Tracking the Future
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Tracking the Future
Explore the most important technology and science trends! News, Analysis, Interviews, Presentations, Documentaries. All in one place at Tracking the future magazine
Curated by Szabolcs Kósa
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Very interesting and sometimes heated conversation with Michio Kaku

The technological revolution of the 20th century has brought the world unprecedented prosperity as well as unimaginable horrors. Will science liberate humanity or shackle it like never before? To hash out these issues, Oksana is joined by Dr Michio Kaku, a world-renowned theoretical physicist and author.

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Broken BRICs

Broken BRICs | Tracking the Future | Scoop.it
In the decade to come, the United States, Europe, and Japan are likely to grow slowly. Their sluggishness, however, will look less worrisome compared with the even bigger story in the global economy, which will be the three to four percent slowdown in China, which is already under way, with a possibly deeper slowdown in store as the economy continues to mature. China's population is simply too big and aging too quickly for its economy to continue growing as rapidly as it has. With over 50 percent of its people now living in cities, China is nearing what economists call "the Lewis turning point": the point at which a country's surplus labor from rural areas has been largely exhausted. This is the result of both heavy migration to cities over the past two decades and the shrinking work force that the one-child policy has produced. In due time, the sense of many Americans today that Asian juggernauts are swiftly overtaking the U.S. economy will be remembered as one of the country's periodic bouts of paranoia, akin to the hype that accompanied Japan's ascent in the 1980s.
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Open Seas - The Arctic is the Mediterranean of the 21st century.

Open Seas - The Arctic is the Mediterranean of the 21st century. | Tracking the Future | Scoop.it

If climate scientists' prophesies of an ice-free Arctic Ocean pan out, the world will witness the most sweeping transformation of geopolitics since the Panama Canal opened. Seafaring nations and industries will react assertively -- as they did when merchantmen and ships of war sailing from Atlantic seaports no longer had to circumnavigate South America to reach the Pacific Ocean.

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Fault Lines - Robot wars

What is the role of robots and drones in wars and how will they shape the future of the US military?

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The Next 50 Years: Why I'm Optimistic Because Everything Will Be Terrible

The Next 50 Years: Why I'm Optimistic Because Everything Will Be Terrible | Tracking the Future | Scoop.it

With everything rolling towards the abyss, our only hope for a bright future seems to be the Singularity, a technological transformation of what it means to be human.

But in a talk for TEDx Brussels, science fiction and horror writer John Shirley argues that there are really two Singularities — and yes, everything will be terrible in the short term. So why is he optimistic about the future of the human race? Read on.

You can watch the presentation on Youtube: http://youtu.be/dtpX_9E__hU

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When will we finally have a world government?

When will we finally have a world government? | Tracking the Future | Scoop.it

Political scientists and science fiction writers alike have long been taken with the idea that humans would one day form a global government. Yet few of us take this prospect very seriously, often dismissing it as an outright impossibility or very far off in the future. Given the rapid pace of globalization, however, it would seem that humanity is inexorably headed in this direction. So how long will it take us to build a world government?

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'A Period of Persistent Conflict' - By Micah Zenko

'A Period of Persistent Conflict' - By Micah Zenko | Tracking the Future | Scoop.it

Why the United States will never have another peacetime president.

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Technology and Politics in the 21st Century – New Governance, New Micro Nations, New Experiments

Technology and Politics in the 21st Century – New Governance, New Micro Nations, New Experiments | Tracking the Future | Scoop.it

The impact of 21st century technology is just starting to be felt in the political realm. The Internet and social media sites have spawned political movements built around social causes. Political parties from countries all around the world are wrestling with these new phenomena. If Facebook were a nation today it would be the third largest in the world only surpassed by China and India.
For micro-nations at sea it won’t be the Internet that leads to experiments in new governance. This will come from the founders of these communities and from the homesteaders who are attracted to the new frontier it represents. Designed to be self sufficient, seasteads may produce a new Athens or a new Sparta, a libertarian or theocratic mini-state. Once again the world will have a new frontier but it won’t be in space. It will be right here on the surface, not on terra firma, but rather at sea.

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Paddy Ashdown: The global power shift

Paddy Ashdown claims that we are living in a moment in history where power is changing in ways it never has before. In a spellbinding talk at TEDxBrussels he outlines the three major global shifts that he sees coming.

 

 

http://www.ted.com 

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Problems Will Be Global -- And Solutions Will Be, Too

Problems Will Be Global -- And Solutions Will Be, Too | Tracking the Future | Scoop.it

By 2025 the U.N. Security Council will have expanded from the present 15 members to between 25 and 30 and will include, either as de jure or de facto permanent members, Brazil, India, Japan, South Africa, either Egypt or Nigeria, and either Indonesia or Turkey. At the same time, regional organizations on every continent -- the African Union, the Association of Southeast Asian Nations, some version of the Organization of American States -- will be much stronger. Each will follow its own version of economic and political integration, inspired by the European Union, and many will include representation from smaller subregional organizations. In the Middle East, Israel, Palestine, Jordan, Syria, and Turkey could provide the core of a new Middle East free trade area; alternatively the European Union could be interlocked with an emerging Mediterranean Union.

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