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#Translation Crackdown in Quebec: ‘Le Gap’ Won’t Do …

#Translation Crackdown in Quebec: ‘Le Gap’ Won’t Do … | Translation and language in the news | Scoop.it
Crackdown in Quebec: ‘Le Gap’ Won’t Do By IAN AUSTEN Published: November 22, 2012 GATINEAU, Quebec — The southern gentleman with the distinctive tie who looms above the entrance to a fast-food rest...
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Translation and language in the news
News and insights into the fascinating world of language and the translation industry
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What Are The Best Times & Days to Post to Social Media? #Infographic

What Are The Best Times & Days to Post to Social Media? #Infographic | Translation and language in the news | Scoop.it
Trying to find the optimal times and days for your social media posts can be a difficult challenge. You have to make it an effort to post at different times each day for each social media account, while tediously recording your results.

Via Brian Yanish - MarketingHits.com
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DigitalDimension's curator insight, November 23, 2016 12:47 PM
¿Quieres saber cuáles son los mejores días y horas para publicar en las redes sociales? 
AvizorMedia's curator insight, November 24, 2016 3:36 AM
Los mejores días y horas para publicar en Redes Sociales. Interesante infografía ¿Conocías los datos? 
EL OBSERVATORIO DIGITAL's curator insight, December 10, 2016 4:01 AM
Completa infografía que ayuda a conocer los  mejores  momentos para publicar en las redes sociales (Facebook, Twitter...)
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'Translating subtitles is like translating poetry'

'Translating subtitles is like translating poetry' | Translation and language in the news | Scoop.it
Darcy Paquet, an American film critic and translator who has worked on English subtitles for over 100 Korean films, says movie subtitles in English have come a long way. “The situation now is better than, for example, the late 1990s. Some of the films I see are translated quite well. But other times you come across some that don't, which is very frustrating, because the Korean dialogue is interesting but the subtitles are not,” said Paquet during a recent interview with The Korea Times.

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The next big problem facing aged care: How to talk to culturally diverse patients

The next big problem facing aged care: How to talk to culturally diverse patients | Translation and language in the news | Scoop.it
By 2030, almost a third of people over 65 are expected to be from culturally diverse backgrounds and speak languages other than English.

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Why English is such a difficult language to learn

Why English is such a difficult language to learn | Translation and language in the news | Scoop.it
The prime minister, David Cameron, wants more Muslim women in the UK to be taught English to reduce segregation between different linguistic communities and even limit the lure of extremism. Most of us who have tried it probably feel that learning a new language is difficult, even if that new language is similar to our own. So how difficult is it to learn English and especially if your first language is quite different?
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Resting brain chatter predicts ability to learn second language

Resting brain chatter predicts ability to learn second language | Translation and language in the news | Scoop.it
If you are planning on learning a second language, the connectivity of your brain at rest might predict how easy, or how difficult, you find it.
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Importance of website translation and what internet businesses should know

Importance of website translation and what internet businesses should know | Translation and language in the news | Scoop.it

Online businesses are doing all they can to win the hearts of their customers all around the world.

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Express makes front-page correction for claiming English is dying out in schools

Express makes front-page correction for claiming English is dying out in schools | Translation and language in the news | Scoop.it
Paper distorted figures and made repeated inaccuracies when it claimed English-speaking pupils were ‘becoming a minority in hundreds of classrooms’, says Ipso
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Translating Success: Tips for Multilingual Marketing

Translating Success: Tips for Multilingual Marketing | Translation and language in the news | Scoop.it
As a global company, your marketing campaigns may be in multiple languages to reach local audiences. Make sure you're getting your translations right.
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Top Technical Translation Company Helps Exporters Conquer Global Markets

Top Technical Translation Company Helps Exporters Conquer Global Markets | Translation and language in the news | Scoop.it
Translators are the invisible force providing businesses with opportunities in international markets that they wouldn’t necessarily have otherwise. Many local, national and international companies ...
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Google Translate error sees Spanish town advertise clitoris festival

Google Translate error sees Spanish town advertise clitoris festival | Translation and language in the news | Scoop.it
Food festival organisers say they are ‘quite surprised’ to learn event in honour of Galician speciality grelo had been badly mistranslated
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Looking at the cloud through European eyes - diginomica

Looking at the cloud through European eyes - diginomica | Translation and language in the news | Scoop.it
From a European point of view, the cloud seems to be dominated by US providers and everything the European Commission does just seems to make things worse
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Expert Tips on Multilingual SEO to Boost Your Online Findability

Expert Tips on Multilingual SEO to Boost Your Online Findability | Translation and language in the news | Scoop.it
So you’ve created a beautiful, compelling website that wows your home audience. The time is ripe for adapting it for key markets around the world. But how valuable is your excellent website to your…
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The world's most multilingual cities

The world's most multilingual cities | Translation and language in the news | Scoop.it
Learning a new language is often a core part of moving abroad - but in some linguistically diverse places, expats will need to learn two or three languages just to get by.
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What is a Cultural Broker?

"The term “culture broker” or “cultural broker” is not particularly defined in the literature but is defined through common usage as a person who facilitates the border crossing of another person or group of people from one culture to another culture[2]. Jezewski (in Jezewski & Sotnik, 2001) defined culture broking as “the act of bridging, linking or mediating between groups or persons of differing cultural backgrounds for the purpose of reducing conflict or producing change”. Usually the culture broker is from one or other of the cultures but could be from a third group. Often they are capable of acting in both directions. The role covers more than being an interpreter, although this is an important attribute in cross-cultural situations where language is part of the role.

A broker is usually defined as a middleman (sic) and emphasises the commercial aspect such as in stockbroker. In terms of cultural broker, the use of the term broker is most in accord with “middleman, intermediary, or agent generally; an interpreter, messenger, commissioner” from the Oxford English Dictionary and the idea of reward is not necessarily financial (e.g. Szasz, 2001). (The Oxford English Dictionary does not give a specific definition for cultural broker.)

The origin of the term is in the field of anthropology in the mid-1900s, when several anthropologists wrote about native people whose role in their society was as a cultural intermediary or cultural broker, usually with the western society. The term ‘cultural intermediary’ was used in some of the literature, with ‘culture broker’ and ‘cultural broker’ as alternatives. Other terms used include ‘innovator’ and ‘marginal man’ (sic). The genre was given an historical perspective and the field of ethnohistory came into existence. The background to this can be found in the introduction to Margaret Connell Szasz’s Between Indian and White Worlds: The Cultural Broker (Szasz, 2001)."


Above text taken from: "The role of culture brokers in intercultural science education: A research proposal" by Michael Michie, Centre for Research in Science and Technology Education, University of Waikato - Paper presented at the 34th annual conference of the Australasian Science Education Research Association held in Melbourne, 10-12 July 2003.

To read complete paper, click here.

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Ireland's international tech sector bumps up against language barrier

Ireland's international tech sector bumps up against language barrier | Translation and language in the news | Scoop.it
A taxing problem for US and European firms relocating
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21 Times Tumblr Proved English Is The Worst Language Ever

21 Times Tumblr Proved English Is The Worst Language Ever | Translation and language in the news | Scoop.it
Is it data or data?..
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What Are the Most Marketable Business Skills Today? | The Economic Voice

What Are the Most Marketable Business Skills Today? | The Economic Voice | Translation and language in the news | Scoop.it
Since business management depends on innovations, modern workers have to develop a view of the world completely different from their parents’ attitudes.
ALM Translations's insight:

It's heartening to see that language skills are cited in this article as an important business skill for now and in the future.

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Why some people find learning a language harder than others

Why some people find learning a language harder than others | Translation and language in the news | Scoop.it
Speed and extent of learning determined by innate differences in how the
various parts of the brain "talk" to one another
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Building a brand on trust – the business of relationships | UKTI blog

Building a brand on trust – the business of relationships | UKTI blog | Translation and language in the news | Scoop.it
News and updates from UKTI
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Great advice!

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Putin presents English language self-teacher to Russian sports minister as birthday gift

Putin presents English language self-teacher to Russian sports minister as birthday gift | Translation and language in the news | Scoop.it
Vitaly Mutko's remarks made in English have brought him world fame
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13 untranslatable words from foreign languages that English desperately needs

13 untranslatable words from foreign languages that English desperately needs | Translation and language in the news | Scoop.it
While English has a solid 171,476...
ALM Translations's insight:

We come across many articles like this and most are not worth reading, but these are indeed beautiful words and phrases that describe different concepts and feelings. Why don't we have these in our rich and beautiful language? That's the question...

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A Translation Site's Clever Recipe Taste Test Shows How Wrong Google Translate Can Be

A Translation Site's Clever Recipe Taste Test Shows How Wrong Google Translate Can Be | Translation and language in the news | Scoop.it
BERLIN, Germany—When you have a free competitor as hugely popular as Google Translate, your only valid option is to make the most of it.
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Let's admit it, Hong Kong's English standards will never rise

Let's admit it, Hong Kong's English standards will never rise | Translation and language in the news | Scoop.it
Michael Chugani says despite all the angst, extra lessons and pressure on children, Hong Kong should realise we're on a hiding to nothing by trying to raise standards for everyone
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Sepp Blatter's "disloyalty" and false friends in translation!

Sepp Blatter's "disloyalty" and false friends in translation! | Translation and language in the news | Scoop.it
THE ethics committee for FIFA, football’s governing association, provisionally banned Sepp Blatter, the head of FIFA, on October 8th, owing to allegations of...
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Is the sky falling with our increasingly common writing errors? | Star Tribune

There have been some disturbing things in the news lately.When reading a story about the three Americans and the Briton who subdued the gunman on a French train, Karen was dismayed to come upon this sentence: “The assault was described as a terrorist attack by the Belgian prime minister.”Her question: “Will the PM go to jail?”Bob was incredulous when he read about a mystery chuck of ice that crashed into a California home: “A loud crash startled a California family at home Wednesday morning when a chunk of ice the size of a basketball hurdled from the sky and smashed through the roof, likely the result of frozen moisture breaking loose from an airplane flying high overhead.”“Can you imagine?” Bob wrote. “Not sure what the ice chunk jumped over; instead, maybe it hurtled from the sky.”“Curiouser and curiouser!” cried Alice. Actually, that one makes sense. Alice has just said goodbye to her feet after eating a cake that has made her telescope to 9 feet tall in “Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland,” but in this case the 19th-century author Lewis Carroll offered an apology and an explanation by way of an aside: “She was so much surprised, that for the moment she quite forgot how to speak good English.”Forgetting how to speak good English — it seems to be going around these days.In Karen’s example above, the unintended meaning comes from a misplaced modifying phrase: “The assault was described as a terrorist attack by the Belgian prime minister.” Moving the prepositional phrase to its proper location, adjacent to the verb it modifies, eliminates the ambiguity: “The assault was described by the Belgian prime minister as a terrorist attack.”Bob’s example, hurdled for hurtled, illustrates our tendency to misuse homonyms, or words that sound alike, an understandable error in this case. After all, unlike the Brits, long ago we Americans began pronouncing many of our t’s as d’s, as in wahder for water and lader for later. (Do you pronounce those t’s?) More recently, I’ve noticed even well-educated speakers saying tah for to, as in “Tah tell the truth,” and gotta for got to, as in “I’ve gotta go” rather than “I’ve got to go,” or heaven forbid, “I must go.”I’m not saying the sky is falling. Language changes, sometimes for the better, but let’s resist change that degrades our rich, vibrant, quirky, wonderful English language. Here are some exercises to keep you on your toes.Which one of the following sentences contains an error?1. It’s good to be back to my old stamping grounds.2. After Saddam Hussein flaunted the no-fly zones, we invaded Iraq in 2003.3. She worked quickly to stanch the flow of blood.Did you identify the misuse of flaunt, which means “to show off,” for flout, which means “to show contempt for,” in sentence 2? (Yes, stamping, not stomping, and stanch, not staunch, are correct.)Finally, do you see anything wrong with this sentence? “Meals are prepared under supervision of a dietitian packaged in disposable Styrofoam containers.”Just saying.Stephen Wilbers offers training seminars in effective business writing. E-mail him at wilbe004@umn.edu. His website is www.wilbers.com.


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Charles Tiayon's curator insight, October 7, 2015 4:13 AM
There have been some disturbing things in the news lately.When reading a story about the three Americans and the Briton who subdued the gunman on a French train, Karen was dismayed to come upon this sentence: “The assault was described as a terrorist attack by the Belgian prime minister.”Her question: “Will the PM go to jail?”Bob was incredulous when he read about a mystery chuck of ice that crashed into a California home: “A loud crash startled a California family at home Wednesday morning when a chunk of ice the size of a basketball hurdled from the sky and smashed through the roof, likely the result of frozen moisture breaking loose from an airplane flying high overhead.”“Can you imagine?” Bob wrote. “Not sure what the ice chunk jumped over; instead, maybe it hurtled from the sky.”“Curiouser and curiouser!” cried Alice. Actually, that one makes sense. Alice has just said goodbye to her feet after eating a cake that has made her telescope to 9 feet tall in “Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland,” but in this case the 19th-century author Lewis Carroll offered an apology and an explanation by way of an aside: “She was so much surprised, that for the moment she quite forgot how to speak good English.”Forgetting how to speak good English — it seems to be going around these days.In Karen’s example above, the unintended meaning comes from a misplaced modifying phrase: “The assault was described as a terrorist attack by the Belgian prime minister.” Moving the prepositional phrase to its proper location, adjacent to the verb it modifies, eliminates the ambiguity: “The assault was described by the Belgian prime minister as a terrorist attack.”Bob’s example, hurdled for hurtled, illustrates our tendency to misuse homonyms, or words that sound alike, an understandable error in this case. After all, unlike the Brits, long ago we Americans began pronouncing many of our t’s as d’s, as in wahder for water and lader for later. (Do you pronounce those t’s?) More recently, I’ve noticed even well-educated speakers saying tah for to, as in “Tah tell the truth,” and gotta for got to, as in “I’ve gotta go” rather than “I’ve got to go,” or heaven forbid, “I must go.”I’m not saying the sky is falling. Language changes, sometimes for the better, but let’s resist change that degrades our rich, vibrant, quirky, wonderful English language. Here are some exercises to keep you on your toes.Which one of the following sentences contains an error?1. It’s good to be back to my old stamping grounds.2. After Saddam Hussein flaunted the no-fly zones, we invaded Iraq in 2003.3. She worked quickly to stanch the flow of blood.Did you identify the misuse of flaunt, which means “to show off,” for flout, which means “to show contempt for,” in sentence 2? (Yes, stamping, not stomping, and stanch, not staunch, are correct.)Finally, do you see anything wrong with this sentence? “Meals are prepared under supervision of a dietitian packaged in disposable Styrofoam containers.”Just saying.Stephen Wilbers offers training seminars in effective business writing. E-mail him at wilbe004@umn.edu. His website is www.wilbers.com.