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Inside The Weird Brains Of Real-Time Translators

Inside The Weird Brains Of Real-Time Translators | autoayuda | Scoop.it
The world’s most powerful computers can’t perform accurate real-time translation. Yet interpreters do it with ease. Geoff Watts meets the ...
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How to talk posh: a rarely marvlous glossary

How to talk posh: a rarely marvlous glossary | autoayuda | Scoop.it
Steven Poole: If one wants to ensure one never sounds Non-U again, one must really learn the difference between serviettes and napkins, and the correct way to pronounce waistcoat, forehead and golf (How to talk posh: a rarely marvlous glossary
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10 Spanish Words That Have No English Translation

10 Spanish Words That Have No English Translation | autoayuda | Scoop.it
Ever get that annoying feeling that you can't find the exact word to describe something? You may not be thinking in the right language. Here are 10 very specific words in Spanish that don't quite have an English counterpart.
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The Doublespeak Dictionary | InvestmentWatch

The Doublespeak Dictionary | InvestmentWatch | autoayuda | Scoop.it
SUPPORT BFP: http://ur1.ca/hi0ua SOURCES AND LINKS: http://www.corbettreport.com/?p=12120 Ever wonder what politicians are really saying? Well wonder no

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Charles Tiayon's curator insight, September 4, 2014 12:14 PM

Ever wonder what politicians are really saying? Well wonder no more. With this handy dandy doublespeak dictionary from BoilingFrogsPost.com you can find out what all that hot air is really about.
Read more at http://investmentwatchblog.com/the-doublespeak-dictionary/#rhMqV1wLG488ORVG.99

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BBC News - BBC debate demonstrates power of machine translation

BBC News - BBC debate demonstrates power of machine translation | autoayuda | Scoop.it
An BBC experiment using translation software to allow people to communicate in seven languages is hailed as a success.

Via Juan Pino-Silva
Traducciones Emmett Translations's insight:

Manuel from VIGO, in Spain, commented (in imperfect translation): "Since I say to my daughters that the profession has a great interpreter present, but a black future."

  
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Manual de traducción jurada (5.3). Convenciones comunes: direcciones, nombres, marcas, tildes, etc.Blog de Leon Hunter | Blog de Leon Hunter

Manual de traducción jurada (5.3). Convenciones comunes: direcciones, nombres, marcas, tildes, etc.Blog de Leon Hunter | Blog de Leon Hunter | autoayuda | Scoop.it

Seguimos con el capítulo sobre convenciones comunes empleadas en traducción jurada (recordando, eso sí, que no son normas sino meramente observaciones de lo que se viene haciendo en la práctica, junto con algunas recomendaciones personales de este autor).



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Charles Tiayon's curator insight, August 23, 2014 9:41 PM

Seguimos con el capítulo sobre convenciones comunes empleadas en traducción jurada (recordando, eso sí, que no son normas sino meramente observaciones de lo que se viene haciendo en la práctica, junto con algunas recomendaciones personales de este autor).


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FIR Live: Language Translation for Communicators - NevilleHobson.com

FIR Live: Language Translation for Communicators - NevilleHobson.com | autoayuda | Scoop.it
Language translation has bedevilled communications and PR practitioners forever, but the rise of digital media has complicated the situation in a number of ways. The requirements for producing content right now have led to a need for almost instantaneous translation while access to the internet has introduced languages spoken in regions that weren’t previously participants …

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FIR Live: Language Translation for Communicators - NevilleHobson.com

FIR Live: Language Translation for Communicators - NevilleHobson.com | autoayuda | Scoop.it
Language translation has bedevilled communications and PR practitioners forever, but the rise of digital media has complicated the situation in a number of ways. The requirements for producing content right now have led to a need for almost instantaneous translation while access to the internet has introduced languages spoken in regions that weren’t previously participants …

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Trados Studio 2011 primera traducción

Descripción de cómo abrir un documento para traducir. Crear una memoria de traducción. Proceso de traducción en la ventana de editor y guardar en la memoria....
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How to create an effective portfolio for your translation business

How to create an effective portfolio for your translation business | autoayuda | Scoop.it
For translators, building a strong portfolio can result in increased credibility when marketing their services to translation agencies and direct clients alike. In fact, translation agencies often...
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The writer as translator

The writer as translator | autoayuda | Scoop.it
U.R. Ananthamurthy was responsible for bringing world poetry into Kannada literature.

U.R. Ananthamurthy often said that he plunged into an intense reading of other poets when he felt that his writings failed to fully capture his own self and the world around him. This sometimes led him to translating the poets into Kannada. At their best, these translations at once provided him a fresh way of seeing the world and took him closer to his inner being.

That was how he brought poems of W.B. Yeats, Bertolt Brecht, Rainer Maria Rilke, Edwin Muir or the teachings of Lao Tzu to Kannada.

The Jnanpith Award winner was renowned as the author of novels like Samskara and Bharatipura, now canonised classics. He commanded attention as a candid public intellectual whose views on politics and society won him a legion of both admirers and enemies. But Ananthamurthy also left behind a small but interesting lot of poems and a fairly large body of poetry translations.

“Brecht feels like our own man. His works carry the political complexity of our times,” he had said in an interview in 2010. “He does not write in order to write beautifully.” Those were times when Ananthamurthy was growing increasingly anxious about the rise of the politics of the right in India. What endeared Brecht to him was also that the German poet was not one to give up hope in the darkest of times. Complete pessimism, said Ananthamurthy, is also self-indulgence.  

His love for Rilke, on the other hand, was linked to his metaphysical interest in the tension betweendvaita and advaita. “Brecht reflects my political interest and Rilke reflects my metaphysical interest. One does not take away from the other,” he said.

Interestingly, his fascination for Yeats occupied both these realms. In his introduction to the poems of Yeats, he called him a poet “who wove together the voice of the community and the sceptical whisper of the soul.” He provided an erudite analysis of Yeats’ Easter, 1916 to illustrate how the poem perfectly marries these two aspects.

Ananthamurthy’s translations are — to borrow a phrase from the late A.K. Ramanujan who translatedSamskara into English — “self-contained, faithful yet readable.” Ananthamurthy said that a translation should “become the other language, but not too much of the other language.” 

This was a difficult and intense negotiation in which he invested deeply, often leading to fascinating literary debates with other writers and critics. For instance, Ananthamurthy and critic O.L. Nagabhushanaswamy had long and fruitful exchanges on the translation of Rilke’s three-line epitaph, leading to several versions. Ananthamurthy’s guiding principle on the essential quality a good translator is that he/she should have great love and respect for the original poem, and a matching faith in what the magic of words in his/her own language can achieve.

Being a poet himself, there were times when the translations seemed to reflect more of Ananthamurthy than Rilke or Brecht. “For instance, I had made Rilke’s I Find You Lord in All Things in All so much my own that I had forgotten it was originally not my poem!” he said.

After translating Brecht, Ananthamurthy was trying his hand at translating some of the Romantic poets in 2010. “I want to translate William Blake, but it’s scary because I love him so much!” he said. “The simplest poems are the most difficult to translate” and went on to describe how despite attempting many versions of Wordsworth’s phrase “the little unremembered acts of kindness and love” none satisfied him.

Ananthamurthy believed that bringing another language and its experiences into our fold is an important exercise in giving power and mobility to our own language. While English travelled piggyback on imperialism to not only spread itself but also to bring new worlds of experience within its reach, translation is the only vehicle for regional languages like Kannada. Modern Kannada renaissance was, for instance, inspired greatly by the translations of Galaganath, B. Venkatacharya and B.M. Srikantiah.

The fact that this has largely been a one-way journey — since far fewer Kannada writers, including the greatest, have been translated into English — did not particularly bother Ananthamurthy. “That is probably the arrogance of a Bhasha writer!” he said.

Keywords: U.R. Ananthamurthy


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Charles Tiayon's curator insight, September 7, 2014 12:06 AM
U.R. Ananthamurthy was responsible for bringing world poetry into Kannada literature.

U.R. Ananthamurthy often said that he plunged into an intense reading of other poets when he felt that his writings failed to fully capture his own self and the world around him. This sometimes led him to translating the poets into Kannada. At their best, these translations at once provided him a fresh way of seeing the world and took him closer to his inner being.

That was how he brought poems of W.B. Yeats, Bertolt Brecht, Rainer Maria Rilke, Edwin Muir or the teachings of Lao Tzu to Kannada.

The Jnanpith Award winner was renowned as the author of novels like Samskara and Bharatipura, now canonised classics. He commanded attention as a candid public intellectual whose views on politics and society won him a legion of both admirers and enemies. But Ananthamurthy also left behind a small but interesting lot of poems and a fairly large body of poetry translations.

“Brecht feels like our own man. His works carry the political complexity of our times,” he had said in an interview in 2010. “He does not write in order to write beautifully.” Those were times when Ananthamurthy was growing increasingly anxious about the rise of the politics of the right in India. What endeared Brecht to him was also that the German poet was not one to give up hope in the darkest of times. Complete pessimism, said Ananthamurthy, is also self-indulgence.  

His love for Rilke, on the other hand, was linked to his metaphysical interest in the tension betweendvaita and advaita. “Brecht reflects my political interest and Rilke reflects my metaphysical interest. One does not take away from the other,” he said.

Interestingly, his fascination for Yeats occupied both these realms. In his introduction to the poems of Yeats, he called him a poet “who wove together the voice of the community and the sceptical whisper of the soul.” He provided an erudite analysis of Yeats’ Easter, 1916 to illustrate how the poem perfectly marries these two aspects.

Ananthamurthy’s translations are — to borrow a phrase from the late A.K. Ramanujan who translatedSamskara into English — “self-contained, faithful yet readable.” Ananthamurthy said that a translation should “become the other language, but not too much of the other language.” 

This was a difficult and intense negotiation in which he invested deeply, often leading to fascinating literary debates with other writers and critics. For instance, Ananthamurthy and critic O.L. Nagabhushanaswamy had long and fruitful exchanges on the translation of Rilke’s three-line epitaph, leading to several versions. Ananthamurthy’s guiding principle on the essential quality a good translator is that he/she should have great love and respect for the original poem, and a matching faith in what the magic of words in his/her own language can achieve.

Being a poet himself, there were times when the translations seemed to reflect more of Ananthamurthy than Rilke or Brecht. “For instance, I had made Rilke’s I Find You Lord in All Things in All so much my own that I had forgotten it was originally not my poem!” he said.

After translating Brecht, Ananthamurthy was trying his hand at translating some of the Romantic poets in 2010. “I want to translate William Blake, but it’s scary because I love him so much!” he said. “The simplest poems are the most difficult to translate” and went on to describe how despite attempting many versions of Wordsworth’s phrase “the little unremembered acts of kindness and love” none satisfied him.

Ananthamurthy believed that bringing another language and its experiences into our fold is an important exercise in giving power and mobility to our own language. While English travelled piggyback on imperialism to not only spread itself but also to bring new worlds of experience within its reach, translation is the only vehicle for regional languages like Kannada. Modern Kannada renaissance was, for instance, inspired greatly by the translations of Galaganath, B. Venkatacharya and B.M. Srikantiah.

The fact that this has largely been a one-way journey — since far fewer Kannada writers, including the greatest, have been translated into English — did not particularly bother Ananthamurthy. “That is probably the arrogance of a Bhasha writer!” he said.

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Bilingualism: Impact on your Personality?

Bilingualism: Impact on your Personality? | autoayuda | Scoop.it
Bilingualism: Does Your Personality Change According to the Language You Speak? Studies suggest this is the case.

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Charles Tiayon's curator insight, September 1, 2014 4:15 PM

Many issues are considered.  For example, being able to speak another language is generally linked to a more flexible brain.  This, coupled with cultural influences amongst languages may have an impact. For example, some speakers reported a difference in speaking style.  These differences ranged from level of perceived rudeness to frequency of interrupting another speaker.  Reasons cited for these characteristics included cultural differences in the acceptance of more rude language to the structural differences between the languages spoken.  Word order may have an impact.  If the meaning of the sentence is revealed earlier in one language, interrupting in that language may reduce the risk of misunderstanding the speaker if the significant word or words have already been uttered.

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150 Ebooks gratis para Traductores e Intérpretes

150 Ebooks gratis para Traductores e Intérpretes | autoayuda | Scoop.it
Nuevos libros incorporados a la biblioteca U niversidad deS alamanca F acultad de Traducción y D ocumentación B iblioteca Web Libros profesionales InfoTrad Diciembre 2013 150 Ebooks gratis para Tra...

Via Estelblau, Genny Harris Boyd
Traducciones Emmett Translations's insight:

Porque es lunes, unos libros gratis.

 

Because it's Monday, some free books.

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Lorena Oli's curator insight, February 26, 2014 5:21 PM

Cuanto más libros tenga en mi colección virtual o real nunca es suficiente.  Ya sea en su idioma original o traducción se me han vuelto un vicio.  Y lo que me gusta más es comparar la idea original con las traducciones a veces precarias de algunas editoriales.

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Benefits of a Bilingual Brain Infographic

Benefits of a Bilingual Brain Infographic | autoayuda | Scoop.it
Dual language education provides a unique and powerful opportunity to strengthen children's highest cognitive brain potentials.

Via Tom D'Amico (@TDOttawa)
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Virginia Doherty's curator insight, April 29, 2014 8:20 AM

For our visual learners. Another way to show the benefits of dual language.

Virginia Doherty's curator insight, April 29, 2014 8:21 AM

A visual representation of the benefits of dual language learning.

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'Spanish for the Wine Industry' dictionary online released - Napa Valley Register

'Spanish for the Wine Industry' dictionary online released - Napa Valley Register | autoayuda | Scoop.it
'Spanish for the Wine Industry' dictionary online released
Napa Valley Register
Josefina K.
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The experience of translating

The experience of translating | autoayuda | Scoop.it
Seamus Heany once said that the best part about translating is that you get to finish something you didn't have to start. It's a strange feeling, though, finishing up something for someone else -- ...

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Charles Tiayon's curator insight, August 21, 2014 9:51 PM

Seamus Heany once said that the best part about translating is that you get to finish something you didn’t have to start. It’s a strange feeling, though, finishing up something for someone else — and not only that, finishing something that is always necessarily secondary and supplemental to that work by someone else. It is supplemental in the full Derridean sense, insofar as a mistranslation can become a “dangerous supplement” whose incorrect rendering replaces and obliterates the author’s original meaning.

That’s not where my anxiety lies as a translator of Agamben, however. Agamben is not a “difficult” author to translate in the same way that, for instance, Laruelle is. His writing style is smooth and straightforward, and he very rarely places a lot of emphasis on the specific resources of the Italian language (in the way that Derrida could be said to push French to the limit, or Heidegger German). My anxiety is less dramatic — I worry I’m going to make some dumb, low-level error. Nothing that obscures or distorts Agamben’s meaning, just the kind of thing that makes me look like an idiot.

There are errors of that kind in my published translations. They’re not huge, but they bother me. The worst is when I simply transcribed the Italian word “due” instead of translating it as “two.” It’s surprising in a way that something like that doesn’t happen more. When I run a spellcheck over my translation work, I notice how my spelling has been strangely influenced by Italian, and more generally how the quality of my typing deteriorates when I’m doing the relatively mechanical work of translating rather than producing material in my own name. Most of that comes out in spellcheck or at the various stages of editing and revising (whether I’m pressing friends into service or responding to the press’s copy editor). I comfort myself that some Agamben translations have more such errors than mine, and I have yet to find a translation that has none.

The worst part with Agamben isn’t the translation as such, but the vast apparatus of citations. For every source he cites, I must determine whether an English translation is extant. If so, the press requires that I base my quotations on that translation, though I must often “triangulate” between the English, the original text, and Agamben’s provided translations. Sometimes I must supply formal citations where the text lacks them (above all in classical references), and just for the sake of thoroughness, I have also taken up the habit of supplying macrons and breathings in Greek citations where the text lacks them. Agamben also loves to cite untranslated Latin, sometimes a paragraph at a time, and I must often provide my own translation in a concession to the monolingualism of the other.

Tracking down these sources is extremely time-consuming and often frustrating. The method I’ve developed is to put quotes in boldface in my draft. If it’s a long quote from a text I know to be translated, I’ll often simply put “quote” at that point in the text. If it’s a short quote, I’ll usually do a rough rendering of Agamben’s Italian just for my own convenience in tracking it down later. Then I go back after I have a full draft and fill in the quotations. Every time I do a translation I consider whether there’s any way around leaving them for the end, and I’ve decided it’s unfortunately the only way to go — tracking down quotations and translating are two fundamentally different tasks, and switching back and forth hurts the quality of both.

Better to stay “in the zone” of translating, I say, so as to get a full draft as quickly as possible. And sometimes I can really, really be “in the zone.” Those days can be satisfying, albeit in the weird way that intensive data entry is satisfying. I feel like I’ve accomplished a feat, but I weirdly don’t have anything to show for it. This is not to say that I don’t benefit from doing these translations. I get paid, and I also get the credibility of an “expert” on Agamben (or on certain texts of his), with the invitations to speak and write that go along with that. But at the end of the day, the person who really has “something to show” for my work is Agamben, who is after all the author of the text.

The best I can hope for is to be invisible, not to draw undue attention to myself through mistakes or overly aggressive translation choices. My fondest hope is that my translation will “hold up” after three or four close readings, at which point anyone wishing to go further would have to turn to the original Italian in any case. My nightmare, of course, is that I’ll wind up one of those accursed translators everyone hates (like the poor guy who did Adorno’s Negative Dialectics) or that one of my translation choices will later be regarded as having set back the scholarship by a generation (like the translation of Freud’sTrieb as “instinct”). I’ve probably already avoided the former, and the latter seems intrinsically unlikely given Agamben’s writing style.

And yet, and yet… I’ve woken up in the middle of the night, panicked at some translation error I’ve surely made. The feel of those incidents is not like a social anxiety dream (like where one shows up naked to school), but like one of those “work dreams” — the kind where you’re waiting tables and discover you’ve completely neglected one for an hour. That’s what it is, at the end of the day: a job. It’s a relatively cool job, one that helps me keep on top of my language skills, but it’s still a job.