Transformational Teaching and Technology
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Transformational Teaching and Technology
A collection of articles, websites, and apps designed to catalyze creativity and success in today's schools!
Curated by Chris Carter
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Rescooped by Chris Carter from 21st Century Learning and Teaching
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Studying With Quizzes Helps Make Sure the Material Sticks

Studying With Quizzes Helps Make Sure the Material Sticks | Transformational Teaching and Technology | Scoop.it
This phenomenon — testing yourself on an idea or concept to help you remember it — is called the “testing effect” or “retrieval practice.” People have known about the idea for centuries. Sir Francis Bacon mentioned it, as did the psychologist William James. In 350 BCE, Aristotle wrote that “exercise in repeatedly recalling a thing strengthens the memory.”

But the testing effect had been mostly overlooked in recent years. “What psychologists interested in learning and memory have always emphasized is the acquisition part. The taking [information] in and getting it into memory,” Roediger said.

Laypeople — and even experts — tend to think of human memory as a box to be packed with information.

 

“Memory is dynamic, and it keeps changing,” McDaniel said. “And retrieval helps it change.”

 

Learn more / En savoir plus / Mehr erfahren:

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?tag=Brain

 


Via Gust MEES
Chris Carter's insight:
I recently presented at EduTECH Asia, Singapore, concerning the power of recall-based learning. Essentially, get the information once (encode-learning), then test yourself repeatedly. The 60+ studies and meta-studies that I examined in preparation for my presentation all tell the same story. Recall-based learning (quizzing) is at least 400% more effective than re-studying in the traditional way. the keys are:
1. frequent quizzes
2. low-stakes quizzes
3. Immediate feedback
4. Interleaved quizzing (quizzing over time, and across units)
5. Pre- and Post-summative assessment reflection
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Koen Mattheeuws's curator insight, November 23, 2016 3:07 AM
Dit artikel daagt ons uit om de 'varken metafoor /evaluatie stelling' in vraag te stellen. (een varken verdikt niet door het vaker te wegen). Het antwoord zit volgens dit artikel in de wijze waarop we wegen. 
Mona K. Haug's curator insight, December 5, 2016 3:38 AM
Share your insight
Sandra Vizcaíno's curator insight, June 30, 12:49 PM

#3#SCEUNED16#

Rescooped by Chris Carter from Purposeful Pedagogy
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Brain-Based Learning | 10 Dangerous Myths Every Educator Should ...

Brain-Based Learning | 10 Dangerous Myths Every Educator Should ... | Transformational Teaching and Technology | Scoop.it
MYTH #1: KID'S BRAINS ARE STUCK. If you think kids can't get better in school, then you think brains have minimal capacity for change. But they are actually changing ALL the time. If a child spends the summer relaxing, ...

Via Will Gourley, Lynnette Van Dyke, Dean J. Fusto
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Will Gourley's curator insight, April 25, 2014 9:01 PM

Food for thought.

Rescooped by Chris Carter from 21st Century Learning and Teaching
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How Does the Brain Learn Best? Smart Studying Strategies | #Research

How Does the Brain Learn Best? Smart Studying Strategies | #Research | Transformational Teaching and Technology | Scoop.it

— Breaking up and spacing out study time over days or weeks can substantially boost how much of the material students retain, and for longer, compared to lumping everything into a single, nose-to-the-grindstone session.


— Varying the studying environment — by hitting the books in, say, a cafe or garden rather than only hunkering down in the library, or even by listening to different background music — can help reinforce and sharpen the memory of what you learn.

— A 15-minute break to go for a walk or trawl on social media isn’t necessarily wasteful procrastination. Distractions and interruptions can allow for mental “incubation” and flashes of insight — but only if you’ve been working at a problem for a while and get stuck, according to a 2009 research meta-analysis.

— Quizzing oneself on new material, such as by reciting it aloud from memory or trying to tell a friend about it, is a far more powerful way to master information than just re-reading it, according to work by researchers including Henry Roediger III and Jeffrey Karpicke. (Roediger has co-authored his own book, “Make It Stick: The Science of Successful Learning.”)

 

Learn more / En savoir plus / Mehr erfahren:

 

https://gustmees.wordpress.com/2016/03/14/time-the-most-important-factor-neglected-in-education/

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?tag=Brain

 


Via Gust MEES
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Koen Mattheeuws's curator insight, September 26, 2016 2:49 AM
Leren: Er is geen geijkte weg voor. 
David Picard Roussel's curator insight, January 31, 7:47 AM

[ À tous ceux qui ont un cerveau V.A. ] Avez-vous déjà essayé ces méthodes d'apprentissage? Est-ce que dans vos équipes de travail vous tentez d'appliquer certaines de ces méthodes?

Rescooped by Chris Carter from Eclectic Technology
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How the Brain Learns—A Super Simple Explanation

How the Brain Learns—A Super Simple Explanation | Transformational Teaching and Technology | Scoop.it
eLearning professionals should learn more about the biological basis of learning. Check out this simple explanation.

Via Beth Dichter
Chris Carter's insight:

This is your brain ... this is your brain when it learns.

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Beth Dichter's curator insight, June 24, 2014 10:53 AM

Are you looking for a simple explanation on how learning happens in the brain? The infographic above shows the shorthand version and a more detailed version is available in the post. Although this post is geared to e-learning the four processes that take place are also found in the traditional (and the blended) classroom.

Process 1: Getting the information which takes place in the sensory cortices. This is the time to touch as many of the senses as possible. Try to create lessons when introducing new material that include audio, visual and kinesthetic experiences.

Process 2: Make meaning which takes place in the temporal lobe. To make meaning of new information we must provide time for reflection.

Process 3: Form abstractions which takes place in the prefrontal lobe. The learner has received new information, reflected on the information and now begins to make meaning in their brain by making relationships, forming abstractions and creating new knowledge.

Process 4: Active testing which takes place in the motor cortex. The abstract becomes active, providing guides for future learning.

You will also find a link on this page which will allow you to download an eBook - Neuroscience Based eLearning Tips.

Betty Skeet's curator insight, September 1, 2014 6:54 AM

We need to know more about how the brain works in the learning process so that eLearning can be more effective.

Shawn Wright's curator insight, September 6, 2014 9:14 PM

Cool