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Tracking the Future
Explore the most important technology and science trends! News, Analysis, Interviews, Presentations, Documentaries. All in one place at Tracking the future magazine
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Nanotechnology needle arrays for drug delivery

Nanotechnology needle arrays for drug delivery | Tracking the Future | Scoop.it

The ultimate goal of nanotechnology-enabled drug delivery, especially with regard to cancer therapy, is to ferry most of the administered drug to the target, while eliminating the accumulation of the drug at any non-target tissues.
Nanomedicine applications with targeted nanoparticles are expected to revolutionize cancer therapy. The use of such nanoparticles to deliver therapeutic agents is currently being studied as a promising method by which drugs can be effectively targeted to specific cells in the body, such as tumor cells.

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Ray Kurzweil: This is your future

Ray Kurzweil: This is your future | Tracking the Future | Scoop.it

Acclaimed futurist Ray Kurzweil on the future of human life -- one where we print organs and play in total immersion environments.

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Dmitry Alexeev's curator insight, December 20, 2013 6:03 AM

organs printed
diseases healed in 20yrs time 

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Pills of the future: Scientists develop way to successfully give nanoparticle therapeutics orally

Pills of the future: Scientists develop way to successfully give nanoparticle therapeutics orally | Tracking the Future | Scoop.it

Drugs delivered by nanoparticles hold promise for targeted treatment of many diseases, including cancer. However, the particles have to be injected into patients, which has limited their usefulness so far.

Now, researchers from MIT and Brigham and Women's Hospital (BWH) have developed a new type of nanoparticle that can be delivered orally and absorbed through the digestive tract, allowing patients to simply take a pill instead of receiving injections.

In a paper appearing in the Nov. 27 online edition of Science Translational Medicine, the researchers used the particles to demonstrate oral delivery of insulin in mice, but they say the particles could be used to carry any kind of drug that can be encapsulated in a nanoparticle. The new nanoparticles are coated with antibodies that act as a key to unlock receptors found on the surfaces of cells that line the intestine, allowing the nanoparticles to break through the intestinal walls and enter the bloodstream.

This type of drug delivery could be especially useful in developing new treatments for conditions such as high cholesterol or arthritis. Patients with those diseases would be much more likely to take pills regularly than to make frequent visits to a doctor's office to receive nanoparticle injections, say the researchers.

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NIH Grant to Develop New Nanotechnology for Better Cancer Treatment

NIH Grant to Develop New Nanotechnology for Better Cancer Treatment | Tracking the Future | Scoop.it
UB researcher Jonathan Lovell has received a five-year, $1.9 million grant from the National Institutes of Health to work on a new nanotechnology that could greatly improve how doctors treat and understand cancer.
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Nanotechnology: striking a balance between glorification and 'grey goo'

Nanotechnology: striking a balance between glorification and 'grey goo' | Tracking the Future | Scoop.it

Emerging fields such as nanotechnology must resist the false dichotomy that says they're either marvellous or demonic

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10-9 The Essence of Life and Energy at the Nano Scale: Doug Linman at TEDxSpokane

Douglas Linman, PhD., Solar Energy Science Innovator, Founder/Chief Executive, SUNTCO is the pioneer behind the leap in electrochemistry and nano science capturing solar energy in a new way and delivering it as Liquid Power. As its inventor he has become the Father of Solar Liquid Power (SLP). This TEDx talk will be on the state of the art in Nano-Science and how this relatively new science of matter will continue to change the way we live, work and play for the next 100 years.

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Toward next-generation nanomedicines for cancer therapy

Toward next-generation nanomedicines for cancer therapy | Tracking the Future | Scoop.it

The ultimate goal of drug delivery, especially with regard to cancer therapy, is to ferry most of the administered drug to the target, while eliminating or minimizing the accumulation of the drug at any non-target tissues. Nanomedicine applications with targeted nanoparticles are expected to revolutionize cancer therapy. The use of such nanoparticles to deliver therapeutic agents is currently being studied as a promising method by which drugs can be effectively targeted to specific cells in the body, such as tumor cells.

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Nanotechnology medicine — from gene delivery to tissue targeting

Nanotechnology medicine — from gene delivery to tissue targeting | Tracking the Future | Scoop.it

There is no question that nanotechnology will become increasingly more important in the future of medicine. Hamde Nazar describes some exciting developments

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Reality Check for DNA Nanotechnology: Mapping a 3-D object with Subnanometer Detail

Zoom in for a closer look at a breakthrough — the map of a 3-D object, made from DNA, that proved such structures can be built with atomically precise control. Based on a PNAS paper by Thomas Martin and Hendrik Dietz (TUM) with Xiao-chen Bai and Sjors Scheres (MRC Laboratory of Molecular Biology).
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Building Medical Robots, Bacteria sized

We learned of the existence of bacteria over 300 years ago and we have far more of them in our bodies than human cells, but it was less than 40 years ago when we first realized how they swim. With the discovery of the rotary motor of E. coli in 1973, a motor just 45 nanometers in diameter, some claimed this incredible mechanism as evidence of God, though it is really just a step along the path of evolution. Now we can actually build nanorobots that swim similar to bacteria like E. coli. We're working to use these to deliver drugs to specific locations in the body. E. coli itself is a kind of robot: it has sensors (chemoreceptors), motors, communication along protein guided pathways, and software (DNA). When we look at a bacterium from this perspective it seems like a machine, even one that we will be hopefully able to duplicate someday. So if bacteria are really just machines then what are we?

Bradley Nelson talks at TEDxZurich
Via Wildcat2030
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Nanomedicine: DNA clamp to grab cancer before it develops

Nanomedicine: DNA clamp to grab cancer before it develops | Tracking the Future | Scoop.it

As part of an international research project, a team of researchers has developed a DNA clamp that can detect mutations at the DNA level with greater efficiency than methods currently in use. Their work could facilitate rapid screening of those diseases that have a genetic basis, such as cancer, and provide new tools for more advanced nanotechnology.

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Nanotechnology in Life Sciences

Nanotechnology in Life Sciences | Tracking the Future | Scoop.it

The fusion of nanotechnology and medicine is changing healthcare as we know it. Organizations and government entities are investing huge amounts in nanotech R&D; life science technology innovators across the world are delivering new products and technologies that almost seem straight from a sci-fi movie.
Take the "lab-on-a-chip" (LOC) concept, for example. Originally based on technology pursued by the U.S. military for detection of biological and chemical warfare agents, the LOC is now being used to examine DNA strands to identify cancer. Soon, researchers expect to have an LOC capable of rendering a complete diagnostic workup using just a drop of blood of urine.

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Unraveling the mysteries of life

Unraveling the mysteries of life | Tracking the Future | Scoop.it

Time, space and matter were created 13.7 billion years ago, when the Big Bang occurred. This pale, blue planet, so termed by Carl Sagan, our earth, came into existence about 4.5 billion years ago. Life originated on earth about 3.8 billion years ago. Our species, the home sapiens, came much later at about 0.2 million years while recorded history is merely 6000 years old.
However in the last 60 years or so, man has started to unravel many secrets of his own existence. There have been extremely rapid advances in science and mankind is now grappling with very profound aspects of life from intelligence, perception, aging all the way to death itself.
Moving forward to the next 60 years, there are several areas of research, which will have an extraordinary impact on our lives as we move forward.

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Nanostructures made of DNA strands can encapsulate, release small-molecule drugs

Nanostructures made of DNA strands can encapsulate, release small-molecule drugs | Tracking the Future | Scoop.it

Nanoscale "cages" made from strands of DNA can encapsulate small-molecule drugs and release them in response to a specific stimulus, McGill University researchers report in a new study.
The research, published online Sept. 1 in Nature Chemistry, marks a step toward the use of biological nanostructures to deliver drugs to diseased cells in patients. The findings could also open up new possibilities for designing DNA-based nanomaterials.
"This research is important for drug delivery, but also for fundamental structural biology and nanotechnology," says McGill Chemistry professor Hanadi Sleiman, who led the research team.

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The Amazing Potential of Nanotechnology

The Amazing Potential of Nanotechnology | Tracking the Future | Scoop.it

Long considered to be exclusively the product of science fiction, today some people believe nanotechnology is about to reaches its potential, and drastically change the world.

 

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Gust MEES's curator insight, April 14, 2013 6:43 PM

 

Check also:

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-innovative-technologies-and-developments?tag=Nano

 

gawlab's curator insight, April 14, 2013 8:35 PM

Currently nanotechnology is mainly used to produce nanoparticles, or materials with very specific properties.  In the video http://youtu.be/mEH6tDLKcVU ;

the superhydrophobic coatings shown at the beginning are one example.  Graphene and carbon nanotubes are other nanoparticles with incredible potential in a variety of applications.

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New nanomedicine resolves inflammation, promotes tissue healing

New nanomedicine resolves inflammation, promotes tissue healing | Tracking the Future | Scoop.it

A multicenter team of researchers, including scientists at Columbia University Medical Center (CUMC), Brigham and Women's Hospital (BWH), Mount Sinai School of Medicine, and Massachusetts Institute of Technology, has developed biodegradable nanoparticles that are capable of delivering inflammation-resolving drugs to sites of tissue injury. The nanoparticles, which were successfully tested in mice, have potential for the treatment of a wide array of diseases characterized by excessive inflammation, such as atherosclerosis.

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Nanoparticles that look, act like cells

Nanoparticles that look, act like cells | Tracking the Future | Scoop.it

By cloaking nanoparticles in the membranes of white blood cells, scientists at The Methodist Hospital Research Institute may have found a way to prevent the body from recognizing and destroying them before they deliver their drug payloads. 

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Dr. Wade Adams: Nanotechnology and the Future of Energy

Dr. Wade Adams, Associate Dean of the School of Engineering at Rice University, passionately explains what nanotechnology is and why it is fundamental to solving many of the world's most pressing challenges.

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Sworoba OyetKep's curator insight, March 19, 2013 1:59 AM

In this video Wade Adams presents a seminar on nanotechnology and the future of energy. He discusses the history of nanotechnology and the people who have contributed to the field. He also talks about the functionality of nanotechnolgy and how this technology can be enhanced. The presentation gives a brief story of how a gold nanoshell that was used on animals to cure various types of cancer. Although it has not be approved by the government, this has been tested on humans with positive results. Extensive research is still being carried out on enchancing the capabilites of nanotechnology.

Jessica Wilds's curator insight, March 22, 2013 1:30 AM

In this video Wade Adams presents a seminar on nanotechnology and the future of energy. He talks about the people that contributed to nanotechnology and how it was discovered. He also discusses where nanotechnology is going in the future.

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Nanomedicine: nanobots could eliminate all diseases; even death

Nanomedicine: nanobots could eliminate all diseases; even death | Tracking the Future | Scoop.it
Medical nanobots hold the greatest promise for curing disease, extending human health, and one day, a few bold future watchers predict, this wonder tool could even eliminate death. With diligent effort, positive futurists believe the first fruits of advanced nanomedicine could appear in clinical trials by mid-to-late 2020s.
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Nanotech can be used for MS, diabetes, food allergies and asthma

In a breakthrough for nanotechnology and multiple sclerosis, a biodegradable nanoparticle turns out to be the perfect vehicle to stealthily deliver an antigen that tricks the immune system into stopping its attack on myelin and halt a model of relapsing remitting multiple sclerosis (MS) in mice, according to new Northwestern Medicine research.
The new nanotechnology also can be applied to a variety of immune-mediated diseases including Type 1 diabetes, food allergies and airway allergies such as asthma.

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