayer had been unhappy with the deal she inherited and exploited areas where the contract was silent (e.g., mobile) to build a new search business and ads platform at the company (i.e., Gemini). Under the new deal, by the way, mobile is defined as both smartphone and tablet traffic.

Yahoo expressed optimism that the new deal would allow both companies to move ahead in a more positive yet competitive manner. Both Mayer and Microsoft CEO Satya Nadella had been working under a deal put in place by their predecessors. Now, they have a new deal they’ve both crafted with expectations they’ve directly agreed upon.

The announcement was silent about ad position or priority. It’s a safe bet that Gemini will expand to cover the PC as well. Will Yahoo favor its own ads on the PC? In other words, will there be designated Yahoo and Bing ad slots in Yahoo PC search results? How will Yahoo integrate and prioritize Bing Ads vs. Yahoo search ads on the PC?

The parties will also handle all their own ad sales. Previously Yahoo was handling so-called “premium search” sales for both companies. That will end. Premium search ad sales were sales to larger advertisers and brands. By comparison, smaller advertisers bought directly from Bing. SEM firms using Microsoft APIs also bought directly from Bing.

Yahoo explained in the release that revenue sharing and the “existing underlying economic structure [of the prior deal] remains unchanged.” Presumably that means that the major financial terms are not affected.

Bing will continue to provide the underlying non-paid search results and technology for Yahoo. In the old agreement, Yahoo gave up the technology it had for ten years and pretty much just mirrored Bing’s results with a Yahoo look-and-feel. But under the new agreement, it now has the flexibility to generate about half its results using its own technology or even to partner with someone else, if it wants. Bing just has to be used for 51% of all search results.

Would that happen? Right now, Yahoo says it sees lots of opportunities in the space of contextual search, looking forward. Things like Siri, Google Now and contextual / predictive search in general is where innovation is happening. Aviate, which Yahoo purchased, gives it fresh tech in this area. Yahoo also mentioned vertical search as an area of interest.

On the surface this has to be seen as a win primarily for Yahoo. The company gives up some ad sales control, but it gains the ability to start selling its own ads into its own search results.

I’m sure many more details will come out in the following weeks that will give us a clearer sense of how the mechanics of this modified arrangement will play out. But I would imagine that Marissa Mayer is pleased with an outcome that gives Yahoo more control and freedom.

Yesterday comScore reported that Bing search market share had reached 20 percent in the US, while Yahoo was at 12.7 percent.


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Google Inc Testing New Algorithm To Improve Mobile Search Results

Google Inc (NASDAQ:GOOGL) has been working hard to increase the total number of its mobile search users, given the growth in smartphone usage. For this specific reason the search engine giant is testing a new algorithm, that will rank all the websites based on their mobile-friendliness. This means that Google will enhance its search engine, by listing the most accurate and relevant results.

These changes will take place starting from April 21. Google is looking to update its algorithm, which will initially affect the mobile searches, and have a significant impact on search results. Search results will be filtered on the basis on relevancy, and will be fully optimized for the mobile users. Google can retain its market share by vending off its competitors like Yahoo and Bing, by expanding its market for mobile users.

The search engine giant wants to capitalize on the recent shift in the market away from the desktop. According to a report by Search Engine Watch, Internet search usage on smartphones has finally surpassed desktop usage in 2014. Furthermore, they also mentioned that over 77% of business executives use internet on their smartphones, instead of desktops or laptops.

Meanwhile, overall mobile traffic for most prominent websites range from 10%-35% in the first three month of the year. This means that websites which are not yet optimized for the mobile, could stand to losing approximately one third of their traffic starting from April 21. Companies can gain considerable advantage over competitors by optimizing their websites for mobile devices. Due to the latest change in the algorithm, companies can now finally capitalize on increasing mobile traffic, and should be very responsive while adapting to changes provided by Google.

The search engine has made an announcement that it will continue to provide updates for mobile devices, which can increase engagement by optimizing search results. Moreover, Google is facing pressure from EU regulators, who have accused the search engine of favoring its own online shopping stores by distorting search results.

In the latest comScore for March, Google is losing its market share to Bing, as it has grabbed more than 20% in the US market. However, Google kept its lead with a market share of 64.4%, while Microsoft shares grew to 20.1%, reflecting an increase of 0.3%. Yahoo made a little ground holding onto its 12.7%. Google stock closed at $543.52 yesterday, and has risen approximately 1.6% this year.
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Yandex Starts Valuing Links Again in its Search Results

Russian search engine Yandex made a controversial decision last year when it decided to stop valuing inbound links in its algorithm that ranks search results.

Now it appears Yandex has done an about-face, reversing their previous decision while introducing harsher penalties for paid links.

An abundance of paid links to Russian sites is in part what led to the decision to stop valuing links in the first place. Yandex believed that devaluing all links would put an immediate end to link selling. Much to the dismay of Yandex, link selling only dropped 16% as a result.

Starting in May, Yandex will be rolling out an update that brings value back to naturally acquired links, and penalizes sites that have an abundance of paid links.

This is expected to affect a large number of websites, as it will cover all types of search queries in all regions.

What has unfortunately been left out of this report is how the overall quality of search results was impacted as a result of not counting links. Were searchers more satisfied with the results? Less satisfied? About the same?

It’s interesting that link buying was barely affected, but the goal of any search engine should be to deliver the best possible results to its users. With that in mind, I think it would be beneficial to know whether or not removing links from the algorithm affected the quality of results.

If you happen to be a regular Yandex user, I’d be interested to hear your thoughts on this in the comments section.
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Real estate terminology is the same for both buyers and sellers - Ask a Realtor - NorthJersey.com

L et’s take a few minutes to look at all the different "real estate lingo" that consumers hear from real estate professionals. The purchase of a home is often the largest financial transaction a family or individuals will make. And the process usually begins with prospective buyers being qualified by both their respective Realtors and lending institutions.

According to several industry sources, including the National Association of Realtors, more than 90 percent of prospective purchasers will begin their search for information and homes online via the Internet. Yet, only 13 percent will actually engage the Realtor they "met" online.

Most prospective buyers will do their own due diligence and almost 70 percent of the time, it is a personal referral that leads a customer to their Realtor. Among the most important attributes buyers and sellers seek in Realtors are trust, confidence and skills — the ability to negotiate professionally and to present a full and accurate offer are essential to the success of all parties involved. These attributes are not always apparent online and may take time through a personal working relationship to become evident.

Now, some of my favorites real estate terms that are often misunderstood or misinterpreted.

Buyers’ Market and Sellers’ Market are terms commonly heard when real estate is discussed. But I think it’s more accurate to just refer to both as the Real Estate Market. In my 34 years, that’s what the factors that affect both buyers and sellers have always been. Buyers and sellers are impacted differently by interest rates, current inventory, past sales, homes under contract, job security and other factors. Most sellers feel they undersold their property and most buyers feel they paid too much for the SAME property.

The point to all of this is … perspective. If you want to come out on the happy side of the equation, it’s best to understand the process, work with a reputable Realtor who may be referred to you, and do your due diligence.

***

Now, for a recap of the 1st Quarter of 2015 versus the 1st Quarter of 2014: According to the New Jersey Multiple Listing Service, activity for Q1 2015 is much brisker as new sales are up 8.2 percent and prices are up 4.3 percent. While in Q1 2014, closings were down 1 percent and the prices were down 5.9 percent.

The year 2015 is shaping up to be a stronger market in units and price appreciation. Sellers should take advantage of the current low inventory if they are considering entering the market in the coming months. There are plenty of buyers ready to act if they see value in the property. The basics remain in place — trust, confidence and the skills to negotiate the transaction.

Find your Realtor today. Happy House hunting this spring!

Charles Oppler is the chief operating officer and broker/owner of Prominent Properties Sotheby’s International Realty, 90 County Road, Tenafly. The firm has 12 offices in northern and central New Jersey. For more information, call 201-314-4922 (cell) or 201-585-8080 (office), or visit www. ProminentProperties.com.
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Tech Analysis: Where Does Bing Stand in the Search Engine Market | Tech News

The search engine market is very much controlled and led by Google. Bing however has tried well to gain as much market as it can, although it is still considered as an also run. According to the recent reports from the market, the search engine from Microsoft (NASDAQ MSFT) is already having around 20% of the market share in internet search user-ship. The number was reported by ComScore and the data pertains to the month of march.

This is the first time Bing has more than 20% share in the search share. Google still dominates the market, having more than thrice of Bing’s market. The domination of Google is unquestionable. However by no means is Bing’s achievement a small one. Whether it can consolidate even more, is another question altogether.

Here in this article, we will take a closer look at some of the key features and points which may decide the future of Bing as a search engine. It would be intriguing to see if Microsoft’s search engine can actually rival Google and perhaps give it a good enough fight.



News on Microsoft Corporation (NASDAQ MSFT)
Google (NASDAQ GOOG) and Apple (NASDAQ AAPL) have recently decided not to renew their association for Safari’s default search engine. Earlier this contract made sure that Safari had Google as the default search engine. In the coming months, Bing looks like the search engine which might well replace Google in Safari.

Bing certainly seems like a search engine which has been growing in the recent months. Therefore it does not come as a surprise that it is gaining some ground in the search engine market. Internet search is closely related to the browser which the users use. Therefore Bing might be on its way to growing a lot of users.

Microsoft Corporation (NASDAQ MSFT) Business News
Microsoft (NASDAQ MSFT) has been performing well in the recent months. The stock has been rejuvenated under new leadership. With the release of Windows 10 on the horizon, it would not be a stretch to say that the stock might end up making new highs in the coming months.

Thanks for visiting the TechNews.org website. Be sure to catch all Microsoft Corporation (NASDAQ MSFT) financial news, bookmark us and check all the videos and news articles regarding the Microsoft stock.
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Direção Geral do Livro apoiou mais de 1.700 traduções de obras portuguesas desde 1993

Lisboa, 17 abr (Lusa) - Em vinte anos, a Direção-Geral do Livro, Arquivos e Bibliotecas (DGLAB) apoiou 1.787 traduções de obras da literatura portuguesa para 56 países, mas é preciso reforçar a formação de tradutores, afirmou hoje o diretor-geral, José Manuel Cortês.

No âmbito de um fórum internacional sobre cultura, a decorrer no Centro Cultural de Belém, em Lisboa, José Manuel Cortês revelou que entre 1993 e 2014 foram investidos 3,4 milhões de euros no apoio à tradução de obras literárias portuguesas, descrevendo-o como um mais importantes programas de apoio da DGLAB.

José Manuel Cortês destacou o interesse internacional pela literatura portuguesa, revelando que a Mongólia apresentou, pela primeira vez, candidaturas de apoio para tradução de obras portuguesas, e que está a ser preparada uma intervenção específica para o mercado chinês.
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