Metaglossia: The Translation World
307.3K views | +6 today
Follow
Metaglossia: The Translation World
News about translation, interpreting, intercultural communication, terminology and lexicography - as it happens
Curated by Charles Tiayon
Your new post is loading...

UN Careers - jobs in this network (Translators, Revisers, Editors, etc.)

Vacancies in this network: Translators, Revisers, Editors, etc.

Scoop.it!
No comment yet.

New app makes foreign translation easier

Program Executive Office, Intelligence, Electronic Warfare, and Sensors release 19 hrs ago
The Machine Foreign Language Translation System is a software application to meet the Army’s prioritized language translation requirements. MFLTS assists warfighters in communicating effectively with foreign, non-English speaking populations by providing an automated foreign speech and text language translation capability.

While it does not replace human linguist support such as interpreters and translators, MFLTS successfully augments and complements that support. As a result, warfighters may fully leverage translator and interpreter resources to aid in mission execution. Moreover, MFLTS may be employed as a “check” on the accuracy of an offered translation. The primary components of the MFLTS system are machine translation, automatic speech recognition, and optical character recognition.

The Product Director Machine Foreign Language Translation System is a subordinate organization of the Project Manager Distributed Common Ground System – Army (PM DCGS-A). PD MFLTS manages the development and delivery of the system in support of Army and Joint Capabilities Integration Development System language translation requirements. Its software application is designed to operate on both commercially available off-the-shelf hardware and government off-the-shelf automation systems. To meet varying warfighter needs, three MFLTS software configurations are now available:

•Web-Enabled (Distributed Common Ground System-Army, text-to-text).

•Mobile (Army Golden Master, text-to-text, speech-to-speech).

•Portable (Nett Warrior, speech-to-speech).

Applications will be developed in anticipation of, or in response to warfighter requirements. An expansion to include a speech-to-text application is planned in the near future. MFLTS will be integrated into Army tactical systems, making it readily accessible. MFLTS is being integrated into the DCGS-A baseline, with a planned fielding time period of late 2016 or early 2017. Additionally, a late 2016 fielding (as part of Nett Warrior) to the 1st Brigade 82nd Airborne Division was successfully completed.

MFLTS’s open systems architecture enables the continuous integration of additional language components to meet the Army’s ever increasing language translation requirements. As such, it directly contributes to the chief of staff of the Army’s priority of readiness by enabling warfighters to communicate and, in turn, operate effectively among non-English speaking populations globally.

Scoop.it!
No comment yet.

Nepal proposes Constitution amendment to meet Madhesis demands

Nepal’s government has registered the Constitution amendment bill in Parliament despite opposition from CPN-UML, aimed at carving out a new province to meet the demands of agitating Madhesis and othe
Scoop.it!
No comment yet.

Merriam-Webster’s plea: There’s still time to prevent ‘fascism’ from becoming word of the year

Fascism is poised to join an elite pool of words — among them science, integrity, socialism, bailout, truthiness and the slang interjection “w00t” — that the Merriam-Webster Dictionary has selected as word of the year.

The word fascism, as Merriam-Webster noted on Twitter on Tuesday, is likely to be crowned 2016’s winner. The unusually high interest in its definition over the course of 2016 has propelled it to the fourth-most-searched word in the history of the dictionary’s website.

“Guys, 2016 is so bad it made the dictionary sad,” went one reply, capturing the general pathos prompted by Merriam-Webster’s tweet. Within two hours, Merriam-Webster said there was an uptick in searches for flummadiddle, meaning nonsense. Flummadiddle’s only fighting chance against fascism, however, was if “everyone” searched it twice a day for the rest of the year.

The words of the year are more than the “most frequently looked up in the dictionary,” as Merriam-Webster put it in its end-of-2015 announcement. The words also “give us a window into what people are thinking.”

In 2015, people were apparently thinking about the suffix “-ism.” Fascism scored high, but socialism topped the charts. Its popularity spiked after rallies held by self-avowed democratic socialist Bernie Sanders, according to the dictionary.

Likewise, 2008 was the year of the bailout, as well as searches for what “bailout” meant.

This year, words such as misogyny and fascism have had huge bursts of interest, particularly after the election. Users looked up fascism at a rate 400 percent higher in 2016 than in 2015, the dictionary said Nov. 14.

[Wealthy, but ‘not in a braggadocious way’: Donald Trump’s favorite humblebrag phrase]

Merriam-Webster was unable to respond to a query from The Washington Post early Friday, to see whether the dictionary was so against fascism it would suppress the rules to allow another word to win.

After all, the dictionary altered the selection process in the past. In 2006, Merriam-Webster introduced an online poll to allow users to submit and vote for the word of the year. That year, the winner was “truthiness,” a joke word coined by Stephen Colbert on “The Colbert Report” in October 2005. Truthiness was followed by 2007’s “w00t,” a victory whoop popular among video-gamers in the mid-2000s; neither w00t nor truthiness was an official inclusion in Merriam-Webster’s dictionary at the time of their victories. The dictionary made the change back to search volume in time for 2008’s bailout.

[Behold, the new words added to Merriam-Webster: Clickbait, WTF and photobomb]

For the record, Merriam-Webster defines fascism as:

1 A political philosophy, movement, or regime (as that of the Fascisti) that exalts nation and often race above the individual and that stands for a centralized autocratic government headed by a dictatorial leader, severe economic and social regimentation, and forcible suppression of opposition.

2 A tendency toward or actual exercise of strong autocratic or dictatorial control.

If fascism wins, as it seems likely to do, it will round out a cluster of bleak words for the year 2016. Across the pond, the Oxford Dictionaries announced that “post-truth” was this year’s word. As The Post reported in November, the phrase does not mean beyond fact, but rather the sense that objective truth may be less relevant than appeals to emotion or belief. Paranoid occupied the brains at Cambridge Dictionary. And Dictionary.com chose xenophobia — the fear of strangers, foreigners or the alien — as its word of the year.


There are 29 days left in 2016.
Scoop.it!
No comment yet.

Taking 'Stepes' to Mobilize Translation


“The translation industry is overdue for a major disruption to catch up to the 21st century,” according to Marisa Bowers, senior director, global account management at CSOFT. Like everything else related to the mobile web, speed is paramount when it comes to translation, and CSOFT is trying to address that concern with its Stepes product. And Bowers—along with James Davidson, senior business developer at CSOFT—talked to audiences at the Gilbane Digital Content Conference about how this product is aiming to push translation into the 21st century.

According to Bowers, old translation models are too slow, and the technology is too technical, inaccessible, and expensive. But Stepes is offering live human translation on-demand via your mobile device. Think Uber for translation. You open the app, enter your (relatively small) amount of text into a box for translation—choose the languages you’re translating from and to—click a button and wait. Within a few minutes or seconds, your translated content should be returned. The translators are rated, and you can see who they are via their profiles. Bowers says Stepes is especially well-suited to social media or other user-generated content.

If you need to translate a tweet, or a user review it may not make sense to invest in more comprehensive translation software. But Stepes is betting that paying a person $10 via PayPal isn’t too much to cover those smaller translation needs. Bowers also says that convenience of mobile allows bilingual people who aren’t professional translators—like doctors, lawyers, and engineers—lend their expertise to the process. Those kinds of translators may be able to address more niche topics or terminology.

The quality control is a bit more nebulous, and largely incumbent upon the user. Translators are rated, so you can see how other users feel about them. But beyond that you’ll probably need to conduct at least a cursory in-house review of the content to verify accuracy.

Stepes is hoping to shake up the way companies think about translation, and Davidson and Bowers say they are planning on trying to translate an entire Harry Potter novel using this crowd-sourced version of translation. They expect it will take about half an hour.  
Scoop.it!
No comment yet.

Harry Potter and the Cursed Translators

With spin-off series Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them debuting in cinemas and sequel play Harry Potter and the Cursed Child almost completely sold out for the next year, this is the return of a beloved franchise for fans worldwide, but the return of an awful headache for the translators who bring it to them.

It may have taken a lot of courage to cross the barrier to Platform 9¾, but the hardest barrier Harry Potter has crossed may well be the language one. As translation experts Global Voices point out, promoting international female writers around the world is important. Bringing JK Rowling’s magnum opus to a worldwide audience clearly helps with this, but her virtuoso use of wordplay and wild imagination made translating the Wizarding World almost as difficult as defeating Voldemort himself.

With the Boy Who Lived taking centre stage once again, these translators are in for another triwizard tournament of translation trickery. But how hard will it be?

Harry Potter’s Translators and the Beloved Children’s Book Series

The original series of Harry Potter books are some of the most widely-read books of all time, and this is largely thanks to the books being translated into 73 languages. When the first book was released, it was even “translated” into US English, with the title changed from Harry Potter and the Philosopher’s Stone to the more telling Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone. This version also had changes to words and phrases, such as “pitch” becoming “field” and “nutter” becoming “maniac”.

These changes were widely criticised as being unnecessary and taking away from the book’s distinctive Britishness, so later books crossed the Atlantic in their original form. Bringing this Britishness to non-English-speaking audiences, though, proved more difficult.

JK Rowling’s linguistic innovation in the Harry Potter series is complex and layered, making it very difficult to translate. References to British culture, wordplay and frequent invented words meant translating Harry Potter was much more difficult than your average translation job. Famous words like “muggles” and “quidditch” all needed foreign language equivalents.

Character names in particular proved a challenge as some of them are implicitly descriptive. Severus Snape, for example, has all the connotations that come with “severe” and “snake” in English, but if his name was kept intact, this would be lost in translation. The Italian translator changed “Snape” to “Piton”, which sounds like python in Italian.

The most complicated name to translate was the real name of Lord Voldemort. In English it is Tom Marvolo Riddle, which is infamously an anagram of “I am Lord Voldemort”. The French translator renamed him Tom Elvis Jedusor, which unravels into “Je suis Voldemort”, but unfortunately conjures up the image of the world’s most powerful dark wizard singing It’s Now or Never in a white leotard.

Clearly, this was hard work, and it was no easier once the films came along.

Harry Potter’s Translators and the Record-Breaking Film Franchise

When the Harry Potter books were transfigured for the silver screen, wizarding wordsmiths had new challenges to face. The bright side was that the original British English editions were released untouched in America, and character names more often than not remained the same. But since the films raised the books’ popularity, publishers began to pressure translators to their work much faster than ever before to avoid leaks. French translator Jean-François Ménard, for example, had to turn around the entire 700-plus page Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire in just 63 days. It took many people longer than that just to read it.

Aside from the speedier book translations, the films themselves had to be translated too. While each country’s distributor had the already-translated books to work from, translating film subtitles is very different, and as exemplified in these Chinese Harry Potter subtitle mixups, it doesn’t always go well. These mistakes, such as the bizarre repeated use of the word “melon” were thankfully carried out by bootleggers, not official translators, who no doubt did a better job with their official subtitling.

Dubbing also has its fair share of problems to solve. Harry is referred to as Mister Potter by his teachers throughout the series, the German equivalent of which would be Herr Potter, but due to the mouth movements, this substitution would not work, so “Mister” remains in the movie.

Dialect has also proven difficult for dubbing. Hagrid’s West Country dialect was replicated in the Japanese dub with Tōhoku dialect, which has a similar meaning to Japanese viewers. The Irish Gaeilge dub of Harry Potter, however, drew ridicule from viewers for failing to convey Voldemort’s intimidating nature.

Harry Potter’s Translators and the New Phase of Potter

With the agonising ordeal of the original series, it is doubtful that many translators are looking forward to these new additions to the franchise. Fantastic Beasts, in particular, has all the makings of a translation nightmare with its various invented creature names. The film’s multiple foreign names can be found on IMDB, most of which faithfully translate to the film’s English title.

Fans will have to come to London to watch Harry Potter and the Cursed Child live, and as of now the cast are only performing it in English (and, spoiler alert: parseltongue). But that hasn’t stopped publishers hiring translators to put out localised versions of the script as a hardback book. Considering the play’s plot (spoiler alert: it’s complicated), this was no mean feat for our intrepid interpreters.

The question all this troublesome tongue-twisting raises is this: is it worth it? The answer, unfortunately enough for the translators, could be no. As Byte Level reports, those translating the Wizarding World are “badly paid” and “virtually invisible,” perhaps locked in the literary cupboard under the stairs.

On the upside, however, these translators are bringing so much magic to millions of people around the world, and that in itself is priceless. Harry Potter may have defeated Lord Voldemort, but as far as we’re concerned, these translators are the real wizards.
Scoop.it!
No comment yet.

Wycliffe Bible Translators – Blending Art and Science in Translation

Wycliffe Bible Translators
 

Wycliffe Bible Translators is the largest Bible-translating company in the world, and their United States headquarters is located in our Nonahood area off Moss Park Road. They are currently celebrating their 75th anniversary and have a new book to go along with the celebration, When God’s Word Speaks. A discount code is available at the end of this article for Nonahood News readers.

Upon entering Wycliffe, you see the Discovery Center, the Village Shop and the Wycliffe Café. All are open to the public, and I highly encourage you to stop by for the salad bar; I believe it’s currently the only one in our Nonahood area, and it is delicious. The Discovery Center is colorful and looks like something from our neighboring theme parks, while the Village Shop is a place where you can purchase unique gifts from around the world.

I was fortunate enough to speak to the president of Wycliffe, Mr. Bob Creson. He has worked for Wycliffe for more than 30 years and is eager to continue to reach areas and languages without a Bible in their native tongue. There are almost 7,000 languages worldwide. As of today, there are still 1,800 languages without a Bible. “It must be a clear, accurate, and natural translation with consistencies to their culture,” says Mr. Creson of how Wycliffe translates the Bible. He explained to me the importance of understanding cultural differences and how simple word-to-word translation is not enough. “Handing someone a snake in Cameroon is a sign of honor,” says Mr. Creson. “That is not the same in our culture.” American culture refers to love emanating from the heart; other cultures refer to the liver or the intestines. This is where Bible translation becomes a sort of art. These differences are what the Wycliffe translators learn and adapt into a translated Bible, a Bible in the peoples’ heart language.


First Translated Bible
Wycliffe translators span the globe. They are found on nearly every continent. In the English language, a word generally means what it says. Around the world, languages differ greatly. Mr. Creson mentioned how some translators have had to create an alphabet for languages that were only spoken. He also mentioned the differences in tonal languages, a language where the tone or pitch changes the word. These language differences are where the science of translation occurs.

Technology has greatly helped Wycliffe in Bible translation. Before computers, it took roughly 25 years to translate a Bible. It currently takes about eight years. “We have Vision 2025,” says Mr. Creson of Wycliffe’s goal of having a Bible translation program started by that year in every language still needed. “If we meet our goal, and we are on target, every language should have a translated Bible by 2033.”

Walking around the Discovery Center, I saw two different Bibles, Da Jesus Book in Hawaiian Pidgin and De Nyew Testament in the South Carolina language of Gullah. Mr. Creson says, “Our goal is to have the Bible translated in your heart language; the language you dream and express love in.”


Wycliffe Bible Translators Discovery Center
As part of their 75th anniversary, Wycliffe is offering a coupon code for a 25% discount to the book When God’s Word Speaks commemorating 75 years of Bible translation when you use the code NONA25. It is available online at www.wycliffe.org/shop or by visiting the Village Shop in the Discovery Center at Wycliffe. At the Village Shop, simply mention the code for the discount.

To learn more about Wycliffe Bible Translators, please visit the Discovery Center located at 11221 John Wycliffe Blvd., Orlando, FL 32832. I encourage you to take a tour as they are very knowledgeable. Their hours are Monday-Friday from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. 
Scoop.it!
No comment yet.

First basic sign language and dictionary developed for deaf and hearing impaired people in South Sudan

First basic sign language and dictionary developed for deaf and hearing impaired people in South Sudan
Published on December 2, 2016 at 9:56 AM · No Comments

inShare
10
Partager1

South Sudan's first unified basic sign language and sign language dictionary will be officially launched and presented in the capital city Juba on Thursday. The dictionary contains 200 signs recorded by the development organization Light for the World in collaboration with the Ministry of Gender, Child and Social Welfare of the Republic of South Sudan as well as local disabled people’s organizations and experts from the Universities of Addis Ababa and Leiden.


Girl signing the letter "L" / Credit: Jaco Klamer/Light for the World
"The sign language dictionary is a historic milestone for people in South Sudan who are deaf and hearing impaired. For the first time, unified signs have been recorded that can be used for communication across the country and to address key educational challenges of the deaf community", explains Klaas Aikes, program coordinator of South Sudan at Light for the World. Until now, the world’s youngest nation did not have an official and unified basic sign language. While deaf and hearing impaired people used a variety of local and regional signs, they had to use a mixture of Ugandan, Sudanese and American signs for official situations and for cross-regional communication. However, these were not widely known and did not cover much of the signing practiced. The new unified sign language is comprised of signs that are used in all regions of South Sudan. "The first 200 signs recorded in the dictionary are mainly about everyday topics such as family, education, food and drinks but also cities and state names", says Klaas Aikes, adding: "The goal is to expand this collection of signs and codification continuously and to capture other areas of life".

Process of Sign Language Recording

Over the past three years, Light for the World designed and coordinated the process of recording the new official sign language of South Sudan together with local and international actors – among them members of the South Sudanese deaf communities and two sign language experts from the Universities of Leiden and Addis Ababa. In cooperation with local disability organizations, data-collectors were trained across the country to systematically identify and record regional signs. The recordings were analyzed with the support of sign language experts, selected together with local organizations and edited for the dictionary. "Representatives of the Deaf Communities in South Sudan were at the heart of the sign language development process, as they are the experts of sign language practice and represent the local communities”, explains Klaas Aikes, adding that, “the development of their own sign language also gave them more self-confidence and encouraged them to fight for their rights and inclusion in society”. Among the main contributors from the deaf communities were the Equatoria Association of the Deaf, the National Association of the Deaf, the Association of Deaf Concern as well as members from the Women Disability Network. The sign language project was strongly supported by the Ministry of Education’s department for Inclusive Education as well as the Ministry of Gender, Child and Social Welfare in South Sudan, which will officially launch the new dictionary together with Light for the World and disability organizations on December 1st in Juba on the occasion of the International Day of Persons with Disabilities (3rd Dec.). The ministry will also present their new disability policy.

Advancement of Sign Language Planned

"The new official basic sign language and the dictionary will be further developed during the coming years", explains Klaas Aikes. Light for the World is working on an advanced edition with new signs representing further areas of life. In addition, master trainers for the new sign language will be trained in order to make the language known throughout the country and to facilitate the use of the language, especially in official situations, such as in education or for translation.

Source:
https://www.light-for-the-world.org/
Scoop.it!
No comment yet.

Berlitz Group in Toronto Announces Latest Information on Why English is Difficult to Learn – Satellite Press Releases

While many English speakers complain that other languages are difficult to master, non-English speaking people say English is actually the harder one to learn.

[embedded content]

“According to The Berlitz Group, a company that helps people learn English in Toronto, practice really does make perfect.”

Online PR News – 01-December-2016 – Toronto, ON – While many English speakers complain that other languages are difficult to master, non-English speaking people say English is actually the harder one to learn. The Berlitz Group would agree that English can be particularly difficult to master, depending on the student’s native tongue.



English is more difficult for someone who speaks a language unlike the English language. Many English words take their origins from French and Spanish words, which would be helpful for someone who speaks those languages. Other languages, such as Arabic, have almost no similarities, making it difficult to comprehend many of the concepts of English.

Another reason why people struggle to learn English is due to the confusing spellings and pronunciation. Unlike many other languages, letters in the English alphabet can have multiple sounds. Words sound different even if they are spelled the same. They also may sound alike and be spelled differently. The Berlitz Group uses the words “laugh” and “half” as an example of how it can be difficult for non-English speakers to understand the rules of the language. While these two words sound alike, they are spelled differently. English also has numerous instances of silent letters. In addition, a single word can be pronounced in more than one way. For instance, words like lead, present and object have more than one sound and meaning.

Irregular verbs are another area of difficulty that non-native English speakers must master. There are several hundred of these in the English language, and they don’t follow any sort of rule or pattern. For example, read is the same whether it is past or present tense, but drink is drank as past tense. Each one must be memorized individually. Slang also causes people problems when they aren’t used to speaking in English. In many modern situations, slang is appropriate in conversation as well as in writing. Non-native English speakers may not understand what others are talking about and struggle to follow the conversation. This includes special phrases and colloquialisms as well as actual slang terms.

How is a non-native English speaker supposed to learn such a complex language? According to The Berlitz Group, a company that helps people learn English in Toronto, practice really does make perfect. It helps if those learning English spend time around people who speak it and listen to it as much as they can. They can find English radio programs and read English books to practice on their own. Attending classes which teach English will help, but it’s also important to practice other times as well. The more one uses English or any other language they are attempting to learn, the faster they will master it. As with any language, a person should focus on learning the meaning of a phrase or sentence rather than trying to master each individual word. As they learn general concepts, they will get better at learning the words which make up the sentences. Since English is spoken in many countries, it is possible to learn how to speak it well.
Scoop.it!
No comment yet.

Shenzhen Stock Exchange introduces online “Easy IR” instant translation

FacebookTwitterLinkedInRedditEmail
SHARES
To match up with Shenzhen-Hong Kong Stock-Connect, Shenzhen Stock Exchange (SZSE) has introduced “Instant Translation”, an English translation function, on its “Easy IR” (an Internet-based interactive investor relations service). This enables a convenient means for foreign investors to know about companies listed in Shenzhen market and further perfects the foreign investor service system of SZSE.

At present, this new function is available on both the web version and mobile client of “Easy IR” in the English language environment. Through the function, foreign investors can get instant English translation of the Chinese Q&A on “Easy IR.” On web “Easy IR”, users can make the mouse hover over the desired Q&A to get its English version. On the mobile client, English translation will automatically display under the original text of Q&As, which improves the operation convenience and user experience for mobile client users.

In the future, SZSE will continue the improvement of “Easy IR” platform service to make it convenient for users to inquire information about SZSE-listed companies and improve user experience so that a quality “one-stop” service platform will be available to domestic and overseas investors.
Scoop.it!
No comment yet.

GroundUp: Hearings on Khoi San Bill held with no translation into Khoi and San languages | Daily Maverick

A disturbing pattern emerged from the public hearings on the Traditional and Khoi San Leadership Bill, writes Nolundi Luwaya for GROUNDUP. For one thing, no attempt was made to provide translation into any of the Khoi and San languages – or even into Afrikaans.

First published by GroundUp
Public hearings held by Parliament’s Portfolio Committee on Co-operative Governance and Traditional Affairs on the Traditional and Khoi San Leadership Bill in the Northern Cape this week got off to a cynical start.

A pattern emerged from the first four hearings in Kimberley, Kuruman, Upington and Springbok. There was no provision made for translation services, not even into Afrikaans, let alone Khoi and San languages. Yet member after member of the Khoi and San communities who spoke stressed that recognition of their language and their culture were key priorities. Recognition of their language must precede recognition of leadership and structures, they said, because a people without a language and culture are not a people, even if they have leaders.

Neither the Portfolio Committee nor the Provincial Legislature provided any form of interpretation. Instead, members of the public were asked to volunteer to translate. The quality and accuracy of the translation was dependent upon who was volunteering. It is unfair both to the volunteers and to those in attendance to expect people who are not trained in translation and who had never seen the 99-page bill to translate its complicated and often ambiguous content accurately.

The irony is that the Portfolio Committee belaboured the point that the bill is about giving Khoi and San communities recognition and respect. Yet if the process of consulting Khoi and San groups starts off flawed, what hope could there be for the complex process of giving them recognition? If the Portfolio Committee can speak about recognition as a priority yet not make it possible for people to participate fully in this conversation, this raises questions about the integrity of the process of recognition.

Not only were there no formal translation services at the hearings, but no copies of the bill were provided. Nor was there a summary or any written information on the bill in any of the languages the communities use. Had there been adequate spoken translation perhaps the absence of documents would not have been so serious, but a combination of formal translation and any written information on the bill, or even copies of the bill, itself, put the community members at a considerable disadvantage.

Most participants were hearing about the bill for the first time. In order to gain any understanding of it, they had to rely on sometimes poorly translated, verbal inputs by officials. In the context of a richly instructive body of jurisprudence on public participation from the Constitutional Court, the process in the Northern Cape is disappointing.

Members of the various Khoi and San communities spoke with passion and frustration about how desperately they would like the government to preserve, recognise and protect their language and cultural practices. Yet nowhere was it made clear to these communities that the bill provides only recognition of leadership structures and communities, without any promise of cultural preservation or land rights. Nor does the Bill provide that Khoi-San communities will be supported in attempts to practise their way of life. This way of life, participants explained, is built around communing with nature and passing on traditions.

The Content Adviser to the Portfolio Committee explained in no uncertain terms that only clauses dealing directly with Khoi and San communities would be discussed, not those dealing with traditional leaders in former Bantustans, apparently because the hearings were being held in areas with a predominance of Khoi and San communities. But is this sufficient justification to warrant a selective explanation of this Bill? It means that from the start, the Khoi and San communities do not have a comprehensive understanding of the bill.

This disadvantage is brought sharply into focus in relation to land rights. In its present form, the bill gives traditional leaders in the former homelands jurisdiction over land, whereas Khoi-San leaders are given jurisdiction only over people, and not territory. It was not explained to participants that the bill differentiates between Khoi-San and other “traditional” groups in this way.

Inevitably, Khoi and San community members raised the issue of land, and whether the Bill returns land to the Khoi-San communities – because, they said, what is a leader without land? They did so with no knowledge that the Bill attempts to sidestep the Khoi-San land issue completely by treating Khoi-San leaders differently from other leaders.

The Portfolio Committee failed to make it to the hearing in Kimberley. The explanation for their absence was that there was a delay with their flight. The Kimberley hearing was the best attended of the four held in the Northern Cape, with the community hall packed and more than 300 people in attendance. But after community leaders and members voiced their frustration about the conditions of the hall in which the hearing was held, the hearing was closed.

Even without the benefits of translation or documentation, community members saw right through the promises of recognition. They repeatedly pointed out to the committee that the recognition of language and the return of land are the heart and soul of any form of recognition and must come first. There is therefore deep symbolism in the fact that translation was the weakest point at these hearings.

The public consultation process will continue over the next two weeks in the Western and Eastern Cape and will resume early next year in other provinces.

But it does not bode well that in a context where people are making it clear that recognising them means recognising their languages, the Portfolio Committee could overlook providing translation. We are still speaking past each other, it seems. DM

Photo: Hearings on the Traditional and Khoi San Leadership Bill got under way in the Northern Cape last month. Photo: Geoffrey York

Nolundi Luwaya is a researcher and Deputy Director of the Land and Accountability Research Centre in the Faculty of Law at the University of Cape Town.

Views expressed are not necessarily those of GroundUp.
Scoop.it!
No comment yet.

Diversity in Translation, a New Report from Europe

As rights and licensing offer the world publishing industry more and more potential in terms of revenue, the new Diversity Report 2016 explores what works.

Rüdiger Wischenbart uses data from UNESCO’s Index Translatonum in his new Diversity Report 2016
By Porter Anderson, Editor-in-Chief | @Porter_Anderson

‘Flows of Literary Translation’

In the newly released, free Diversity Report 2016, Vienna-based consultant Rüdiger Wischenbart tells us that “the three top languages combined, English, German and French, account for roughly of four in five translations recorded.”

Rüdiger Wischenbart
Wischenbart, who directs Berlin’s Publishers’ Forum conference (coming April 24 and 25) and serves as international affairs director for BookExpo, goes on to say that “together with Italian and Spanish, these top five original languages cover most of the spectacular increase in translations” between 1979 and 2004.

“But also one big loser can be identified,” Wischenbart writes: “Russian, whose wild popularity collapsed quickly with the Soviet imperium after 1991.”

This is some of the material he brings forward in this report of more than 60 pages, which builds on prior reports from 2008, 2009, and 2010.

The focus here has two important parameters: “diversity,” in this context, refers to “flows of literary translation.” And the world context in this work is book markets of Europe.

With primary emphases on Germany, France, Spain, Poland, and Sweden, a goal here is “to better understand how some authors are being successfully translated into different languages, while distinct barriers curtail other works of fiction from traveling beyond their original linguistic realms.”

Across a dozen languages and the work of almost 250 authors, Wischenbart is looking for “what makes some books, and their authors, find multiple reading audiences while others are recognized just by their domestic readership.”

Clearly, when Frankfurt Book Fair’s Literary Agents and Scouts Center (the “LitAg”) sells out its 460 tables by early spring for the October fair, as happened this year, there’s keen interest in the translation rights markets.

Among new models, Wischenbart considers AmazonCrossing, now rated by translation expert Chad Post as the top producer of translations. You can read about some of the work of this imprint of Amazon Publishing in our interviews with Finland’s Katja Kettu and editor Gabriella Page-Fort and with Poland’s Zygmunt Miłoszewski and translator Antonia Lloyd-Jones, and our London Book Fair look at the imprint’s expansion.

While he seems a bit skeptical of the approach of translating more than literary fiction (the imprint selects what it feels is worthy genre work, as well), Wischenbart is looking in the right direction for where, as he notes that “re-thinking, re-organizing, and re-directing” translation is the issue now.

Worrying, as many of us do, about the health of literary fiction in the digital era, he writes:

“Each and every one acknowledges that in literary fiction, average print runs have significantly fallen in recent years, while advance payments have risen for the few top authors, the pressure from a few outstanding bestsellers has increased, so that in the end, it has become ever more challenging to sustain book publishing as a viable business.

“In this context, the extra cost of a translation, and disputes about the ‘fair’ compensation of authors, and also of translators, have added additional risk in that traditional model for making books, stories and ideas travel across linguistic boundaries.”

He seizes, however, on what many see as  an answer, one reflected in how AmazonCrossing, this year alone, will produce work from 22 countries in 16 languages: opening new markets to translation pairs may be key.

Perhaps “stakeholders should look beyond Europe (and North America),” Wischenbart writes, “and become aware of new reading audiences in many regions around the world, in Brazil and Mexico, in South Africa and in the Emirates, India, China, Korea, Japan, to just name a few.”

And he deftly sums up what makes this seem particularly critical today:  “When ‘rights and licenses’ often are seen as the only imminent sector of growth in traditional publishing,” we look to translators who “have always taken up the role of cultural mediators, and added income as scouts from their often meager translation fees.

“The Internet opens the reach of such an extended approach,” Wischenbart writes, for the publishing player who “becomes an organizer of a dedicated professional network.”

Early material is being released about the 2017 Publishers’ Forum program in Berlin here. 

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Porter Anderson
Facebook Twitter Google+
Porter Anderson is Editor-in-Chief of Publishing Perspectives. Prior to that he was Associate Editor for The FutureBook, a channel at The Bookseller focused on digital publishing. Anderson has also worked with CNN International, CNN.com, CNN USA, the Village Voice, the Dallas Times Herald, and other media.
Scoop.it!
No comment yet.

Intel Granted US Patent for Language Translation System | Slator

At first rejected back in February 2016, Intel’s US patent application for a “System and Method for Dual Screen Language Translation” was granted on November 22, 2016. Fellow tech giants Microsoft, Google, and Amazon all have a number of translation-related patents to their name. But it appears to be the first time the Silicon Valley-based chipmaker had applied for—and was granted—a patent this closely related to language translation.

It had been four years since Intel started working to get its patent approved by the US Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO). According Ryan Honick of the USPTO’s Public Affairs Office, to whom Slator reached out for this story, Intel’s dual screen system patent is “not a continuation of any prior US application.”

ADVERTISEMENT
First for Intel

We scanned Intel’s USPTO filings and its 26 other “translation” related patent applications were all false positives in terms of language translation. Rather, they were more related to buffers, paging tables, and statistical mechanics.

Intel’s dual screen system patent revolves around making real-time translation easier between two speakers who do not speak the same language. The point of the patent, per the filing, is to provide “a way to improve clarity of understanding between parties that speak different languages in an efficient and cost effective manner”; for instance, during business transactions between multilingual parties.

Based on Intel’s filing, the real-time language translation system could include an audio beamforming microphone (a professional-grade mic), a language translation module, and a display element.

A microphone would be designed to detect speech in the language of the first speaker as well as that of the second speaker. A language translation module would be set up to translate the speech of the first speaker into text in the second speaker’s language and vice versa. Finally, a display element would be configured with two sides: the first side will display text in the first language, the second display, in the second language.

And to make the patent’s scope more far-reaching, Intel’s filing includes several general diagrams that, for example (shown), state that the dual-sided screen may be replaced by what looks like almost any ubiquitous mobile device! (Intel names the following: a laptop, tablet, phone, smartphone, ultrabook, or any other mobile computing device.)

What’s more, the patent allows for the use of common peer-to-peer technology to hook up the system, such as WiFi, Bluetooth, or any “other suitable communication mechanism.”

What Is It For?

Other than the use of common devices in Intel’s newly granted patent for a translation system, the other question that comes to mind is, what is a chipmaker up to in the translation space?

Listed as first named inventor for Intel’s dual screen system patent is Nick Manuselis, Director of Market Development for the company’s Digital Home Group. After it hiredex-BBC new media executive Erik Huggers way back in 2011 to head the group, Intel decided nine months later to abandon its Digital Home Group products (i.e., digital TV) in favor of tablets. Could Intel be developing some translation gizmo tailored for the tablet market?

Or could it be homing in on the transcription space? In an article on the company blog by one “Marion K” of Intel, speech to text is discussed along with three scenarios on how captioning and media transcription software can expand its applications.

Share
by Marion Marking on December 1, 2016

Communications specialist, veteran journalist, and online editor at Slator who dreams of driving a Veyron on the Autobahn

Scoop.it!
No comment yet.

PEN America Will Unveil Longlists Next Week

PEN America will unveil the longlisted titles for the 2017 PEN America Literary Awards throughout the week next week.
Scoop.it!
No comment yet.

GroundUp: Hearings on Khoi San Bill held with no translation into Khoi and San languages | Daily Maverick

First published by GroundUp
Public hearings held by Parliament’s Portfolio Committee on Co-operative Governance and Traditional Affairs on the Traditional and Khoi San Leadership Bill in the Northern Cape this week got off to a cynical start.

A pattern emerged from the first four hearings in Kimberley, Kuruman, Upington and Springbok. There was no provision made for translation services, not even into Afrikaans, let alone Khoi and San languages. Yet member after member of the Khoi and San communities who spoke stressed that recognition of their language and their culture were key priorities. Recognition of their language must precede recognition of leadership and structures, they said, because a people without a language and culture are not a people, even if they have leaders.

Neither the Portfolio Committee nor the Provincial Legislature provided any form of interpretation. Instead, members of the public were asked to volunteer to translate. The quality and accuracy of the translation was dependent upon who was volunteering. It is unfair both to the volunteers and to those in attendance to expect people who are not trained in translation and who had never seen the 99-page bill to translate its complicated and often ambiguous content accurately.

The irony is that the Portfolio Committee belaboured the point that the bill is about giving Khoi and San communities recognition and respect. Yet if the process of consulting Khoi and San groups starts off flawed, what hope could there be for the complex process of giving them recognition? If the Portfolio Committee can speak about recognition as a priority yet not make it possible for people to participate fully in this conversation, this raises questions about the integrity of the process of recognition.

Not only were there no formal translation services at the hearings, but no copies of the bill were provided. Nor was there a summary or any written information on the bill in any of the languages the communities use. Had there been adequate spoken translation perhaps the absence of documents would not have been so serious, but a combination of formal translation and any written information on the bill, or even copies of the bill, itself, put the community members at a considerable disadvantage.

Most participants were hearing about the bill for the first time. In order to gain any understanding of it, they had to rely on sometimes poorly translated, verbal inputs by officials. In the context of a richly instructive body of jurisprudence on public participation from the Constitutional Court, the process in the Northern Cape is disappointing.

Members of the various Khoi and San communities spoke with passion and frustration about how desperately they would like the government to preserve, recognise and protect their language and cultural practices. Yet nowhere was it made clear to these communities that the bill provides only recognition of leadership structures and communities, without any promise of cultural preservation or land rights. Nor does the Bill provide that Khoi-San communities will be supported in attempts to practise their way of life. This way of life, participants explained, is built around communing with nature and passing on traditions.

The Content Adviser to the Portfolio Committee explained in no uncertain terms that only clauses dealing directly with Khoi and San communities would be discussed, not those dealing with traditional leaders in former Bantustans, apparently because the hearings were being held in areas with a predominance of Khoi and San communities. But is this sufficient justification to warrant a selective explanation of this Bill? It means that from the start, the Khoi and San communities do not have a comprehensive understanding of the bill.

This disadvantage is brought sharply into focus in relation to land rights. In its present form, the bill gives traditional leaders in the former homelands jurisdiction over land, whereas Khoi-San leaders are given jurisdiction only over people, and not territory. It was not explained to participants that the bill differentiates between Khoi-San and other “traditional” groups in this way.

Inevitably, Khoi and San community members raised the issue of land, and whether the Bill returns land to the Khoi-San communities – because, they said, what is a leader without land? They did so with no knowledge that the Bill attempts to sidestep the Khoi-San land issue completely by treating Khoi-San leaders differently from other leaders.

The Portfolio Committee failed to make it to the hearing in Kimberley. The explanation for their absence was that there was a delay with their flight. The Kimberley hearing was the best attended of the four held in the Northern Cape, with the community hall packed and more than 300 people in attendance. But after community leaders and members voiced their frustration about the conditions of the hall in which the hearing was held, the hearing was closed.

Even without the benefits of translation or documentation, community members saw right through the promises of recognition. They repeatedly pointed out to the committee that the recognition of language and the return of land are the heart and soul of any form of recognition and must come first. There is therefore deep symbolism in the fact that translation was the weakest point at these hearings.

The public consultation process will continue over the next two weeks in the Western and Eastern Cape and will resume early next year in other provinces.

But it does not bode well that in a context where people are making it clear that recognising them means recognising their languages, the Portfolio Committee could overlook providing translation. We are still speaking past each other, it seems. DM

Photo: Hearings on the Traditional and Khoi San Leadership Bill got under way in the Northern Cape last month. Photo: Sobantu Mzwakali

Nolundi Luwaya is a researcher and Deputy Director of the Land and Accountability Research Centre in the Faculty of Law at the University of Cape Town.

Views expressed are not necessarily those of GroundUp.
Scoop.it!
No comment yet.

Hearings on Khoi San Bill held with no translation into Khoi and San languages

Portfolio committee hearings in Northern Cape off to shaky start
Scoop.it!
No comment yet.

Cameroun - Textes OHADA: Le Cameroun a reçu la version anglaise

La traduction des actes uniformes de l'Organisation pour l'Harmonisation en Afrique du Droit des Affaires (OHADA), était l'une des principales revendications des avocats d'expression anglaise du barreau camerounais, lors d’un récent mouvement humeur qui a paralysé les tribunaux de Bamenda.
Dorothée Kossin Nsoxa, secrétaire permanent de l'Organisation pour l'Harmonisation en Afrique du Droit des Affaires (OHADA), a été reçu lundi 28 novembre 2016, par le Secrétaire Général de la Présidence de la  République du Cameroun (SGPR), Ferdinand Ngo Ngo. La version anglaise des textes de l'OHADA était au centre de cette audience. Le secrétaire permanent de l'OHADA a remis en mains propres la version traduite en anglais au SGPR.

Selon Le Quotidien l’Epervier Plus du 30 novembre 2016, ces textes arrivent avec un grand retard, et dans un contexte où les avocats anglophones du Cameroun ne cessent de revendiquer cette traduction.  Dorothée Kossin Nsoxa a indiqué que son Organisation prendra des mesures qui s’imposent pour que de tels retards ne soient plus observés. «Ce sont des mesures qui iront jusqu’à la surveillance des Etats afin que ceux-ci respectent les engagements pris vis-à-vis de l’OHADA», révèle le journal.

Ce texte qui règlemente les affaires dans 17 pays africains a été à l'origine pensé pour les pays francophones. Sa langue de travail était le français. C'est la révision du traité survenu à Québec au Canada qui a introduit le portugais, l'Espagnol et l'Anglais comme langue de travail. Dans la pratique, seul le secrétaire permanent de l'OHADA peut acheminer les documents officiels aux états membres. Mais avant il existe une procédure stricte.

Les documents doivent d'abord recevoir la certification des archives du gouvernement de la République du Sénégal qui est le gouvernement dépositaire de tous les textes OHADA conformément à l'article 63 du traité. Après la traduction du texte rédigé en français vers l'une des autres langues introduites par la révision du traité c'est à dire l'anglais l'espagnol et le portugais, chaque état membre doit ratifier le document. Les instruments de ratification et d'adhésion sont par la suite déposés auprès du gouvernement du Sénégal, lequel délivre une copie au secrétaire permanent pour acheminement aux états membres. C'est cette ultime étape qui vient d'être franchie pour le cas du Cameroun.
Scoop.it!
No comment yet.

(01) traducteur-interprète (anglais) - Offres d'emploi, de stage et de formation - Emploi, Travail, Job, Carrière - Site d'annonces d'emploi

(01) TRADUCTEUR-INTERPRÈTE (ANGLAIS)
Entreprise : ORGANISATION OUEST AFRICAINE DE LA SANTÉ (OOAS)
Secteur d'activité : ADMINISTRATION / SERVICE PUBLIC
Type d'offre : EMPLOI
Niveau(x): BAC+3
Expérience: 7 ANNÉES
Lieu: BOBO DIOULASSO, BURKINA FASO
Date de publication: 30 NOVEMBRE 2016
Date limite: 8 DÉCEMBRE 2016
Contact : wahooas@wahooas.org - (226) 20 97 57 75 / 20 97 00 97

inPartager
Partager
À propos de cette offre
SOLLICITATION DE MANIFESTATIONS D’INTERET

(Services de Consultation Individuelle)
Référence N°FM/TEND/AMI/2016/013/bk

Pour l’Appui à la Gestion des :
Projet Régional de renforcement des capacités en Surveillance des Maladies et Riposte (WARDS)
Projet Régional pour le Renforcement des Systèmes de Surveillance des Maladies (REDISSE)
Projet Autonomisation des Femmes et Dividende Démographique au Sahel (SWEDD)
Projet Paludisme et Maladies Tropicales Négligées au Sahel (P/MTN)

Novembre 2016

POSTE : traducteur-interprète (anglais)

Introduction

L’Organisation Ouest Africaine de la Santé (OOAS) est l’institution spécialisée de la CEDEAO en charge des questions de santé, ayant pour mandat d’offrir le niveau le plus élevé en matière de prestation de soins de santé aux populations de la sous-région. Les maladies transmissibles et non transmissibles sont les principales causes de morbidité et de mortalité dans la région. Par conséquent, la lutte contre les maladies et la prévention des épidémies comptent parmi les priorités des 15 pays de l’espace CEDEAO et sont au cœur des activités de l’OOAS.
La Banque Mondiale a accordé des subventions à la CEDEAO pour la mise en œuvre par l’OOAS de plusieurs projets (WARDS, REDISSE, SWEDD et P/MTN) dans le secteur de la santé.

C’est dans le cadre de l’exécution desdits projets que l’OOAS souhaite recruter un Traducteur-interprète (Anglais) ayant les qualifications et expériences requises.

But Principal de la mission

Le traducteur-interprète, (Français – Anglais) est chargé d’assurer l’interprétation, la traduction et la révision des documents de l’Organisation Ouest Africaine de la Santé (OOAS) et de tous les projets.

Tâches et responsabilités

Le titulaire de ce poste travaillera sous la Coordination du Coordonnateur général de l’Unité de Gestion des Projets (UGP) et la supervision directe du responsable de WAHO LINGUA, Unité en charge des traductions et de interprétariat de l’OOAS. De manière spécifique, il ou elle aura à :

• Traduire un large éventail de documents (y compris les correspondances officielles, communiqués de presse, les rapports de conférences, d’ateliers ou de réunions, etc. dans la langue cible, en assurant le maintien du sens de la langue source ;
• Réviser les documents (les rapports, procès-verbaux, communiqués, communiqués de presse et contrats, etc.) traduits du français en anglais, et vice versa ;
• Assurer, le cas échéant, l’interprétation lors des réunions internes et externes ;
• Prendre attache avec les traducteurs et interprètes externes en ce qui concerne les besoins de l’Unité de gestion des projets (UGP) en matière de traduction et de révision des documents.
• Organiser et gérer le volume des documents à traduire et à réviser de l’UGP ;
• Tenir un registre de l’ensemble des travaux de traduction et de révision envoyés à l’UGP ;
• Mettre en place et gérer une base de données linguistique des terminologies et références en assurant l’exactitude et la cohérence grammaticale, et contextuelle.

Qualifications, expériences et compétences requises

• Avoir une licence ou un certificat d’interprète et traducteur obtenu dans une Institution reconnue ;
• Avoir au moins 7 ans d’expérience professionnelle en interprétation, traduction et en révision à un niveau supérieur ;
• Avoir une maitrise de l’outil informatique avec une connaissance des outils de traduction ;
• Avoir une bonne capacité d’organisation et être capable de hiérarchiser la charge de travail, de définir et de respecter les délais, puis d’exécuter plusieurs tâches à la fois, et veiller au respect des détails ;
• Avoir la capacité à utiliser toutes les sources de référence, de consultation et d’information pertinentes pour la traduction de textes de document ;
• Avoir une bonne capacité de révision des documents ;
• Avoir l’aptitude à établir et entretenir des relations de travail efficaces avec des personnes de différentes origines, nationalités et cultures avec une sensibilité et un respect pour la diversité ;
• Avoir une expérience en matière d’utilisation des technologies de traduction serait un atout supplémentaire ;
• Avoir une parfaite maitrise (écrite et orale) de l’Anglais et du Français. La maîtrise du Portugais serait un atout supplémentait.

Durée, lieu d’affectation et nature du poste

Il s’agit d’un poste de consultant au sein de l’UGP de l’OOAS, financé par la Banque mondiale. La durée du contrat est d’un (1) an sous réserve d’une période probatoire d’un (1) mois, et peut être renouvelée suivant la disponibilité des fonds du projet. La rémunération salariale est attrayante.

Le lieu d’affectation du Traducteur-interprète est le siège de l’OOAS à Bobo-Dioulasso au BURKINA FASO. Il ou elle effectuera des missions dans les pays membres de la CEDEAO, si nécessaire.

Les consultants intéressés par le présent avis sont invités à manifester leur intérêt. Ils ou elles doivent fournir des informations attestant des qualifications et compétences requises (Lettre de motivation indiquant le poste, un curriculum vitae détaillé, y compris la description de missions et expériences similaires, et copies des documents justificatifs).

Le consultant requis sera sélectionné conformément aux procédures de sélection de consultants individuels définies dans les Directives : Sélection et Emploi de Consultants par les Emprunteurs de la Banque Mondiale ; (édition de janvier 2011, version révisée en juillet 2014) disponible sur le site web de la Banque Mondiale http://www.worldbank.org

Information, délai et lieu de dépôt des manifestations

Des informations supplémentaires peuvent être obtenues aux heures suivantes :
Lundi-Vendredi 08h00 – 16h00 GMT auprès de la personne ressource à l’OOAS à l’adresse ci-dessous :
Lalaissa AMOUKOU
Téléphone : (226) 20 97 57 75 / 20 97 00 97
Fax : (226) 20 97 57 72
E-mail : lamoukou@wahooas.org

Les Consultants individuels intéressés et ayant les qualifications requises sont invités à manifester leur intérêt en soumettant leur dossier (en personne, par courrier ou e-mail) à l’adresse ci-dessous :

Dr Xavier CRESPIN
Directeur Général
Organisation Ouest Africaine de la Santé
01 BP 153 Bobo-Dioulasso 01
Burkina Faso
Email : wahooas@wahooas.org ; offres@wahooas.org

L’angle supérieur droit de l’enveloppe ou l’objet de l’e-mail doivent indiquer le poste de la manifestation d’intérêt. La date limite pour la réception des dossiers est le 08 Décembre 2016 à 11H00 GMT.

L’OOAS ou la Banque Mondiale ne sauraient être tenues responsables des coûts ou autres dépenses engagés par le Consultant individuel dans le cadre de la préparation ou de la soumission de la manifestation d’intérêt.

Date de clôture de l'offre : 8 décembre 2016
Scoop.it!
No comment yet.

Conférence – 13/12/2016 – La Bible historiale. Traduction, mise en page et illustration du livre sacré à l’époque gothique

EVÉNEMENTS SCIENTIFIQUES ET CULTURELS
CONFÉRENCE – 13/12/2016 – LA BIBLE HISTORIALE. TRADUCTION, MISE EN PAGE ET ILLUSTRATION DU LIVRE SACRÉ À L’ÉPOQUE GOTHIQUE
30/11/2016 MODERNUM LAISSER UN COMMENTAIRE
La Bible historiale. Traduction, mise en page et illustration du livre sacré à l’époque gothique
Thomas Flum (Université de Franche-Comté)

Lieu : Liège, Université de Liège, Grand Physique (Bât. A1)

Date de l’événement : 13/12/2016 (18h)

Source de l’info : ULg
Scoop.it!
No comment yet.

Heritage speakers deepen language skills through classes | Cornell Chronicle

The 54 ancient and modern languages offered at Cornell – including Indonesian, Polish and Arabic – provide students with opportunities to stretch their skills beyond the typical European languages taught in most high schools.

For some students, the language they choose to study is one they already know well – perhaps speaking or hearing it since birth. These students are called heritage language learners, and there are classes in Spanish, Chinese, Korean, Arabic, Hindi and Russian offered just for them.

While these students know that the language skills may benefit them in a future career, many students also take the classes to connect with family.

Elsie Ikpot ’16 studied Spanish in high school, but when she learned she could take Yoruba at Cornell, she signed up in the second semester of her freshman year. Three semesters later, she earned a Fulbright fellowship to study in Nigeria.

“At first I was so afraid that I would make a mistake, but that experience made me feel confident and empowered,” she said. “I visited my grandmother [after learning more of the language], and she was so surprised.”

Frances Yufen Lee Mehta said teaching heritage speakers is something like filling in holes in a piece of Swiss cheese. All of the students have different strengths and weaknesses – in reading, writing, pronunciation, vocabulary or other areas – so classes need to address many facets of language learning, said Mehta, a senior lecturer in the Department of Asian Studies.

For Billie Sun ’19, her Chinese reading and writing skills are good since she took Chinese throughout high school, but her oral skills are lacking because although her parents spoke to her in Chinese growing up, she would always answer in English.


Lindsay France/University Photography
Frances Yufen Lee Mehta, senior lecturer in the Department of Asian Studies, left, teaches a Chinese language class for students who already have some knowledge of the language. Benjamin Ho, right, a Cornell law student, is in her class this semester.
The classes have allowed her to connect with her extended family on many levels, she said. “I think a lot of my family’s humor is kind of Chinese-language-centric, so the language brings us all closer together in that respect.”

Kevin Alonyo ’16 realized he had large vocabulary gaps when he tried to explain his environmental science major to his mother and other relatives.

“I moved from Jakarta when I was 7 years old, so I had a good grasp of the Indonesian language. But I slowly lost it because the only person I would talk to in Indonesian was my mom,” he said.

Attending a Herbert F. Johnson Museum of Art exhibit and hearing the Gamelan Ensemble brought back memories of his childhood, Alonyo said. Chris Miller, music professor and ensemble leader, encouraged Alonyo to take his class, which led to a class in Indonesian, another class in Southeast Asian studies and intensive summer studies in Indonesia.

Writing and vocabulary are also the main challenges for students in Munther Younes’ Arabic classes.

“Many students have taken classes for religious purposes so they know a little about reading and speaking, but they have no grammar,” he said, adding that two of the eight students in his class this semester had never seen Arabic letters before.

The progress after one semester can be surprising, though, said Younes, a senior lecturer in the Department of Near Eastern Studies.

“I can read most words and understand them now, and I can write small, simple passages,” said David Labib ’20, who was born in Egypt but immigrated to the U.S. when he was 10. “This is a huge stride from where I started, considering that in August I didn’t even know the letters of the alphabet.”

Along with heritage language classes, Cornell students can also practice their family language skills in Foreign Language Across the Curriculum (FLAC) classes. These one-credit classes are attached to a “parent” class in some discipline, where all discussion is in a foreign language.

One interesting conundrum students and faculty face in these classes is that although they all speak the same language, there can be vast differences in accents, pronunciations and word choice based on their native country or region.

“Faculty who teach heritage speakers must be respectful of the dialectal differences they will encounter,” said Nilsa B. Maldonado Mendez, visiting senior lecturer in the Department of Romance Studies, who teaches Spanish to heritage speakers. “After all, we’re talking about 20 nations, each with its own history and influences from regional indigenous people, different accents and even uses of certain verb tenses.”

Dick Feldman, director of Cornell’s Language Resource Center, said heritage speakers benefit from regular classes and FLAC experiences. “At the same time that their increased language skills help them relate more meaningfully to their families and communities, the more professional nature of those skills give them study and employment opportunities they never had before,” Feldman said.

Kathy Hovis is a writer for the College of Arts and Sciences.
Scoop.it!
No comment yet.

Et de trois pour le petit dictionnaire des mots meusiens

Monique Villaume signe le 3e tome d’un dictionnaire relatant des mots issus d’un temps ou chaque région avait ses particularités linguistiques. C’es
Scoop.it!
No comment yet.

Prochain lancement du 1er dictionnaire de "darija" marocaine

Le Centre de promotion de la darija, présidé par Noureddine Ayouch, a annoncé le lancement du premier dictionnaire d’arabe marocain (darija). Il sera présenté samedi 3 décembre prochain à Casablanca.
Scoop.it!
No comment yet.

Ministry of Justice in Romania Authorizes Professional Translators Team - Press Release - Digital Journal

Romanian-based translation services include a strong team of professional translators authorized by the Ministry of Justice. The team specializes in several foreign languages, including English, Spanish, and German.

The Authorised Translator is pleased to announce the establishment of their highly qualified team of professional translators. The professionals are authorized by the Ministry of Justice. They are able to translate several foreign languages, including English, Spanish, and German. The competency is in several different professional areas, including legal, economic, technical, financial, medical, publishing, IT, commercial, marketing, advertising and multimedia. All translators provide professionalism, seriousness, and efficiency in completing translation projects.

An authorized translator in Romania is carefully selected for their promptness, competence, and experience to date. Each applicant for the professional team is required to successfully pass a language test in order to prove that they meet all the necessary qualifications of a competent translator. Once the fairly rigorous recruitment process is completed, translators who have been selected to be part of the team are available to respond quickly and to assist in overcoming any language barrier.

According to a spokesperson for the translation service, “Our team will ensure that each project or document received will be treated with maximum reliability, each submission deadline agreed with the client will be respected, and that services will meet the quality requirements of the client. We offer high-quality translations, quick response, and extremely advantageous prices.”

In today's global economy, more cross-language transactions are occurring. The need for accurate and timely translations of legal and business documents is a growing concern. The sharing of information in fields such as research, medicine and health and energy requires translation in accurate terms. Translation is also needed in the fields of communications, education, transportation and agriculture.

The trained professional team is able to respond quickly and accurately to the need for documents and communication in written form in various major languages. Recruitment and assessment criteria are maintained at a high level in order to ensure that the completed documents meet the highest quality standards.

For additional information, visit http://biroutraduceriautorizate.ro/.

###

Contact biroutraduceriautorizate.ro/:

biroutraduceriautorizate.ro/
+40786 602 533
Scoop.it!
No comment yet.

German speaking Market Analyst/Content Translator job with Euro London Appointments | 554235


Recruiter Euro London Appointments
Location England, Hertfordshire, St. Albans
Salary £26000 - £30000 per annum
Posted 29 Nov 2016
Closes 27 Dec 2016
Ref CYKT291116
Contact Kenny Tsang
Fluent Language Western European Languages, German
Industry Betting and Gaming, Translation, Localization, Interpretation
Job Type Permanent Vacancy
Send
Save
Apply
My client, a market leading company in financial and sports spread betting, is looking for a German speaking market analyst/content translator to be based in its office in St Albans, Hertfordshire.

The role is varied, challenging and rewarding for the right candidate. Tasks include creating content for its German website and social media channels and communicating with journalists to create positive PR for the company.

The right candidate should possess the following...
- native German speaker who is very familiar with financial terminology in German and English
- great standard of written and spoken German and English
- a degree in Business, Economics, Finance, Journalism or Languages from a leading university
- an understanding of how financial spread betting and CFDs work
- experience in financial spread betting or CFD is preferable
- strong mathematical and communication skills

This is an exciting permanent opportunity beginning immediately. If you are currently available and have the required skillset please send your CV in word format.


Thank you for your interest in Euro London Appointments. Please be advised CV's will be treated in the strictest of confidence and that your application will not be forwarded without your permission. We aim to respond promptly to your application however, due to the high level of CV's we receive we are only able to respond to applicants whose profile matches our Clients requirements. For more jobs please visit our website at www.eurolondon.com.
Scoop.it!
No comment yet.

Translators without Borders develops world's first crisis-specific machine translation for Kurdish | Slator

Translators without Borders (TWB) has developed offline machine translation engines for Sorani and Kurmanji for translating content for refugees

DANBURY, CT USA – 30 November 2016. Translators without Borders (TWB) has developed offline machine translation (MT) engines for Sorani and Kurmanji, specifically for translating content for refugees. Sorani and Kurmanji are the two main languages spoken by Kurdish refugees; the data used to build the systems came from the work that TWB has done as part of its Words of Relief crisis response for the European refugee crisis via START network funding provided by DFID.

In just one week, the TWB team of Kurdish translators could generate enough data to build systems that can provide rudimentary communications between Kurdish refugees and aid workers in Greece, demonstrating the value a minimal viable offline MT application in underserved languages can have during a crisis.

ADVERTISEMENT

‘We used a rules-based machine translation (RBMT) for this project, which is suitable for languages for which there is very little data, meaning that statistical or neural ‘training’ is not an option. Especially in a humanitarian context, technological choices must be driven by actual needs, regardless of what may be considered cutting edge elsewhere’, said Mirko Plitt, TWB’s Head of Technology. ‘For Sorani, no MT solution existed up until now; for Kurmanji only one, online.’

RBMT systems also have more modest hardware requirements than statistical MT and neural MT systems, making it possible to use them on low-spec smartphones without an Internet connection, a very important consideration in a crisis situation. TWB’s Kurdish MT systems can be used via an Android app freely available on the Google Playstore, and can also be integrated into other applications.

‘By creating rudimentary tools using open-source technology, we also provide a starting point for language communities who wish to develop their own language technology resources, without exclusively depending on the roadmaps of the leading tech companies with whom we cooperate as well,’ added Plitt.

This project was carried out with the open-source Apertium MT system, which is actively maintained by a team at Prompsit, a University of Alicante spin-off in Spain, who remotely trained and coordinated ten TWB Rapid Response Kurdish translators over the duration of one week. The translators were assisted in creating the set of vocabulary and grammar rules that are most likely to be needed for communications in a crisis.

For press enquiries please contact Rebecca Petras: rebecca@translatorswithoutborders.org

About Translators without Borders

Translators without Borders envisions a world where knowledge knows no language barriers. The US-based non-profit provides people access to vital knowledge in their language by connecting non-profit organizations with a professional community of volunteer translators, building local language translation capacity, and raising awareness of language barriers. Originally founded in 1994 in France as Traducteurs sans Frontières (now its sister organization), Translators without Borders translates more than 8 million words per year. In 2012, the organization established a Translators’ Training Center in Nairobi, Kenya.

For more information and to volunteer or donate, please visit: http://www.translatorswithoutborders.org or follow on Twitter at http://www.twitter.com/TranslatorsWB.

 

Share
by Translators Without Borders on November 30, 2016

Translators without Borders (TWB) the world’s leading non-profit translation organization. Our mission is a world where knowledge knows no language barriers.

Scoop.it!
No comment yet.

Nouveau dictionnaire Robert. Alain Rey à Brest pour deux jours


Le linguiste Alain Rey partagera sa passion des mots lors d'une conférence publique à l'UBO et d'une rencontre à la librairie Dialogues. (Photo d'archives Le Télégramme)
Une nouvelle édition du Dictionnaire historique de la langue française, largement augmentée, vient de paraître, sous la direction d'Alain Rey, qui, depuis plus de cinquante ans, anime la grande aventure des Dictionnaires Robert. Le Dictionnaire historique de la langue française est un dictionnaire unique au monde, qui se lit comme un roman.

60.000 mots détaillés
Il emmène ceux qui s'y plongent à travers plus de dix siècles de voyage dans la langue des idées, des cultures et des sociétés, grâce à l'histoire détaillée de 60.000 mots.

À l'occasion de cette parution, Alain Rey sera présent, demain, à 18 h, dans la salle des conférences Yves-Moraud de la faculté Victor-Segalen, pour une conférence publique, dans le cadre d'« Écritures vives », une série de rencontres avec des écrivains, autour de leurs préférences artistiques, d'extraits de leurs oeuvres et de celles de leurs auteurs de prédilection. Vendredi, à 18 h, il sera au café de la librairie Dialogues pour y parler plus précisément de la nouvelle édition du Dictionnaire historique de la langue française, mais aussi de ses nombreuses autres publications, de son parcours et de sa passion des mots.
Scoop.it!
No comment yet.