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Tracking the Future
Explore the most important technology and science trends! News, Analysis, Interviews, Presentations, Documentaries. All in one place at Tracking the future magazine
Curated by Szabolcs Kósa
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Between Ape and Artilect

Between Ape and Artilect | Tracking the Future | Scoop.it

During 2010-12, noted AI researcher and long-time Humanity+ Board member Ben Goertzel conducted a series of textual interviews with researchers in various areas of cutting-edge science — artificial general intelligence, nanotechnology, life extension, neurotechnology, collective intelligence, mind uploading, body modification, neuro-spiritual transformation, and more. These interviews were published online in H+ Magazine, and are here gathered together in a single volume. The resulting series of dialogues treats a variety of social, futurological and scientific topics in a way that is accessible to the educated non-scientist, yet also deep and honest to the subtleties of the topics being discussed.

 

Between Ape and Artilect is a must-read if you want the real views, opinions, ideas, muses and arguments of the people creating our future.

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luiy's curator insight, March 8, 2014 2:34 PM

- Itamar Arel: AGI via Deep Learning 

- Pei Wang: What Do You Mean by “AI”? 
- Joscha Bach: Understanding the Mind
- Hugo DeGaris: Will There be Cyborgs?
- DeGaris Interviews Goertzel: Seeking the Sputnik of AGI 
- Linas Vepstas: AGI, Open Source and Our Economic Future 
- Joel Pitt: The Benefits of Open Source for AGI
- Randal Koene: Substrate-Independent Minds
- João Pedro de Magalhães: Ending Aging 
- Aubrey De Grey: Aging and AGI
- David Brin: Sousveillance
- J. Storrs Hall: Intelligent Nano Factories and Fogs
- Mohamad Tarifi: AGI and the Emerging Peer-to-Peer Economy 
- Michael Anissimov: The Risks of Artificial Superintelligence 
- Muehlhauser & Goertzel: Rationality, Risk, and the Future of AGI 
- Paul Werbos: Will Humanity Survive?
- Wendell Wallach: Machine Morality
- Francis Heylighen: The Emerging Global Brain 
- Steve Omohundro: The Wisdom of the Global Brain and the Future of AGI 
- Alexandra Elbakyan: Beyond the Borg 
- Giulio Prisco: Technological Transcendence 
- Zhou Changle: Zen and the Art of Intelligent Robotics 
- Hugo DeGaris: Is God an Alien Mathematician? 
- Lincoln Cannon: The Most Transhumanist Religion?
- Natasha Vita-More: Upgrading Humanity 
- Jeffery Martin & Mikey Siegel: Engineering Enlightenment 

aanve's curator insight, March 8, 2014 10:03 PM

www.aanve.com

 

Mlik Sahib's curator insight, March 8, 2014 10:40 PM

- Itamar Arel: AGI via Deep Learning 

- Pei Wang: What Do You Mean by “AI”? 
- Joscha Bach: Understanding the Mind
- Hugo DeGaris: Will There be Cyborgs?
- DeGaris Interviews Goertzel: Seeking the Sputnik of AGI 
- Linas Vepstas: AGI, Open Source and Our Economic Future 
- Joel Pitt: The Benefits of Open Source for AGI
- Randal Koene: Substrate-Independent Minds
- João Pedro de Magalhães: Ending Aging 
- Aubrey De Grey: Aging and AGI
- David Brin: Sousveillance
- J. Storrs Hall: Intelligent Nano Factories and Fogs
- Mohamad Tarifi: AGI and the Emerging Peer-to-Peer Economy 
- Michael Anissimov: The Risks of Artificial Superintelligence 
- Muehlhauser & Goertzel: Rationality, Risk, and the Future of AGI 
- Paul Werbos: Will Humanity Survive?
- Wendell Wallach: Machine Morality
- Francis Heylighen: The Emerging Global Brain 
- Steve Omohundro: The Wisdom of the Global Brain and the Future of AGI 
- Alexandra Elbakyan: Beyond the Borg 
- Giulio Prisco: Technological Transcendence 
- Zhou Changle: Zen and the Art of Intelligent Robotics 
- Hugo DeGaris: Is God an Alien Mathematician? 
- Lincoln Cannon: The Most Transhumanist Religion?
- Natasha Vita-More: Upgrading Humanity 
- Jeffery Martin & Mikey Siegel: Engineering Enlightenment 

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Unraveling the mysteries of life

Unraveling the mysteries of life | Tracking the Future | Scoop.it

Time, space and matter were created 13.7 billion years ago, when the Big Bang occurred. This pale, blue planet, so termed by Carl Sagan, our earth, came into existence about 4.5 billion years ago. Life originated on earth about 3.8 billion years ago. Our species, the home sapiens, came much later at about 0.2 million years while recorded history is merely 6000 years old.
However in the last 60 years or so, man has started to unravel many secrets of his own existence. There have been extremely rapid advances in science and mankind is now grappling with very profound aspects of life from intelligence, perception, aging all the way to death itself.
Moving forward to the next 60 years, there are several areas of research, which will have an extraordinary impact on our lives as we move forward.

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Finally, the War on Aging Has Truly Begun

Finally, the War on Aging Has Truly Begun | Tracking the Future | Scoop.it

To paraphrase Churchill’s words following the Second Battle of El Alamein: Google‘s announcement about their new venture to extend human life, Calico, is not the end, nor even the beginning of the end, but it is, perhaps, the end of the beginning. - by Dr.  Aubrey de Grey

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Video Tour of Alcor and Interview with CEO Max More

Video Tour of Alcor and Interview with CEO Max More | Tracking the Future | Scoop.it

A tour of Alcor where Max More walks us through the process of vitrification, shows us their long term storage facilities and talks about cryonics.

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Aging, cryonics, and the quest for immortality

Aging, cryonics, and the quest for immortality | Tracking the Future | Scoop.it

As we begin to scratch at the basic workings of life, we’ll also inevitably come up against the mechanics of death. Real life extension science is on the horizon, and we should have a belief in place about how to approach these areas of science, because progress is not going to wait while we grapple with imponderables.

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Breakthrough: Brain Molecule Controls Aging

Breakthrough: Brain Molecule Controls Aging | Tracking the Future | Scoop.it

An exciting new study published in the prestigious journal Nature shows for the first time that manipulation of a brain chemical in a single region influences lifespan.

The authors conclude:

"To summarize, our study using several mouse models demonstrates that the hypothalamus is important for systemic ageing and lifespan control. This hypothalamic role is significantly mediated by IKK-band NF-kB-directed hypothalamic innate immunity involving microglia–neuron crosstalk. The underlying basis includes integration between immunity and neuroendocrine of the hypothalamus, and immune inhibition and GnRH restoration in the hypothalamus or the brain represent two potential strategies for combating ageing-related health problems."


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Will Google's Ray Kurzweil Live Forever?

Will Google's Ray Kurzweil Live Forever? | Tracking the Future | Scoop.it

In The Wall Street Journal, Holman Jenkins interviews Ray Kurzweil, the famous inventor who expects that in 15 years, medical technology will add a year of life expectancy every year.

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Evolution's Next Stage

Evolution's Next Stage | Tracking the Future | Scoop.it
Driven by technological advances, humans are changing faster than ever. Coming soon: our next stage, Homo evolutus.
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Discovery Of Sirtuin Interactions May Open Up Molecular Fountain Of Youth

Discovery Of Sirtuin Interactions May Open Up Molecular Fountain Of Youth | Tracking the Future | Scoop.it

A new study led by researchers at the University of California, Berkeley, represents a major advance in the understanding of the molecular mechanisms behind aging while providing new hope for the development of targeted treatments for age-related degenerative diseases.

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Nanomedicine: nanobots could eliminate all diseases; even death

Nanomedicine: nanobots could eliminate all diseases; even death | Tracking the Future | Scoop.it
Medical nanobots hold the greatest promise for curing disease, extending human health, and one day, a few bold future watchers predict, this wonder tool could even eliminate death. With diligent effort, positive futurists believe the first fruits of advanced nanomedicine could appear in clinical trials by mid-to-late 2020s.
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Thomas Blake's curator insight, March 24, 11:05 PM

Nanobots are robots that are built on the nano scale and have a variety of uses. One of their major applications is for medicinal uses.  Robots have been used for the replacement of body parts in the past but now the robots can be inserted into the body and perform maintenance on the cellular level, preventing disease and prolonging our lives.

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Cryonics, avatars or medicine: a transhumanist's dilemma (Wired UK)

Cryonics, avatars or medicine: a transhumanist's dilemma (Wired UK) | Tracking the Future | Scoop.it

Life-extending technologies are getting more lab time and investment than ever before, and with experts in the field proclaiming the knowledge is just a few decades away, you'll want to be around for it.

 

Over the past decade, the main areas of research -- brain emulation, regenerative medicine and cryonics -- have gradually been departing the realms of science fiction and making a name for themselves in scientific journals. Back in 2009, when Avatar suggested that people could one day upload their brain to an invincible body-double, it seemed like something only James Cameron could dream up. Then a student in Israel controlled a robot with his mind from 2,000km away. In 2009 Aubrey de Grey announced -- to more than a few raised eyebrows -- that the first person to live to 1,000 thanks to regenerative medicine was probably already alive -- and by 2012 a four-year old became the first person to receive a life-saving blood vessel made from her own cells. And around about the same time the horrendous 1997 film Batman & Robin painted cryonics as a field best reserved for psychotic villains, Gregory Fahy and William Rall announced the development of the first cryoprotectant able to vitrify the human body slowly enough that ice crystals don't form and cause tissue damage.

 

Wired.co.uk spoke with leading proponents of each field to find out if we could be convinced to fork out £50,000 to have our brains put on ice. (Wired and Tired by Luke Robert Mason, director of Virtual Futures and advisor to Humanity Plus).


Via olsen jay nelson
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Will Life Extension Mean the End of Religion?

Will Life Extension Mean the End of Religion? | Tracking the Future | Scoop.it

The invention of true immortality will be a sharp discontinuity with everything that came before, demanding a completely new model of human life and society.

What happens when death is no longer inevitable? What will happen in a world where, barring rare accidents, people must choose to die? Will theists choose their faith in an afterlife over the certainty of an earthly life?

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Catalyst: Elixir of Life

Catalyst: Elixir of Life | Tracking the Future | Scoop.it

The elixir of life may emerge from a laboratory within our lifetime Maryanne Demasi explores the science of immortality...

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For his next act, genome wiz Craig Venter takes on aging

For his next act, genome wiz Craig Venter takes on aging | Tracking the Future | Scoop.it

Craig Venter, the U.S. scientist who raced the U.S. government to map the human genome over a decade ago and created synthetic life in 2010, is now on a quest to treat age-related disease.
Venter has teamed up with stem cell pioneer Dr Robert Hariri and X Prize Foundation founder Dr Peter Diamandis to form Human Longevity Inc, a company that will use both genomics and stem cell therapies to find treatments that allow aging adults to stay healthy and functional for as long as possible.
"We're hoping to make numerous new discoveries in preventive medicine. We think this will have a huge impact on changing the cost of medicine," Venter said on a conference call announcing his latest venture.

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PostHuman: An Introduction to Transhumanism


"We investigate three dominant areas of transhumanism: super longevity, super intelligence and super wellbeing, and briefly cover the ideas of thinkers Aubrey de Grey, Ray Kurzweil and David Pearce. 
PostHuman: An Introduction to Transhumanism is the first of our planned video series on transhumanism, titled PostHuman

Want more? We need your help to make it happen. See our Kickstarter at http://kck.st/Huitjs ; "

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Google vs. Death

Google vs. Death | Tracking the Future | Scoop.it

At the moment Google is preparing an especially uncertain and distant shot. It is planning to launch Calico, a new company that will focus on health and aging in particular. The independent firm will be run by Arthur Levinson, former CEO of biotech pioneer Genentech, who will also be an investor. Levinson, who began his career as a scientist and has a Ph.D. in biochemistry, plans to remain in his current roles as the chairman of the board of directors for both Genentech and Apple, a position he took over after its co-founder Steve Jobs died in 2011. In other words, the company behind YouTube and Google+ is gearing up to seriously attempt to extend human lifespan.

 

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Inside The Immortality Business

Inside The Immortality Business | Tracking the Future | Scoop.it

Thanks to a small but devoted core of true believers and an infusion of Silicon Valley research funds, the once-revered, much-reviled science of cryopreservation may itself be coming back from the dead.

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Nacho Vega's curator insight, July 2, 2013 1:58 PM

Welcome to Alcor, where death is merely a temporary setback.

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Do these startling longevity studies mean your lifespan could double?

Do these startling longevity studies mean your lifespan could double? | Tracking the Future | Scoop.it

Biologists have successfully extended the life spans of some mice by as much as 70%, leading many to believe that ongoing experimentation on our mammalian cousins will eventually lead to life-extending therapies in humans. But how reliable are these studies? And do they really apply to humans?

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Undoing Aging: Aubrey de Grey at TEDxDanubia 2013

Aubrey de Grey is a biomedical gerontologist and the Chief Science Officer of SENS Foundation, a charity dedicated to combating the aging process. He is also Editor-in-Chief of Rejuvenation Research, the world's highest-impact peer-reviewed journal focused on intervention in aging. His research targets the accumulating and eventually pathogenic molecular and cellular side-effects of metabolism that constitute mammalian aging and the design of interventions to repair or obviate them. His comprehensive plan breaks aging down into seven major classes and identifies detailed approaches to addressing each one

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Will Old People Take Over the World?

Will Old People Take Over the World? | Tracking the Future | Scoop.it

One of the consequences of radical life extension is the potential for a gerontocracy to set in — the entrenchment of a senior elite who will hold on to their power and wealth, while dominating politics, finance, and academia. Some critics worry that society will start to stagnate as the younger generations become increasingly frustrated and marginalized. But while these concerns need to be considered, a future filled with undying seniors will not be as bad as some might think, and here’s why.

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Breakthrough May Lead To Anti-Aging Drugs In Five Years

Breakthrough May Lead To Anti-Aging Drugs In Five Years | Tracking the Future | Scoop.it

According to a prominent Australian researcher, drugs that combat aging may be available within five years, following landmark research.
The study, published in a recent issue of the journal Science, finally proves that a single anti-aging enzyme in the body can be targeted, with the potential to prevent age-related diseases and extend lifespans.
The paper shows all of the 117 drugs tested work on the single enzyme through a common mechanism. This means that a whole new class of anti-aging drugs is now viable, which could ultimately prevent cancer, Alzheimer's disease and type 2 diabetes.
"Ultimately, these drugs would treat one disease, but unlike drugs of today, they would prevent 20 others," says the lead author of the paper, Professor David Sinclair, from UNSW Medicine, who is based at Harvard University. "In effect, they would slow aging."

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Roger Ellman's curator insight, March 13, 2013 5:52 AM

Good!  Swiftly - remain youthful!!

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Should We Live to 1,000?

Should We Live to 1,000? | Tracking the Future | Scoop.it
On which problems should we focus research in medicine and the biological sciences? There is a strong argument for tackling the diseases that kill the most people –diseases like malaria, measles, and diarrhea, which kill millions in developing countries, but very few in the developed world.
Developed countries, however, devote most of their research funds to the diseases from which their citizens suffer, and that seems likely to continue for the foreseeable future. Given that constraint, which medical breakthrough would do the most to improve our lives?
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Chemical Brain Preservation: How to Live "Forever" - A Personal View

A number of neuroscientists, working today with simple model organisms, are investigating the hypothesis that chemical brain preservation may inexpensively preserve the organism's memories and mental states after death.

by John Smart

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Would it be boring if we could live forever?

Would it be boring if we could live forever? | Tracking the Future | Scoop.it

Some futurists predict that we'll be able to halt the aging process by the end of this century — if not sooner. The prospect of creating an ageless society is certainly not without its critics, with concerns ranging from the environmental right through to the spiritual. One of the most common objections to radical life extension, however, is the idea that it would be profoundly boring to live forever, and that by consequence, we should not even attempt it.

So are the critics right? Let's take a closer look at the issue and consider both sides.

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The future of human lifespans, a demographic perspective

The future of human life spans, a demographic perspective by Caleb E Finch, Andrus Gerontology Center, University of Southern California

 

© SENS Foundation 2011 - http://www.sens.org 

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