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Transition Culture
Worldwide, communities and initiatives spring up who transition to a culture of strong sustainability and harmony with the natural world. What is it that makes them tick?
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Our co-owned future

Our co-owned future | Transition Culture | Scoop.it

The explosive force of Occupy Wall Street—and more than a thousand other local efforts—offers hope that a movement committed to long-term change might one day achieve a fundamental transformation of the American political-economic system. Quietly, a different kind of progressive change is emerging, one that involves a transformation in institutional structures and power, a process one could call “evolutionary reconstruction.”

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5 Big Ideas For A New Economy

5 Big Ideas For A New Economy | Transition Culture | Scoop.it

In the aftermath of the recession, we have the opportunity to truly change the system. From replacing outsourcing with insourcing to untying well-being from GDP, here is what the economy of the future might look like.

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Why this is an amazing time to be alive

Why this is an amazing time to be alive | Transition Culture | Scoop.it

This is an amazing time to be alive!
“Yeah, right,” my inner cynic says, “crumbling economy, peak oil, peak everything, melting ice caps, mass extinctions…”

 

The dying paradigm within global warming, peak oil and economic crisis is not all gloom. It gives us the gift of visioning and creating something new.

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Mapping the future

Mapping the future | Transition Culture | Scoop.it

Visioning is one of the Tools and Ingredients in The Transition Companion. It states that not imagining a low-carbon world is a huge impediment to designing and realising it.

 

Transition suggests we start by creating a positive vision of a future. It asks:

If you woke up in, say, 2030, and the transition had been successfully managed, what would it look, feel, smell and sound like? What would you have for breakfast? What would you see when walking down the street?

 

If you woke up in 2012 what would you see?

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The Great Turning: An Epic Passage

The Great Turning: An Epic Passage | Transition Culture | Scoop.it

The capacity to anticipate and choose our future is a defining characteristic of the human species. We must now choose between two contrasting models for organizing human affairs.

 

Earth Community organizes by principles of partnership and shares resources equitably to grow the generative potential of the whole.

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In with the new: part III of "As economic growth fails, how do we live?"

In with the new: part III of "As economic growth fails, how do we live?" | Transition Culture | Scoop.it

In this third and final article in this series, we will discuss seven new ways of living which we can adopt as economic growth fails. They are not revolutionary (revolutions never achieve their utopian visions because of something called "human nature"). Rather, they may allow us to "muddle through" the best we can right now with what we already know how to do.

1. Debt for Investment, Not Consumption. Like a cook who has dreadfully botched a recipe by adding a cup of salt where a teaspoon was called for, we have overused debt and are now suffering the consequences.

2. Location, Location, Location. While we have for the last century used cheap oil powering our transportation systems to make distances virtually irrelevant, as oil prices rise it is going to matter a great deal where one is located.

3. Collaborate and Conquer. As the U.S. military Empire begins to shrink back, the self-appointed role of the U.S. as the world's free-of-charge military security service must end.

4. Go With the Flow. A standard admonishment to the younger generation in families of wealth has always been: Never Spend Your Capital. It's ok to spend the annual Income, but never touch the Capital or you will destroy the family wealth.

5. Patient, Heal Thyself! Rather than heed the sign at the door to the nation's health care system -- "Abandon Hope All Ye Who Enter Here!" --
we must address our health, as this beast is already sucking 17% of our GDP and scheduled to go higher. It's as big as our waistlines and growing just as fast.

6. Connect the Dots. It is always good to pay attention to broad-based grassroots movements. A "Common Wisdom" -- such as the current idea that it might be better to tax consumption rather than earned income -- may actually be a good idea, even though it flies in the face of "Conventional Wisdom".

7. Become Producers Again. Americans should recoil from the label we have so blithely accepted for ourselves: "Consumers". This is not the label of a proud and free people, but a nation of sheep. We are a nation of borrowing consumers, gobbling up about 25% of the world's resources as we consume "bread and circuses". It is a measure of shame and ruin that 70% of our economy is devoted to consumer consumption.

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Tribes: 15 Illustrated New Myths for the Permaculture Age by Willi Paul. An openmythsource.com freeBook | www.planetshifter.com

Tribes: 15 Illustrated New Myths for the Permaculture Age by Willi Paul. An openmythsource.com freeBook | www.planetshifter.com | Transition Culture | Scoop.it
Snippet from the book's Intro:

"... But sometimes, society falls in a myth gap. Like now. Another way of saying this is that the cultural narrative is broken. Most of us are acutely aware of this current state of affairs, especially in the broader context of systemic change. We see that our institutions (education, finance, politics, economy) are not equipped to serve us any longer, and we’re clawing around for a story (or stories) to describe the “new way of doing things” that can be agreed upon by society so we can move forward."

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Occupying Post-Collapse America: What if the industrial death-urge lived on?

The Occupy movement is a start. But the stakes are rising. The earth is dying. The industrial economy, while coming apart at the seams, still rages on. …And what if the attacker DOESN’T die? What then? And what does that imply for resistance movements?

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Intentcasting - Blueprints for Networked Cocreation

Intentcasting - Blueprints for Networked Cocreation | Transition Culture | Scoop.it

"Intentcatching means connecting to an intent that has already been cast, in effect signaling, "I want this to happen too" or "We want this to happen too" and moving from a passive to an active stance towards the intent.

 

At its core, intentcasting is invitation into a possible future. It is a statement of possibility and will. Although it does not have to spell out how the intent is to materialize, it contains the germ of an architecture of participation."

 

by @sebpaquet


Via ddrrnt
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The 6 Questions That Lead To New Innovations

The 6 Questions That Lead To New Innovations | Transition Culture | Scoop.it
It is often said that innovation is at the core of sustainability, but turning that abstract idea into action isn’t always easy.

 

As O’Connor worked with a team of MBAs from Hult International Business School to review the first 100 innovations, they quickly identified six questions that famous innovators have consistently asked and answered to generate ideas that can lead to new innovations.

These six innovation questions are:

- What could I look at in a new way? (Steve Jobs looked at the computer in a new way, leading to the Mac and the personal computer revolution.)
- What could I use in a new way? (Paleolithic humans turned fire from a scourge into a means of cooking, heat, light, and protection.)
- What could I recontextualize in space or time? (The Sumerians moved language from spoken to written form, expanding its power and reach.)
- What could I connect in a new way? (Thomas Edison connected the light bulb to the electrical grid, leading to electrified cities.)
- What could I change, in terms of design or performance? (Nearly 3 million years ago, the world’s first “innovator” transformed a simple rock into a stone hand-axe.)
- What could I create that is truly new? (In 1776, American colonists created the first “intentional” nation, based on specific abstract principles.)

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What’s the language of the future?

What’s the language of the future? | Transition Culture | Scoop.it
As English takes over the world, it's splintering and changing -- and soon, we may not recognize it at all (“…while the number of languages in the world is diminishing, the number of Englishes is increasing.” – via @Salon...

Via Athanasios Karavasilis
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Intentcasting an Epic Vision: How to Bootstrap Creative Economy 3.0

Intentcasting an Epic Vision: How to Bootstrap Creative Economy 3.0 | Transition Culture | Scoop.it

Q: How do the Amish raise a barn without money?
A: Community, and the social capital that weaves it together.
In my husband’s Latvian community, they have a concept similar to barnraising ...

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Do Future Generations Need Protecting from Ourselves?

Do Future Generations Need Protecting from Ourselves? | Transition Culture | Scoop.it
It's a new year, so let's start with a new idea: a democratic body to safeguard the basic needs and fundamental interests of future people.

That is the proposal of Rupert Read, a philosopher at the University of East Anglia, in a report called Guardians of the Future for the think tank Green House. The core idea is both radical and straightforward: a council of "Guardians of Future Generations", chosen like a jury from the general public, would sit above the existing law-making bodies and have two core powers. A power to veto legislation that threatened the basic needs and interests of future people and the power to force a review, following suitable public petition, of any existing legislation that threatens the interests of future people.

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The 12 most hopeful trends to build on in 2012

The 12 most hopeful trends to build on in 2012 | Transition Culture | Scoop.it

Who would have thought that some young people camped out in lower Manhattan with cardboard signs, a few sharpies, some donated pizza, and a bunch of smart phones could change so much? This uprising is the biggest reason for hope in 2012. The following are 12 ways the Occupy Movement and other major trends of 2011 offer a foundation for a transformative 2012.

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future of money project

future of money project | Transition Culture | Scoop.it

What are young adults thinking about money and value?
How can we create new systems of wealth generation and abundance?
What does the future hold for banks and other financial institutions in the wake of massive peer to peer exchange?

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At last, a new story for the future

At last, a new story for the future | Transition Culture | Scoop.it

We need to break the intellectual spell under which we live. The last few decades have been dominated by the premise that privatizing all economic resources will produce endless riches. Which was kind of true, except that the riches went to only a few people. And in the process they melted the Arctic, as well as dramatically increasing inequality around the world.

Jay Walljasper performs the greatest of services with the book All That We Share: A Field Guide to the Commons. It is—choose your metaphor—a bracing slap across the face or the kiss that breaks an enchantment. In either case, after reading it, you will be much more alive to the world as it actually is, not as it exists in the sweaty dreams of ideologues and economics professors.

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An outline of benefits from a lower energy civilization

An outline of benefits from a lower energy civilization | Transition Culture | Scoop.it

Assuming the inevitability of a lower energy civilization, How low will it go? What will civilization look like? While accurate prediction is impossible, there are ways to look at the question that provide insights, and can even dispel some visions of ‘gloom and doom’. We know a lot about the way the world looked before the advent of fossil fuels, so we can look at how societies used the available energy late in that period, say 1800 in European civilization and its extensions as a point of departure, and ask, how will the post-petroleum age differ?

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