Transition Culture
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Transition Culture
Worldwide, communities and initiatives spring up who transition to a culture of strong sustainability and harmony with the natural world. What is it that makes them tick?
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Rescooped by Christoph Hensch from Sustainable Futures
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Want calmer cities? Build socially sustainable communities...

Want calmer cities? Build socially sustainable communities... | Transition Culture | Scoop.it

Environmental sustainability is now well recognized, though social sustainability – finding ways to make places work for people, that are inclusive and cohesive, and adaptable in the face of changing circumstances – is a new challenge.

There is strong evidence about the relationship between the quality of our local social relationships – the people we pass time with on the street, whether we can call on neighbors for help when we are ill – and how happy we are with where we live. The work that is needed to support this is the small scale, efforts of community development workers and local neighbourhood groups. However, this work is vulnerable to cuts in public spending, though corner cutting can have a stark long-term negative impact; the financial and social costs of neighbourhood failure are high and include raised levels of crime, unemployment and mental health problems...


Via Lauren Moss, Flora Moon
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Goodbye, Sidewalks: London Planners Break Down Boundaries Between Cars and Pedestrians - Cities - GOOD

Goodbye, Sidewalks: London Planners Break Down Boundaries Between Cars and Pedestrians - Cities - GOOD | Transition Culture | Scoop.it
Londoners learn how to share the street without barriers to keep vehicles and pedestrians apart.
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Rescooped by Christoph Hensch from Sustainable Futures
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Are Complete Streets Incomplete?

Are Complete Streets Incomplete? | Transition Culture | Scoop.it

The “complete streets” movement has taken the country by storm. Few movements have done so much to influence needed policy change in the transportation world- almost 300 jurisdictions in the U.S. have adopted complete streets policies or have committed to do so. This sets the stage for communities to reframe their future around people instead of cars.

But communities can't stop there. Complete streets is an engineering policy that, according to the National Complete Streets Coalition website, “ensures that transportation planners and engineers consistently design and operate the entire roadway with all users in mind — including bicyclists, public transportation vehicles and riders, and pedestrians of all ages and abilities.”

Getting transportation professionals to include pedestrians, bicyclists, and transit users is a key first step in creating great places and livable communities. But that is not enough to make places that truly work for people — “streets as places.” The planning process itself needs to be turned upside-down...


Via Lauren Moss, Flora Moon
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Rescooped by Christoph Hensch from green streets
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NACTO’s New Urban Bikeway Design Guide

NACTO’s New Urban Bikeway Design Guide | Transition Culture | Scoop.it

In an effort to create Complete Streets that are also safer for bicyclists, the National Association of City Transportation Officials (NACTO) announced the release of a new Urban Design Bikeway Guide last week. At the report launch, Janette Sadik-Khan, NACTO president and NYC Transportation Commissioner, Ray LaHood, U.S. Transportation Secretary, and Congressman Earl Blumenauer all emphasized that smart bicycle infrastructure design can not only make roadways safer for all, but can also boost economic growth.


Via Lauren Moss
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