Transcalar Imaginary
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Transcalar Imaginary
mundus imaginalis traversing the micro, meso, and macro...
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Welcome to the Transcalar Imaginary

Welcome to the Transcalar Imaginary | Transcalar Imaginary | Scoop.it

 

"The Universe is made up of stories, not atoms."

Muriel Rukeyser

 

The stories we tell ourselves about the cosmos shape our experiences of reality. We interpret our experiences through ever-shifting lenses of enculturation, embodiment, and enaction, which continually shape the explanatory maps and narratives we create to account for the nature of existence. Recognizing our unique perspectives, as well as how they might be expanded, requires identifying the influences and assumptions within which they are enmeshed. 

 

The Transcalar Imaginary refers to the ever-shifting worlds constructed within the individual and collective minds' eye, imagining connections between everyday experience and realms beyond unaided perception. These visions result from the dynamic interplay between empirical observations, nested social-ecological systems, and creative representations of phenomena, creating new sensemaking processes and cultural narratives. The extent to which we can recognize patterns and traverse spectral, temporal, and spatial scales within our imaginations greatly influences our abilities to anticipate and adapt to changing environments.

 

This collection is an invitation to explore the ways in which our expanded capacity to collectively imagine stories and perspectives across scales can inform new ways of seeing, knowing, and acting in the world...

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Science for Designers: Scaling and Fractals

Science for Designers: Scaling and Fractals | Transcalar Imaginary | Scoop.it
Patterns of growth in nature are also prevalent and important in good design.
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Geometrical Plants For Symmetry Lovers

Geometrical Plants For Symmetry Lovers | Transcalar Imaginary | Scoop.it

Who said math can’t be interesting? Fractals like these can seem too perfect to be true, but they occur in nature and plants all the time and are examples of math, physics, and natural selection at work!


When we see order in the world, we think it must be some human hand that made it so. But Galileo Galilei in his Il Saggiatore wrote, “[The universe] is written in the language of mathematics, and its characters are triangles, circles, and other geometric figures.” There is order in nature, and artists who want to reproduce it faithfully spend hours studying nature’s forms.

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How to Apply Eames's Legendary "Powers of 10" to Real-life Problems

How to Apply Eames's Legendary "Powers of 10" to Real-life Problems | Transcalar Imaginary | Scoop.it

Powers of Ten is arguably more relevant now than it was the year it was released. The simple idea executed in the film has become a powerful construct for thinking through design problems today. In it, Charles and Ray Eames guide us through a deceptively straightforward exercise -- zooming out to 10^24 and then back in to 10^-16 -- re-framing a simple scene by showing it within ever-larger and then smaller contexts.

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Safari

Safari straddles the border between the real and the fanciful. This wordless, hallucinatory nature documentary is not precisely natural, nor exactly a documentary. Following the travails of a cockroach through a studio-constructed tropical paradise, its extreme close-ups present a world in which bizarre plants and animals engage in a constant dance of eat and be eaten.

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From Drifter to Dynamo: The Story of Plankton

Most plankton are tiny drifters, wandering in a vast ocean. But where wind and currents converge they become part of a grander story… an explosion of vitality that affects all life on Earth, including our own. 

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A Rough Sketch for a Proposed Film Dealing with the Powers of Ten and the Relative Size of Things in the Universe (1968)

The Powers of Ten films are two short American documentary films written and directed by Charles and Ray Eames. Both works depict the relative scale of the Universe according to an order of magnitude (or logarithmic scale) based on a factor of ten, first expanding out from the Earth until the entire universe is surveyed, then reducing inward until a single atom and its quarks are observed. The first film: A Rough Sketch for a Proposed Film Dealing with the Powers of Ten and the Relative Size of Things in the Universe — was a prototype and was completed in 1968; the second film: Powers of Ten: A Film Dealing with the Relative Size of Things in the Universe and the Effect of Adding Another Zero— was completed in 1977.

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An Astronaut's View of Earth

Col. Chris Hadfield on what it's like to experience the Earth from orbit. The transcalar imaginary embodied...

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...meanwhile...

Meanwhile in a world far, far away ...

 

. ...Meanwhile... shows the world of marine animals like corals and starfish at high magnification and during long time span through timelapse. This is an infinitesimal part of the wonderful world in which we live and of which we should take better care. A trip through a different perspective that encourages reflection on the consequences of our actions on each scale of space and time.

 

Enjoy the vision...

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What Gives the Morpho Butterfly Its Magnificent Blue?

What does it mean to be blue? The wings of a Morpho butterfly are some of the most brilliant structures in nature, and yet they contain no blue pigment -- they harness the physics of light at the nanoscale.

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How Electric Light Changed the Night

Artificial light makes the modern world possible. But not all kinds of light are good for us. Electric light has fundamentally altered our lives, our bodies and the very nature of our sleep. 

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The Amazing Life of Sand

There’s a story in every grain of sand: tales of life and death, fire and water. If you scooped up a handful of sand from every beach, you'd have a history of the world sifting through your fingers. From mountain boulders to the shells of tiny ocean creatures, follow the journey that sand takes through thousands of years across entire continents to wind up stuck between your toes. 

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Our unique 'microbial aura' travels with us wherever we go

Our unique 'microbial aura' travels with us wherever we go | Transcalar Imaginary | Scoop.it

The more scientists learn about the microbiome, the more they understand how influential it is. “We like to think of the world as being compartmentalized, but everything is pretty much in a continuum. [Almost] all of life exists interconnected by the bacteria and the viruses that we constantly shed and pick up,” Gilbert says.

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Where's The Octopus?

A study of camouflage in cephalopods -- squid, cuttlefish and octopus -- who are masters of optical illusion...

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SUN

Edited time lapse sequences of the sun’s atmosphere observed by the Solar Dynamics Observatory spacecraft between 2011 and 2015. Music: Una by Murcof Taken…
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The Universe That We Can't See (infographic)

The Universe That We Can't See (infographic) | Transcalar Imaginary | Scoop.it

Just outside of eyeshot is a whole world we can’t see or experience. There is light at longer and shorter wavelengths, like in infrared (the wavelength the Sun emits most of its energy in), x-ray, and ultraviolet. On Earth, what we can see serves us well, but in space, a lot of the universe is hidden from sight without special tools...

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Lyrebird mimics construction sounds

Chainsaws. Dogs. Even you. Birds are known for being great mimics. But the reasons why have been a mystery. Until now. Full story: http://bit.ly/1FuNu1n ;

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Rose of Jericho

A time lapse of a Rose of Jericho (Selaginella lepidophylla). After being exposed to water, the plant turns from a dried tumbleweed to a green fern over the course of several hours.

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NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory - Year 5

February 11, 2015 marks five years in space for NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory, which provides incredibly detailed images of the whole sun 24 hours a day. Capturing an image more than once per second, SDO has provided an unprecedentedly clear picture of how massive explosions on the sun grow and erupt ever since its launch on Feb. 11, 2010. The imagery is also captivating, allowing one to watch the constant ballet of solar material through the sun's atmosphere, the corona. 

In honor of SDO's fifth anniversary, NASA has released a video showcasing highlights from the last five years of sun watching. Watch the movie to see giant clouds of solar material hurled out into space, the dance of giant loops hovering in the corona, and huge sunspots growing and shrinking on the sun's surface. 

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Banana Slugs: Secret of the Slime

Beneath the towering redwoods lives one of the most peculiar creatures in California: the banana slug. They're coated with a liquid crystal ooze that solves many problems slugs face in the forest -- and maybe some of our own.

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Pygmy Seahorses: Masters of Camouflage

Tiny and delicate, pygmy seahorses survive by attaching to vibrant corals where they become nearly invisible to both predators and researchers. Now, biologists at the California Academy of Sciences have successfully bred them in captivity for the first time. Finally, they're able to study the seahorses' amazing act of camouflage up close. Visit kqed.org/deeplook to learn more about the series and pygmy seahorses at the California Academy of Sciences.

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In the Race for Life, Which Human Embryos Make It?

Every one of us started out as an embryo, but only a few early embryos – about one in three – grow into a baby. Researchers are unlocking the mysteries of our embryonic clock and helping patients who are struggling to get pregnant.

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The Hidden Complexities of the Simple Match

This award-winning, high-speed video shows the epic life story of a match once lit. The scientists who made the video used a special technique, called Schlieren imaging, to highlight the flame's thick gas churning and mixing with the air around it in a beautiful black-and-white display.
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At Multiverse Impasse, a New Theory of Scale

At Multiverse Impasse, a New Theory of Scale | Transcalar Imaginary | Scoop.it

Though galaxies look larger than atoms and elephants appear to outweigh ants, some physicists have begun to suspect that size differences are illusory. Perhaps the fundamental description of the universe does not include the concepts of “mass” and “length,” implying that at its core, nature lacks a sense of scale.

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