Tracking the Future
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Tracking the Future
Explore the most important technology and science trends! News, Analysis, Interviews, Presentations, Documentaries. All in one place at Tracking the future magazine
Curated by Szabolcs Kósa
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Between Ape and Artilect

Between Ape and Artilect | Tracking the Future | Scoop.it

During 2010-12, noted AI researcher and long-time Humanity+ Board member Ben Goertzel conducted a series of textual interviews with researchers in various areas of cutting-edge science — artificial general intelligence, nanotechnology, life extension, neurotechnology, collective intelligence, mind uploading, body modification, neuro-spiritual transformation, and more. These interviews were published online in H+ Magazine, and are here gathered together in a single volume. The resulting series of dialogues treats a variety of social, futurological and scientific topics in a way that is accessible to the educated non-scientist, yet also deep and honest to the subtleties of the topics being discussed.

 

Between Ape and Artilect is a must-read if you want the real views, opinions, ideas, muses and arguments of the people creating our future.

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luiy's curator insight, March 8, 2014 2:34 PM

- Itamar Arel: AGI via Deep Learning 

- Pei Wang: What Do You Mean by “AI”? 
- Joscha Bach: Understanding the Mind
- Hugo DeGaris: Will There be Cyborgs?
- DeGaris Interviews Goertzel: Seeking the Sputnik of AGI 
- Linas Vepstas: AGI, Open Source and Our Economic Future 
- Joel Pitt: The Benefits of Open Source for AGI
- Randal Koene: Substrate-Independent Minds
- João Pedro de Magalhães: Ending Aging 
- Aubrey De Grey: Aging and AGI
- David Brin: Sousveillance
- J. Storrs Hall: Intelligent Nano Factories and Fogs
- Mohamad Tarifi: AGI and the Emerging Peer-to-Peer Economy 
- Michael Anissimov: The Risks of Artificial Superintelligence 
- Muehlhauser & Goertzel: Rationality, Risk, and the Future of AGI 
- Paul Werbos: Will Humanity Survive?
- Wendell Wallach: Machine Morality
- Francis Heylighen: The Emerging Global Brain 
- Steve Omohundro: The Wisdom of the Global Brain and the Future of AGI 
- Alexandra Elbakyan: Beyond the Borg 
- Giulio Prisco: Technological Transcendence 
- Zhou Changle: Zen and the Art of Intelligent Robotics 
- Hugo DeGaris: Is God an Alien Mathematician? 
- Lincoln Cannon: The Most Transhumanist Religion?
- Natasha Vita-More: Upgrading Humanity 
- Jeffery Martin & Mikey Siegel: Engineering Enlightenment 

aanve's curator insight, March 8, 2014 10:03 PM

www.aanve.com

 

Mlik Sahib's curator insight, March 8, 2014 10:40 PM

- Itamar Arel: AGI via Deep Learning 

- Pei Wang: What Do You Mean by “AI”? 
- Joscha Bach: Understanding the Mind
- Hugo DeGaris: Will There be Cyborgs?
- DeGaris Interviews Goertzel: Seeking the Sputnik of AGI 
- Linas Vepstas: AGI, Open Source and Our Economic Future 
- Joel Pitt: The Benefits of Open Source for AGI
- Randal Koene: Substrate-Independent Minds
- João Pedro de Magalhães: Ending Aging 
- Aubrey De Grey: Aging and AGI
- David Brin: Sousveillance
- J. Storrs Hall: Intelligent Nano Factories and Fogs
- Mohamad Tarifi: AGI and the Emerging Peer-to-Peer Economy 
- Michael Anissimov: The Risks of Artificial Superintelligence 
- Muehlhauser & Goertzel: Rationality, Risk, and the Future of AGI 
- Paul Werbos: Will Humanity Survive?
- Wendell Wallach: Machine Morality
- Francis Heylighen: The Emerging Global Brain 
- Steve Omohundro: The Wisdom of the Global Brain and the Future of AGI 
- Alexandra Elbakyan: Beyond the Borg 
- Giulio Prisco: Technological Transcendence 
- Zhou Changle: Zen and the Art of Intelligent Robotics 
- Hugo DeGaris: Is God an Alien Mathematician? 
- Lincoln Cannon: The Most Transhumanist Religion?
- Natasha Vita-More: Upgrading Humanity 
- Jeffery Martin & Mikey Siegel: Engineering Enlightenment 

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Nanotechnology needle arrays for drug delivery

Nanotechnology needle arrays for drug delivery | Tracking the Future | Scoop.it

The ultimate goal of nanotechnology-enabled drug delivery, especially with regard to cancer therapy, is to ferry most of the administered drug to the target, while eliminating the accumulation of the drug at any non-target tissues.
Nanomedicine applications with targeted nanoparticles are expected to revolutionize cancer therapy. The use of such nanoparticles to deliver therapeutic agents is currently being studied as a promising method by which drugs can be effectively targeted to specific cells in the body, such as tumor cells.

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Nanomedicine: DNA clamp to grab cancer before it develops

Nanomedicine: DNA clamp to grab cancer before it develops | Tracking the Future | Scoop.it

As part of an international research project, a team of researchers has developed a DNA clamp that can detect mutations at the DNA level with greater efficiency than methods currently in use. Their work could facilitate rapid screening of those diseases that have a genetic basis, such as cancer, and provide new tools for more advanced nanotechnology.

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Nanotechnology in Life Sciences

Nanotechnology in Life Sciences | Tracking the Future | Scoop.it

The fusion of nanotechnology and medicine is changing healthcare as we know it. Organizations and government entities are investing huge amounts in nanotech R&D; life science technology innovators across the world are delivering new products and technologies that almost seem straight from a sci-fi movie.
Take the "lab-on-a-chip" (LOC) concept, for example. Originally based on technology pursued by the U.S. military for detection of biological and chemical warfare agents, the LOC is now being used to examine DNA strands to identify cancer. Soon, researchers expect to have an LOC capable of rendering a complete diagnostic workup using just a drop of blood of urine.

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Pills of the future: Scientists develop way to successfully give nanoparticle therapeutics orally

Pills of the future: Scientists develop way to successfully give nanoparticle therapeutics orally | Tracking the Future | Scoop.it

Drugs delivered by nanoparticles hold promise for targeted treatment of many diseases, including cancer. However, the particles have to be injected into patients, which has limited their usefulness so far.

Now, researchers from MIT and Brigham and Women's Hospital (BWH) have developed a new type of nanoparticle that can be delivered orally and absorbed through the digestive tract, allowing patients to simply take a pill instead of receiving injections.

In a paper appearing in the Nov. 27 online edition of Science Translational Medicine, the researchers used the particles to demonstrate oral delivery of insulin in mice, but they say the particles could be used to carry any kind of drug that can be encapsulated in a nanoparticle. The new nanoparticles are coated with antibodies that act as a key to unlock receptors found on the surfaces of cells that line the intestine, allowing the nanoparticles to break through the intestinal walls and enter the bloodstream.

This type of drug delivery could be especially useful in developing new treatments for conditions such as high cholesterol or arthritis. Patients with those diseases would be much more likely to take pills regularly than to make frequent visits to a doctor's office to receive nanoparticle injections, say the researchers.

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Compact delivery system for microbeam radiation therapy developed using nanotechnology

Compact delivery system for microbeam radiation therapy developed using nanotechnology | Tracking the Future | Scoop.it

Microbeam radiation therapy (MRT) provides tremendous promise for cancer patients through its ability to destroy tumor cells while protecting surrounding healthy tissue. Yet research into its clinical use has been limited by the sheer size of the technology required to generate the beams. Until now, administering MRT required massive electron accelerators known as synchrotrons. But with a new microbeam emitter developed at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, the technology has been scaled down, opening the doors for clinical research.

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Big nanotech: building a new world with atomic precision

Big nanotech: building a new world with atomic precision | Tracking the Future | Scoop.it

Eric Drexler: Atomically precise manufacturing has implications for everything from medicine to economic development to climate change

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NIH Grant to Develop New Nanotechnology for Better Cancer Treatment

NIH Grant to Develop New Nanotechnology for Better Cancer Treatment | Tracking the Future | Scoop.it
UB researcher Jonathan Lovell has received a five-year, $1.9 million grant from the National Institutes of Health to work on a new nanotechnology that could greatly improve how doctors treat and understand cancer.
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Single nanocrystal sensitivity

Researchers have made a breakthrough discovery in identifying the world's most sensitive nanoparticle and measuring it from a distance using light. These super-bright, photostable and background-free nanocrystals enable a new approach to highly advanced sensing technologies using optical fibres.
This discovery, by a team of researchers from Macquarie University, the University of Adelaide, and Peking University, opens the way for rapid localisation and measurement of cells within a living environment at the nanoscale, such as the changes to a single living cell in the human body in response to chemical signals.
Published in Nature Nanotechnology, the research outlines a new approach to advanced sensing that has been facilitated by bringing together a specific form of nanocrystal, or "SuperDotTM" with a special kind of optical fibre that enables light to interact with tiny (nanoscale) volumes of liquid.

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Nanotechnology T-Shirt to replace batteries? Towards wearable energy storage

Nanotechnology T-Shirt to replace batteries? Towards wearable energy storage | Tracking the Future | Scoop.it

If current research is an indicator, wearable electronics will go far beyond just very small electronic devices or wearable, flexible computers. Not only will these devices be embedded in textile substrates but an electronics device or system could ultimately become the fabric itself. Electronic textiles (e-textiles) will allow the design and production of a new generation of garments with distributed sensors and electronic functions. Such e-textiles will have the revolutionary ability to sense, act, store, emit, and move – think biomedical monitoring functions or new man-machine interfaces – while ideally leveraging an existing low-cost textile manufacturing infrastructure.
All these wearable and potentially textile-embedded electronic gadgets will require power; and it wouldn't make sense to have to plug your sleek flexible sleeve display into a bulky lithium-ion battery brick. Researchers are therefore pushing the development of wearable energy storage. Especially supercapacitors with a cable-type architecture could lead to flexible energy storage devices that can remove traditional restriction and achieve a subversive technology that could open up a path for design innovation.
Researchers have now demonstrated that flexible cotton threads can be used as a platform to fabricate a cable-type supercapacitor.

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JanHenk Bouman's curator insight, August 30, 2013 3:05 AM

Bekijk ook deze TEDtalk over nano-energyvan Justin Hall


http://www.ted.com/talks/justin_hall_tipping_freeing_energy_from_the_grid.html
 

 

 

Wat is nanotechnologie?

 

http://nl.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nanotechnologie

 

Nanotechnologie is de techniek die het mogelijk maakt te werken met deeltjes in de grootteorde van nanometers (afkorting nm, een miljardste van een meter).

Dit is een schaal van grootte die net boven die van atomen (0,060 nm tot 0,275 nm) en eenvoudige moleculen ligt. Een criterium is dat een structuur in op zijn minst één dimensie minder dan 100 nanometer groot is. Veelgebruikte toepassingen van nanotechnologie zijn de emulsie van kleine deeltjes ('nanodeeltjes') titaniumoxide in verf- en vernissoorten, deeltjes in zonnebrandcreme, cosmetica, koolstof ingeckotape (sterk plakband, principe bewezen, in ontwikkeling)[1][2], zilver in voedselverpakking, kleding, verband, desinfectiemiddelen en huishoudapparatuur en cerium als katalysator bij verbranding.

De grote opslagcapactiteit van computergeheugens is tevens een toepassing van nanotechnologie. Een probleem van nanotechnologie is de onbekende giftigheid van de nieuwe producten.

 

Linda Allen's curator insight, August 30, 2013 7:16 AM

 work in the apparel business; this would be an amazing product. Apparel has always been a walking bill board for a company; this would be amazing.

David Bell's curator insight, August 31, 2013 5:20 AM

New corporate "casual tee-shirt days" to avoid battery running out?  ;)

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New iron catalyst promises green future for hydrogenation

New iron catalyst promises green future for hydrogenation | Tracking the Future | Scoop.it

A new iron nanoparticle catalyst developed by researchers in Japan and Canada promises to drastically improve the efficiency of hydrogenation, a key chemical process used in a wide array of industrial applications. Cleaner, safer and cheaper than traditional rare metal-based catalysts, the new, more environmentally friendly technique marks a breakthrough for the emerging field of green chemistry.

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Human extinction warning from Oxford

Human extinction warning from Oxford | Tracking the Future | Scoop.it

What are the greatest global threats to humanity? Are we on the verge of our own unexpected extinction?

An international team of scientists, mathematicians and philosophers at Oxford University's Future of Humanity Institute is investigating the biggest dangers.

And they argue in a research paper, Existential Risk as a Global Priority, that international policymakers must pay serious attention to the reality of species-obliterating risks.

Last year there were more academic papers published on snowboarding than human extinction.

The Swedish-born director of the institute, Nick Bostrom, says the stakes couldn't be higher. If we get it wrong, this could be humanity's final century.

Szabolcs Kósa's insight:

access the full report here:http://www.existential-risk.org/concept.html

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Hybrid energy harvester generates electricity from vibrations and sunlight

Hybrid energy harvester generates electricity from vibrations and sunlight | Tracking the Future | Scoop.it

Devices that harvest energy from the environment require specific environmental conditions; for instance, solar cells and piezoelectric generators require sunlight and mechanical vibration, respectively. Since these conditions don't exist all the time, most energy harvesters don't generate a constant stream of electricity. In order to harvest ubiquitous energy continuously, researchers have designed and fabricated a hybrid energy harvester that integrates a solar cell and piezoelectric generator, enabling it to harvest energy from both sunlight and sound vibration simultaneously.

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Nanotechnology may be key to solar energy and energy storage

Nanotechnology may be key to solar energy and energy storage | Tracking the Future | Scoop.it

A new study from the IEC (International Electrotechnical Commission) and the Fraunhofer Institute for Systems and Innovation Research ISI has found that nanotechnology will bring significant benefits to the energy sector, especially to energy storage and solar energy. Improved materials efficiency and reduced manufacturing costs are just two of the real economic benefits that nanotechnology already brings these fields and that’s only the beginning. Battery storage capacity could be extended, solar cells could be produced cheaper, and the lifetime of solar cells or batteries for electric cars could be increased, all thanks to continued development of nanotechnology.

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aanve's curator insight, March 2, 2014 9:36 PM

www.aanve.com

 

mariam tounkara's curator insight, March 3, 2014 1:04 PM

Brèche radicale ! Nos autos seront-elles plus légères ? 

Alexandra Minks's curator insight, March 21, 2015 2:28 AM

As nanotechnology continues to grow, the amount of pre-existing technologies that can be improved by it increases significantly. As described in this article, the use of nanotechnology could result in drastic changes to the way energy is stored and used. It could provide extended battery life as well as larger storage capacities, making it incredibly useful in the ever-expanding technological world.

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Beyond the Moore's Law: Nanocomputing using nanowire tiles

Beyond the Moore's Law: Nanocomputing using nanowire tiles | Tracking the Future | Scoop.it

An interdisciplinary team of scientists and engineers from The MITRE Corporation and Harvard University have taken key steps toward ultra-small electronic computer systems that push beyond the imminent end of Moore's Law, which states that the device density and overall processing power for computers will double every two to three years.

The ultra-small, ultra-low-power control processor—termed a nanoelectronic finite-state machine or "nanoFSM"—is smaller than a human nerve cell. It is composed of hundreds of nanowire transistors, each of which is a switch about ten-thousand times thinner than a human hair. The nanowire transistors use very little power because they are "nonvolatile." That is, the switches remember whether they are on or off, even when no power is supplied to them.

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James Jandebeur's curator insight, February 1, 2014 12:57 PM

It mentions that the processors can now be made smaller than a neuron, I wonder how its power compares. Still, quite a breakthrough if it works out.

aanve's curator insight, February 1, 2014 11:09 PM
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Christian Verstraete's curator insight, February 3, 2014 1:29 AM

Will this address our needs when we reach the physical limits of our current chip technology?

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Ray Kurzweil: This is your future

Ray Kurzweil: This is your future | Tracking the Future | Scoop.it

Acclaimed futurist Ray Kurzweil on the future of human life -- one where we print organs and play in total immersion environments.

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Dmitry Alexeev's curator insight, December 20, 2013 6:03 AM

organs printed
diseases healed in 20yrs time 

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Nanoscale coatings improve stability and efficiency of devices for renewable fuel generation

Nanoscale coatings improve stability and efficiency of devices for renewable fuel generation | Tracking the Future | Scoop.it

Splitting water into its components, two parts hydrogen and one part oxygen, is an important first step in achieving carbon-neutral fuels to power our transportation infrastructure – including automobiles and planes.

Now, North Carolina State University researchers and colleagues from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill have shown that a specialized coating technique can make certain water-splitting devices more stable and more efficient. 
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Nanotechnology for self-powered systems

Nanotechnology for self-powered systems | Tracking the Future | Scoop.it

There is an almost infinite number of mechanical energy sources all around us – basically, anything that moves can be harvested for energy. These environmental energy sources can the very large, like wave power in the oceans, or very small, like rain drops or biomechanical energy from heart beat, breathing, and blood flow. With the increasing use of nanotechnology materials and applications in energy research, scientists are finding more and more ways to tap into these pretty much limitless sources of energy.
The continued miniaturization of portable electronics is increasingly challenged by the reliance on conventional battery technology. But for the near future, micro- and even nanoscale devices will be widely used in health monitoring; infrastructure and environmental monitoring; internet of things; and of course defense technologies. In these application areas, battery design will have to go way beyond today's typical lithium-ion batteries. Rather than relying on stored power, nanodevices will probably rely on novel, also nanoscale, power sources.

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ASU collaboration creates breakthroughs for solar cell efficiency

ASU collaboration creates breakthroughs for solar cell efficiency | Tracking the Future | Scoop.it

Research into making better crystals with high crystalline quality, light emission efficiency and luminosity is also at the heart of studies being done at Arizona State University by research scientist Alec Fischer and doctoral candidate Yong Wei in professor Fernando Ponce’s group in the Department of Physics.

In an article recently published in the journal Applied Physics Letters, the ASU group, in collaboration with a scientific team led by professor Alan Doolittle at the Georgia Institute of Technology, has just revealed the fundamental aspect of a new approach to growing InGaN crystals for diodes, which promises to move photovoltaic solar cell technology toward record-breaking efficiencies.

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UW engineers invent programming language to build synthetic DNA

UW engineers invent programming language to build synthetic DNA | Tracking the Future | Scoop.it

Similar to using Python or Java to write code for a computer, chemists soon could be able to use a structured set of instructions to “program” how DNA molecules interact in a test tube or cell.
A team led by the University of Washington has developed a programming language for chemistry that it hopes will streamline efforts to design a network that can guide the behavior of chemical-reaction mixtures in the same way that embedded electronic controllers guide cars, robots and other devices. In medicine, such networks could serve as “smart” drug deliverers or disease detectors at the cellular level.

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jakiydom's curator insight, October 7, 2013 8:19 AM

good program !

 

jumping jack flash's curator insight, October 7, 2013 3:25 PM

Singularity is close

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Nanotechnology solutions to combat superbugs

Nanotechnology solutions to combat superbugs | Tracking the Future | Scoop.it

The emergence of superbugs has made it imperative to search for novel methods, which can combat the microbial resistance. Thus, application of nanotechnology in pharmaceuticals and microbiology is gaining importance to prevent the catastrophic consequences of antibiotic resistance. Nanotechnology based approaches are advantageous to improve various preventive measures such as coatings and filtration. Similarly, diagnosis using efficient nanosensors or probes can speed up the treatment process at an early stage of disease. Nano-based drug carriers for existing antibiotics enhance their bioavailability and make them more targets specific. Also the combination of nanoparticles (NPs) along with antibiotics makes them more lethal for micro-organisms.

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Pedro Barbosa's curator insight, September 11, 2013 10:19 AM

Nanotecnologia vesus resistência so micróbios.Esta é uma tendência que importa acompanhar, tanto na área do desenvolvimento cintífico, como na necessidade de alteração de hábitos na presecrição médica e sobretudo na automedicamentação.

A introdução de nanosensores na área preventiva é uma de muitas microevoluções que fazem desta área do desenvolvimento uma importante tendência para o futuro de médio prazo.

Pedro Barbosa | www.pbarbosa.com  |www.harvardtrends.com

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Nanostructures made of DNA strands can encapsulate, release small-molecule drugs

Nanostructures made of DNA strands can encapsulate, release small-molecule drugs | Tracking the Future | Scoop.it

Nanoscale "cages" made from strands of DNA can encapsulate small-molecule drugs and release them in response to a specific stimulus, McGill University researchers report in a new study.
The research, published online Sept. 1 in Nature Chemistry, marks a step toward the use of biological nanostructures to deliver drugs to diseased cells in patients. The findings could also open up new possibilities for designing DNA-based nanomaterials.
"This research is important for drug delivery, but also for fundamental structural biology and nanotechnology," says McGill Chemistry professor Hanadi Sleiman, who led the research team.

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Breakthrough could lead to 'artificial skin' that senses touch, humidity and temperature

Breakthrough could lead to 'artificial skin' that senses touch, humidity and temperature | Tracking the Future | Scoop.it

Using tiny gold particles and a kind of resin, a team of scientists at the Technion-Israel Institute of Technology has discovered how to make a new kind of flexible sensor that one day could be integrated into electronic skin, or e-skin. If scientists learn how to attach e-skin to prosthetic limbs, people with amputations might once again be able to feel changes in their environments.

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DNA constructs antenna for solar energy

DNA constructs antenna for solar energy | Tracking the Future | Scoop.it

Artificial photosynthesis is one of the hot trends in energy research. A large number of the worlds' energy problems could be resolved if it were possible to recreate the ability plants have to transform solar energy into fuel. The Earth receives enough solar energy every hour to satisfy our energy needs for an entire year.

A research team at Chalmers University of Technology has made a nanotechnological breakthrough in the first step required for artificial photosynthesis. The team has demonstrated that it is possible to use self-assembling DNA molecules as scaffolding to create artificial systems that collect light.

 

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Nanotechnology: striking a balance between glorification and 'grey goo'

Nanotechnology: striking a balance between glorification and 'grey goo' | Tracking the Future | Scoop.it

Emerging fields such as nanotechnology must resist the false dichotomy that says they're either marvellous or demonic

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