Tracking the Future
Follow
Find tag "economy"
43.0K views | +5 today
Tracking the Future
Explore the most important technology and science trends! News, Analysis, Interviews, Presentations, Documentaries. All in one place at Tracking the future magazine
Curated by Szabolcs Kósa
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Szabolcs Kósa
Scoop.it!

Between Ape and Artilect

Between Ape and Artilect | Tracking the Future | Scoop.it

During 2010-12, noted AI researcher and long-time Humanity+ Board member Ben Goertzel conducted a series of textual interviews with researchers in various areas of cutting-edge science — artificial general intelligence, nanotechnology, life extension, neurotechnology, collective intelligence, mind uploading, body modification, neuro-spiritual transformation, and more. These interviews were published online in H+ Magazine, and are here gathered together in a single volume. The resulting series of dialogues treats a variety of social, futurological and scientific topics in a way that is accessible to the educated non-scientist, yet also deep and honest to the subtleties of the topics being discussed.

 

Between Ape and Artilect is a must-read if you want the real views, opinions, ideas, muses and arguments of the people creating our future.

more...
luiy's curator insight, March 8, 2:34 PM

- Itamar Arel: AGI via Deep Learning 

- Pei Wang: What Do You Mean by “AI”? 
- Joscha Bach: Understanding the Mind
- Hugo DeGaris: Will There be Cyborgs?
- DeGaris Interviews Goertzel: Seeking the Sputnik of AGI 
- Linas Vepstas: AGI, Open Source and Our Economic Future 
- Joel Pitt: The Benefits of Open Source for AGI
- Randal Koene: Substrate-Independent Minds
- João Pedro de Magalhães: Ending Aging 
- Aubrey De Grey: Aging and AGI
- David Brin: Sousveillance
- J. Storrs Hall: Intelligent Nano Factories and Fogs
- Mohamad Tarifi: AGI and the Emerging Peer-to-Peer Economy 
- Michael Anissimov: The Risks of Artificial Superintelligence 
- Muehlhauser & Goertzel: Rationality, Risk, and the Future of AGI 
- Paul Werbos: Will Humanity Survive?
- Wendell Wallach: Machine Morality
- Francis Heylighen: The Emerging Global Brain 
- Steve Omohundro: The Wisdom of the Global Brain and the Future of AGI 
- Alexandra Elbakyan: Beyond the Borg 
- Giulio Prisco: Technological Transcendence 
- Zhou Changle: Zen and the Art of Intelligent Robotics 
- Hugo DeGaris: Is God an Alien Mathematician? 
- Lincoln Cannon: The Most Transhumanist Religion?
- Natasha Vita-More: Upgrading Humanity 
- Jeffery Martin & Mikey Siegel: Engineering Enlightenment 

aanve's curator insight, March 8, 10:03 PM

www.aanve.com

 

Mlik Sahib's curator insight, March 8, 10:40 PM

- Itamar Arel: AGI via Deep Learning 

- Pei Wang: What Do You Mean by “AI”? 
- Joscha Bach: Understanding the Mind
- Hugo DeGaris: Will There be Cyborgs?
- DeGaris Interviews Goertzel: Seeking the Sputnik of AGI 
- Linas Vepstas: AGI, Open Source and Our Economic Future 
- Joel Pitt: The Benefits of Open Source for AGI
- Randal Koene: Substrate-Independent Minds
- João Pedro de Magalhães: Ending Aging 
- Aubrey De Grey: Aging and AGI
- David Brin: Sousveillance
- J. Storrs Hall: Intelligent Nano Factories and Fogs
- Mohamad Tarifi: AGI and the Emerging Peer-to-Peer Economy 
- Michael Anissimov: The Risks of Artificial Superintelligence 
- Muehlhauser & Goertzel: Rationality, Risk, and the Future of AGI 
- Paul Werbos: Will Humanity Survive?
- Wendell Wallach: Machine Morality
- Francis Heylighen: The Emerging Global Brain 
- Steve Omohundro: The Wisdom of the Global Brain and the Future of AGI 
- Alexandra Elbakyan: Beyond the Borg 
- Giulio Prisco: Technological Transcendence 
- Zhou Changle: Zen and the Art of Intelligent Robotics 
- Hugo DeGaris: Is God an Alien Mathematician? 
- Lincoln Cannon: The Most Transhumanist Religion?
- Natasha Vita-More: Upgrading Humanity 
- Jeffery Martin & Mikey Siegel: Engineering Enlightenment 

Scooped by Szabolcs Kósa
Scoop.it!

Malthus, Marx, and Modern Growth - Kenneth Rogoff identifies several obstacles to keeping living standards on an upward trajectory

Malthus, Marx, and Modern Growth - Kenneth Rogoff identifies several obstacles to keeping living standards on an upward trajectory | Tracking the Future | Scoop.it
The promise that each generation will be better off than the last is a fundamental tenet of modern society. By and large, most advanced economies have fulfilled this promise, with living standards rising over recent generations, despite setbacks from wars and financial crises. In the developing world, too, the vast majority of people have started to experience sustained improvement in living standards and are rapidly developing similar growth expectations. But will future generations, particularly in advanced economies, realize such expectations? Though the likely answer is yes, the downside risks seem higher than they did a few decades ago.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Szabolcs Kósa
Scoop.it!

The onrushing wave

The onrushing wave | Tracking the Future | Scoop.it
Previous technological innovation has always delivered more long-run employment, not less. But things can change
more...
Christian Verstraete's curator insight, February 3, 1:33 AM

Technology Innovation and jobs.

Scooped by Szabolcs Kósa
Scoop.it!

The Future of Society and new ways of learning - Federico Pistono @ University Of Life Sciences Oslo

The pace of technological innovation is speeding up at an ever increasing rate. This is bringing unprecedented and incredibly rapid changes to the economy and society at large, particularly in the job market. 
Automation is removing jobs like never before, while comparatively few new jobs are being created by the new digital economy. This might be one of the greatest challenges that we've ever faced, but it could also represent our biggest opportunity. What can people and companies do right now to avoid being swept away by the exponentially increasing technologies that are coming to the market? What can governments do to provide for their people? What will be the future of work and of society? What will the transition look like, who will benefit from it, and who will be left behind? 

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Szabolcs Kósa from Knowmads, Infocology of the future
Scoop.it!

A New Scorecard Explains How the World Is Getting Better. Really.

A New Scorecard Explains How the World Is Getting Better. Really. | Tracking the Future | Scoop.it
For centuries, optimists and pessimists have argued over the state of the world.

-

For centuries, optimists and pessimists have argued over the state of the world. Pessimists see a world where more people means less food, where rising demand for resources means depletion and war, and, in recent decades, where boosting production capacity means more pollution and global warming. One of the current generation of pessimists’ sacred texts, The Limits to Growth, influences the environmental movement to this day.

 

The optimists, by contrast, cheerfully claim that everything—human health, living standards, environmental quality, and so on—is getting better. Their opponents think of them as  “cornucopian” economists, placing their faith in the market to fix any and all problems.

But, rather than picking facts and stories to fit some grand narrative of decline or progress, we should try to compare across all areas of human existence to see if the world really is doing better or worse. Together with 21 of the world’s top economists, I have tried to do just that, developing a scorecard spanning 150 years. Across 10 areas—including health, education, war, gender, air pollution, climate change, and biodiversity—the economists all answered the same question: What was the relative cost of this problem in every year since 1900, all the way to 2013, with predictions to 2050.


Via Wildcat2030
more...
Scooped by Szabolcs Kósa
Scoop.it!

James Miller - Economics & Intelligence Amplification

James D. Miller, Associate Professor of Economics at Smith College and author of Singularity Rising: Surviving and Thriving in a Smarter, Richer, and More Dangerous World, discusses the economics of the singularity, or the point of time in which we'll either have computers that are smarter than people or we will have significantly increased human intelligence.
According to Miller, brains are essentially organic computers, and, thus, applying Moore's law suggests that we are moving towards singularity. Since economic output is a product of the human brain, increased brainpower or the existence of computers smarter than humans could produce outputs we cannot even imagine.
- another excellent interview by Adam Ford

Szabolcs Kósa's insight:

 the first part of this interview is available here> http://youtu.be/vLlySUEcWhQ

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Szabolcs Kósa
Scoop.it!

Solar Engineering

Climate engineering-which could slow the pace of global warming by injecting reflective particles into the upper atmosphere-has emerged in recent years as an extremely controversial technology. A leading scientist long concerned about climate change offers a proposal for an easy fix to what is perhaps the most challenging question of our time. After decades during which very little progress has been made in reducing carbon emissions we must put this technology on the table and consider it responsibly.

David Keith is the Gordon McKay Professor of Applied Physics in the School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS) at Harvard University and Professor of Public Policy at the Harvard Kennedy School.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Szabolcs Kósa
Scoop.it!

More Thoughts On The Coming Swarm Economy

More Thoughts On The Coming Swarm Economy | Tracking the Future | Scoop.it

The industrial model with lifetime single-employer careers is dying, and not coming back. The first sign was a change from lifetime-marriage employments into its serial-monogamy equivalent, where people change jobs every three years at the most. The next change in progress is that most people have more than one employment — or employment-equivalent — at one time: this is an enormous change to society, where people are juggling five to ten projects at a time, some for fun, some for breadwinning, some for both. 

ABOUT THE AUTHOR: RICK FALKVINGE

Rick is the founder of the first Pirate Party and is a political evangelist, traveling around Europe and the world to talk and write about ideas of a sensible information policy

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Szabolcs Kósa
Scoop.it!

The Rise of Artificial Intelligence | Off Book | PBS Digital Studios

Artificial intelligence is an ever evolving goal for researchers, and the object of endless fascination for writers, filmmakers, and the general public. But despite our best science fiction visions, creating digital intelligence is incredibly difficult. The universe is a very complicated place, and humans have had millions of years to evolve the ability to navigate and make sense of it. Contemporary attempts to create AI have us looking more at how our own brains work to see how a computer could simulate the core activities that create our intelligence. No matter how we get there, it is certain that artificial intelligence will have tremendous impact on our society and economy, and lead us down a path towards evolving our own definitions of humanity.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Szabolcs Kósa
Scoop.it!

Thinking Utopian: How about a universal basic income?

Thinking Utopian: How about a universal basic income? | Tracking the Future | Scoop.it

Though establishing a basic income was once at the forefront of politics, it has since become more of a Utopian, abstract project. But sometimes it is helpful to step back from the day-to-day wonk work and think Utopian.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Szabolcs Kósa
Scoop.it!

Global Information Technology Report 2013

Global Information Technology Report 2013 | Tracking the Future | Scoop.it

The Global Information Technology Report 2013, the 12th in the series, analyses the impact and influence of ICTs on economic growth and jobs in a hyperconnected world. Read the full news release for more information.
At the core of the report, the Networked Readiness Index (NRI) measures the preparedness of an economy to use ICT to boost competitiveness and well-being.
The report highlights the lack of progress in bridging the new digital divide – not only in terms of developing ICT infrastructure but also in economic and social impact. Despite rapid adoption of mobile telephony, most developing economies lag behind advanced economies due to environments that are insufficiently conducive to innovation and competitiveness. On the other hand, the report shows the progress that countries are making to fully use ICT to boost higher productivity, economic growth and quality jobs in the current economic environment. Finally, the report reveals an apparent investment threshold in ICT, skills and innovation beyond which return on investment increases significantly.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Szabolcs Kósa
Scoop.it!

Bitcoin Explained

A short video looking at 'Bitcoin', a decentralized digital currency.

Directed, Designed and Animated by Duncan Elms - duncanelms.com

Written and Voiced by Marc Fennell - marcfennell.com

Szabolcs Kósa's insight:

the price you have to pay for 1 bitcoin is 234 USD at this moment (2013.04.10), up from 184 in 24 hours. check the current price on : https://mtgox.com/

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Szabolcs Kósa
Scoop.it!

Buy, sell, lift-off: the global economy is going interplanetary

Buy, sell, lift-off: the global economy is going interplanetary | Tracking the Future | Scoop.it

Harvesting space resources will raise living standards worldwide, without further damaging Earth. So how can those resources be tapped in a way that will produce a return on investment?

That question may have been hypothetical in the past; now, it’s of pressing concern.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Szabolcs Kósa from Zeitgeist
Scoop.it!

Technology: Rise of the replicants

Technology: Rise of the replicants | Tracking the Future | Scoop.it

Rapid advances in artificial intelligence now threaten the jobs of educated white-collar workers


Via Kalani Kirk Hausman
more...
Annel Montelongo's curator insight, March 5, 9:08 PM

.

Hombre vs Maquina!!, Un tema de sumo interés para los ingenieros!!

Annel Montelongo's comment, March 5, 9:15 PM
¿Sera que las maquinas y los avances tecnológico pueden perjudicar al hombre?<br>Yo no lo creo, tal vez si ayuda o contribuye a la pereza del ser humano, pero en ninguna manera afecta al crecimiento de una empresa en el mejoramiento continuo, y en la calidad de vida de nosotros (=<br>@Edgar Mata
aanve's curator insight, March 5, 10:12 PM

www.aanve.com

 

Scooped by Szabolcs Kósa
Scoop.it!

The Dawn of the Age of Artificial Intelligence

The Dawn of the Age of Artificial Intelligence | Tracking the Future | Scoop.it

The advances we’ve seen in the past few years—cars that drive themselves, useful humanoid robots, speech recognition and synthesis systems, 3D printers,Jeopardy!-champion computers—are not the crowning achievements of the computer era. They’re the warm-up acts. As we move deeper into the second machine age we’ll see more and more such wonders, and they’ll become more and more impressive.

How can we be so sure? Because the exponential, digital, and recombinant powers of the second machine age have made it possible for humanity to create two of the most important one-time events in our history: the emergence of real, useful artificial intelligence (AI) and the connection of most of the people on the planet via a common digital network.

Either of these advances alone would fundamentally change our growth prospects. When combined, they’re more important than anything since the Industrial Revolution, which forever transformed how physical work was done.

more...
Stephanie Rudisill's comment, February 27, 5:32 PM
The dawn Of Artificial Intelligence>> Erik Brynjolfson and Andrew McAfee>> 2.14.14.>> This article is about how artificial intelligence is gaining popularity in the world// These technologies range from smart phones to hearing aids and beyond. They are gaining a steady in crease in the world, as dif. parts of the planet begin to industrialize. It is believed in the near future that everything will be automated// The author also believes this and has evidences of this by his notation of numerous innovations, rapid increases in certain <AI> technologies or technologies related to AI, and how everything is becoming 'automated', all within the text.// They should include more or something more in depth about AI's effect on prosthetics.// This is important to science because as we develop technologies (Artificial Intelligence), it can be used to find more scientific discoveries. (ex. microscope, we used it to prove that animals and all things in existence are made up of cells..)
Mason Mclaughlin's comment, March 3, 6:53 AM
title: The Dawn of the Age of Artificial Intelligence Author: Andrew McAfee Erik Brynjolfson. Date: 2-14-14. Main Idea: Everything now has to be quick and automated. Summary: We've seen tons of innovations in technology recently. It ranges from small things to robots. The world is beginning to industrialize. Question: Is industrialization a good or bad thing? Opinion: The world is benefiting from the industrialization. Sources: http://www.theatlantic.com/business/archive/2014/02/the-dawn-of-the-age-of-artificial-intelligence/283730/
Celest Ybarra's curator insight, March 29, 9:43 PM

Title: The Dawn of the Age of Artificial Intelligence

Author: Erik Brynjolfson and Andrew McAfee

Main Idea: How artificial intelligence is gaining popularity in the world

Summary:

1) The technology ranges from smart phones to hearing aids and much, much, more.

2) The world is beginning to industrialize and expand more in technology

3) It's believed that in the future everything will be automated

Opinion: No, its filled with facts about the present and hypotheses about the future

Question: Is the advancement in technology a good or bad thing? Will it make people more lazy in the future?

Is this article important to science?: Yes, because its beneficial to people who are interested in knowing about the future of technology.

Source: http://www.theatlantic.com/business/archive/2014/02/the-dawn-of-the-age-of-artificial-intelligence/283730/

Scooped by Szabolcs Kósa
Scoop.it!

3rd Annual Seymour Benzer Lecture - Aliens, computers and the bio-economy - An introduction to synthetic biology

Our capacity to partner with biology to make useful things is limited by the tools that we can use to specify, design, prototype, test, and analyze natural or engineered biological systems. However, biology has typically been engaged as a "technology of last resort" in attempts to solve problems that other more mature technologies cannot. This lecture will examine some recent progress on virus genome redesign and hidden DNA messages from outer space, building living data storage, logic, and communication systems, and how simple but old and nearly forgotten engineering ideas are helping make biology easier to engineer.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Szabolcs Kósa
Scoop.it!

Will Work For Free | OFFICIAL RELEASE | 2013

Will Work For Free is a documentary by Sam Vallely on the subject of technological unemployment.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Szabolcs Kósa
Scoop.it!

Fighting the fuel giants for a fully renewable future

Fighting the fuel giants for a fully renewable future | Tracking the Future | Scoop.it

The viability of a fossil fuel future is rarely connected to the human rights abuses required to sustain it. How often do we think about where oil and gas is obtained? Are the Europeans or Americans any more aware? This deliberate depoliticisation of our energy present, by the vast majority of politicians, journalists and self-described public intellectuals, is leading to an environment that is both unsustainable and dangerous for the planet.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Szabolcs Kósa
Scoop.it!

Urban world: The shifting global business landscape | McKinsey & Company

Urban world: The shifting global business landscape | McKinsey & Company | Tracking the Future | Scoop.it

Emerging markets are changing where and how the world does business. For the last three decades, they have been a source of low-cost but increasingly skilled labor. Their fast-growing cities are filled with millions of new and increasingly prosperous consumers, who provide a new growth market for global corporations at a time when much of the developed world faces slower growth as a result of aging. But the number of large companies from the emerging world will rise, as well, according to a new report from the McKinsey Global Institute (MGI). This powerful wave of new companies could profoundly alter long-established competitive dynamics around the world.

Szabolcs Kósa's insight:

you can download the full report here>

http://www.mckinsey.com/~/media/McKinsey/dotcom/Insights/Urbanization/Urban%20world%20The%20shifting%20global%20business%20landscape/MGI%20Urban%20world%203_Full%20report_Oct%202013.ashx

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Szabolcs Kósa
Scoop.it!

Are Robots Going To Kill Your Next Job Or Create It?

Are Robots Going To Kill Your Next Job Or Create It? | Tracking the Future | Scoop.it

Everyone agrees that some jobs for humans will be lost to robots, and some jobs for humans will be created because of robots. But there is a growing debate about the math. Will the robotics revolution be an aggregate job creator or job killer for humans?

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Szabolcs Kósa
Scoop.it!

Very interesting and sometimes heated conversation with Michio Kaku

The technological revolution of the 20th century has brought the world unprecedented prosperity as well as unimaginable horrors. Will science liberate humanity or shackle it like never before? To hash out these issues, Oksana is joined by Dr Michio Kaku, a world-renowned theoretical physicist and author.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Szabolcs Kósa
Scoop.it!

Andrew McAfee: What will future jobs look like? | Video on TED.com

Economist Andrew McAfee suggests that, yes, probably, droids will take our jobs -- or at least the kinds of jobs we know now. In this far-seeing talk, he thinks through what future jobs might look like, and how to educate coming generations to hold them.

Andrew McAfee studies how information technology affects businesses and society.

more...
Rafael Doménech Sánchez's curator insight, October 22, 3:10 PM
Un libro de lectura sencilla y fascinante "The Second Machine Age" que plantea un futuro en el que el crecimiento exponencial de la capacidad de computación y la creciente interconexión transformarán el paradigma económico. Puede encontrarse un avance de cómo estos cambios afectarán al mercado de trabajo en esta conferencia ofrecida por uno de los autores, Andrew McAfee. ¿Quién crees que se verá más afectado por estos cambios? ¿Tu doctor, o el jardinero que se ocupa del parque municipal? Vedlo, puede que la respuesta os sorprenda.
Scooped by Szabolcs Kósa
Scoop.it!

Erik Brynjolfsson: The key to growth? Race with the machines

As machines take on more jobs, many find themselves out of work or with raises indefinitely postponed. Is this the end of growth? No, says Erik Brynjolfsson -- it's simply the growing pains of a radically reorganized economy. A riveting case for why big innovations are ahead of us ... if we think of computers as our teammates.

Szabolcs Kósa's insight:

Be sure to watch the opposing viewpoint from Robert Gordon at http://youtu.be/PYHd7rpOTe8

and then a quick debate :http://youtu.be/ofWK5WglgiI

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Szabolcs Kósa
Scoop.it!

Bitcoin Blows Up, Exchange Rate Jumps Ten-Fold in Recent Weeks

Bitcoin Blows Up, Exchange Rate Jumps Ten-Fold in Recent Weeks | Tracking the Future | Scoop.it

Will the cryptocurrency survive these Bitcoin booms and busts? Maybe, maybe not. The volatility may diminish as the market grows in size and liquidity. But maybe Bitcoin’s greatest value is its use as a case study for future currencies that rely less on the all too human judgment of central banking’s philosopher kings.
Regardless, if recent history is a guide, it’ll be an entertaining outing as Bitcoin gives birth to fortunes and failures, buys homes and cars, gets hacked, manipulated, regulated—and generally evolves at a frenzied pace worthy of the digital age.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Szabolcs Kósa
Scoop.it!

Robots Are Not Killing Jobs, Says a Roboticist

Robots Are Not Killing Jobs, Says a Roboticist | Tracking the Future | Scoop.it
A Georgia Tech professor of robotics argues automation is still creating more jobs than it destroys
more...
No comment yet.