Transformations in Business & Tourism
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Transformations in Business & Tourism
Personal and organizational development resources for business & tourism.  [ Also see: http://www.onlineanddistancelearning.com ]
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Want to Make Your Presentation Memorable? Do These 5 Things

Want to Make Your Presentation Memorable? Do These 5 Things | Transformations in Business & Tourism | Scoop.it

Want to Make Your Presentation Memorable? Do These 5 Things

 

Want people who hear you speak to remember you long after your presentation is over? Follow my top five rules for success.

 

You're standing at a podium. In front of you is a crowd of friends, peers, and co-workers. Sitting. Staring at you.

 

Your presentation is about to begin.

 

Will your presentation wow the crowd?

 

Or will your presentation be background noise for attendees as they look at their smartphones and laptops?


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The Learning Factor's curator insight, February 15, 12:56 AM

Want people who hear you speak to remember you long after your presentation is over? Follow my top five rules for success.

Bovee & Thill's Online Business Communication Magazines's curator insight, February 20, 4:47 PM

"I've done about 40 presentations at conferences around the globe. I've given presentations to crowds of 300 people and audiences of more than 2,500.

 

"When I started giving presentations, I was pretty terrible.

In fact, for a long time I fell victim to the worst speaking mistake possible: kicking off my presentation by introducing myself. Sorry, but nobody who pays to attend an event really wants to hear you talking about how awesome you are.

 

"Today I'm consistently rated among the top one or two speakers at the events where I'm invited to speak."

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12 things successful people do in the last 10 minutes of the workday

12 things successful people do in the last 10 minutes of the workday | Transformations in Business & Tourism | Scoop.it

Perhaps you spend the last 10 minutes of your workday staring at the clock, counting down the seconds until you’re free. Or, maybe you bury yourself in your work until the very last minute — then you grab your stuff and go without saying goodbye to your colleagues.

 

If either of the above scenarios sounds familiar, it may be time to reassess your end-of-day routine. “How you finish the workday is very important,” says Michael Kerr, an international business speaker and author of “The Humour Advantage.” “It can set your mood for the rest of your day; it may impact your personal relationships, overall level of happiness, and how well you sleep that night; and it will set the stage for the next day.”

 


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The Learning Factor's curator insight, November 23, 2016 4:30 PM

Perhaps you spend the last 10 minutes of your workday staring at the clock, counting down the seconds until you’re free. Or, maybe you bury yourself in your work until the very last minute — then you grab your stuff and go without saying goodbye to your colleagues.

 

If either of the above scenarios sounds familiar, it may be time to reassess your end-of-day routine.

Jerry Busone's curator insight, December 1, 2016 7:37 AM

These tip are simple and really work ... love 3,4 9, 11 and do them everyday.Try it 

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Six Things Great Bosses Constantly Remind Their Teams

Six Things Great Bosses Constantly Remind Their Teams | Transformations in Business & Tourism | Scoop.it
Whether you’ve just started training your first hire or you’ve been managing scores of people for decades, you’re in the position of being a leader. And if there’s one aspect of leadership that holds true, regardless of staff size or industry, it’s that being one isn’t for the thin-skinned or the faint of heart.
 

So much of your job isn’t about hitting goals, but rather about being rooted in reality, constantly striving to bring perspective and empathy to whatever situations you encounter. Sometimes, finding the right words can be the biggest challenge of your day. But other times, you’re overthinking it, and it’s as simple as saying these six tiny sentences.


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The Learning Factor's curator insight, November 8, 2016 5:22 PM

Great leaders tell their team members over and over again to speak their minds and to say no to the right things.

Walter Gassenferth's curator insight, November 9, 2016 1:35 PM

Leadership is a very important topic and often overlooked by companies. For those who speak the Spanish or Portuguese, more about leadership can be read in http://www.quanticaconsultoria.com

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How to Give an Emotionally Intelligent Presentation

How to Give an Emotionally Intelligent Presentation | Transformations in Business & Tourism | Scoop.it

Emotions play an active role in almost all of our decision making. That's one reason why emotional intelligence, the ability to identify, understand, and manage those emotions, is such an invaluable skill. 

 

But how specifically does emotional intelligence help us with our daily tasks? Here are three tips to make sure your next presentation is emotionally intelligent:

 

1. Don't get anxious. Get excited.

All of us get nervous before a presentation, even if we've done it hundreds of times. So take that nervousness and turn it into something positive: enthusiasm.How do you do that exactly?

Spend those final few moments reviewing your favorite parts of the presentation. Remind yourself why you're doing this, and focus on the value you have to deliver to your listeners.

Now, take that enthusiasm and give a talk that you passionately believe in.

 


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Bovee & Thill's Online Business Communication Magazines's curator insight, October 2, 2016 3:27 PM

 

"But how specifically does emotional intelligence help us with our daily tasks? Here are three tips to make sure your next presentation is emotionally intelligent: . . . "

Helen Teague's curator insight, October 4, 2016 5:18 PM
The Learning Factor's insight: View your presentation from your audience's perspective instead of your own.
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The Hidden Curriculum of Work

The Hidden Curriculum of Work | Transformations in Business & Tourism | Scoop.it

What do you do for work? Not, what is your job title, or what’s written in your official job description? But what do you actually do?

 

It’s potentially the most important question you can ask yourself if you care about standing out, staying ahead of the change curve, and continuously elevating your performance to gain access to choice assignments and opportunities to advance.

 

This is because the value you deliver, the results you produce, and the impact you have on others come more often from the execution of unspoken intangibles that are not reflected in your title, job description, or the daily tasks and activities you’re responsible for. This severe mismatch is based on a fundamental misunderstanding of the true demands of work.

 


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rodrick rajive lal's curator insight, August 10, 2016 5:33 AM
The hidden curriculum of work, is about what goes beyond your job profile. When you apply for a perticular post, you are accepting two jobs, one is the what you applied for, and the other is the interpersonal work, the hidden curriulum that goes with the post. The post of teaching includes your knowledge of the subject, pedagogical skills and most immportant of all are your inter-personal skills, your life skills, your attitude towards the learners, approachablility...etc.
Walter Gassenferth's curator insight, August 10, 2016 8:11 AM
Very interesting subject to be considered and discussed. I will disclose the post to my contacts and subscribers in http://www.quanticaconsultoria.com
Ron McIntyre's curator insight, August 10, 2016 11:19 AM

Excellent discussion of something that I believe is often ignored and really forms the core of career management.

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Executive Assistant Training | Online and Distance Learning

Executive Assistant Training | Online and Distance Learning | Transformations in Business & Tourism | Scoop.it
Find out about what is required to become an executive secretary, about executive assistant training, where you can find it, what you can earn, and more ...
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The Only Three Networking Emails You Need To Know How To Write

The Only Three Networking Emails You Need To Know How To Write | Transformations in Business & Tourism | Scoop.it

It’s helpful to be honest about why you’re reaching out (for example, you’re going through a job search or moving to a new city). It can combat nerves and help the process feel more genuine. In other words, it instantly solves two core issues many people stress about when told to network.

 

That said, as with anything else, you know there’s a difference between being straightforward and being overly blunt. For example, you know to write, "I was thinking of approaching the project from a different angle" over "I hate all of your ideas."

 

Aspiring to find this balance, many people begin networking emails with "Remember me?" or even, "You probably don’t remember me..." After all, why not begin with an honest admission so the other person knows you aren’t being fake? Well, unfortunately, this approach often backfires. While you’re coming from a sincere place, it’s pretty audacious to ask for something from someone whom you’re blatantly admitting you barely know.

 


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Adele Taylor's curator insight, December 5, 2016 3:53 PM

I think this title should be about reaching out to contacts.

As the article implies networking can be scary, and might scare away readers but a good article overall.

rodrick rajive lal's curator insight, December 5, 2016 9:43 PM
It certainly helps to be upfront, honest and straightforward in writing Networking Emails. We have come a long way from times when it was perhaps expected that letters should run into pages, filled with flowery expression and long sentences. I found the examples in the article really helpful, and am sharing the same for others to read!
Emma Urbanek's curator insight, December 6, 2016 1:46 PM
Writing about yourself can seem nearly impossible, not anymore! 
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4 Reasons Great Leaders Don't Need to Criticize

4 Reasons Great Leaders Don't Need to Criticize | Transformations in Business & Tourism | Scoop.it

I have a fundamental belief about the kind of people I try to employ. And that's that they're going to be harder on themselves than I'll ever need to be. I also believe that the concept of constructive criticism is overrated, if not an outright fallacy. Your employees are either aware of problems with their performance, or they're not.

 

The best way to find out which category they're in is through asking questions and listening. Let's look at some of the reasons this passive approach to problem-solving is good for both of you.


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Adele Taylor's curator insight, November 16, 2016 5:11 PM
Perfect read for all leaders/mentors/managers
starbutane's comment, November 19, 2016 1:35 AM
Nice one
Walter Gassenferth's curator insight, November 19, 2016 5:49 AM

Interesting post, presenting a newsworthy concept. For those who speak Portuguese or Spanish and are interested in people management, more about the theme in http://www.quanticaconsultoria.com

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Leadership Is About Emotion

Leadership Is About Emotion | Transformations in Business & Tourism | Scoop.it

Make a list of the 5 leaders you most admire. They can be from business, social media, politics, technology, the sciences, any field. Now ask yourself why you admire them. The chances are high that your admiration is based on more than their accomplishments, impressive as those may be. I’ll bet that everyone on your list reaches you on an emotional level.

 

This ability to reach people in a way that transcends the intellectual and rational is the mark of a great leader. They all have it. They inspire us. It’s a simple as that. And when we’re inspired we tap into our best selves and deliver amazing work.

 

So, can this ability to touch and inspire people be learned? No and yes. The truth is that not everyone can lead, and there is no substitute for natural talent. Honestly, I’m more convinced of this now – I’m in reality about the world of work and employee engagement. But for those who fall somewhat short of being a natural born star (which is pretty much MANY of us), leadership skills can be acquired, honed and perfected. And when this happens your chances of engaging your talent increases from the time they walk into your culture.

 

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Cameron Larsuel's curator insight, October 17, 2016 6:27 PM

Leadership is emotion, leadership is energy, leadership is you.

Matthias von Wnuk-Lipinski's curator insight, October 18, 2016 3:09 AM
Leadership and Emotion
Walter Gassenferth's curator insight, October 18, 2016 4:39 AM

Leadership is a very important topic and often overlooked by companies. For those who speak the Spanish or Portuguese, more about leadership can be read in http://www.quanticaconsultoria.com

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3 Subtle Ways To Make An Impact While You're New To The Job

3 Subtle Ways To Make An Impact While You're New To The Job | Transformations in Business & Tourism | Scoop.it
You’d probably be lying to yourself if you said you’ve never gone into a new job and resolved to outperform your team’s expectations. You have plenty of good ideas and want everyone to know that you’re a genius of sorts.

Most of the time, that mind-set’s great for your career—it pushes you to be your best day in and day out. But the problem is that some people think that motivating themselves this way gives them permission to push their teammates around.

 

While your company hired you because you bring something unique to the table, that doesn’t give you license to be condescending about it. So if you want to convince your coworkers that you perform above your pay grade, here are a few mind-sets you should adopt ASAP.


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The Learning Factor's curator insight, September 4, 2016 6:41 PM

Being the new hire with tons of "great ideas" won't always endear you to your team. Here's a better way to have an influence early on.

Walter Gassenferth's curator insight, September 5, 2016 10:00 AM
Very interesting subject to be considered and discussed. I will disclose the post to my contacts and subscribers in http://www.quanticaconsultoria.com
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How To Get A Job In A Field You Didn't Major In

How To Get A Job In A Field You Didn't Major In | Transformations in Business & Tourism | Scoop.it

To graduate on time, you probably needed to declare your major by your sophomore year. But by the time graduation rolls around, it wouldn’t be surprising if your career ambitions have shifted to something outside of your major. Perhaps an internship didn’t turn out how you expected, or certain courses dampened your passion for the occupation you thought you wanted to pursue. So, now you’re in a tough spot, where your degree doesn’t quite line up with what it is you want to do.

 

The upshot? There’s no need to panic. "It’s natural for college students to change their career direction," says Donald Asher, author of How to Get Any Job with Any Major. Furthermore, employers aren’t as hung up on your major as you might think. "Once you step off campus, hiring managers care a lot less about what your major was," says Asher. "They care more about the fact that you have a college degree."

 

After you’ve secured a diploma, it’s time to convince a potential employer to hire you, regardless of what your degree is in. These five steps can help you start off on the right foot.


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The Learning Factor's curator insight, July 24, 2016 6:31 PM

Your degree doesn't chain you to a field for the rest of your career. Here's how to use what you've already learned to try something else.

Walter Gassenferth's curator insight, July 26, 2016 7:46 AM
Very interesting subject to be considered and discussed. I will disclose the post to my contacts and subscribers in http://www.quanticaconsultoria.com