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Tracking the Future
Explore the most important technology and science trends! News, Analysis, Interviews, Presentations, Documentaries. All in one place at Tracking the future magazine
Curated by Szabolcs Kósa
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For his next act, genome wiz Craig Venter takes on aging

For his next act, genome wiz Craig Venter takes on aging | Tracking the Future | Scoop.it

Craig Venter, the U.S. scientist who raced the U.S. government to map the human genome over a decade ago and created synthetic life in 2010, is now on a quest to treat age-related disease.
Venter has teamed up with stem cell pioneer Dr Robert Hariri and X Prize Foundation founder Dr Peter Diamandis to form Human Longevity Inc, a company that will use both genomics and stem cell therapies to find treatments that allow aging adults to stay healthy and functional for as long as possible.
"We're hoping to make numerous new discoveries in preventive medicine. We think this will have a huge impact on changing the cost of medicine," Venter said on a conference call announcing his latest venture.

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Gabor Forgacs: "We live in a time when it is really difficult to say: "This is impossible!""

Dr. Gabor Forgacs is a theoretical physicist turned tissue-engineer turned entrepreneur. His companies are pioneering 3D bio-printing technologies that will produce tissues for medical and pharmaceutical uses, as well as for consumption, in the form of meat and leather.

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The Dawn of the Age of Artificial Intelligence

The Dawn of the Age of Artificial Intelligence | Tracking the Future | Scoop.it

The advances we’ve seen in the past few years—cars that drive themselves, useful humanoid robots, speech recognition and synthesis systems, 3D printers,Jeopardy!-champion computers—are not the crowning achievements of the computer era. They’re the warm-up acts. As we move deeper into the second machine age we’ll see more and more such wonders, and they’ll become more and more impressive.

How can we be so sure? Because the exponential, digital, and recombinant powers of the second machine age have made it possible for humanity to create two of the most important one-time events in our history: the emergence of real, useful artificial intelligence (AI) and the connection of most of the people on the planet via a common digital network.

Either of these advances alone would fundamentally change our growth prospects. When combined, they’re more important than anything since the Industrial Revolution, which forever transformed how physical work was done.

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Celest Ybarra's curator insight, March 29, 2014 9:43 PM

Title: The Dawn of the Age of Artificial Intelligence

Author: Erik Brynjolfson and Andrew McAfee

Main Idea: How artificial intelligence is gaining popularity in the world

Summary:

1) The technology ranges from smart phones to hearing aids and much, much, more.

2) The world is beginning to industrialize and expand more in technology

3) It's believed that in the future everything will be automated

Opinion: No, its filled with facts about the present and hypotheses about the future

Question: Is the advancement in technology a good or bad thing? Will it make people more lazy in the future?

Is this article important to science?: Yes, because its beneficial to people who are interested in knowing about the future of technology.

Source: http://www.theatlantic.com/business/archive/2014/02/the-dawn-of-the-age-of-artificial-intelligence/283730/

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Imagine your robot today. Design one tomorrow.

With an open source robot design for 3-D printers, discover how Intel's 21st Century Robot program hopes to increase the growth rate, diversity, and utility of robots by allowing anyone to create and program their own robot.

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Hyping Artificial Intelligence, Yet Again

Hyping Artificial Intelligence, Yet Again | Tracking the Future | Scoop.it

Some advances are genuinely exciting, but whether they will really produce human-level A.I. is unclear.

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luiy's curator insight, February 26, 2014 6:23 AM

..... but, examined carefully, the articles seem more enthusiastic than substantive. As I wrote before, the story about Watson was off the mark factually. The deep-learning piece had problems, too. Sunday’s story is confused at best; there is nothing new in teaching computers to learn from their mistakes. Instead, the article seems to be about building computer chips that use “brainlike” algorithms, but the algorithms themselves aren’t new, either. As the author notes in passing, “the new computing approach” is “already in use by some large technology companies.” Mostly, the article seems to be about neuromorphic processors—computer processors that are organized to be somewhat brainlike—though, as the piece points out, they have been around since the nineteen-eighties. In fact, the core idea of Sunday’s article—nets based “on large groups of neuron-like elements … that learn from experience”—goes back over fifty years, to the well-known Perceptron, built by Frank Rosenblatt in 1957. (If you check the archives, the Times billed it as a revolution, with the headline “NEW NAVY DEVICE LEARNS BY DOING.” The New Yorker similarly gushed about the advancement.) The only new thing mentioned is a computer chip, as yet unproven but scheduled to be released this year, along with the claim that it can “potentially [make] the term ‘computer crash’ obsolete.” Steven Pinker wrote me an e-mail after reading the Timesstory, saying “We’re back in 1985!”—the last time there was huge hype in the mainstream media about neural networks.

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The Future of the Internet: Futurist Speaker Gerd Leonhard at ITU World Bangkok 2013

Inspirational futurist Gerd Leonhard delivered a compelling, challenging, and at times chilling glimpse into a possible near future dominated by data, digital dependence and dramatic sociological changes. Over the next ten years, human to machine interfaces will take us far beyond connected fridges, self-parking cars and intelligent wristwatches -- and at an unbelievable pace, as real life begins to outstrip fiction. Artificial intelligence will augment our bodies and extend our personalities into devices as chips as small as 5 nanometres across become fast, cheap and embedded in everything. This is the new version of the internet: the internet of everything with up to 100bn connected devices. We will be living inside a computer -- and our mobile phones will function as an external brain.

Future interfaces will lead to prediction markets, the quantified self, unprecedented access to huge amounts of information, moving from typing to gesturing to going inside a device to pull out data. We can already operate Google glass by blinking -- in the future, thinking will be enough. Used responsibly, this can bring unprecedented benefits, increased efficiency, vastly more comfortable and convenient lifestyles. But there is an equally huge associated risk, as well as the danger of unintended consequences in an age of exponential expansion in connectivity. One simple example is how by leapfrogging over television to YouTube in Indonesia has changed society, changed how people behave, act and think as they have become "more transparent, more digitally naked."

And those risks are nowhere more evident than in the downsides of Big Data. An economy of data, worth up to 15 trillion dollars in new commerce and activities, could trigger #datawars over the power than massive money puts in play -- and pollution in the form of surveillance, lack of trust and flawed privacy. Privacy and security failure is the present as "the power of technology exceeds the scope of ethics". Cloud computing, big data, scanning technologies and other new technologies are running our lives in a deep way. Recent world events make it clear that capturing pretty much everything is technically possible -- yes, we scan, as Gerd punned. And growing awareness of that is set to cost the US, as international companies -- and even countries -- consider putting their clouds, and their business, elsewhere.

Privacy will be the domain of the rich, able to afford encrpyted email and to opt out of permanent surveillance and intrusion. Privacy and trust have been eroded to the extent that police scanning the number plates of passing cars keep that information for up to five years; or bluetooth-enabled rubbish bins connect with mobiles to register anyone walking past. It's all possible; but being able to do it doesn't mean it should be done. Artificial intelligence, M2M communication, the Internet of Things -- none of this might happen unless we can forge new social contracts, ethics, a rule of law that makes us feel safe and lets us work. So what will be important for the industry in this future reality that is already upon us? Trust and ethics are key, according to Gerd. Without establishing a trust framework, no one will survive the next five years. Sector convergence and consumer power are shaping the market. People need to be given control, government laws on copyright and payment must be abandoned. "Forcing people to pay is like forcing people to love. It won't work" -- they will simply migrate to free and more. And telcos are no longer operating in a clear-cut sector, but are instead competing in an arena made of many, and often new, players.

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Why Cognition-as-a-Service is the next operating system battlefield

Why Cognition-as-a-Service is the next operating system battlefield | Tracking the Future | Scoop.it

The Semantic Web may have failed, but higher intelligence is coming to applications anyway, in another form: Cognition-as-a-Service (CaaS). And this may just be the next evolution of the operating system.

CaaS will enable every app to become as smart as Siri in its own niche. CaaS powered apps will be able to think and interact with consumers like intelligent virtual assistants — they will be “cognitive apps.” You will be able to converse with cognitive apps, ask them questions, give them commands — and they will be able to help you complete tasks and manage your work more efficiently.


Via Maurizio [ITA]
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The 3D Printing Industry (2013)

This video provides an overview of all current public and other large 3D printing companies at the end of November 2013.

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Ambri liquid metal battery: Prototype deployment set for 2014

Ambri liquid metal battery: Prototype deployment set for 2014 | Tracking the Future | Scoop.it

November is a milestone month for Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) spinoff company Ambri, where a ribbon-cutting ceremony in Marlborough, Massachusetts, on November 7 marked its new production facility. Ambri is targeting its liquid metal battery technology for use in the electricity grid. The company believes they have an electricity storage solution that will change the way electric grids are operated worldwide. Ambri's liquid metal battery technology breaks away from other storage options; each cell consists of three self-separating liquid layers, two metals and a salt, that float on top of each other based on density differences and immiscibility, said Ambri. The system operates at elevated temperature maintained by self-heating during charging and discharging.

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The Nuclear Fusion Arms Race Is Underway

The Nuclear Fusion Arms Race Is Underway | Tracking the Future | Scoop.it

Scientists today are much closer to creating fusion energy than they were 40 years ago. And while most large public research projects are still decades from producing a reactor that can compete in the marketplace, a number of private companies have jumped headlong into the fusion race. Propelled by advances in engineering and science, changes in public funding, and tens of millions in high-risk high-tech investment dollars, they’re betting they can create a scalable, sellable reactor in less than a decade.

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Augmented Reality Apps: Making the Case for Smart Eyewear

Augmented Reality Apps: Making the Case for Smart Eyewear | Tracking the Future | Scoop.it

With the AR market expected to reach $659.98 million by 2018, many factors will contribute to its success, including design, performance and features. Ultimately, however, the AR industry vision is to become an invisible utility as the bridge between the digital and physical worlds merges seamlessly — a challenge, perhaps, but one soon to be remedied with revolutionary developments in processor capabilities and vision computing techniques.

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Trader Dread's curator insight, October 22, 2013 3:52 AM

YOU KNEWTHEY WOULD FIND A WAY TO SELL IT

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Urban world: The shifting global business landscape | McKinsey & Company

Urban world: The shifting global business landscape | McKinsey & Company | Tracking the Future | Scoop.it

Emerging markets are changing where and how the world does business. For the last three decades, they have been a source of low-cost but increasingly skilled labor. Their fast-growing cities are filled with millions of new and increasingly prosperous consumers, who provide a new growth market for global corporations at a time when much of the developed world faces slower growth as a result of aging. But the number of large companies from the emerging world will rise, as well, according to a new report from the McKinsey Global Institute (MGI). This powerful wave of new companies could profoundly alter long-established competitive dynamics around the world.

Szabolcs Kósa's insight:

you can download the full report here>

http://www.mckinsey.com/~/media/McKinsey/dotcom/Insights/Urbanization/Urban%20world%20The%20shifting%20global%20business%20landscape/MGI%20Urban%20world%203_Full%20report_Oct%202013.ashx

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CIO Network: The Eight Most Important Technologies

At the CIO Network, X Prize Chairman and CEO Peter Diamandis talks about eight emerging technologies and sciences which will shape the future.

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Linda Allen's comment, September 19, 2013 10:09 AM
Very informative; technology is always changing.
Szabolcs Kósa's comment, September 21, 2013 3:26 PM
true, it's a great summary in 10 minutes
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Technology: Rise of the replicants

Technology: Rise of the replicants | Tracking the Future | Scoop.it

Rapid advances in artificial intelligence now threaten the jobs of educated white-collar workers


Via Kalani Kirk Hausman
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Annel Montelongo's curator insight, March 5, 2014 9:08 PM

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Hombre vs Maquina!!, Un tema de sumo interés para los ingenieros!!

Annel Montelongo's comment, March 5, 2014 9:15 PM
¿Sera que las maquinas y los avances tecnológico pueden perjudicar al hombre?<br>Yo no lo creo, tal vez si ayuda o contribuye a la pereza del ser humano, pero en ninguna manera afecta al crecimiento de una empresa en el mejoramiento continuo, y en la calidad de vida de nosotros (=<br>@Edgar Mata
aanve's curator insight, March 5, 2014 10:12 PM

www.aanve.com

 

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More AI for developers as Expect Labs releases the MindMeld API

More AI for developers as Expect Labs releases the MindMeld API | Tracking the Future | Scoop.it

Expect Labs, makers of the MindMeld app for dynamically suggesting content in response to the topics in a spoken conversation, is opening its artificial intelligence engine to the world via the new MindMeld API. It’s the latest example of just how powerful APIs are becoming and offers yet another glimpse into how intelligent we will expect applications to be in the years to come.

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Roger Ellman's curator insight, February 26, 2014 7:01 AM
Some AI news will be action taking place right now, some will be premature and some will surprise us by happening NOW or decades ahead - so glance at all ideas - that's best for keeping abreast!
Terry Yelmene's curator insight, March 1, 2014 7:37 PM

This API can enable automated curation and should be considered as a real advantage in some dev projects.

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Google isn't the only company working on artificial intelligence. It's just the richest

Google isn't the only company working on artificial intelligence. It's just the richest | Tracking the Future | Scoop.it

Everyone’s more interested in artificial intelligence since news broke that Google acquired a secretive startup called DeepMind. The technology has big promise, but make no mistake: It’s not sentient yet, and Google is far from alone in its quest.

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Christian Verstraete's curator insight, February 3, 2014 1:31 AM

AI has been around for many years. Are we finally cracking the ceiling? 

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The onrushing wave

The onrushing wave | Tracking the Future | Scoop.it
Previous technological innovation has always delivered more long-run employment, not less. But things can change
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Christian Verstraete's curator insight, February 3, 2014 1:33 AM

Technology Innovation and jobs.

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CRISPR technology leaps from lab to industry

CRISPR technology leaps from lab to industry | Tracking the Future | Scoop.it

Instead of taking prescription pills to treat their ailments, patients may one day opt for genetic 'surgery' — using an innovative gene-editing technology to snip out harmful mutations and swap in healthy DNA.
The system, called CRISPR (Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats), has exploded in popularity in the past year, with genetic engineers, neuroscientists and even plant biologists viewing it as a highly efficient and precise research tool. Now, the gene-editing system has spun out a biotechnology company that is attracting attention from investors as well.

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3rd Annual Seymour Benzer Lecture - Aliens, computers and the bio-economy - An introduction to synthetic biology

Our capacity to partner with biology to make useful things is limited by the tools that we can use to specify, design, prototype, test, and analyze natural or engineered biological systems. However, biology has typically been engaged as a "technology of last resort" in attempts to solve problems that other more mature technologies cannot. This lecture will examine some recent progress on virus genome redesign and hidden DNA messages from outer space, building living data storage, logic, and communication systems, and how simple but old and nearly forgotten engineering ideas are helping make biology easier to engineer.

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Google Puts Money on Robots, Using the Man Behind Android

Google Puts Money on Robots, Using the Man Behind Android | Tracking the Future | Scoop.it

Over the last half-year, Google has quietly acquired seven technology companies in an effort to create a new generation of robots. And the engineer heading the effort is Andy Rubin, the man who built Google’s Android software into the world’s dominant force in smartphones.

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Graphene - the new wonder material

Graphene - the new wonder material | Tracking the Future | Scoop.it

The molecule is priceless but it is not a matter of cost – a few hundred dollars per kilo. The value lies in its potential. The molecule in question is called graphene and the EU is prepared to devote €1bn ($1.3bn) to it between 2013 and 2023 to find out if it can transform a range of sectorssuch as electronics, energy, health and construction. According to Scopus, the bibliographic database, more than 8,000 papers have been written about graphene since 2005.

 
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The Gigaom guide to deep learning: Who's doing it, and why it matters

The Gigaom guide to deep learning: Who's doing it, and why it matters | Tracking the Future | Scoop.it

Deep learning is one of the hottest trends in big data right now and is currently underpinning the cutting edge in areas such as natural language processing and image recognition. Here’s a brief guide about what it is about who’s doing it.

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Fighting the fuel giants for a fully renewable future

Fighting the fuel giants for a fully renewable future | Tracking the Future | Scoop.it

The viability of a fossil fuel future is rarely connected to the human rights abuses required to sustain it. How often do we think about where oil and gas is obtained? Are the Europeans or Americans any more aware? This deliberate depoliticisation of our energy present, by the vast majority of politicians, journalists and self-described public intellectuals, is leading to an environment that is both unsustainable and dangerous for the planet.

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Elon Musk: Tesla Motors CEO, Stanford GSB 2013 Entrepreneurial Company of the Year

At the 36th annual ENCORE Award event on October 2, 2013, Stanford Graduate School of Business honored Tesla Motor CEO and Product Architect, Elon Musk.

 

 


Via Stratocumulus
Szabolcs Kósa's insight:

great interview

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Nick Roberts's curator insight, October 17, 2013 11:48 PM

Stanford GSB has awarded the Tesla Motor CEO with Entrepreneurial Company of the Year. Elon Musk is a man of many achievements, he founded PayPal, he is the inspiration for Tony Stark and started zip 2.  Most likely his greaest achievemet should be Tesla Motor. His ultimate goal was to drasically effect the future of humanity, "...like creating a new nervous system." What he is referring to is the internet. He beleives that computers are a world wide nervous system communicating different thoughts throughout it. He looks at a computer in terms of a person. It has a brain, a memory, a body and a nervous system. He even briefely talks about genetic engineering. 

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The future of consumer 3D printing: What's real, what's coming, and what's hype

The future of consumer 3D printing: What's real, what's coming, and what's hype | Tracking the Future | Scoop.it

3D printers have been all over the news for their potential to change our lives. Here’s a look at where the technology is really heading.

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Charles Young's curator insight, October 2, 2013 7:31 PM

I love 3D Printing, I am not quite sure why mind you, I think it the idea of the Star Trek Replicator becoming a reality! A very good article about the practical pathway for this technology.

JanHenk Bouman's curator insight, October 3, 2013 5:26 AM

Een mooie update over de status van 3D Printing